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British Basket-Hilted Swords: A Typology of Basket-Type Sword Hilts Hardcover by Cyril Mazansky. The phrase basket-type hilts refers to a large group of hilts which provide a degree of protection to the hand and wrist. Basket-hilted swords have featured prominently among British military edged weapons over the past five centuries, from the Wars of the Roses in the mid fifteenth century to the period immediately after the second Boer War of the early twentieth century. In setting out to give a full account of the hilt type, and the many variants within it, the first necessity has been to provide an appropriate terminology to employ in cataloguing and describing individual examples. The book, well illustrated with 100 black and white illustrations, falls into several parts, dealing successively with general aspects of various hilt types and discussion of typological methodology, the three major groups of basket-hilted swords, the diverse group of incomplete basket hilts, 'mortuary' hilts, and hilts closely related to 'mortuary' hilts. CYRIL MAZANSKY's expertise in British military swords grew out of his interest in aspects of British military history. His large collection of British military swords may be seen at Brown University, donated by the author. Remarkable. The best book on British swords to be published for over a generation. Hardcover: 318 pages
1st Edition James Bond, Man with the Golden Gun, by Ian Fleming London: Jonathan Cape 1965. 1st Edition 1st Impression. Flemings 12th outing for Commander Bond. Minor spotting as to be expected. With dust jacket. Cover artist Richard Chopping (Jonathan Cape ed.). The Man with the Golden Gun is the twelfth novel (and thirteenth book) of Ian Fleming's James Bond series. It was first published by Jonathan Cape in the UK on 1 April 1965, eight months after the author's death. The novel was not as detailed or polished as the others in the series, leading to poor but polite reviews. Despite that, the book was a best-seller. The story centres on the fictional British Secret Service operative James Bond, who had been posted missing, presumed dead, after his last mission in Japan. Bond returns to England via the Soviet Union, where he had been brainwashed to attempt to assassinate his superior, M. After being "cured" by the MI6 doctors, Bond is sent to the Caribbean to find and kill Francisco Scaramanga, the titular "Man with the Golden Gun". The first draft and part of the editing process was completed before Fleming's death and the manuscript had passed through the hands of his copy editor, William Plomer, but it was not as polished as other Bond stories. Much of the detail contained in the previous novels was missing, as this was often added by Fleming in the second draft. Publishers Jonathan Cape passed the manuscript to Kingsley Amis for his thoughts and advice on the story, although his suggestions were not subsequently used. The novel was serialised in 1965, firstly in the Daily Express and then in Playboy; in 1966 a daily comic strip adaptation was also published in the Daily Express. In 1974 the book was loosely adapted as the ninth film in the Eon Productions James Bond series, with Roger Moore playing Bond and Fleming's cousin, Christopher Lee, as Scaramanga. The Man with the Golden Gun film was filmed in 1974 the ninth film entry in the James Bond series and the second to star Roger Moore as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. A loose adaptation of Ian Fleming's novel of the same name, the film has Bond sent after the Solex Agitator, a device that can harness the power of the sun, while facing the assassin Francisco Scaramanga, the "Man with the Golden Gun". The action culminates in a duel between them that settles the fate of the Solex. The Man with the Golden Gun was the fourth and final film in the series directed by Guy Hamilton. The script was written by Richard Maibaum and Tom Mankiewicz. The film was set in the face of the 1973 energy crisis, a dominant theme in the script. Britain had still not yet fully overcome the crisis when the film was released in December 1974. The film also reflects the then popular martial arts film craze, with several kung fu scenes and a predominantly Asian location, being set and shot in Thailand, Hong Kong, and Macau. Part of the film is also set in Beirut, Lebanon, but it was not shot there. Ian Fleming wrote The Man with the Golden Gun at his Goldeneye estate in Jamaica in January and February 1964, completing it by the beginning of March. His health affected him badly during the writing process and he dropped from his usual rate of two thousand words a morning to a little over an hour's worth of work a day. As with his previous novels, Fleming used events from his past as elements in his novel. Whilst at Kitzbühel in the 1930s, Fleming's car, a Standard Tourer, had been struck by a train at a level crossing and he had been dragged fifty yards down the track. From that time on he had associated trains with death, which led to their use as a plot device not just in The Man with the Golden Gun, but also in Diamonds Are Forever and From Russia, with Love. To show just how much all things original Bond are appreciated in the world of collectors the Walther pistol used by Connery in the poster of From Russia With Love, in 1963, and also drawn in the man With The Golden Gun poster [as shown here] an air pistol, .177 (4.5mm) Walther 'LP MOD.53' Air Pistol, Serial No. 054159, was sold by Christies in 2010 with an estimate of £15,000 to £20,000 for an incredible £277,000. [We dropped out of the bidding at £22,000] Incredible in that it was never used in any film, was an air pistol not a real automatic, and only used in promotional posters. It was 'said' to have been used by accident in fact as they couldn't find a correct Walther PPK on the day of the photoshoot.
1st Edition James Bond, Octopussy & The Living Daylights, by Ian Fleming 1st Edition, 1st Impression second issue jacket. Published by Jonathan Cape, 1966. Octopussy and The Living Daylights (sometimes published as Octopussy) is the fourteenth and final James Bond book written by Ian Fleming in the Bond series. The book is a collection of short stories published posthumously in the United Kingdom by Jonathan Cape on 23 June 1966. The book originally contained just two stories, "Octopussy" and "The Living Daylights", with subsequent editions also carrying firstly "The Property of a Lady" and then "007 in New York". The stories were first published in different publications, with "Octopussy" first serialised in the Daily Express in October 1965. "The Living Daylights" had first appeared in The Sunday Times on 4 February 1962; "The Property of a Lady" was published in November 1963 in a Sotheby's publication, The Ivory Hammer, whilst "007 in New York" first appeared in the New York Herald Tribune in October 1963. The two original stories, "Octopussy" and "The Living Daylights", were both adapted for publication in comic strip format in the Daily Express in 1966–1967. Elements from the stories have also been used in the Eon Productions Bond films. The first, Octopussy, starring Roger Moore as James Bond, was released in 1983 as the thirteenth film in the series and provided the back story for the film Octopussy's family, while "The Property of a Lady" was more closely adapted for an auction sequence in the film. The Living Daylights, released in 1987, was the fifteenth Bond film produced by Eon and starred Timothy Dalton in his first appearance as Bond.On the morning of 12 August 1964, Fleming died of a heart attack; eight months later, The Man with the Golden Gun was published.[8] The rights to Fleming's works were held by Glidrose Productions (now Ian Fleming Publications) and it was decided by the company that two short stories, "Octopussy" and "The Living Daylights", would be published in 1966The story "Octopussy" was written in early 1962 at Fleming's Goldeneye estate in Jamaica. The story is told in the manner of "Quantum of Solace", with Bond as catalyst for story told in flashback, rather than as a main character for action. Fleming originally titled "The Living Daylights" as "Trigger Finger", although when it first appeared, in The Sunday Times colour supplement of 4 February 1962, it was under the title of "Berlin Escape". It was also published in the June 1962 issue of the American magazine Argosy under the same name As with his previous novels, Fleming used events from his past as elements in his novel. Whilst at Kitzbühel in the 1930s, Fleming's car, a Standard Tourer, had been struck by a train at a level crossing and he had been dragged fifty yards down the track. From that time on he had associated trains with death, which led to their use as a plot device not just in The Man with the Golden Gun, but also in Diamonds Are Forever and From Russia, with Love. To show just how much all things original Bond are appreciated in the world of collectors the Walther pistol used by Connery in the poster of From Russia With Love, in 1963, and also drawn in the man With The Golden Gun poster [as shown here] an air pistol, .177 (4.5mm) Walther 'LP MOD.53' Air Pistol, Serial No. 054159, was sold by Christies in 2010 with an estimate of £15,000 to £20,000 for an incredible £277,000. [We dropped out of the bidding at £22,000] Incredible in that it was never used in any film, was an air pistol not a real automatic, and only used in promotional posters. It was 'said' to have been used by accident in fact as they couldn't find a correct Walther.. A full set of 1st edition Ian Fleming's 14 James Bond novels published by Jonathan Cape between 1953-1966 could now cost in the region of £90,000. Comprising: Casino Royale, Live and Let Die, Moonraker, Diamonds are Forever, From Russia with Love, Dr No, Goldfinger, For Your Eyes Only, Thunderball, The Spy Who Loved Me, On Her Majesty's Secret Service, You Only Live Twice, The Man with the Golden Gun and Octopussy and the Living Daylights.
1st Edition The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit By Charles Dickens The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit, 1844, Chapman & Hall, first edition in book form with all of Smith's flaws present, plates as called for (tanned, several close cropped to fore-edge), 100 £ engraved vignette title, lacks errata leaf, all page edges gilt, [Smith I:7]. Beautifully half morocco and gilt bound, with marbled end papers. Illustrator Hablot Knight Browne (Phiz). Delightful presentation dedication on the inner leaf "to John Power Hicks from his affectionate wife Julia E. Power Hicks" A chance to own a first edition first impression of one of the great classics of English literature. Printed and first read before the Crimean War in Russia, and the 'Charge of the Light Brigade' that became infamous in British military history. Original printing imperfections and flaws are detailed in Walter E. Smith and his wonderful work 'Charles Dickens in the Original Cloth'. Smith's comprehensive bibliography of each of Dickens's works enabled all to describe the bindings in detail; identifying them as original and therefore extremely sought after by discerning Dickens enthusiasts and general bibliophiles alike. Feb. 28th 1880" The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit (commonly known as Martin Chuzzlewit) is a novel by Charles Dickens, considered the last of his picaresque novels. It was originally serialised between 1842 and 1844. Dickens thought it to be his best work. Like nearly all of Dickens' novels, Martin Chuzzlewit was released to the public in monthly instalments. Early sales of the monthly parts were disappointing, compared to previous works, so Dickens changed the plot to send the title character to America. This allowed the author to portray the United States (which he had visited in 1842) satirically as a near wilderness with pockets of civilisation filled with deceptive and self-promoting hucksters. The main theme of the novel, according to a preface by Dickens, is selfishness, portrayed in a satirical fashion using all the members of the Chuzzlewit family. The novel is also notable for two of Dickens' great villains, Seth Pecksniff and Jonas Chuzzlewit. It is dedicated to Angela Georgina Burdett-Coutts, a friend of Dickens. The story starts thus; Martin Chuzzlewit has been raised by his grandfather and namesake. Years before, Martin senior took the precaution of raising an orphaned girl, Mary Graham. She is to be his nursemaid, with the understanding that she will be well cared for only as long as Martin senior lives. She thus has strong motivation to promote his well-being, in contrast to his relatives, who only want to inherit his money. However, his grandson Martin falls in love with Mary and wishes to marry her, ruining Martin senior's plans. When Martin refuses to give up the engagement, his grandfather disinherits him. Martin becomes an apprentice to Seth Pecksniff, a greedy architect. Instead of teaching his students, he lives off their tuition fees and has them do draughting work that he passes off as his own. He has two spoiled daughters, nicknamed Cherry and Merry, having been christened as Charity and Mercy. Unbeknown to Martin, Pecksniff has actually taken him on to establish closer ties with the wealthy grandfather, thinking that this will gain Pecksniff a prominent place in the will. Old Martin Chuzzlewit, the wealthy patriarch of the Chuzzlewit family, lives in constant suspicion of the financial designs of his extended family. At the beginning of the novel he has aligned himself with Mary, an orphan, to have a caretaker who is not eyeing his estate. Later in the story he makes an apparent alliance with Pecksniff, who, he believes, is at least consistent in character. His true character is revealed by the end of the story. Young Martin Chuzzlewit is the grandson of Old Martin Chuzzlewit. He is the closest relative of Old Martin and has inherited much of the stubbornness and selfishness of the old man. Young Martin is the protagonist of the story. His engagement to Mary is the cause of estrangement between himself and his grandfather. By the end of the story he becomes a reformed character, realising and repenting of the selfishness of his previous actions.
1st Edition The Personal History of David Copperfield by Charles Dickens David Copperfield was Dickens' most autobiographical novel. A classic and charming story by the maestro of Victorian fiction. The Personal History of David Copperfield, 1850, Bradbury and Evans, first edition, first issue in book form (Smith 9), forty plates as called for, top page edges gilt, full morocco by Bayntun-Riviere. Engraved vignette title page (dated) is present. With Illustrations by H.K. Browne. True first issue with error points, including "screamed" for "screwed" on page 132 line 20 (usually lacking). Chapter XXVII is on page 282 rather than page 283 as listed in the table of contents; page 16: line 1 and page 225: line 22 both read "recal" rather than "recall"; Printed and first read before the Crimean War in Russia, and the 'Charge of the Light Brigade' that became infamous in British military history. Original printing imperfections and flaws are detailed in Walter E. Smith and his wonderful work 'Charles Dickens in the Original Cloth'. Smith's comprehensive bibliography of each of Dickens's works enabled all to describe the bindings in detail; identifying them as original and therefore extremely sought after by discerning Dickens enthusiasts and general bibliophiles alike. David Copperfield is the eighth novel by Charles Dickens. The novel's full title is The Personal History, Adventures, Experience and Observation of David Copperfield the Younger of Blunderstone Rookery (Which He Never Meant to Publish on Any Account).[note 1] It was first published as a serial in 1849–50, and as a book in 1850. Many elements of the novel follow events in Dickens's own life, and it is often considered as his veiled autobiography. It was Dickens' favourite among his own novels. In the preface to the 1867 edition, Dickens wrote, "like many fond parents, I have in my heart of hearts a favourite child. And his name is David Copperfield." The story follows the life of David Copperfield from childhood to maturity. David was born in Blunderstone, Suffolk, England, six months after the death of his father. David spends his early years in relative happiness with his loving, childish mother and their kindly housekeeper, Peggotty. When he is seven years old his mother marries Edward Murdstone. During the marriage, partly to get him out of the way and partly because he strongly objects to the whole proceeding, David is sent to lodge with Peggotty's family in Yarmouth. Her brother, fisherman Mr. Peggotty, lives in a house built in an upturned boat on the beach, with his adopted relatives Emily and Ham, and an elderly widow, Mrs. Gummidge. "Little Em'ly" is somewhat spoilt by her fond foster father, and David is in love with her. On his return, David is given good reason to dislike his stepfather and has similar feelings for Murdstone's sister Jane, who moves into the house soon afterwards. Between them they tyrannise his poor mother, making her and David's lives miserable, and when, in consequence, David falls behind in his studies, Murdstone attempts to thrash him – partly to further pain his mother. David bites him and soon afterwards is sent away to a boarding school, Salem House, under a ruthless headmaster, Mr. Creakle. There he befriends an older boy, James Steerforth, and Tommy Traddles. He develops an impassioned admiration for Steerforth, perceiving him as something noble, who could do great things if he would…...David Copperfield – The narrator and protagonist of this veiled autobiography, created on the image of the author himself. He is characterised in the book as having perseverance, but also an undisciplined heart, which is an important point of the latter part of the book. After being adopted by his aunt Betsey Trotwood, he is called "Trotwood Copperfield" in deference to her wishes. Throughout the novel he goes by multiple names: the Peggotty family address him as "Davy", James Steerforth nicknames him "Daisy", Dora calls him "Doady", the Micawbers mostly address him by his last name, and his aunt and her circle refer to him as "Trot".
A Fine Volume Of The Life of General Monk, Duke of Albemarle 2nd Edit. 1724 Publishd from an Original Manuscript of Thomas Skinner. M. D. ; with a Preface in Vindication of General Monks Conduct; and Giving Some Account of the Manuscript by William WebsterPublisher: London : Printed For J. Graves: J. Isted And J. Hooke, Published in 1724 binding in hardcover. George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle, KG (6 December 1608 – 3 January 1670) was an English soldier and politician and a key figure in the Restoration of Charles II. During the operations on the Scottish border in the Bishops' Wars (1639–1640) he showed his skill and coolness in the dispositions by which he saved the English artillery at the Battle of Newburn (1640). At the outbreak of the Irish rebellion (1641) Monck became colonel of Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester's regiment under the command of James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde. All the qualities for which he was noted through life—his talent for making himself indispensable, his imperturbable temper and his impenetrable secrecy—were fully displayed in this post. The governorship of Dublin stood vacant, and Leicester recommended Monck. However, Charles I overruled the appointment in favour of Charles Lambart, 1st Earl of Cavan, and Monck surrendered the appointment without protest. James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde viewed him with suspicion as one of two officers who refused to take the oath to support the Royal cause in England and sent him under guard to Bristol. Monck justified himself to Charles I in person, and his astute criticisms of the conduct of the Irish war impressed the king, who gave him a command in the army brought over from Ireland during the English Civil War.Taken prisoner by Parliament's Northern Association Army under Sir Thomas Fairfax, 3rd Lord Fairfax of Cameron at the Battle of Nantwich in January 1644, he spent the next two years in the Tower of London. He spent his imprisonment writing his Observations on Military and Political Affairs Monck's experience in Ireland led to his release. He was made major general in the army sent by Parliament against Irish rebels. Making a distinction (like other soldiers of the time) between fighting the Irish and taking arms against the king, he accepted the offer and swore loyalty to the Parliamentary cause. He made little headway against the Irish led by Owen Roe O'Neill and concluded an armistice (called then a "convention") with the rebel leaders upon terms which he knew the Parliament would not ratify. The convention was a military expedient to deal with a military necessity. When in February 1649 Scotland proclaimed Charles, Prince of Wales, as Charles II, King of Scotland, the Protestant Ulster Scots settlers did the same and following Charles's lead took the Solemn League and Covenant. Most of Monck's army went over to the Royalist cause, placing themselves under the command of Hugh Montgomery, 1st Earl of Mount Alexander. Monck himself remained faithful to Parliament and returned to England. Although Parliament disavowed the terms of the truce, no blame was attached to Monck's recognition of military necessity.He next fought at Oliver Cromwell's side in Scotland at the 1650 Battle of Dunbar, a resounding Roundhead victory. Made commander-in-chief in Scotland by Cromwell, Monck completed the subjugation of the country. In February 1652 Monck left Scotland to recover his broken health at Bath, and in November of the same year he became a General at Sea in the First Anglo-Dutch War, which ended in a decisive victory for the Commonwealth's fleet and marked the beginning of England's climb to supremacy over the Dutch at sea. On his return to shore Monck married Anne Radford (née Clarges).In 1653 he was nominated one of the representatives for Devon in Barebone's Parliament. He returned to Scotland, methodically beating down a Royalist insurrection in the Highlands. At Cromwell's request, Monck remained in Scotland as governor During the confusion which followed Cromwell's death on 3 September 1658, Monck remained silent and watchful at Edinburgh, careful only to secure his hold on his troops. At first he contemplated armed support of Richard Cromwell, but on realising the young man's incapacity for government, he gave up this idea and renewed his waiting policy. In July 1659 direct and tempting proposals were again made to him by the future Charles II. Monck was elected Member of Parliament for both Devon and Cambridge University in the Convention Parliament of 1660. Though he protested his adherence to republican principles, it was a matter of common knowledge that the parliament would have a strong Royalist colour. Monck himself, in communication with Charles II, accepted the latter's Declaration of Breda of 4 April 1660, which was largely based on Monck's recommendations. On 1 May the newly convened Convention Parliament formally invited Charles, as King Charles II, to be the English monarch in what has become known as the Restoration
A Most Attractive 500 Year old Koto Katana Now with refinished ito in dark blue. Circa 1500. A finely elegant early blade with a super funbari [graduating curvature]. Stunning signed Shibuishi mounts, the kashira has a fabulous relief hawk in the branches of a prunus tree and the fushi is the matching base of the tree. A Shibuishi Tsuba decorated with group of cranes in reeds. Brown and black woodgrain effect lacquer to the saya. One must bear in mind the rarity of Samurai swords of this era is also in no small part due to the infamous 'Sword Hunt' initiated by Hideyoshi. Having conquered the Japanese, Hidéyoshi meant to keep them under control. On 29 August 1588 , Hidéyoshi announced 'the Sword Hunt' (taiko no katanagari) and banned possession of swords and firearms by the non-noble classes. He decreed: The people in the various provinces are strictly forbidden to have in their possession any swords, short swords, bows, spears, firearms or other arms. The possession of unnecessary implements makes difficult the collection of taxes and tends to foment uprisings… Therefore the heads of provinces, official agents and deputies are ordered to collect all the weapons mentioned above and turn them over to the Government. Once the swords and guns were collected, Hidéyoshi had them melted into a statue of himself.
A Most Rare Item; An Epitome of Brighton By R. Sickelmore 1815 Topographical and Descriptive. A most wonderous and elegant leather bound original volume, from the very zenith of Brighton's fashionable fame, as the recreational home of the Prince Regent [at his Pavilion palace], and for London's society. Brighton's popularity as the Prince Regent's favourite town was world renown, and this is a most rare guide to the town, it's neighbours, it's attractions and facilities, complete with coloured town map. An absloute essential guide for all the residing and visiting nobilty, but very few survive today. Cost when published six shillings, and still with an old 1930's bookstore price label of ten pounds.
A Simply Stunning Japanese Wakazashi Bound In Imperial White Late Koto period blade, circa 1590. With a full suite of Edo period gold and patinated brass fittings, a fine iron Edo tsuba, and a crayfish handled kodzuka. It has a singularly beautiful and most scarcely seen colour combination of 'Red Devil' red and imperial white. White ito binding being the prerogative of only those of the highest level of status, due to it's obvious difficulty to maintain in pristine condition when worn regularly. Rich, so-called 'Red Devil' red, was the distinctive colour and famous in Japanese samurai history, as the Li clan family’s colour, depicted with their imposing red lacquered suits of armour and weapons. Rich red, as opposed to the more usual black and brown, was worn by all from the lord down to the foot soldiers, and it marked them out on the battlefield and advertised their origin to those who stood opposed to them. Known as the Red Devils, samurai under the rule of the Ii family played an integral part in the battles that ended the civil war and raised Tokugawa Ieyasu to the office of shogun, gaining great fame and a fierce reputation. Ii Naomasa, served as one of Tokugawa Ieyasu's generals, and received the fief of Hikone in Omi Province as a reward for his conduct in battle at Sekigahara. The colour of their armour meant that they were the easiest to recognize on the painted screens that depicted the great events of Japanese history, showing that the Ii family understood the benefits of good public relations. The Ii and a few sub-branches remained daimyo for the duration of the Edo period. The family remained at the heart of events until 1860 when Ii Naosuke, the last of the lords of Hikone was murdered by anti-shogun and anti-Western rebels. He was deeply involved in the negotiations between the shogunate and the Western diplomats concerning the opening of Japan to
A Unique Leaf From The Published Work of Nicolas Jenson Printer 1472 A great treasure from the very earliest days of printed text, with original handwritten annotations. This is a Folio. 6pp plus and original unique leaf from Ambrosius Aurelius Theodosius Macrobius's "In Somnium Scipionis Exposito". In Publisher's wrappers. 1 of only 73 ever published folio's that were containing an original unique leaf from the masters great works of 1472. In very good condition. In The Manual Of Linotype Typography, Published 1923, he is clearly regarded him as one of the three greatest master printers of all time,alongside Gutenberg and Aldus To own an original unique piece of Jenson's work, with annotations may be considered by some as one of the greatest privileges afforded to admirers of the printed word. An entire volume would be priceless, or at the least running up to a million pounds or more. Some hypothesize that Jenson studied under the tutelage of Gutenberg, the man who printed the rarest and most valuable book of all time, the Gutenberg or Mazarin Bible [one was apparently lost on the Titanic]. Jenson worked before the greatest English printer, the legendary William Caxton, and the very first book ever to be printed in English by Caxton was in 1473, "Recuyell of the Historyes of Troye" Jenson's story; In October 1458, while acting as Master of the French Royal Mint, Jenson was sent to Mainz, by King Charles VII, to study the art of metal movable type. Jenson then went to Mainz to study printing under Johannes Gutenberg. In 1470 he opened a printing shop in Venice, and, in the first work he produced, the printed roman lowercase letter took on the proportions, shapes, and arrangements that marked its transition from an imitation of handwriting to the style that has remained in use throughout subsequent centuries of printing. Jenson also designed Greek-style type and black-letter type. By 1472, Jenson had only been printing for two years. Even so, his roman type quickly became the model for what later came to be called Venetian oldstyle and was widely imitated. Though Jenson's type was soon superceded in popularity by those of Aldus and Garamond, it was revived again by William Morris in the late 19th century and became the model of choice for a number of private press printers. Twentieth century commercial interpretations include Centaur and Cloister lightface, and most recently, ITC Legacy and Adobe Jenson. The books of Johann and Wendelin de Spira were printed with a new fount, a roman type; this was a style of type that is familiar to the present day, but was at the time a radical innovation. A year later, in 1470, a new, slightly lighter and more elegant version appeared in books with a new imprint, that of Nicolas Jenson. In the colophons of books printed from 1470 his name appears along with praise for his typographical skills. It is here that we see for the first time statements that leave no room for doubt. Jenson hasrightly become famous as the designer and cutter of the punches for the new roman typefaces as well as other founts that for a long time were the standard for legal and theological works. Confirmation of his status as typographer is found in his last will and testament, written in 1480, where he made careful dispositions for what should be done with his punches, the tangible results of a life’s experience and work that he wished to be protected. All these circumstances together lead to the notion that it was Jenson who improved the production of movable type by cutting excellent punches, a skill that he had brought from the traditions of the Mint in Paris, and that he may first have applied inMainz to the long-lasting types used by Fust and Schoeffer.It is only in the last ten years of his life that Nicolas Jenson abandoned his anonymity, and became prominent as a printer of magnificent books. Executed in sober, almost sculptural layouts they became models for centuries of printing. A famous example is the monumental edition of Pliny’s classical encyclopaedic work, his Historia naturalis, published by Jenson in 1472. An Italian translation, also published by Jenson, appeared in 1476 . The translation and printing were commissioned by the Florentine merchant Girolamo Strozzi, who also took care of the marketing. Following in the tradition of Thomas Jefferson, whose library contained numerous works on European history, politics, and culture, the Library of Congress has many comprehensive European collections. The rarest of these works come to the Rare Book and Special Collections Division. A special category of the division's European holdings is its collection of incunabula--books printed before 1501. Printed during the first decades of printing with movable type, these very rare and valuable books cover the whole spectrum of classical, medieval, and Renaissance knowledge and represent many of the highlights of the division's European materials. Over its nearly two-hundred-year history the Library of Congress has collected nearly 5,700 fifteenth-century books, the largest collection of incunabula in the western hemisphere. When Congress originally established its Library in 1800 and saw its collections destroyed by fire in 1814, it had no fifteenth-century books. Neither did the collection that Thomas Jefferson sold to Congress in 1815. This is not surprising because the books in the first Library served the need for general literature, and Jefferson primarily collected modern, scholarly editions in handy formats. For the first fifty years or so after the acquisition of Jefferson's collection, the Library acquired incunabula very sparingly. The 1839 Catalogue of the Library of Congress lists only 2 incunabula: the Chronecken der Sassen (Mainz: Peter Schoeffer, 6 March 1492) and Ranulphus Hidgen's Polychronicon (Westminster: Wynkyn de Worde, 13 April 1495). The earliest incunabulum with a recorded date of acquisition is a 1478 edition of Astesanus de Ast's Summa de casibus conscientiae (Venice: Johannes de Colonia and Johannes Manthen, 18 March 1478). The date that marks the real beginning of the incunabula collection at the Library of Congress is April 6, 1867, when the last shipment of Peter Force's library was received at the Capitol. His personal library held approximately 22,500 volumes, including 161 incunabula. The collection had some important books. The earliest imprint was Clement V's Constitutiones (Mainz: Peter Schoeffer, 8 October 1467); also included were a copy of Hartmann Schedel's Liber chronicarum (Nuremberg: Anton Koberger, 12 July 1493) and Jenson's printing of Pliny's Historia naturalis (Venice: Nicolaus Jenson, 1472). Gutenberg, Aldus and Jenson
A Wonderful Collection of Cowper's Evocative Poetry. Stunningly Bound A wonderful size pocket edition. If there was ever a single poet who should be read by every higher education student Cowper is the one. Poems by William Cowper of the Inner Temple. In two books, within this single volume of 480 pages. Printed for Longman and Co. Paper Ex Libris label of L E WEIR. George Cowper was an English poet and hymnodist. One of the most popular poets of his time, Cowper changed the direction of 18th century nature poetry by writing of everyday life and scenes of the English countryside. In many ways, he was one of the forerunners of Romantic poetry. Samuel Taylor Coleridge called him "the best modern poet", whilst William Wordsworth particularly admired his poem Yardley-Oak. He was a nephew of the poet Judith Madan. The stages of William Cowper's life: forced into a career in the law that he did not want, forbidden from marrying the woman he loved, and insensed by certain religious and political views of his cousin, can be found within the lines of his verse. His words very much encapsulate the zeitgeist of the late 1700s. The religious tone of The Task, its domesticity, and its treatment of such topics as slavery and consideration for animals, are all anticipated themes associated with the evangelical revival which began in the late 1780s. The clash between Cowper's horror at his cousin's theories and his sense of family and personal obligations unleashed a great burst of creative energy. In the four months from December 1780 to March 1781 Cowper composed 2700 lines of verse, moral satires, in pentameter couplets. This portrait of a man divided particularly demonstrates the conflicting nature of the era. In decorative full calf bindings. Externally beautiful with most handsome tooling with only a little wear to the extremities. Generally very bright and clean with just occasional light spotting on the last two pages. 5.25 x 3 x1 inches approx.
Aur.Theodosii Macrobii, v. cl. & inlustris, Opera Published London 1694 by Ambrosius Aurelius Theodosius Macrobius, Johannes Isacius Pontanus, Johannes van Meurs, Jacobus Gronovius. First printing in England. Published by Dring and Harper of Fleet St. Imprimateur Rob. Ridgely, Feb 25, 169 1/2. Editio Novissima, Cum Indice Rerum & Vocum Locupletissimo. Calf leather, spine with four raised bands.
Baa Baa Black Sheep, 1st edition New York 1958, 24 Knights Cross Autographs By Gregory 'Pappy' Boyington. Medal of Honor, Navy Cross. Also with American aces autographs. Portrait frontispiece, 24 mostly German Knight's Cross winner autographs to half-title verso, frontispiece recto, title verso and dedication pages, signatures include Hajo Herrmann, Kurt Buhligen, Herman Graf, Herbert Ihlefeld, Walter Schuch, Gunther Rall, Johannes Steinhoff, Pappy Boyngton, Saburo Sakai, Eric Hartmann, Leonidas Maximcivc, Frans Kieslich, Adolf Galland, John Bolt, Jimmy Doolittle and A.G. Coons (Boyngton's mechanic), some paper thinning from name erasure to half-title recto, original cloth in dust jacket, a little chipped, soiled and creased, John Franklin Bolt (19 May 1921 – 8 September 2004) was a naval aviator in the United States Marine Corps and a decorated flying ace who served during World War II and the Korean War. He remains the only U.S. Marine to achieve ace status in two wars and was also the only Marine jet fighter ace. He rose to the rank of lieutenant colonel during his military career. Gregory "Pappy" Boyington (December 4, 1912 – January 11, 1988) was an American combat pilot who was a United States Marine Corps fighter ace during World War II. He received both the Medal of Honor and the Navy Cross. Hans-Joachim "Hajo" Herrmann (1 August 1913 – 5 November 2010) was a Luftwaffe bomber pilot. In World War II, he was a high-ranking and influential member of the Luftwaffe and a recipient of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. The Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Sub-Lieutenant Saburo Sakai 25 August 1916 – 22 September 2000 was a Japanese naval aviator and flying ace of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II. Sakai had 28 aerial victories (including shared) by official Japanese records, while his autobiography Samurai!, co-written by Martin Caidin and Fred Saito, claims 64 aerial victories
Books, All with a Military & Historical Flavour We have thousands of books, but as they are our largest individual selling item they come and go so fast that individual listing is too impractical. If you require a military, or historical book, either antique or modern, please email a request, stating; title, author, and publisher [if known]. Large quantity book purchases [over 30 volumes] can attract discounts wherever possible. We specialise in hardbacks, both for reference or the study of history, and 'coffee table' books. We also specialise in rare medieval books, and manuscripts.
Briefe Napoleons From Field Marshal Keitel's Personal Library Briefe Napoleons des Ersten : in drei Bänden ; Auswahl aus der gesamten Korrespondenz des Kaisers. Napoleon the First. Selection from all the correspondence of the emperor. Published in 1910; Napoleon's correspondence from 1809 until his death in 1821. Published in 3 volumes this is volume 3. Taken in 1946 from the family library of Field Marshal Keitel, and one of two books from the library we have just acquired. Bearing the Ex Libris Book Label of his family and eldest son, who he lost in the war, Karl-Heinz Keitel SS-Sturmbannführer of 8th SS Cavalry Division Florian Geyer, awarded the German Cross in Gold, Iron Cross 1st Class for heroism, Iron Cross Iind class, Close Combat Clasp & Wound Badge in black. Wilhelm Bodewin Johann Gustav Keitel (22 September 1882 – 16 October 1946) was the most famous German field marshal of WW2 who served as chief of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (Supreme Command of the Armed Forces) for most of World War II, making him the Chief of Defence for Germany and Hitler's number two after Reichmarshall Goring. At the Allied court at Nuremberg, he was tried, sentenced to death, and hanged as a war criminal. He was the third highest-ranking German officer to be tried at Nuremberg. Karl-Heinz Keitel was born on 2 January 1914, in Wolfenbüttel, the eldest son of Wilhelm Keitel who would rise to become Chief of the OKW, the German Military High Command, during World War II. Karl-Heinz joined the Heer in 1934 and served in various cavalry units following the outbreak of war in 1939. In June 1943 he was assigned to the Kavallerie-Schule in Potsdam-Krampnitz, and served as a battalion commander, and later the regimental commander of the Kavallerie-Regiment Nord. On 5 August 1944, he transferred into the Waffen-SS and served with the 22. SS-Freiwilligen-Kavallerie-Division "Maria Theresia". On 20 October of that year, he was promoted to command SS-Freiwilligen-Kavallerie-Regiment 17 / 22.SS-Freiwilligen-Kavallerie-Division "Maria Theresia" in the area of Hungary. In November 1944, combined with the Florian Geyer division, the "Maria Theresia" was assigned to the garrison of Budapest. On 12 December he was wounded in action while defending against Red Army probing attacks into Budapest for which he was awarded the Wound Badge in Black. In March he transferred to the 37. SS-Freiwilligen-Kavallerie-Division "Lützow" as its commander, and led the 2000 strong remnants of the division in heavy fighting around Wiener-Neustadt as part of 6. SS-Panzer Armee. He was reportedly promoted Obersturmbannführer (Lieutenant Colonel) in the closing months of the war. The book's label also bears the label of his wife Dorothee, the daughter of the Werner Eduard Fritz von Blomberg (2 September 1878 – 14 March 1946) was a German Generalfeldmarschall, Minister of War, and Commander-in-Chief of the German Armed Forces until January 1938. The marriage of Karl-Heinz and Dorothee was one of the reasons her father, Generalfeldmarschall von Blomberg, was forced to resign by Hitler in 1938 It was in order to avoid a damaging scandal caused by the Generalfeldmarschall's new wife's criminal history as a prostitute that was discovered by Himmler. It was an extraordinary discovery as both Hitler and Goring attended her wedding to Keitel.Another volume that we know of, also originally from Field Marshal Keitel's library, an 1827 first edition of Alexander Pushkin’s The Robber Brothers printed in Russian, was appently given to Keitel in 1941/2, after it's liberation from another but unknown Russian Ex Libris collection during Operation Barbarossa. That volume was given, in its turn in 1945, to Marshal Zhukov, commander of the Army of the USSR, and bears his Red Star stamp, and also Keitel's military stamp. Napoleon Bonaparte was General of the French Revolution; the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from 11 November 1799 to 18 May 1804; then Emperor of the French (Empereur des Français) and King of Italy under the name Napoleon I from 18 May 1804 to 6 April 1814; and briefly restored as Emperor from March 20 to June 22 of 1815.
Brown Bess Bayonet Of The 44th. The Regt. That Captured The French Eagle At Salamanca, and the regiment that advanced and occupied Washington in the War of 1812 in America.. There are very few regiments that ever had the honour and glory to capture a French Eagle in the Napoleonic Wars, in fact only five were ever taken, and his bayonet would have been used by the 2nd battalion of the regiment at Salamanca that achieved that very glorious event. In the series of novels and films, Sharpe's Rifles, Bernard Cornwall based his fictionary South Essex Regt. on the 2nd Battalion the East Essex. It was also used in numerous other battles in the Peninsular Campaign, and at Quatre Bras and Waterloo in the 100 Days War. The 2nd Battalion of the 44th East Essex was a most amazing and valorous regiment. This historical bayonet has it's original regimental markings of the 2nd [bat] 44th [foot], and was made in 1803. It is in perfect, untouched 'sleeper' condition with over 200 years of original patina completely intact. It is, without question, one of the most interesting historical regimental bayonets ever to appear with us. The bayonet is maker marked by Dawes, official ordnance suppliers, who were awarded the ordnance contract for Brown Bess bayonets in 1803, at the formation of the 2nd battalion. It also bears ordnance inspectors stamp and the seperate number '2'. The bayonet was fitted to a Brown Bess, regimentally marked for the 2nd/44th, and thus issued to it's infantryman. The Bess and it's bayonet was used throughout it's life in the 2nd Battalion during the period of the Napoleonic Wars, the Peninsular campaign Quatre Bras and Waterloo. What battles it must have seen!! The 44th regiment was increased in strength by one battalion for the Napoleonic Wars and it's new battalion was organised as the 2nd Battalion in 1803. The 2/44th was raised in Ireland, and it is perhaps to commemorate this and the many Irishmen who served with gallantry in the ranks of the 44th and 56th in their earlier years, that both regular battalions of The Essex Regiment always marked St Patrick's Day by the beating of reveille by the Corps of Drums playing traditional Irish airs - a custom still observed today. The 44th served in Malta, Sicily, Spain and North America. In the latter campaign the battle honour "Bladensburg" was awarded for the part the Regiment took in the advance to and occupation of Washington, the American capital, 1814. The 2nd Battalion also saw valiant active service in the Peninsular War and the Waterloo Campaign. Notably, the battalion fought with distinction at the Battle of Fuentes de Onoro (1811), the Siege of Badajoz (1812), the Battle of Salamanca (1812), the Battle of Quatre Bras (1815), and the Battle of Waterloo (1815). The battalion was disbanded in 1816 at the conclusion of the wars. The 2nd Battalion won great glory for the 44th at the Battle of Salamanca in 1812 when it captured the French Imperial Eagle, the equivalent of a British Regiment's Colours, of the French 62nd Regiment. The Eagle was carried on parade by the Essex Regiment, a tradition inherited by the 3rd Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment and now the 1st Battalion. One of the best known exploits of the Essex Regiment was the capture of the French Eagle at the battle of Salamanca. The battle of Salamanca in 1812 followed swiftly on the capture of forts at Ciudad Rodrigo and Badojoz during which the Essex played a prominent roll and spirits were high. The British army freed the town of Salamanca and then withdrew to the nearby heights awaiting the arrival of French Forces commanded by Marshall Marmont. Over the next two weeks the armies movies in the countryside around Salamanca with both trying to get into an advantageous position. On 22 July 1812 Lord Wellington felt that he had the advantage and ordered and advance thus starting the Battle of Salamanca. The 44th Regiment was attached to the Fifth Division which formed the centre of the British line. As battle joined the 44th section line of battle coincided with a small area of woodland , which meant that the two lines were only a few yards apart before each became visible. Fortunately for the British the French line at this point was engaged in a change of formation and the British seized advantage by firing a volley and then charging. The French line turned in confusion at which point two Squadrons of Dragoon Guards drove through the French Lines Lt Pearce noticed an Officer wrench the French Eagle of the French 62nd Regiment of the line from its pole and conceal it under his Greatcoat. Lt Pearce attacked the French Officer who resisted and a French soldier attempted to bayonet Lt Pearce but was shot dead by Private Murray. Lt Pearce was then able to secure the Eagle. Further French Infantry came into sight and at once the Eagle was hoisted above the 44th to great cheers with the French infantry making no further advance. Not only did the 44th win their battle but the British Army as a whole scored a resounding victory. The Eagle was kept for the night in the regimental Quarter Guard. Lt Pearce divided 5 pounds between the Privates as a mark of his appreciation of their gallant exertions in supporting him. On the march for the next day the Eagle was carried by Lt Pearce as a mark of honour until it could be presented to Lord Wellington. Lt Pearce achieved the rank of Lieutenant -General and was made a KB in 1813 although he was always known as the man who took the French Eagle at Salamanca. Private Finley was promoted to Sergeant. A strange footnote to the battles is that a second eagle was taken that day by Major Crookshank of the 38th Regiment although this was removed from the dead on the battlefield rather than in battle and as such did not receive the same renown as the eagle captured by the 44th Essex. At the beginning of the memorable battle of Waterloo which commenced about ten o clock in the morning of the 18th of June the second battalion of the 44th with the rest of Sir Denis Pack's brigade was placed in support of some Belgian troops on the left of the main road to Brussels and throughout the day was exposed to the fire of the enemy's artillery and sharpshooters The 1815 left regiment the 44th was stationed on a knoll in rear of the right of Best's Hanoverian brigade and the 92nd 42nd and the third battalion of the Royals stood on the right of the 44th. Marshal Ney, having been ordered to attack the farmhouse of La Haye Sainte advanced in force and the brigade of Belgians of Perponcher's division which formed the first line of infantry gave way at the mere sight of the formidable French columns before they were within half musket shot. Sir Archibald Alison in his History of Europe speaking of Sir Denis Pack's brigade at this point of the battle states that it advanced with a loud shout and poured in so close and well directed a fire that the French columns broke and recoiled in disorder While leading his division in this gallant charge the noble Sir Thomas Picton received his death wound He fell gloriously said his illustrious Commander leading his division to a charge with bayonets by which one of the most furious attacks made by the enemy was defeated. Napoleon now directed his strongest efforts to crush the left and centre of the allied army with the view to cut them off from the possibility of a junction with the Prussians who were known to be approaching from that direction clouds of cavalry and of the far famed Imperial Guard supported by a numerous artillery were hurled against the regiments of Pack's and other brigades in this portion of the field who were alternately thrown into square to receive them and deployed into line as they drew off the artillery opening fire. As history tells us, the 44th was attacked as they deployed from square to line formation, a lancer charge was remarked in many letter's as even praise by the British regarding the lancers. The lancer charge was briefly fired at by only those who recognized that they were French. One lancer made a dash at Ensign Christie, who was forced to drop the flag to save it. The lancer was stabbed. The regiment was lost 16 officers and roughly 200 men in the charge but were able to preserve their regimental honors. The 2nd Battalion suffered 165 casualties during the Battle of Waterloo. Bayonet specs. 17 inch blade 4 inch socket, with New Land Pattern conv. Spring catch. This bayonet must not be compared to a standard, regular, and anonymous Bess bayonet. It's rarity and desirability due to it's markings is near priceless. Less than one in a hundred Bess bayonets can be historically attributed to a major Napoleonic Wars Front Line regiment, but the 44th is a completely different league above most others, and it's totally original markings tell it's entire history, and what a history that is! This bayonet originally came from a regimentally marked 2nd Bat. 44th foot Brown Bess [stock dated 1803] gun number 132. It has a fitted catch on the 4 inch socket with flush screw. In 1771 the ordnance experimented with this form of catch for the Long Land Pattern Bess and made 600 but at that time they were never officially adopted. 4 inch socket 17 inch blade
Eikon Basilike. " The King's Book" The Pourtraicture of His Sacred Majestie in His Solitudes and Sufferings. Printed 1662. 2 Volumes. Hand named and dated to it's owner 'John Coke' 1695 [see next to last photo in gallery]. Likely the son or grandson of Sir John Coke, of Melbourne Hall [from whence Melbourne City gained it's root name] a passionate royalist servant of King Charles Ist, and, his Secretary of State. His eldest son though [also named Sir John Coke] was not a royalist, being more of a parliamentarian. However, his son, once more a John, quite rightly returned to his grandfather's royalist views. A wonderful pair of Restoration period books that would grace the finest library or perfectly compliment a collection of antique or period arms and armour. Beautifully rebound in the last century. A pair published in 1662 just after Charles the IInd was returned to the throne of England. "Eikon Basilika" (vol. 1) has been attributed to King Charles I himself, and also to John Gauden. Vol. 2 has title: A collection of declarations, treaties, and other principal passages concerning the differences betwixt King Charles I and his two houses of Parliament / edited by William Fulman and Richard Perrinchief. The workes of King Charles the martyr Aeternitati sacrum A collection of declarations, treaties, and other principal passages concerning the differences betwixt King Charles I and his two houses of Parliament The works of Charles I with his life and martyrdome Eikon basilike. Printed by James Flesher for R. Royston Bookseller to the King. The first version issue was published during King Charles Ist's lifetime, and were immensely successful. However, after the King's execution, the years of the Commonwealth intervened and it wasn't until the return of the King, did Charles IInd order a new version for the Restoration, and these are the first edition of 1662 of those. A large pair, 13.5 inches by 9.25 inches by 1.5 inches
Foxe's Book of Martyrs 1570, An Impartial Hand 1741 Richard Hoare Ex Libris One of the most foremost and important books of the 16th century. The Book of Martyrs: Containing an Account of the Sufferings and Death of the Protestants in the Reign of Queen Mary. ... Illustrated with Copper-plates. Originally Written by Mr. J. F., and Now Revised and Corrected by an Impartial Hand. A most fine example formerly from the library and private collection [with family crest and library plate] of Richard Hoare descendant of famous abolitionist and 'Sign of the Black Horse' founding banker, Samuel Hoare Jr. Richard, of Marden Hill Hertfordshire, was born in 1824, son of the banker Samuel Hoare (1783-1847) who was grandson of Quaker and abolitionist Samuel Hoare Jr. whose bank, Barnetts, Hoares, Hanbury & Lloyd, first used The Sign of the Black Horse as it's symbol, that was taken over and used by Lloyds Bank as it's logo in 1884. We show a portrait of young Richard Hoare painted by Royal Academician George Richmond The book was originally produced in 1563 and illustrated with over sixty distinctive woodcut impressions and was to that time the largest publishing project ever undertaken in England. Their product was a single volume book, a bit over a foot long, two palms-span wide, too deep to lift with only one hand, and weighed about the same as a small infant. Foxe's own title for the first edition (as scripted and spelled), is Actes and Monuments of these Latter and Perillous Days, Touching Matters of the Church. Long titles being conventionally expected, so this title continues and claims that the book describes "persecutions and horrible troubles" that had been "wrought and practiced by the Roman Prelates, speciallye in this realm of England and Scotland". Foxe's temporal range was "from the yeare of our Lorde a thousand unto the tyme nowe present" Following closely on the heels of the first edition (Foxe complained that the text was produced at "a breakneck speed"), the 1570 edition was in two volumes and had expanded considerably. The page count went from approximately 1,800 pages in 1563 to over 2,300 folio pages. The number of woodcuts increased from 60 to 150. As Foxe wrote about his own living (or executed) contemporaries, the illustrations could not be borrowed from existing texts, as was commonly practiced. The illustrations were newly cut to depict particular details, linking England's suffering back to "the primitive tyme" until, in volume I, "the reigne of King Henry VIII"; in volume two, from Henry's time to "Queen Elizabeth our gracious Lady now reygnyng..The title plate bears a hand penned note dating the entry in 1847 at Marden Hill. 9.75 inches x 15 inches x 2.25 inches 713 pages , plus index of the victims up to 'H'.
From the Earl of Portsmouth. The History of the Life of King Henry IInd. and of the age in which he lived, in five books : to which is prefixed, a history of the revolutions of England from the death of Edward the Confessor to the birth of Henry the Second / by George Lord Lyttelton Printed for W. Sandby and J. Dodsley, 1767 [second printing] 2 original leather bound volumes, from the personal library of the Earl of Portsmouth. George Lyttelton, studied at Eton (1725) and Oxford (1726) before touring the Continent (1728-31) before becoming intimate with Pope's circle at Twickenham. He was secretary to the Prince of Wales (1732-44), member of Parliament from Okehampton (1735-56); succeeded as 5th baron Lyttleton 1751, and was lord of the treasury (1744-54) and Chancellor of the Exchequer (1755-56). As an opposition politician, Lyttleton was allied to the Prince of Wales; as a poet he was associated with his near-neighbor at Hagley Park, William Shenstone. His life was detailed by Samuel Johnson's Lives of the Poets series, published in 3 volumes between 1779 and 1781. In it Dr Johnson states 'His last literary production was his "History of Henry the Second," elaborated by the searches and deliberations of twenty years, and published with such anxiety as only vanity can dictate. The story of this publication is remarkable. The whole work was printed twice over, a great part of it three times, and many sheets four or five times. The booksellers paid for the first impression; but the changes and repeated operations of the press were at the expense of the author, whose ambitious accuracy is known to have cost him at least a thousand pounds. He began to print in 1755. Three volumes appeared in 1764, a second edition of them in 1767, a third edition in 1768, and the conclusion in 1771. Andrew Reid, a man not without considerable abilities and not unacquainted with letters or with life, undertook to persuade Lyttelton, as he had persuaded himself, that he was master of the secret of punctuation; and, as fear begets credulity, he was employed, I know not at what price, to point the pages of "Henry the Second." The book was at last pointed and printed, and sent into the world. Lyttelton took money for his copy, of which, when he had paid the pointer, he probably gave the rest away; for he was very liberal to the indigent. When time brought the History to a third edition, Reid was either dead or discarded; and the superintendence of typography and punctuation was committed to a man originally a comb-maker, but then known by the style of Doctor. Something uncommon was probably expected, and something uncommon was at last done; for to the Doctor's edition is appended, what the world had hardly seen before, a list of errors in nineteen pages.
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Historically Significant Book From Winston Churchill's Personal Library We have only ever seen items of comparable significance, that personally belonged to Churchill, and were used by him, that are still on view within his country residence, at Chartwell, in Kent. This book was presented by the author Robert Graves to Churchill in 1940. This actual, signed, 1st Edition, presentation book, was one of the only 6 or 7 books Churchill had declared, that he had read, during his Premiership in WW2, up to May 1942. It was also used to base some principles of commando warfare in Churchill's newly formed commando force. With a letter from Major Pearce [asst. to F.M Dill] describing it's gift to Churchill, and it's subsequent passing to Major Pearce by Field Marshal Dill, in order to assist in the creating principles of the commandos [and for his enjoyment]. `Sergeant Lamb of the Ninth` by Robert Graves, the loose fly paper inscribed `Winston S Churchill from Robert Graves Sept 1 1940` This volume was presented to Winston Churchill by Graves in September '40 and it was subsequently given by the Chief of the Imperial General Staff Field Marshall Sir John Dill to his military assistant Major Herbert Pearce, for purpose of the inculcation of some of it's contained ideas into the tactical principles of the newly created [under Churchill's instruction] commandos. In 1942 Churchill wrote a letter of thanks to Robert Graves for this book that he gave him. Churchill describes how much he enjoyed it and incredibly during the whole of WW2 Churchill states he only had time to read 6 or 7 books in the war, and this copy of Sgt Lamb of the 9th was one of them. Just that simple letter of thanks, for this very book and confirmation telegram, typed on 10 Downing St. notepaper, dated 1942, was sold for £2,250 at Christies Auctions in 2010. Field Marshal Sir John Greer Dill, GCB, CMG, DSO (25 December 1881 – 4 November 1944) was a British commander in the First and Second World Wars. From May 1940 to December 1941 he was the Chief of the Imperial General Staff, the professional head of the British Army, and subsequently in Washington, as Chief of the British Joint Staff Mission and then Senior British Representative on the Combined Chiefs of Staff, played a significant role during the Second World War in the formation of the "special relationship" between the United Kingdom and the United States. Dill served in Washington until his death from aplastic anaemia in November 1944. His funeral arrangements reflected the great professional and personal respect and affection that he had earned. A memorial service was held in Washington National Cathedral and the route of the cortege was lined by some thousands of troops, following which he was interred in Arlington National Cemetery, where a simple service was conducted at the graveside. A witness recorded that "I have never seen so many men so visibly shaken by sadness. General Marshall's face was truly stricken …". He was sorely missed by the American Joint Chiefs of Staff, who sent a fulsome message of condolence to their British colleagues. Graves Book, Sgt Lamb of the 9th, was about an American Wars of Independence soldier, serving in the 9th Foot. Robert Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an great English poet, novelist, critic, and classicist. During his long life he produced more than 140 works. Graves's poems—together with his translations and innovative analysis and interpretations of the Greek myths, his memoir of his early life, including his role in the First World War, Good-Bye to All That, and his speculative study of poetic inspiration, The White Goddess—have never been out of print. He earned his living from writing, particularly popular historical novels such as I, Claudius, King Jesus, The Golden Fleece and Count Belisarius. He also was a prominent translator of Classical Latin and Ancient Greek texts; his versions of The Twelve Caesars and The Golden Ass remain popular, for their clarity and entertaining style. Graves was awarded the 1934 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for both I, Claudius and Claudius the God On 11 November 1985, Graves was among 16 Great War poets commemorated on a slate stone unveiled in Westminster Abbey's Poet's Corner. The inscription on the stone was written by friend and fellow Great War poet Wilfred Owen. It reads: "My subject is War, and the pity of War. The Poetry is in the pity." Of the 16 poets, Graves was the only one still living at the time of the commemoration ceremony. UK government documents released in 2012, indicate that Graves turned down a CBE in 1957. In 2012, the Nobel Records were opened after 50 years and it was revealed that Graves was among a shortlist of authors considered for the 1962 Nobel Prize in Literature, along with John Steinbeck (winner), Lawrence Durrell, Jean Anouilh and Karen Blixen. Graves was rejected because even though he had written several historical novels, he was still primarily seen as a poet and committee member Henry Olsson was reluctant to award any Anglo-Saxon poet the prize before the death of Ezra Pound, believing that other writers did not match his talent. We offer this book complete with the letter from Major Pearce. [Asst to F.M. Sir John Dill]
History of the Prince of Wales Own Civil Service Rifles Published in 1921 principally the detailed history of the regiment, the men who served and who died in the Great War. The original Westminster City Reference Library copy [offically withdrawn]. A superbly detailed work of one of the famous volunteer regiments of WW1.
History of United Netherlands from the death of William the Silent to the twelve years truce-1609. by John Lothrop Motley. New Edition with portraits. 4 volumes, all in fine bindings with clean and polished calf in red, two gilted leather title labels on the spines of each, 5 raised bands. Marble cover and interior pages. Marbled edges. Published 1875/6 by John Murray Albemarle St. London. Motley, who served as United States ambassador to Austria during the Civil War and later as ambassador to Great Britain, said of his affinity for the Netherlands: "I had not first made up my mind to write a history and then cast about to take up a subject. My subject had taken me up, drawn me on, and absorbed me into itself." A fine set, very collectable and much sought by collectors.
I Flew for the Fuhrer, The Story of a German Fighter Pilot, Heinz Knoke . With an amazing 35 autographs of American, German, British and Russian Fighter Aces, personally signed in the 1950's. Heinz Knoke (24 March 1921 – 18 May 1993) was a World War II Luftwaffe flying ace. He is credited with 33 confirmed aerial victories, all claimed over the Western theatre of operations, and claimed a further 19 unconfirmed kills in over 2,000 flights. His total included 19 heavy bombers of the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF). Autographs of and including Hitler's personal pilot Hans Baur, General Adolf Galland, British hero Bob Stanford-Tuck, Johnnie Johnson [Air Vice Marshal James Edgar Johnson, CB, CBE, DSO & Two Bars, DFC & Bar, nicknamed "Johnnie"], and American hero Jimmy Doolittle. Translated by John Ewing, with an Introduction by Lieutenant General E.R. Quesada, 4th printing, New York, 1955, portrait frontispiece and black & white plates from photos, a total of 35 ink signatures of German and some British and US WWII pilots to front endpapers, half-title, frontispiece recto and title verso, each with neat pencil name identification beside, original cloth, a little spotted and rubbed, spine slightly browned, dust jacket, a little rubbed and soiled. Signatures include Dieter Harbak, Wolfgang Schenk, Hans Joachim Jabe, Gunther Rall, Walter Schuck, Wolfgang Falck, Adolf Galland, Eric Hartmann, Kurt Buhligen, Gerhard Schopfel, Dennis David, Brian Kingcome, John Cunningham, Desmond Hughes, Bob Stanford-Tuck, Geoffrey Page, Walter Krupinski, Hannes Trautloft, Hajo Herrmann, Heinz Marquarot, Adolf Borchers, Hans Baur (Hitler's pilot), Robert S. Johnson, Leonides Maximciuc and Jimmy Doolittle. James Harold Doolittle (December 14, 1896 – September 27, 1993) was an American aviation pioneer. A Reserve officer in the United States Army Air Corps, Doolittle was recalled to active duty during World War II. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for personal valor and leadership as commander of the Doolittle Raid, a bold long-range retaliatory air raid on the Japanese main islands, on 18 April 1942, four months after the Attack on Pearl Harbor. He was eventually promoted to lieutenant general and commanded the Twelfth Air Force over North Africa, the Fifteenth Air Force over the Mediterranean, and the Eighth Air Force over Europe.Following the reorganization of the Army Air Corps into the USAAF in June 1941, Doolittle was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel on January 2, 1942, and assigned to Army Air Forces Headquarters to plan the first retaliatory air raid on the Japanese homeland. He volunteered for and received General H.H. Arnold's approval to lead the top secret attack of 16 B-25 medium bombers from the aircraft carrier USS Hornet, with targets in Tokyo, Kobe, Yokohama, Osaka and Nagoya. On April 18, Doolittle's and his 16 B-25 crews took off from the Hornet, reached Japan, and bombed their targets. Fifteen of the planes then headed for their recovery airfield in China, while one crew chose to land in Russia due to their bomber's unusually high fuel consumption. As did most of the other crewmen who participated in the one-way mission, Doolittle and his crew bailed out safely over China when their B-25 ran out of fuel. By then, they had been flying for about 12 hours, it was nighttime, the weather was stormy, and Doolittle was unable to locate their landing field. Doolittle came down in a rice paddy (saving a previously injured ankle from breaking) near Chuchow (Quzhou). He and his crew linked up after the bailout and were helped through Japanese lines by Chinese guerrillas and American missionary John Birch. Other aircrews were not so fortunate, although most eventually reached safety with the help of friendly Chinese. Seven crew members lost their lives, four as a result of being captured by the Japanese and three due to an aircraft crash or while parachuting. Doolittle thought he would be court martialed due to having to launch the raid ahead of schedule after being spotted by Japanese patrol boats. Doolittle went on to fly more combat missions as commander of the 12th Air Force in North Africa, for which he was awarded four Air Medals. The other surviving members of the Doolittle raid also went on to new assignments. Doolittle received the Medal of Honor from President Franklin D. Roosevelt at the White House for planning and leading his raid on Japan. Ivan Nikitovich Kozhedub [ June 8, 1920 – August 8, 1991] was a Soviet military aviator and a World War II fighter ace. Kozhedub took a part in the Korean War as a commander of the 324th Fighter Air Division. He is credited with 64 +2 (P-51) individual air victories, most of them flying the Lavochkin La-5 – the top scoring fighter pilot on the Allied side during World War II. He is one of the few pilots to have shot down a Messerschmitt Me 262 jet. He was made a Hero of the Soviet Union on three occasions (4 February 1944; 19 August 1944; 18 August 1945).
Pair Of Volumes, Reminiscences & Recollections of Captain Gronow 1810-1860 Rees Howell Gronow (1794–1865), "Captain Gronow", was a Welsh Grenadier Guards officer, an unsuccessful parliamentarian, a dandy and a writer of celebrated reminiscences. On 24 December 1812 he received a commission as an Ensign in the 1st regiment of foot guards, and after mounting guard at St. James's Palace for a few months was sent with a detachment of his regiment to Spain. In 1813 he took part in the principal military operations in that country, and in the following year returned with his battalion to London. Here he became one of the dandies of the town, and was among the very few officers who were admitted at Almack's, where he remembered the first introduction of quadrilles and waltzes in place of the old reels and country dances. Wanting money to equip himself for his further services abroad, he obtained an advance of £200 from his agents, Cox & Greenwood, and going with this money to a gambling-house in St. James's Square, he won £600, with which he purchased horses and other necessaries. Apparently without the permission of the war office he then crossed the Channel, was present at Quatre Bras and Waterloo, entered Paris on 25 June 1815, and on 28 June became a lieutenant and later a captain in his regiment. From this period until 24 October 1821 he continued with his regiment in England, and then retired from the army. Beautifully reprinted and bound in tan cloth with crest, published by The Surtees Society. With 17 & 13 coloured plates. Published by the society in 1985. The Reminiscences and Recollections of Captain Gronow : being "Anecdotes of the camp, the court, and the clubs at the close of the last war with France" and "Recollections and anecdotes." by R.H. Gronow
Personally Autographed, Dedicated Book by Winston Churchill, 10 Downing St A unique offering. Winston S. Churchill's "Great Contemporaries", presented and autographed by Winston Churchill personally to a member of his wartime staff at No.10 Downing St, on the day he resigned and left office in 1945, complete with its original 10 Downing St, "Mr. Churchill's Compliments" headed note, also hand named to the recipient Mr Widdick, by Churchill in his own hand. It states in full; With Mr Churchills Compliments. A Souvenir of 10, Downing Street 1940-45 26th July, 1945 Mr Widdick. Signed and dedicated "To A Widdick from Winston Churchill 1945" Winston Churchill became Britain's prime minister on 10 May 1940. As he was later to write: 'I felt…that all my past life had been but a preparation for this hour and for this trial'. On the very day that Churchill fulfilled his life's ambition, Germany had, that morning, invaded France, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg. Britain faced its supreme test. It is for his leadership through these fraught years of 1940-1941 - through Dunkirk, the Battle of Britain and the Blitz - that Churchill is best remembered. Crucially, he rallied the nation in defiance of Hitler. In the words of Labour politician Hugh Dalton, Churchill was 'the only man we have for this hour'. This view was shared by the overwhelming majority of the British people. Less obviously, Churchill made planning and decision-making - both political and military - simpler and more efficient. His force of personality was instrumental in cementing the 'Big Three' Alliance with Britain's powerful allies, Russia and the United States. His unbounded energy and determination meant that he was not always easy to work with. But, as Field Marshal Sir Alan Brooke wrote, 'It is worth all these difficulties to have the privilege to work with such a man'. In July 1945, with Nazi Germany defeated and Japan near to collapse, Churchill's Conservative Party lost a general election in a landslide victory for Labour. An electorate weary of war was looking ahead to a new Britain. Winston Churchill, the man who had done so much to secure eventual Allied victory was, once again, out of office. Churchill's good relationship with United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt—between 1939 and 1945 they exchanged an estimated 1700 letters and telegrams and met 11 times; Churchill estimated that they had 120 days of close personal contact—helped secure vital food, oil and munitions via the North Atlantic shipping routes. It was for this reason that Churchill was relieved when Roosevelt was re-elected in 1940. Upon re-election, Roosevelt immediately set about implementing a new method of providing military hardware and shipping to Britain without the need for monetary payment. Roosevelt persuaded Congress that repayment for this immensely costly service would take the form of defending the US; and so Lend-Lease was born. Churchill had 12 strategic conferences with Roosevelt which covered the Atlantic Charter, Europe first strategy, the Declaration by the United Nations and other war policies. After Pearl Harbor was attacked, Churchill's first thought in anticipation of US help was, "We have won the war!" On 26 December 1941, Churchill addressed a joint meeting of the US Congress, asking of Germany and Japan, "What kind of people do they think we are?" Churchill initiated the Special Operations Executive (SOE) under Hugh Dalton's Ministry of Economic Warfare, which established, conducted and fostered covert, subversive and partisan operations in occupied territories with notable success; and also the Commandos which established the pattern for most of the world's current Special Forces. The Russians referred to him as the "British Bulldog." Churchill was party to treaties that would redraw post-Second World War European and Asian boundaries. These were discussed as early as 1943. At the Second Quebec Conference in 1944 he drafted and, together with Roosevelt, signed a less-harsh version of the original Morgenthau Plan, in which they pledged to convert Germany after its unconditional surrender "into a country primarily agricultural and pastoral in its character." Proposals for European boundaries and settlements were officially agreed to by President Harry S. Truman, Churchill, and Joseph Stalin at Potsdam. Churchill's strong relationship with Harry Truman was of great significance to both countries. While he clearly regretted the loss of his close friend and counterpart Roosevelt, Churchill was enormously supportive of Truman in his first days in office, calling him, "the type of leader the world needs when it needs him most." Named the Greatest Briton of all time in a 2002 poll, Churchill is among the most influential people in British history. His highly complex legacy continues to stimulate intense debate amongst writers and historians. On 9 April 1963, Churchill was the first of only eight people to be made an honorary citizen of the United States. The compliments note is loose but for many decades was sellotaped in place, that taping has stained the first inner two pages. Macmillan & Co Ltd., 1943. Book Condition: Good. 1943. 287 pages. No dust jacket. Navy cloth with gilt lettering. Clean pages. Mild foxing and tanning to endpapers and page edges. Mild wear.
Revolving Arms [Hardcover] A.W.F. Taylerson Hardcover: 123 pages Publisher: Arms and Armour Press (1967) ISBN-10: 1111656045
Shooters Bible 1994 Edition. Paperback: 576 pages Publisher: Robert E Weise Language: English ISBN-: 0883171686 Product Dimensions: 26.2 x 20.1 x 3.6 cm
The Gun Report Magazine March 1958 Volume III No. 10 We have just acquired over two hundred archived copies of the Gun Report From the 1950's to 1980. They are simply wonderful reading, and fabulous reference works, with advertisements and reports that likely will never be seen again. A little bit of history with lots of information, photos and enjoyment, nicely bound. The Gun Report Volume III No 10 March 1958 Aledo IL World-Wide Gun Report 1958 Soft cover Very Good Book Softcover. In very good condition, light cover. Civil War Five Per-Center by Donald B Webster Jr, US Martial Inspection (Part II) by Lt Col R C Kuhn, Jim Bowie by Charles L Durfee, In Defense of Ambrose by Graham Burnside, A Tow Flintlock by Ronald Lister, Merwin's Demise by Jerald T Teesdale, Frontier Marksmen by George D Wolfe, 100 Thunders by F Theodore Dexter, Sharpes Rifles and Buffaloes by Richard H Chamberlain, Galveston Drill Exhibition and more. Good vintage condition with minimal wear, nice and tight binding, A very interesting magazine for the antique and vintage collecting or shooting enthusiast. 48 pages in a 11 1/2" X 8 1/2" format
The Gun Report Volume III No 5 October 1957 We have just acquired over two hundred archived copies of the Gun Report From the 1950's to 1980. They are simply wonderful reading, and fabulous reference works, with advertisements and reports that likely will never be seen again. A little bit of history with lots of information, photos and enjoyment, nicely bound. Aledo IL World-Wide Gun Report 1957 Soft cover. Very Good Magazine. Very good condition, light cover wear. Boutet Gun Designer by F Theodore Dexter, Specialization by Robert A Erlandson, Captain David L Payne by Chester C Heizer, Powder Horns by Chester Williams, Old Time Bullet Seaters by Richard H Chamberlain, 60070-60072, From Rodent Rifle to "Gangster's Gat" by James A Leftwich, Who's Who in the Gun World (Featuring John Roten, Wharton, TX) by Annie Lee Williams, A Restored Flintlock Pistol by Ronald Lister, The Story of the Alamo Part I by Paul C Janke. 48 pages. 11 1/2" X 8 1/2" format
The History of America Volume 3 [of 3] W Robertson 1777 , Published 1796 in fine tooled leather. A wonderful book and it would make a fine gift for the collector of early American related artifacts. [Books VI, VII, VIII,] William Robertson FRSE FSA (19 September 1721 – 11 June 1793) was a Scottish historian, minister of religion, and Principal of the University of Edinburgh. "The thirty years during which [he] presided over the University perhaps represent the highest point in its history." Robertson was born at the Manse of Borthwick, Midlothian, and educated at Borthwick Parish School, Dalkeith Grammar School, and at the University of Edinburgh (1733–41), where he studied divinity (DD 1759). He became minister at Gladsmuir (East Lothian) in 1743 and later at Lady Yester's Kirk and Greyfriars Kirk in Edinburgh. A staunch Presbyterian and Whig, he volunteered to defend the city against the Jacobites led by Prince Charles Edward Stuart in 1745. Robertson became Royal Chaplain to George III (1761), Principal of the University of Edinburgh (1762), Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland in 1763, and Historiographer Royal in 1764, reviving a role within the Royal household in Scotland that had been in abeyance from 1709 until 1763. He was also a member of The Poker Club.His most notable work was perhaps his History of Scotland 1542 - 1603, begun in 1753 and first published in 1759. He was a significant figure in the Scottish Enlightenment and also of the moderates in the Church of Scotland. Robertson is buried at Greyfriars Kirkyard, Edinburgh and he now gives his name to the nearby William Robertson Wing of the Old Medical School buildings at the University of Edinburgh on Teviot Place, home to the School of History, Classics and Archaeology.
The Story of the George Cross, 1st edition, 17 VC Winners & 21 George Cross Winners Autographs. Written by John Smyth . The Story of the George Cross, with a Foreword by Air Vice-Marshal Sir Laurence Sinclair, 1st edition, 1968, colour frontispiece and black & white plates from photos, a few little marks and stains, some annotations, several large red ink stamps of the Victoria Cross and George Cross Collection of Kenneth Williams, upper hinge cracked, numerous signatures mostly to preliminary leaves and endpapers at front and rear, original cloth (rubbed) in chipped dust jacket, This simply amazing and unique historical collection of original autographs are simple unrepeatable. The autographs include 17 VC winners and 21 George Cross winners plus various frontiersmen. The VC winners' autographs include David Ross Lauder, Bhanbhagta Gurungn, Lachliman Gurungn, Harry Nicholls, Janju Lama, Albert Hill, Rambahadur Limba (twice), William Butler, Edgar Myles, Jackie Smyth, Richard Annand, Charles Upham and William McNally. The George Cross winners' autographs include Stuart Archer (twice), Dennis Copperwheat, Fred Anderson, Leon Goldsworthy, Walter Arnold, Anthony Cobham, Alfred Lungley, Frank Naughton, Nandlal Thapa, Reg Rimmer, Edwin Crossley, Richard Blackburn, Daphne Pearson and Ernest Elston. The story of the VC award to Lt.John ‘Jackie’ Smyth VC. On 18 May 1915 at Festubert on the Western Front, the British were struggling to hold a captured German trench known as the ‘Glory Hole’. At 3.30pm Lieutenant John ‘Jackie’ Smyth of the 15th Ludhiana Sikhs was ordered to venture out across open ground to deliver some much-needed ammunition. Having watched the horrific consequences of two previous attempts, Smyth faced the daunting prospect of asking for volunteers to undertake the mission. In Smyth’s own words ‘the proudest moment of my life was that every man said he wanted to go’. Accompanied by ten Sikh volunteers, Smyth had to cover a distance of about 230 metres over open ground, exposed to machine-gun fire and enemy snipers. The men were said to have resorted to dragging the heavy ammunition boxes using their pagris (turbans) through mud, water and past the bodies of their fallen comrades. Eight of the ten Sikhs were killed or wounded in the action. But, against all odds, Lieutenant Smyth, with the aid of Lance-Naik Mangal Singh and Sepoy Lal Singh, successfully delivered the bombs and the trench was held. Inside the dust jacket liner is a handwritten note by its second owner who purchased it in 2004 for £600.
Thomas Carlyle's 'Heroes.., From Field Marshal Keitel's Personal Library A taken in 1946 from the family library of Field Marshal Keitel, and one of two books from the library we have just acquired. Bearing the Ex Libris Book Label of his family and eldest son, who he lost in the war, Karl-Heinz Keitel SS-Sturmbannführer of 8th SS Cavalry Division Florian Geyer, awarded the German Cross in Gold, Iron Cross 1st Class for heroism, Iron Cross Iind class, Close Combat Clasp & Wound Badge in black. Wilhelm Bodewin Johann Gustav Keitel (22 September 1882 – 16 October 1946) was the most famous German field marshal of WW2 who served as chief of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (Supreme Command of the Armed Forces) for most of World War II, making him the Chief of Defence for Germany and Hitler's number two after Reichmarshall Goring. At the Allied court at Nuremberg, he was tried, sentenced to death, and hanged as a war criminal. He was the third highest-ranking German officer to be tried at Nuremberg. Karl-Heinz Keitel was born on 2 January 1914, in Wolfenbüttel, the eldest son of Wilhelm Keitel who would rise to become Chief of the OKW, the German Military High Command, during World War II. Karl-Heinz joined the Heer in 1934 and served in various cavalry units following the outbreak of war in 1939. In June 1943 he was assigned to the Kavallerie-Schule in Potsdam-Krampnitz, and served as a battalion commander, and later the regimental commander of the Kavallerie-Regiment Nord. On 5 August 1944, he transferred into the Waffen-SS and served with the 22. SS-Freiwilligen-Kavallerie-Division "Maria Theresia". On 20 October of that year, he was promoted to command SS-Freiwilligen-Kavallerie-Regiment 17 / 22.SS-Freiwilligen-Kavallerie-Division "Maria Theresia" in the area of Hungary. In November 1944, combined with the Florian Geyer division, the "Maria Theresia" was assigned to the garrison of Budapest. On 12 December he was wounded in action while defending against Red Army probing attacks into Budapest for which he was awarded the Wound Badge in Black. In March he transferred to the 37. SS-Freiwilligen-Kavallerie-Division "Lützow" as its commander, and led the 2000 strong remnants of the division in heavy fighting around Wiener-Neustadt as part of 6. SS-Panzer Armee. He was reportedly promoted Obersturmbannführer (Lieutenant Colonel) in the closing months of the war. The book's label also bears the label of his wife Dorothee, the daughter of the Werner Eduard Fritz von Blomberg (2 September 1878 – 14 March 1946) was a German Generalfeldmarschall, Minister of War, and Commander-in-Chief of the German Armed Forces until January 1938. The marriage of Karl-Heinz and Dorothee was one of the reasons her father, Generalfeldmarschall von Blomberg, was forced to resign by Hitler in 1938 It was in order to avoid a damaging scandal caused by the Generalfeldmarschall's new wife's criminal history as a prostitute that was discovered by Himmler. It was an extraordinary discovery as both Hitler and Goring attended her wedding to Keitel. This is a typical book that struck home to the Nazi psyche as it extols the virtues of a radical new thinking progressive hero that could lead a stagnant peoples out of the darkness of old fashioned ideals and values. It could not have been more perfect for the supporters of Adolf Hitler and his new Nazi principles. Progress through National Socialism, where the working classes could rise up rid themselves of the shackles of the old, backward thinking nobility and upper classes. Effectively communism but with a different hat. It is certainly not to say that Carlyle was any way connected with their views at all, but the premise of a Heroic new thinker to lead his people to a working class based Arian promised land fitted Hitler and his supporters perfectly. Thomas Carlyle: On Heroes and Hero-Worship and the Heroic in history. German Josef Neuberg. R. v. Decker, Berlin, The book, a series of six lectures that Carlyle delivered to London audiences in 1840, represents not so much soundly based ideas about the making of history as it does Carlyle’s view of how the world would be if powerful and inspired people were to have the power he thought they deserved. The book thus became England’s contribution to the nineteenth century cult of the “great man,” a dream that was most seductively attractive to intellectuals forced to put their ideas in the marketplace with all the other merchants, but closed off from the real power that was being exercised in the newly industrialized world by economic entrepreneurs. Like most nineteenth century historians and philosophers, Carlyle promotes the notion that progress is good and inevitable; unlike many of his contemporaries, however, he does not believe that the passage of time in and of itself assures progress. Only when persons of heroic temperament step forward to lead the masses can true progress for society occur. The persons featured in On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and the Heroic in History were just such people; their actions, and their willingness to live in accordance with the vision of society that motivated them, changed history for the better. Carlyle finds no one around him acting in a way to set his own age right; given to commercialism and self-gratification, the people of nineteenth century Europe lack the will or the leadership to make something worthwhile of their lives. If his work is not totally successful in conveying a portrait of heroism good for all times, it does succeed in showing Carlyle’s disenchantment with the nineteenth century and its lack of political heroes, as he saw it. Another volume that we know of, also originally from Field Marshal Keitel's library, an 1827 first edition of Alexander Pushkin’s The Robber Brothers printed in Russian, was appently given to Keitel in 1941/2, after it's liberation from another but unknown Russian Ex Libris collection during Operation Barbarossa. That volume was given, in its turn in 1945, to Marshal Zhukov, commander of the Army of the USSR, and bears his Red Star stamp, and also Keitel's military stamp.
Two Original Medieval Pages From Sir John Froissart's Chronicles Of France of the 14th Century. Two original loose pages from the original medieval 1495 printed book, mounted and bound in folio form, within cloth hard back binding with gold titles, 13 x 9 inches. Original medieval pages taken from the book printed in Paris in 1495 by Verrard. This particular printing [that these pages came from] was personally ordered in book form by King Henry VIIth of England from Anthoine Verard in Paris, and his copy now resides in the British Museum. Froissart's Chronicles were initially in manuscript form with fine illustration but were first transformed in to book form in Paris in 1495. Full and complete copies of this book, published by Anthoine Verard in 1495, and as was ordered by King Henry, can now achieve six figure sums. “Froissart might be called the great interviewer of the Middle Ages. The newspaper correspondent of modern times has scarcely surpassed this medieval collector of intelligence. He traveled extensively in the various countries of Europe; he conversed with gentlemen of rank everywhere; and he had the remarkable knack of persuading those about him to divulge all he wanted to know. He learned the details of battles from both sides and from every point of view. He delighted in the minutest affairs of every cavalry skirmish, of the capture of every castle, and of every brave action and gallant deed. He lived from 1337 to about 1410, and wrote chiefly of contemporaneous events. The Chronicles are universally considered as the most vivid and faithful picture we have of events in the 14th century. As a picture of the most favorable side of chivalry, the work has no equal” (Adams, Manual of Historical Literature, 334-35). “There has never been any difference of opinion on the distinctive merits of this great work. It presents a vivid and faithful drawing of the things done in the 14th-century. No more graphic account exists of any age. No historian has drawn so many and such faithful portraits” (Britannica). The Chronicles were originally circulated in manuscript form, with the first printed version appearing around 1498 in Paris. Froissart was one of the greatest of the medieval European writers. In his own century, -the fourteenth it is not easy to see anyone who can be put beside him as a prose-writer. But the literary language of the day was still predominantly verse, and prose was still regarded as something of a utility medium. Because of this and because Froissart is known principally for his descriptions of warfare - an absorbing but ultimately limiting topic - it has not always been realized that he offers a range of interest not so greatly inferior to that of Chaucer, his almost exact contemporary, or that his Chronicles are the same kind of human and social curiosity which underlies the Canterbury Tales. Froissart also wrote verse, prolifically but not very memorably, but it is for the Chronicles, that vast work to which he devoted most of his life, that he is rightly read and remembered. We show in the gallery three hand coloured illustrations that have been used to illustrate the various versions of his works in manuscripts or books. One shows the execution of Hugh the Younger Despenser.
V.Rare Incunabule, Vitae Pontificum, Ist Ed, 1479 By Bartolomaeus Platina Pope Sixtus IVth's Appointed Vatican Librarian. Over 525 years old. When Bartolomeo Sacchi ('Platina', 1421-1481) wrote his Vitae pontificum (Lives of the Popes) and presented it to Pope Sixtus IV in 1475, he surely could not have imagined how influential it would become over the centuries. His was the first papal history, the lives of the popes from the time of Jesus Christ, to the reign of Sixtus IV, composed as a humanist Latin narrative and, as such, marked a distinct breakthrough in relation to the Liber pontificalis, the standard medieval chronicle of the papacy. Whatever Platina's intentions for the book that was published in 1479, it soon came to be regarded as the official history of the Roman pontiffs, an icon of the earliest printing. Formerly from the library of the renown Abolishionist William Roscoe, sold by him at auction in 1816 for £1.13/-, due to the financial difficulties of his banking house, and acquired by order of the Library Committee of the City of Bath Reference Library. This book was likely commissioned due to the influences of Pope Sixtus IV [Francesco della Rovere] upon his librarian, it's author, Bartolomaeus Platina. We show in the gallery a painting of Pope Sixtus appointing Platina as the official Vatican Librarian. An Incunable is a most rare book, pamphlet, or broadside (such as the Almanach cracoviense ad annum 1474) that was printed—not handwritten—before the year 1501 in Europe. They are the earliest form of printed books. Incunabula include the Gutenberg Bible of 1455, probably the most valuable book in the world. This is a First Edition of Bartholomaeus Platina's great history of the lives of the Popes, the first systematic papal history, not only to create the first detailed history of the Popes but also to villify his mortal enemy Pope Paul IInd Pietro Barbo. This book was created in the era of the great Rennaiscance, in the time of the notorious Borgias and in the year of the notorious Pazzi conspiracy, which was a plot by members of the Pazzi family and others to displace the de' Medici family as rulers of Renaissance Florence. It was printed at the time that Leonado De Vinci drew the hanging of a Pazzi conspiritor Bernardo di Bandino Baroncelli. On 26 April 1478 there was an attempt to assassinate Lorenzo de' Medici and his brother Giuliano de' Medici. Lorenzo was wounded but survived; Giuliano was killed. The failure of the plot served to strengthen the position of the de' Medici. The Pazzi were banished from Florence. During the time the Platina served as the first librarian at the Vatican under its modern founder, Sixtus IV. Platina started his career as a soldier employed by condottieri, before gaining long-term patronage from the Gonzagas, including the young cardinal Francesco, for whom he wrote a family history. He studied under the Byzantine humanist philosopher John Argyropulos in Florence, where he frequented other fellow humanists, as well as members of the ruling Medici family. Around 1462 he moved with Francesco Gonzaga to Rome, where he purchased a post as a papal writer under the humanist Pius II (Enea Silvio Piccolomini) and became a member of the pagan-influenced Roman Academy founded by Pomponio Leto. Close acquaintance with the renowned chef Maestro Martino in Rome seems to have provided inspiration for a theoretical treatise on Italian gastronomy entitled De honesta voluptate et valetudine ("On honourable pleasure and health"), which achieved considerable popularity and has the distinction of being considered the first printed cookbook. Platina's papal employment was abruptly curtailed on the arrival of an anti-humanist pope, Paul II (Pietro Barbo), who had the rebellious Platina locked up in Castel Sant'Angelo during the winter of 1464-65 as a punishment for his remonstrations. In 1468 he was again confined in Castel Sant'Angelo for a further year, where he was interrogated under torture, following accusations of an alleged pagan conspiracy by members of Pomponio's Roman academy involving plans to assassinate the pope. Platina's fortunes were revived by the return to power of the strongly pro-humanist pope, Sixtus IV (Francesco della Rovere), who in 1475 made him Vatican librarian—an appointment which was depicted in a famous fresco by Melozzo da Forlì. He was granted the post after writing an innovative and influential history of the lives of the popes that gives ample space to Roman history and pagan themes, and concludes by vilifying Platina's nemesis, Paul Iia paragraph from Platina's Vitæ Pontificum first gave rise to the legend of the excommunication of Halley's comet by Pope Callixtus III, Vitæ Pontificum ("Lives of the Popes", 1479) "Incunable" is the anglicised singular form of "incunabula", Latin for "swaddling clothes" or "cradle", which can refer to "the earliest stages or first traces in the development of anything." A former term for "incunable" is "fifteener", referring to the 15th century. Vitae pontificum, FIRST EDITION, 239 leaves (of 240, lacking first leaf), 39 lines, roman (and a little Greek) letter, capital spaces with guide letters, a few early marginal ink annotations, tears repaired to 2 leaves, small worm trace in upper margin of approximately 30 leaves (touching letters on approximately 20), inner margins of final leaves strengthened at gutter margins and a few other small paper repairs, gnawing to some fore-corners, blindstamp on approximately 6 leaves, late seventeenth/early eighteenth century red morocco gilt, sides panelled with corner, side and central decorations, spine gilt-tooled (including title and publication date) in 7 compartments within raised bands, rebacked preserving most of original spine. [Venice], Johannes de Colonia and Johannes Manthen, 11 June 1479. William Roscoe's copy of the first editon of Platina's history of the Popes. Provenance: William Roscoe (1753-1832), historian and author of Lorenzo de Medici (1796) and The Life of Pope Leo X (1805), with a 10-line pencil note in his hand, above which an ink note reads "Notes by Wm. Roscoe vide infra. Coll. By him". One of this books former owners was the renown William Roscoe (8 March 1753 – 30 June 1831). He was an English historian, leading abolitionist, art collector, M.P. Lawyer, banker, botanist and miscellaneous writer, perhaps best known today as an early abolitionist. 11.25 inches x 7.5inches x 2.25 inches.
Very Rare, London Published, 1616 Coryate's Traveller for the English Wits An incredible book for the seasoned explorer-traveller. Written by the first Englishman [and Elizabethan] to do so, simply for the joy of travelling to unvisited parts, and first published in 1616. Tom Coryate is known as only the second Englishman to visit India, and the first ever traveller of the so called Grand Tour. The man, that history accredits, who introduced dinner forks to the English speaking world. This superb tome is entitled 'Greeting from the court of the Great Moghul, and resident in Asmere a town in Eastern India'. By Tom Coliate. A seemingly small book, composed of numerous letters, sent in the early 1600's to his English friends, from India. They were various gentleman of note and standing, including the Master of the Rolles in Chancery Lane and to the "Fraternity of Sireniacal Gentlemen" at the Mermaid Inn. Coriates Traveller for the English Wits; Greetings from the court of the most mighty monarch, the Great Moghul. Publ London 1616. Very rare, original, early 18th century copy. It has many border annotations and quotes, made by an owner, some in ancient Greek, and additions affixed on the inside cover including old bookseller advertisements. The original and first 1616 printing is now so rare that we do not know of another coming on to the market in the last ten years, and today, if one was to appear it would be not unreasonable to attract a likely price of £20,000. In 1912 another of his published books the earlier Cortyate's Crudities sold for the princely sum of £45, the equivalent today of the paid employment of a household of servants for one year. Thomas Coriate traveller for the English wits, greeting: from the court of the Great Mogul, resident at the Towne of Asmere, in Easterne India ([London]: 1616), p.27. The remarkable and eccentric Coryate (1577-1617) was only the second Englishman to visit India simply out of curiosity, a journey of some 3,300 miles, most of which he accomplished on foot. In a letter to his mother in England Coryates writes, 'I have rid upon an elephant since I came to this Court, determining one day (by Gods leave) to have my picture expressed in my next Booke, sitting upon an elephant' (p.26). Coryat was born in Crewkerne, Somerset, and lived most of his life in the Somerset village of Odcombe. He was a son of George Coryate (d. 1607). He was educated at Winchester College from 1591, and at Gloucester Hall, Oxford from 1596 to 1599. He was employed by Prince Henry, eldest son of James I as a sort of "court jester" from 1603 to 1607, alongside Ben Jonson, John Donne and Inigo Jones. From May to October 1608 he undertook a tour of Europe, somewhat less than half of which he walked. He travelled through France and Italy to Venice, and returned via Switzerland, Germany and the Netherlands. He published his memoirs of the events in a volume entitled Coryat's Crudities hastily gobbled up in Five Months Travels in France, Italy, &c' (1611). In 1611 he published a second volume of travel writings, this one entitled Coryats Crambe, or his Coleworte twice Sodden. Coryat's letters from this time refer to the famous Mermaid Tavern in London, and mention Ben Jonson, John Donne and other members of a drinking club "Fraternity of Sireniacal Gentlemen" that met there. Ever restless, he set out once again in 1612, this time on a journey that would ultimately lead to Asia, visiting Greece, the eastern Mediterranean including Constantinople by 1614, and walking through Turkey, Persia and eventually Moghul India by 1615, visiting the Emperor Jahangir's court in Ajmer, Rajasthan. From Agra and elsewhere he sent letters describing his experiences; this very book his Greetings from the Court of the Great Mogul was published in London in 1616, and a similar volume of his letters home appeared posthumously in 1618. In September 1617, at the invitation of Sir Thomas Roe, he visited the imperial court at Mandu, Madhya Pradesh. In November 1617 he left for Surat; he died of dysentery there in December of that year, his demise hastened by the consumption of sack. Though his planned account of the journey was never to be, some of his unorganized travel notes have survived and found their way back to England. These were published in the 1625 edition of Samuel Purchas's Hakluytus Posthumus or Purchas his Pilgrimes, contayning a History of the World in Sea Voyages and Lande Travells, by Englishmen and others. Coryat's writings were hugely popular at the time. His accounts of inscriptions, many of which are now lost, were valuable; and his accounts of Italian customs and manners—including the use of the table fork—were influential in England at a time when other aspects of Italian culture, such as the madrigal, had already been in vogue for more than twenty years. He is considered by many to have been the first Briton to do a Grand Tour of Europe; a practice which became a mainstay of the education of upper class Englishmen in the 18th century.
Weapons of the American Revolution and Accoutrements. Hardcover by Warren. Moore (Author). This is a well illustrated, and photographed book, about the weapons used by soldiers in the Revolutionary War-pistols, shoulder arms (American British & Hessian), sabres, swords, powder horns, and other accoutrements. Long out of print, this is a great "starter" book on the subject of weapons of the American Revolution. This was my introduction to the subject many years ago and it's still a classic work. Filled with examples of British, French, German, Spanish, Dutch and American pieces. A brief description is given of each gun and accountrement and, in some cases, measurements are provided. Serious students, collectors, museum curators, reenactors and artists would be wise to snag a copy for their bookshelves.
With Napoleon at Waterloo, Edward Bruce Low Other unpublished documents of the Waterloo and Peninsular Campaigns. Also papers on Waterloo by the late Edward Bruce Low MA, edited with an introduction by Mackenzie MacBride. Included are two cuttings from the London Times, a 100 year anniversary [1912] of the burning of Moscow. With 32 illustrations, published in 1911. 244 pages. 26cm x 16.5 cm x 4.5cm
Zeppelin-Weltfahrten Picture Card Book A fascinating piece of German aeronautical history ephemera. A picture album made with collectable photographs sold in the 1930's. 24cm x 34cm I card lacking.