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"We Were Born to Make the Fairy Tale to Come True" …by P Karachentsov 1937 A most rare opportunity to acquire a beautiful, original and rare Russian USSR propaganda poster by the great Peter Karachentsov. Published in 1937. A multicolour lithograph published in Moscow and Leningrad in 1937 by OGIZ-IZOGIZ . Karachentsov, Peter Y. Was born in 1907 in St. Petersburg. From 1927-1931 - he studied in Vhuteine ??- the Moscow Institute of Fine Arts In 1920 - the beginning of his work on posters. In the 1930s to 1980s - he was working in the newspapers "Pravda", "Komsomolskaya Pravda", "Izvestia", "For Industrialization"; in "30 Days" magazine, "Height", "Foreign Literature", "Youth", "Ogonyok" (the magazine received numerous prizes for the best pictures of the year). Author of campaign posters on topical issues of his time - anti-bourgeois, anti-religious, anti-fascist; posters on the theme of socialist labour and sports. It illustrates and prepares books for Military Publishing, publishing "Young Guard", "Soviet writer", "truth" and others. He created works in easel graphics - portraits, landscapes, drawings, executed in ink, brush, gouache, watercolor, pencil. 1941-1945 - being at war, he creates a number of front-line sketches and drawings. Since 1944 he worked in the studio of military artists named after M. Grekov. In the 1940-1950-s - he was drawing postage stamps and stamped envelopes. In 1967 - he was the Honoured Artist of the RSFSR. He died in Moscow in 1998. Approx 26.5 inches x 39 inches sold unmounted. Would look stunning with a fine quality frame.
13th Battalion (The Macquarie Regiment) - Bi Metal Hat Badge 1953 - 60 13th Battalion (The Macquarie Regiment) - Bi Metal Hat Badge 1953 - 60. Complete with two lugs. The 13th Battalion was an infantry battalion of the Australian Army. Originally raised for the 1st Australian Imperial Force during the First World War, it was formed just six weeks after the start of the war. Along with the 14th, 15th and 16th Battalions which were recruited from New South Wales, it formed the 4th Brigade. The battalion saw service initially at Gallipoli before being transferred to France in 1916. For the next two years it fought in the trenches of the Western Front, earning numerous battle honours in the process. Following the end of the war, the 13th Battalion was demobilised in early 1919. It was re-raised in 1921 as a unit of the part-time Citizens Force, based around Maitland, New South Wales. During the Second World War the battalion undertook garrison duties before being amalgamated with the 33rd Battalion in October 1942. It was re-raised for a third and final time sometime after 1948 and remained on the order of battle until 1960 when it was subsumed into the Royal New South Wales Regiment.
1902-1908 Princess Of Wales Own Hussars Elephant Cap Badge The first use of the numeral 19 for a British Army line cavalry regiment was in 1786, when the 23rd Light Dragoons was renumbered. This unit had been raised in 1781 as the first ever British cavalry unit to operate in India, where it fought against Tipu Sultan and Dhoondia Wao and served under Arthur Wellesley at Assaye. It then served on garrison duties in India before being sent to Canada to fight in the War of 1812, becoming the 19th Lancers in 1816 and finally being disbanded in 1821. The second unit to bear the numeral was the 19th Hussars, which was the title taken by the five-year-old 1st Bengal European Light Cavalry when it moved from the East India Company to the British Army in 1862 - it was also allowed to keep the battle honours of the 19th Lancers. This unit then fought in Egypt and Sudan in the 1880s and at the relief of Ladysmith during the Boer War - one of its colonels during this time was John French, better known for his generalship during the First World War. It was sent to France as part of the British Expeditionary Force in 1914, fighting at Mons and the Marne. It served on the Western Front for the rest of World War One and was disbanded in 1921.
1929 Zeppelin Display Stand, In Oak With Zeppelin Badge And Carved Airship Ferdinand von Zeppelin served as an official observer with the Union Army during the American Civil War. During the Peninsular Campaign, he visited the balloon camp of Thaddeus S. C. Lowe. Lowe sent the curious von Zeppelin to another balloon camp where the German-born aeronaut John Steiner could be of more help to the young man. His first ascent in a balloon, made at Saint Paul, Minnesota during this visit, is said to have been the inspiration of his later interest in aeronautics. Zeppelin's ideas for large dirigibles was first expressed in a diary entry dated 25 March 1874. Inspired by a recent lecture given by Heinrich von Stephan on the subject of "World Postal Services and Air Travel", he outlined the basic principle of his later craft: a large rigidly-framed outer envelope continuing a number of separate gasbags. In 1887 the success of Charles Renard and Arthur Krebs' airship La France prompted him to send a letter to the King of Württemberg about the military necessity for dirigibles and the lack of German development in this field. He went on to start the Zeppelin Airship Co. and his name lived on in German legend as the great airship pioneer of international travel and airship warfare. 11 inches x 9 inches x 3.5 inches
1936 Third Reich Polizei/SS Fuhrer Degan Silver plated steel degan hilt, with black ribbed grip, bound with silver wire, and with it's original inset copper badge of the Third Reich German Police. Blade maker marked by WKC, Solingen. The Police and the SS officers shared this common pattern of sword from 1936 onwards. Although a solely serving SS officer may have a sigrunen rune badged hilt to his sword, a Police or combined Police/SS officer may have the Police badged hilt. The Ordnungspolizei was separate from the SS and maintained a system of insignia and Orpo ranks. It was possible for policemen to be members of the SS but without active duties. Police generals who were members of the SS were referred to simultaneously by both rank titles during the war. For instance, a Generalleutnant in the Police who was also an SS member would be referred to as SS Gruppenführer und Generalleutnant der Polizei. In addition, those Orpo police generals that undertook the duties of both Senior SS and Police Leader (Höhere SS und Polizeiführer) gained equivalent Waffen-SS ranks in August 1944 when Himmler was appointed Chef der Ersatzheeres (Chief of Home Army), because they had authority over the prisoner-of-war camps in their area. Heinrich Himmler's ultimate aim was to replace the regular police forces of Germany with a combined racial/state protection corps (Staatsschutzkorps) of pure SS units. Local law enforcement would be undertaken by the Allgemeine-SS with the Waffen-SS providing homeland-security and political-police functions. Historical analysis of the Third Reich has revealed that senior Orpo personnel knew of Himmler's plan and were opposed to it. Good blade, just grey needing polish, good scabbard with no denting just paint wear. Very good bright hilt with all natural age wear
1937 Third Reich Era 'Condor' Aeronautical Presentation Silver Plate, For the first million kilometres of the Airline Syndicato Condor Ltda at Rio De Janiero on the 16th Sept 1937. An airline funded and partnered by Lufthansa, with many German directors and principles. Lufthansa was once an instrument of the Third Reich, an airline that effectively was used to create the modern wartime Luftwaffe through it's training of German pilots for the coming war. It's company title was named after the Nazi favoured representation of their joint Spanish-German aeronautical endeavours. It was decided the South American company name should be the Condor Syndicato Ltda, as the Reich associated aviation in the Spanish speaking worlds with the Condor. This title was thus used by the German pilots and tank crews that served in the 'Condor Legion'. Volunteers from the German armed forces, that fought for Franco in the Spanish Civil war. The Condor Legion was used to develop the principles, and perfect the techniques, of their new system of warfare called Blitzkrieg. This new, devilish, and incredibly successful method of warfare was rehearsed, in other areas of influence and conflict, outside of Germany before the war. Much of it with South American trained German pilots against the Republicans in the Spanish War in 1936 to 1939
1953 Queen Elizabeth IInd Coronation Silver Medal The Queen Elizabeth II Coronation Medal is a commemorative medal that was instituted to celebrate the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. The Queen Elizabeth II Coronation Medal is a silver disk, 1.25 inches in diameter. The obverse features a crowned effigy of Queen Elizabeth II facing right, in a high-collared ermine cloak and wearing the collar of the Garter and Badge of the Bath. There is no raised rim and no legend. Unnamed
2nd Scottish General Hospital Piper's Silver Glengarry Badge Royal Army Medical Corps. Good original cast whitemetal example of sound weight. The unit can trace its origins to the Volunteer Medical Staff Companies formed in the nineteeth century. These saw service in the Boer War. Following the formation of the Territorial Army in 1908 units saw service in the World Wars. 205 (Scottish) Field Hospital (V) is the only TA formation to have served in both the Gulf wars. The unit tartan has for some years been Graham of Montrose, worn originally by the Pipes and Drums of the 2nd Scottish General Hospital from 1920. Now added is the deep cherry red of the RAMC, the dark green of the RADC and the grey and scarlet of the QARANC. These are the three medical elements of the Field Hospital. -
3rd Pattern WW2 FS Knife, With Non Standard Deviation FS Scabbard The blade has been hand honed by the commando to more resemble a needle point stiletto for serious added penetration ability. The scabbard is very similar to the US Raider scabbard, and some that were used by Free French Paras. The story about the Fairbairn Sykes Fighting knife starts in England in 1940. In 1940 the British formed special commandos to carry out raids. The initiative came from Winston Churchill in 1940 for a force that could carry out raids against German occupied Europe.. On the 8 June 1940, Section M09 of the War Office was brought into being. The name commando was taken from small effective mobile Boer units during the war in South Africa 1899-1902. Initially drawn from within the British Army from soldiers who volunteered for special service, the Commandos' ranks would eventually be filled by members of all branches of the United Kingdom's armed forces and a number of foreign volunteers from German-occupied countries. Reaching a wartime strength of over 30 individual units and four assault brigades, the Commandos served in all theatres of war from the Arctic circle to Europe and from the Middle East to South-East Asia. Their operations ranged from small groups of men landing from the sea or by parachute to a brigade of assault troops spearheading the Allied invasions of Europe and Asia. Two of the first instructors were Captain William Ewart Fairbairn (b. 28 February 1885, d. 20 June 1960) and Captain Eric Anthony Sykes (b. 5 February 1883, d. 12 May 1945). These middle aged gentlemen trained the young soldiers in a new and difficult mode of close-combat fighting at the Commando Basic Training Centre, Achnacarry, Scotland. Churchill described the commandos as 'a steel hand from the sea' The need for a proper fighting knife, for these commandos, was apparent from the first few weeks of training specialized personnel. As Fairbairn later wrote, "...the authorities did not recognize a fighting knife as part of the equipment of the fighting services. In fact, such a thing as a fighting knife could not be purchased anywhere in Great Britain." Until now, there had never been an official knife for the British armed services, although many types of knife had been authorised for use in the past. Bowie style knives were carried by some of the Imperial Yeomantry during the South African War of 1900-1901, and in World War I cut-down bayonets, privately purchased hunting knives, or captured German issue folding knives were extensively utilised. In November 1940 there was a meeting between W. E. Fairbairn, E. A. Sykes and Robert Wilkinson Latham at Wilkinson Sword Company. Fairbairn and Sykes described the type of knife they envisioned and the purpose for which it was intended. As discussion continued, preliminary sketches were drawn up and modified time and time again. As Robert Wilkinson Latham tells it: 'In order to explain exactly their point, the two men rose to their feet and one, it was Fairbairn my grandfather mentioned, grabbed the wood ruler from his desk and the two men danced around the office in mock combat'. W. E. Fairbairn had also brought with him an example of a suitable fighting knife. The system they devised utilised techniques drawn from Jiu Jitsu, Gatka, Kung Fu and 'Gutter Fighting'. It proved extremely effective. They were natural choices for the job. Both had served in the Shanghai Municipal Police Force, facing death daily in the dark, narrow streets and alleys of the city against armed thugs and organised gangs. In Shanghai they had made some fighting knives out of bayonets. The meeting resulted in the Fairbairn Sykes Fighting Knife, that was manufactured, firstly, into the 1st pattern FS Knife, it was to then evolve, briefly, into the 2nd pattern FS Knife [in August 1942] and eventually into the 3rd pattern, in around October 1943. The 3rd pattern is still in use today. This is very good example of these highly sought after early 2nd types.
6. Schiffsstammabteilung Der Ostsee Training Crew Recruits Baltic Command A very impressive cap tally from the 1930's and WW2. Photo in the gallery of the Schiffsstammabteilung Der Ostsee officers and men.
8th Punjab Indian Army Regt. Officer's Cap Badge Single pin mount. The 8th Punjab Regiment had its origins in the Madras Army, where its first battalion was raised at Masulipatam in 1798. Four more battalions were raised in 1799-1800. In 1824, they were designated as the 29th, 30th, 31st, 32nd and 33rd Regiments of Madras Native Infantry. In the early 19th century, these battalions were engaged in fighting the Marathas and took part in a number of foreign expeditions including the Anglo-Burmese Wars. Between 1890 and 1893, they were reconstituted with Punjabi Muslims and Sikhs as Burma Battalions and permanently based in Burma to police the turbulent Burmese hill tracts. Under the Kitchener Reforms of 1903, they were redesignated as the 89th, 90th, 91st, 92nd Punjabis, and 93rd Burma Infantry. They were delocalized from Burma before the First World War The 8th Punjabis have a most distinguished record of service during the First World War. Their long list of honours and awards includes the Victoria Cross awarded to Naik Shahmed Khan of 89th Punjabis in 1916. The 89th Punjabis had the unique distinction of serving in more theatres of war than any other unit of the British Empire. These included Aden, where they carried out the first opposed sea-borne assault landing in modern warfare, Egypt, Gallipoli, France, Mesopotamia, North-West Frontier Province, Salonika and Russian Transcaucasia. All battalions served in Mesopotamia, while 93rd Burma Infantry also served in France. The 92nd Punjabis were made 'Prince of Wales's Own' in 1921 for their gallantry and sacrifices during the war During the Second World War the 8th Punjab Regiment again distinguished itself, suffering more than 4500 casualties. It was awarded two Victoria Crosses to Havildar Parkash Singh and Sepoy Kamal Ram, besides numerous other gallantry awards. The regiment raised a further nine battalions. Two of its battalions, the 1st and 7th, were captured on Singapore Island, when the British Commonwealth Army surrendered there to the Japanese on 15 February 1942. Four battalions fought in the Burma Campaign, while others saw service in Iraq, Iran, Italy, French Indochina and the Dutch East Indies. Two men from the 8th Punjab Regiment received the Victoria Cross: Havildar Parkash Singh in Burma and Sepoy Kamal Ram in Italy. By the end of the war, the Regiment consisted of 14 Battalions.
8th Scottish Volunteer Battalion Helmet Plate the Kings Liverpool Regiment, The pre-war territorial Battalions of The King's Liverpool Regiment will also show that the social class within the city was still divided. The King'sLiverpool had six territorial battalions within the city, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, and 10th. The 6th catered for the middle class, 5th, 7th and 9th for the respectable working class, while 8th ( Irish ) and 10th ( Scottish ) recruited men with links to the respected country. the King's Liverpool territorial regiments fought alongside one another many times in France and Belgium in WW1. The battalion was formed on 30th April 1900 when due to the Boer War, it became clear there was a need for men to volunteer their service. It was raised from the higher educated and professional young Scotsmen of city of Liverpool and named the 8th (Scottish) Volunteer Battalion, The King's (Liverpool Regiment). To join you paid an annual subscription of 10 shillings, and an entrance fee of £2. The first Commanding Officer was Colonel C. Forbes Bell.
A Scarce WW2 German Sports Badge Badge of the sports and gymnastics club Kieler Männerturnvereins von 1844. Woven cloth shield in Blue Red and Gold. An offshoot of this club formed the Kiel Football club the Kieler Sportvereinigung Holstein von 1900 e.V, just after WW1, and they continued to play successfully right until the end of WW2. This badge came as a WW2 souvenir from a British Serviceman of WW2, who fought in Germany until 1945, and then transferred to the Military Police to continue to serve during the occupation till 1947. He was stationed in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. It was worn in conjunction with the Nazi Sports badge, which is also for sale in our gallery
A 1908 Mk 1 British Cavalry Other Ranks Pattern Sword In good bright steel, very nice condition, bright scabbard with twin rings [two screws lacking at throat mount]. Black composition diamond chequered pattern grip. Very good, plain, unmarked blade. Probably made in the last 20 years. Early in WW1, cavalry skirmishes occurred on several fronts, and horse-mounted troops were widely used for reconnaissance. Britain's cavalry were trained to fight both on foot and mounted, but most other European cavalry still relied on the shock tactic of mounted charges. There were isolated instances of successful shock combat on the Western Front, where cavalry divisions also provided important mobile fire-power. Beginning in 1917, cavalry was deployed alongside tanks and aircraft, notably at the Battle of Cambrai, where cavalry was expected to exploit breakthroughs in the lines that the slower tanks could not. At Cambrai, troops from Great Britain, Canada, India and Germany participated in mounted actions. Cavalry was still deployed late in the war, with Allied cavalry troops harassing retreating German forces in 1918 during the Hundred Days Offensive, when horses and tanks continued to be used in the same battles. In comparison to their limited usefulness on the Western Front, "cavalry was literally indispensable" on the Eastern front and in the Middle East. The 1908 pattern is the regular pattern of sword used by British cavalry still, as it was in Canada and Australia.
A 1930's Essex Regt. Silver Officers Cap Badge Essex Regiment Officer’s 1935 silver cap badge. Fine example. Within an oak wreath surmounted by a Sphinx resting on “Egypt” tablet Castle and Key of Gibraltar, across the base a scroll inscribed “The Essex Regt”. The Essex Regiment was a line infantry regiment of the British Army in existence from 1881 to 1958, and served in many conflicts such as the Second Boer War and both World War I and World War II, serving with distinction in all three. The regiment was formed in 1881 under the Childers Reforms by the amalgamation of the 44th (East Essex) Regiment of Foot and the 56th (West Essex) Regiment of Foot.
A 1930's German P-Hilt Sabre By Eickhorn Although not an official SS sword, before 1936 there was no regulation SS pattern sabre. The German Army & Navy had their own dedicated swords, but there was no equivalent for the elite political SS service. Thus, before 1936, SS officers often chose this all steel and black P-Hilt sabre as it's black and steel configuration was ideal for their service uniform. In fact many officers chose to wear it after 1936 as well, for not all of them were granted the honour of carrying the new design '36 pattern SS/Polizei degan, as it was a regulation sword permitted to be worn by award only by so honoured SS officers. We show a photograph circa 1936 with one officer on the left carrying the 1936 degan, and the two others with the steel and black P-Hilt. Generally it was known as the cavalry sabre due to it's regular cavalry pattern form and used by the German cavalry regiments on horseback. Prior to the standard, official, 1936 pattern Police / SS Degan [sword] being approved by Himmler, SS officers and NCO's were permitted to wear a sword of choice, from the regular patterns available from the standard Heer [army] swords. Due to the early uniform of the SS being black and silver the choice remained limited, generally, to the pattern of military swords available that utilized these colours. The predominant colour normally used, and chosen by the regular Army officers, was brass [or gold] with black. The private purchase swords, generally chosen by those serving in the SS, were this sword or the Prinz Eugen.
A 1930's Very Good Carl Zeiss 8x Jena Monocular Used as a military hand sized telescope by one of the best German optical makers of WW2. Very nice clear focusing optics, a little dusty inside, with original neck strap, Carl Zeiss Jena maker marking. Made for the London market in the 1930's but used by a German officer in WW2. Possibly as a private purchase piece on a visit to London before the war, or by a German university student in London who later became an officer of the Reich. The firm of Carl Zeiss was founded in Jena in 1846 and grew to be the most dominant optical and fine mechanical firm in the world at the beginning of the twentieth century through 1945.
A 1935 Lahti Finnish Pistol Holster Winter War With Russia 1939 A good holster from the Luger like pistol used by Finland in the Winter War against Russia. Lahti L-35 is a semi-automatic pistol designed by Aimo Lahti that was produced from 1935 to just after the war. About 9000 pistols were made in four production series. The weapon had a bolt accelerator to improve reliability in cold conditions or when fouled. This kind of system was rare for pistols. It also resembled the German Luger P08 pistol. The Finnish army used the L-35 in the Winter War and the Continuation War, and it was the official Finnish service pistol until the 1980s when it was replaced by the FN HP-DA pistol. (Finnish military designation 9.00 PIST 80 / 9.00 PIST 80-91) Finnish L-35 pistol was also known with nicknames Lahti-pistooli (Lahti-pistol) and Suomi-pistooli (Suomi-pistol) among Finnish military. It was reliable, accurate and sturdy pistol, but also one of the largest and heaviest 9-mm military pistols ever manufactured. Structure of the this strong looking pistol had its week point: Powerful submachinegun-ammunition often used by Finnish troops with these pistols could crack the pistols slide quite easily. As all 9 mm x 19 ammunition manufactured during World War 2 in Finland was hot loaded submachinegun-ammunition using this ammunition also pistols of same calibre unfortunately wasn't exactly unusual during World War 2 and years after it. When the slides of L-35 broke down in larger numbers Finnish military soon found itself needing replacements for them. Because of this many series of replacement slides were manufactured for Finnish military after World War 2. Most of these pistols (all but series 4) have shoulder stock attachment lugs. While the Finns developed and tested wooden shoulder stocks and wooden shoulder stock holsters for these pistols, these were never manufactured in real numbers and the pistols were issued without them.
A Ball Race Spare Part, Part of the 'Little Boy' Manhattan Project Although barely 72 years old, it is probably one of the rarest items we are ever likely to offer. A superb, single, micro engineered ball race, one of a pair of spare parts, [and to be sold by us separately] we acquired from the late collection of Professor Samuel Eilenberg, Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at Columbia University in WW2. One of the spare parts used during the construction of 'Little Boy' Uranium Bomb, part of the ultra top secret Manhattan Project. The second example is engraved with it's part code GYRO PT MK3 A. Code L.B.BOMB. This example is plain and un-engraved. Souvenirs of the Manhattan Project were taken by [or presented to] many of the consultants and scientists working on, or associated with, the greatest secret project of the 20th century, once the project was officially closed down in regards to Little Boy. For information purposes the diameter of the ball race is 160mm which is within a small tolerance of the diameter of the gun barrel [165mm] that was central to the construction of 'Little Boy'. This measurement may indeed be relevant to the ball races actual function or use within the project. Unfortunately due to the top secret nature of the whole event Prof Eilenberg did not reveal the ball races function, or even his no doubt significant personal contribution within the project, before his death in January 1998, only that he acquired it at Los Alamos in August 1945, apparently given out by Oppenheimer. The Manhattan Project was the project to develop the first nuclear weapon (atomic bomb) during World War II by the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada. Formally designated as the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), it refers specifically to the period of the project from 1941–1946 under the control of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, under the administration of General Leslie R. Groves. The scientific research was directed by American physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer. The project succeeded in developing and detonating three nuclear weapons in 1945: a test detonation of a plutonium implosion bomb on July 16 (the Trinity test) near Alamogordo, New Mexico; an enriched uranium bomb code-named "Little Boy" on August 6 over Hiroshima, Japan; and a second plutonium bomb, code-named "Fat Man" on August 9 over Nagasaki, Japan. The project's roots lay in scientists' fears since the 1930s that Nazi Germany was also investigating nuclear weapons of its own. Born out of a small research program in 1939, the Manhattan Project eventually employed more than 130,000 people and cost nearly $2 billion USD ($23 billion in 2007 dollars based on CPI). It resulted in the creation of multiple production and research sites that operated in secret. The three primary research and production sites of the project were the plutonium-production facility at what is now the Hanford Site, the uranium-enrichment facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the weapons research and design laboratory, now known as Los Alamos National Laboratory. Project research took place at over thirty different sites across the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. The MED maintained control over U.S. weapons production until the formation of the Atomic Energy Commission in January 1947. We also have an original photo print taken from HMS Colossus, [part of 11th Aircraft Carrier Squadron, that was based in the Pacific, commanded by Rear Admiral Harcourt]. It was taken on 7th August 1945 [the day after Little Boy was detonated]. It is a picture of two I/d profiles of two Japanese T/E fighters that were originally observed in July 1945. These photographs were sent to the Manhattan Project HQ, but why, to us, this remains a mystery. Also, another souvenir, the serial tag from the Army Air Corps Bell and Howell sound projector, that apparently showed the original film of the detonation of 'Little Boy' to Professor Eilenburg and others from the project after the Enola Gay mission. Those souvenirs are for sale with the engrave ball race not this one. We show in the gallery, for information only, a Paul R. Halmos photograph of Samuel Eilenberg (1913-1998), left, and Gordon T. Whyburn (1904-1969) in 1958 at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Edinburgh. For example, in relation to the desirability of original items connected to this monumentally historical mission, two other pieces were sold some 14 years ago in the US. The Little Boy was armed on the mission by removing the green safety plugs, and arming it with red arming plugs. This was undertaken by 23 year old Lt. Morris Richard Jeppson, who armed the bomb during the flight. For this perilous task he was awarded the Silver Star for his unique contribution to the mission. Jeppson, however, kept a few of the green plugs that signified his role in the bombing. He sold two of them in San Francisco for $167,500, at auction, in 2002, however, the US federal government claimed they were classified material and tried, but failed dismally, to block the sale. We were very fortunate to acquire these fascinating pieces, from Prof Eilenberg's collection, from a Doctor and lecturer of oriental studies, who acquired them himself some years ago from a dear colleague of Prof Eilenberg. This less expensive of the two ball race we have does not bear engraving and does not come with the camera plate or photos either.
A Beautiful & Rare Imperial Russian Romanov Period WW1 Propaganda Poster depicting the Triple Entente – Britannia (right) and Marianne [left] the national symbol of the French Republic, an allegory of liberty and reason, and a portrayal of the Goddess of Liberty adorned with her bonnet rouge, in the company of Mother Russia. In this depiction, Britannia's association with the sea is provided by her holding an anchor, an attribute usually represented by Poseidon's Trident. An original Russian 1914 poster. The upper inscription reads "Concord". Shown are the female personifications of France, Russia, and Britain, the "Triple Entente" allies in the first World War. In centre, Russia holds aloft an Orthodox Cross (symbol of faith), Britannia on the right with an anchor (referring to Britain's navy, but also a traditional symbol of hope), and Marianne on the left with a heart (symbol of charity/love, probably with reference to the Sacré-Cœur Basilica) -- "faith, hope, and charity" being the three virtues of the famous Biblical passage I Corinthians 13:13. In the background is a battle scene, with men fighting with guns and swords, some on horseback. Above them is an exploding shell, an early aeroplane, and an airship. It was published on territory of the Russian Empire (Russian Republic) except for territories of the Grand Duchy of Finland and Congress Poland before 7 November 1917. 20.25 inches x 27.75 inchesWould look stunning with a fine quality frame.
A Beautiful Band of the Welsh Guards Hand Painted Tenor Drum With battle honours. The Welsh Guards came into existence on February 26, 1915 by Royal Warrant of His Majesty King George V in order to include Wales in the national component to the Foot Guards, "..though the order to raise the regiment had been given by the King to Earl Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, on February 6 1915." They were the last of the Guards to be created, with the Irish Guards coming into being in 1900. Just two days later, the 1st Battalion Welsh Guards mounted its first King's Guard at Buckingham Palace on 1 March, 1915 - St David's Day.One way to distinguish between the regiments of Foot Guards is the spacing of buttons on the tunic. The Welsh Guards have buttons arranged in groups of five. On March 17, 1915 the 1st Battalion sailed for France to join the Guards Division to commence its participation in the First World War. Its first battle was some months after its initial arrival, at Loos on September 27, 1915. The regiment's first Victoria Cross came two years later in July 1917 awarded to Sergeant Robert Bye.The regiment was increased to three Battalions during the Second World War. The 1st Battalion fought valiantly in all the campaigns of the North-West European Theatre. The 2nd Battalion fought in Boulogne in 1940 whilst the 1st fought in Belgium as part of the British Expeditionary Force. In May 1940 at the Battle of Arras, the Welsh Guards gained their second Victoria Cross by Lieutenant The Hon. Christopher Furness who was killed in the action. The Welsh Guards were subsequently part of the legendary Evacuation of Dunkirk that saw over 340,000 British and French troops return to the UK against all odds. In 1943 the 3rd Battalion fought throughout the arduous Tunisian North African Campaign and Italian Campaigns. Welsh Guards in action near Cagny 19 July 1944 While they battled on in those theatres the 1st and 2nd joined the Guards Armoured Division, with the 1st Battalion being infantry and the 2nd armoured. The two battalions worked closely, being the first troops to re-enter Brussels on September 3, 1944 after an advance of 100 miles in one day in what was described as 'an armoured lash unequalled for speed in this or any other war'.
A Beautiful Graf Zeppelin Frame with Original 1936 Olympics Photo Card A beautiful easel mounted picture frame in florid relief patterned britannia metal, with a portrait bust in relief of Graf Zeppelin. It displays a Berlin stamped photo card of the Olympice rings in Berlin in 1936. A fantastic piece of 1930's German Olympic memorablia.
A Belgian Croix De Guerre Gallantry Medal The croix de guerre is a military decoration of both France and Belgium, where it is also known as the Oorlogskruis (Dutch). It was first created in 1915 in both countries and consists of a square-cross medal on two crossed swords, hanging from a ribbon with various degree pins. The decoration was awarded during World War I, again in World War II, and in other conflicts. The croix de guerre was also commonly bestowed to foreign military forces allied to France and Belgium.The croix de guerre may either be bestowed as a unit award or to individuals who distinguish themselves by acts of heroism involving combat with enemy forces. The medal is also awarded to those who have been "mentioned in despatches", meaning a heroic deed was performed meriting a citation from an individual's headquarters unit. The unit award of the croix de guerre was issued to military commands who performed heroic deeds in combat and were subsequently recognized by headquarters.
A Belgian, Knight of Order Of the Crown Award WW2 issue. In white, blue and green enamel and gold. With original red silk ribbon and double pin mount. Notable winner of this prestigious award has been Steven Spielberg [see photo] The Order was established on October 15, 1897 by King Leopold II in his capacity as ruler of the Congo Free State. The order was first intended to recognize heroic deeds and distinguished service achieved for service in the Congo Free State—many of which acts soon became highly controversial. In 1908, the Order of the Crown was made a national decoration of Belgium, junior to the Order of Leopold. Currently, the Order of the Crown is awarded for services rendered to the Belgian state, especially for meritorious service in public employment. The Order of the Crown is also awarded for distinguished artistic, literary or scientific achievements, or for commercial or industrial services in Belgium or Africa. The Order may also be bestowed to foreign nationals and is frequently awarded to military and diplomatic personnel of other countries stationed in (or providing support to) Belgium. During the Second World War, the Order of the Crown was extensively authorized for award to Allied military personnel who had helped to liberate Belgium from the occupation forces of Nazi Germany. The Order of the Crown is awarded by royal decree.
A Berlin Olympic Zeppelin Tray Showing the 1936 Olympics Transatlanic Route From Germany to America and Back. A good size serving trasy or dish 30cm across. Made in hand beaten German hallmarked silver 835 grade in the form of scalloped shell. Made to celebrate the record braking summer Olympic Games season of the Zeppelin Hindenburg in 1936. LZ 129 Hindenburg (Luftschiff Zeppelin #129; Registration: D-LZ 129) was a large German commercial passenger-carrying rigid airship, the lead ship of the Hindenburg class, the longest class of flying machine and the largest airship by envelope volume. Designed and built by the Zeppelin Company (Luftschiffbau Zeppelin GmbH) on the shores of the Bodensee (Lake Constance) in Friedrichshafen, the airship flew from March 1936 until destroyed by fire 14 months later on May 6, 1937, at the end of the first North American transatlantic journey of its second season of service. Thirty-six people died in the accident, which occurred while landing at Lakehurst Naval Air Station in Manchester Township, New Jersey, United States. Hindenburg was named after the late Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg (1847–1934), President of Germany (1925–1934). The Hindenburg made 17 round trips across the Atlantic Ocean in 1936, its first and only full year of service, with ten trips to the United States and seven to Brazil. In July 1936, the airship also completed a record Atlantic double crossing in five days, 19 hours and 51 minutes. Among the famous passengers who travelled on the airship was German heavyweight boxing champion Max Schmeling, who returned home on the Hindenburg to a hero's welcome after knocking out Joe Louis in New York on June 19, 1936. During the 1936 season the airship flew 191,583 miles (308,323 km), carried 2,798 passengers, and transported 160 tons of freight and mail, a level of success that encouraged the Luftschiffbau Zeppelin Company to plan the expansion of its airship fleet and transatlantic services. The airship was reportedly so stable that a pen or pencil could be stood on a table without falling. Its launches were so smooth that passengers often missed them, believing that the airship was still docked to its mooring mast. The cost of one way passage between Germany and the United States was US$400, an especially considerable sum in the Depression era. Hindenburg passengers were generally affluent, including many public figures, entertainers, noted sportsmen, political figures, and leaders of industry. The Hindenburg was used again for propaganda purposes when it flew over the Olympic Stadium in Berlin on August 1 during the opening ceremonies of the 1936 Summer Olympic Games. Shortly before the arrival of Adolf Hitler to declare the Games open, the airship crossed low over the packed stadium while trailing the Olympic flag on a long weighted line suspended from its gondola. Olympiafahrt 1936 (Berlin) flown Hindenburg cover. Weight approx 22 oz Troy.
A British Army WW1 Gallantry Medal, The ' Military Medal For Bravery in The Field ' Awarded in January 1917 to Acting Corporal W. Broughton 9th (Service) Battalion, The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment [Gazetted 16 Jan 1917]. The 9th was raised at Preston in September 1914 as part of Kitchener's Third New Army and joined 74th Brigade, 25th Division. The new division assembled in the area around Salisbury for training. The 9th Loyals moved to billets in Christchurch in December, then to Southbourne in January. In May they moved to Romsey and to Aldershot for final training in June. They proceeded to to France on the 26th of September 1915, landing at Boulogne, the division concentrating in the area of Nieppe. Their first action was in defence of the German attack on Vimy Ridge in May 1916. They then moved to The Somme and joined the Battle just after the main attack, with 75th Brigade making a costly attack near Thiepval on the 3rd of July. The Division was in action at The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of Pozieres and The Battle of the Ancre Heights. In 1917 they were in action at The Battle of Messines attacking between the Wulverghem-Messines and Wulverghem-Wytschaete roads. In the Third battle of Ypres were were in action during The Battle of Pilkem. In 1918 they were in action on The Somme and in the Battles of the Lys. On the 21st of June 1918 they formed 2nd Composite Battalion with the 8th Border Regiment and transferred to 50th (Northumbrian) Division. On the 12th of August 1918 the battalion was disbanded in France. The Battle of the Somme (French: Bataille de la Somme, German: Schlacht an der Somme), also known as the Somme Offensive, was a battle of the First World War fought by the armies of the British and French empires against the German Empire. It took place between 1 July and 18 November 1916 on both sides of the River Somme in France. The battle was one of the largest of World War I, in which more than 1,000,000 men were wounded or killed, making it one of humanity's bloodiest battles. A Franco-British commitment to an offensive on the Somme had been made during Allied discussions at Chantilly, Oise in December 1915. The Allies agreed upon a strategy of combined offensives against the Central Powers in 1916, by the French, Russian, British and Italian armies, with the Somme offensive as the Franco-British contribution. The main part of the offensive was to be made by the French Army, supported on the northern flank by the Fourth Army of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF). When the German Army began the Battle of Verdun on the Meuse on 21 February 1916, many French divisions intended for the Somme were diverted and the supporting attack by the British became the principal effort. The first day on the Somme was a serious defeat for the German Second Army, which was forced out of its first line of defence by the French Sixth Army, from Foucaucourt-en-Santerre south of the Somme to Maricourt on the north bank and by the British Fourth Army from Maricourt to the vicinity of the Albert–Bapaume road. 1 July 1916 was also the worst day in the history of the British Army, which had c.?60,000 casualties, mainly on the front between the Albert–Bapaume road and Gommecourt, where the attack failed disastrously and few British troops reached the German front line. The British Army on the Somme was a mixture of the remains of the pre-war regular army, the Territorial Force and the Kitchener Army, which was composed of Pals battalions, recruited from the same places and occupations, whose losses had a profound social impact in Britain. The battle is notable for the importance of air power and the first use of the tank. At the end of the battle, British and French forces had penetrated 6 miles (9.7 km) into German-occupied territory, taking more ground than any offensive since the Battle of the Marne in 1914. The Anglo-French armies failed to capture Péronne and were still 3 miles (4.8 km) from Bapaume, where the German armies maintained their positions over the winter. British attacks in the Ancre valley resumed in January 1917 and forced the Germans into local withdrawals to reserve lines in February, before the scheduled retirement to the Siegfriedstellung (Hindenburg Line) began in March.
A British Art Nouveau Letter Opener Engraved with An Airship From the 1910's to WW1 period. Bearing a blue stone it the handle. Silver plated over brass. A most attractive piece of gentlemans deskware.
A British General Service Medal with Northern Ireland Bar. Unnamed.
A Campaign Service South Arabia Bar & Territorial Efficency Medal Pair Unnamed. ERII replacement issue in superb condition court mounted. South Arabia; This campaign is related to the Radfan Campaign, because both were Egyptian-inspired attempts to end the British presence in Aden and end the embryonic Federation of South Arabia.This 3 year long campaign saw numerous terrorist attacks on both civilian and military targets. In both Rafan and Aden, the British Army suffered 90 personnel killed and 510 wounded.The qualifying period was 30 days service in the Federation of South Arabia between 1 August 1964 and 30 November 1967.
A Cast Iron Plaque of Graf Von Zeppelin Dated 1920. Russet finish overall. Approx 4 inches
A Cold War Period Soviet Red Army USSR Medal Group 20 year commemorative Great Patriotic War [WW2] medal of 1965, 30 year commemorative Great Patriotic War [WW2] medal 1975, and 60 year commemorative Great War and Revolution medal 1978. All in very good condition.
A Complete Set Of WW1 German Soldier's Paperwork and His Gallantry Medal Including his Soldbuch and his Certificate of Award for the Iron Cross. A fascinating collection outlining a WW1 German soldier's military career. He was a trench warfare Mortar Grenade operator [the Granatenwerfer 16]. See photo in the gallery [for information only]. It would make a charming and fascinating gift as it is researchable to see where this soldier served, on which front and where his unit fought and when. Next to the Victoria Cross, it is the most famous medal in the world. The Iron Cross was awarded for bravery in battle as well as other conspicuos military contributions in a battlefield environment. The Iron Cross 2nd Class came with a ribbon and was worn in one of two different methods: When in formal dress, the entire cross was worn mounted alone or as part of a medal bar. For everyday wear, only the ribbon was worn from the second hole in the tunic button. The Iron Cross is a black four-pointed cross with white trim, with the arms widening toward the ends, similar to a cross pattée. It was designed by the neoclassical architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel and reflects the cross borne by the Teutonic Knights in the 14th century. The ribbon for the 1813, 1870 and 1914 Iron Cross (2nd Class) was black with two thin white bands, the colours of Prussia. The non-combatant version of this award had the same medal, but the black and white colours on the ribbon were reversed. Initially the Iron Cross was worn with the blank side out. This did not change until 1838 when the sprig facing could be presented. Since the Iron Cross was issued over several different periods of German history, it was annotated with the year indicating the era in which it was issued. For example, an Iron Cross from the First World War bears the year "1914", while the same decoration from the Second World War is annotated "1939". The reverse of the 1870, 1914 and 1939 series of Iron Crosses have the year "1813" appearing on the lower arm, symbolizing the year the award was created. The 1813 decoration also has the initials "FW" for King Frederick William III, while the next two have a "W" for the respective kaisers, Wilhelm I and Wilhelm II. The final version shows a swastika. It was also possible for a holder of the 1914 Iron Cross to be awarded a second or higher grade of the 1939 Iron Cross. In such cases, a "1939 Clasp" (Spange) would be worn on the original 1914 Iron Cross. (A similar award was made in 1914 but was quite rare, since there were few in service who held the 1870 Iron Cross.) For the First Class award the Spange appears as an eagle with the date "1939" that was pinned above the Cross. Although two separate awards, in some cases the holders soldered them together. A cross was the symbol of the Teutonic Knights (a heraldic cross pattée), and the cross design (but not the specific decoration) has been the symbol of Germany's armed forces (now the Bundeswehr) since 1871. As with all our items, each one comes with our unique, lifetime guarantee, certificate of authenticity
A Composite, Experimental Prototype, FS Type Commando Knife. Early WW2 Having traded in the same location for 60 years or so our company has met some many hundreds of thousands of most remarkable people, and heard too many fantastic stories [or tales] to remember. Every week something new is learnt, or someone new is met. This week an aged lady, with a most fascinating story, let us acquire this most intriguing piece. Not valuable, or even that impressive in fact, but it's position in the development of modern edged weaponry is quite fascinating. This is or was a prototype close combat dagger came to us from the niece of a one time cutler and assistant knife designer [trained by the veteran Wilkinson swordsmith Tom Beesley] who was briefly working with Capt. Fairbairn [via Wilkinson Sword Co.] from the very early war period England. At the time that Fairbairn & Sykes were coming up with the concept of their FS commando knife, several forms and mock-ups were made, that eventually evolved into what was to become the FS Knife, 1st Pattern. The handle from this dagger was created and based from small cast brass Wilkinson court sword parts, with a square block and oval quillon. The blade, formed to create a strong, rigid short double edged blade, that has good stout piercing properties came from a long Wilkinson sword blade. No edge was ever put on this blade, but one can easily see how the FS knife may have evolved from this early war period prototype design. We are only distressed that we have no design schematics and paperwork, that were we were told were once in existence, to show how the knife was eventually designed. Sadly and woe alas all the paperwork was discarded some two decades after the war as seemingly insignificant. All that remains for posterity is this most intriguing dagger, that the assistant designer/cutler brought home as a souvenir during the war. Naturally it is certainly possible he ought not to have done so.
A Crash Site Recovered M35 WW2 German Luftwaffe Decal Combat Helmet This is a battle site recovery of a combat helmet from WW2, still bearing a clear Luftwaffe decal, showing a large entry and an even larger exit hole for possibly a 20 mm cannon round. A most fascinating souvenir of WW2 combat
A Cunard White Star Line 'R.M.S.Queen Elizabeth' Lapel Badge Red white and blue enamel on gilt brass in the form of a Steamship Wheel. Launched in 1939 used in WW2 as a Troopship, then restored to service as the worlds greatest luxury cruise ship after the war. Excellent condition.
A Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei Serving Platter From the Graf Zeppelin The platter has the German Zeppelin Co. logo, of the Third Reich Zeppelin, flying across the globe, the Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei. Manufactured by GEBRÜDER HEPP PFORZHEIM, in 90 grade. In March 1935, the South Atlantic flights became the responsibility of Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei, after this company had been set up jointly by Luftschiffbau Zeppelin, the German Air Ministry and Deutsche Lufthansa. The DZR was created at the instigation of Air Minister Hermann Göring as a way to increase Nazi control over zeppelin operations, and can be see as part of the larger policy of Gleichschaltung, or coordination, which affected all aspects of German life in the years following Hitler’s assumption of power. Consistent with Nazi ideology, the airship was expected to be more than just a private commercial venture; it was to be a public symbol of the new German nation. In a speech marking the founding of the DZR, Göring commented: “I hope that the new ship will also fulfill its duty in furthering the cause of Germany… The airship does not have the exclusive purpose of flying across the Atlantic, but also has a responsibility to act as the nation’s representative.” The even larger airship, the LZ 129 'Hindenburg' joined the 'Graf Zeppelin' in 1936, and, in addition to South Atlantic flights with its parter, inaugurated a service over the North Atlantic, between Frankfurt and Lakehurst in New Jersey, in the summer. Also in 1936 the South American route was extended to Rio de Janeiro. Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei ceased operations as the commercial use of airships came to an abrupt end on 6 May 1937, when the 'Hindenburg' exploded at Lakehurst. This large silver tray is made of German silver plate, 90 grade, and was the product of the same silver company that made the the Third Reich military cutlery and other silver objects for the Third Reich hierarchy - Gbr. Hepp. His company alongside his rival, Wellner, was a maker of much of the Fuhrer's formal dinnerware, and the Reich chancellery dinnerware pieces. Many items by were used in several of Hitler's residences, the Hotel [Der Deutscher Hof] personally used by Hitler, and numerous state offices. the Zeppelin Corps became one of the shortest-lived German service branches of World War II. After the German invasion of Poland in 1939, the Luftwaffe ordered the last two Zeppelin airships moved to a large Zeppelin hangar in Frankfurt. In March of 1940, Goring ordered their destruction and the aluminum fed into the Nazi war industry. In May, a fire broke out in the Zeppelin facility which destroyed most of the remaining parts. The rest of the parts and materials were soon scrapped with almost no trace of the German "Giants of the Air" remaining by the end of the year. 49cm x 32.5cm
A East Riding Rgt. Cavalry Sword, With Lawrence of Arabia Interest. British Army 1899 Pattern Cavalry regimental combat sword Made at Enfield and with ordnance issue date March 1910. A great and impressive steel bowl guard cavalry sword, used by one of the great WW1 'pals' regiments of East Yorkshire, and part of this cavalry regiment served in one of the most famous areas of the Great War, in Arabia, under the direct command of T.E.Lawrence, in 1916. Sword marked East Riding Regt. The story of the Lawrence connection is as follows; In 1916 the Regiment was part of the Western Frontier Force, a fairly uninteresting posting , causing NCOs and men to join the newly formed Imperial Camel Corps and 120 officers and men to be detached for service under T. E. Lawrence. The general story of this wonderful regiment is as detailed; The East Riding of Yorkshire Yeomanry was a unit of the British Army from 1794–1956. The regiment was formed as volunteer cavalry in 1794 during the French Revolutionary Wars. During World War I A second and third regiment were raised and designated 2/1st and 3/1st East Riding Yeomanry. The 2/1st converted to a Cyclist Battalion in 1916. The 3/1st was raised in 1915, The 1/1st moved north in November 1914 as Divisional Cavalry for the Northumbrian Division. On May 20, the Regiment formed part of a parade of some 40,000 men before H.M. The King and Lord Kitchener. The Regiment was then ordered south to Filey and then to East Anglia, to form part of the 1/1st North Midland Mounted Brigade. In October 1915 they set sail for Alexandria. In 1916, the Regiment was part of the Western Frontier Force, and a number of NCOs and men joined the newly formed Imperial Camel Corps and 120 officers and men to be detached for service under T. E. Lawrence. In December 1916, the 22nd Mounted Brigade moved to the Suez Canal Zone to form part of the ANZAC Mounted Division. The Regiment first saw action during the First Battle of Gaza, a hard engagement for both the men and the horses, and in the Second Gaza Battle it was posted to the far right flank. In General Allenby's reorganisation 22nd Mounted Brigade transferred to the Yeomanry Mounted Division. In October 1917, the Regiment took part in the third battle of Gaza, and on the 13th November at El Mughar, supported a charge by 6th Mounted Brigade. A Squadron led 22nd Mounted Brigade, having captured their objective they pressed on to Akir and established a position on the far side of the village square, however they had to withdraw as they were unsupported by the rest of the Brigade. Sadly it transpired that the village was the location of a Turkish Corps Headquarters, and had the success of the attack been exploited then a major dislocation of the enemy lines could have resulted. El Mughar was the last great cavalry charge of the British Army. In December 1917, with the exception of the machine gun section the Regiment was dismounted and sent to France. Together with the Lincolnshire Yeomanry, it formed 102 Bn, Machine Gun Corps (Mobile). The Battalion saw action several times in the closing months of the war in the area around Cambrai supporting attacks by the 49th (West Riding) Division, 51st (Highland) Division and 56th (London) Infantry Divisions. Between the Wars The East Riding of Yorkshire Yeomanry was one of the first cavalry regiments to be mechanised. It was one of the 8 Yeomanry Regiments that chose to reduce to squadron strength to form Armoured Car Companies in the Royal Tank Corps. The 26th (ER Yorks Yeomanry) Armoured Car Company Royal Tank Corps was initially equipped with Peerless armoured cars later to be followed by a mixture of Crossleys and Rolls Royces. In 1938, another reorganisation resulted in further change, the Regiment was reconstituted as The East Riding Yeomanry a Divisional Cavalry Regiment (Mechanised) equipped with 28 light tanks, 44 carriers and 41 motorcycles, and in 1939 a duplicate 2nd line regiment was raised. The regiment's World War II story. In March 1940, after training at Tidworth, the 1st Regiment joined the BEF in France as part of 1st Armoured Reconnaissance Brigade, initially the Corps Cavalry to 3 Corps. However, in May the Regiment passed under the command of 48th (South Midland) Division, 44th (Home Counties) Division, Macforce, and finally back to 48th (South Midland) Division. The Regiment was first involved in fighting near Ath, south of Brussels, and then over the next fortnight fought seven rearguard actions before being finally surrounded at Cassel on the night of 29/30 May in the company of 145th Brigade. As rearguard to the Brigade’s breakout, the F echelon was fatally exposed. The remnants of 1 ERY (7 officers and 230 men) returned to Tidworth, where the Regiment was brought up to strength by drafts from the 2nd Regiment, prior to moving onto Bovington to rejoin 1st Armoured Reconnaissance Brigade. What was left of 2 ERY formed 10th (East Riding Yeomanry) Bn Green Howards, which later converted to become the 12th (Yorkshire) Bn Parachute Regiment. They next deployed to Essex for anti-invasion duties, where it was equipped with Beavettes. When new material became available in Spring 1942, the Regiment reequipped with Covenanter tanks and Honeys, and formed 27th Armoured Brigade, together with the 4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards (replaced by the Staffordshire Yeomanry, in January 1944) and the 13th/18th Royal Hussars. In April 1943, the Regiment again reequipped, this time with Sherman Duplex Drive tanks. The training all came to fruition on June 6, 1944, when the Regiment landed on D Day supporting 9th Infantry Brigade in 3rd Division, and for the following fifty days they took part in the bridgehead battles. During this period they also supported 59th (Staffordshire) Infantry Division. Because of casualties, 27th Armoured Brigade was broken up on the July 29, and on August 16 the Regiment joined 33rd Armoured Brigade, taking over the petrol MK1 & II Shermans of 148 Regt RAC. The Regiment was now attached to 51st (Highland) Division, for the final Falaise Pocket Battles, the advance to the River Seine, its crossing and the taking of St Valery-en-Caux; after which the Regiment transferred to 49th (West Riding) Division for the Battle of Le Havre. In October, the Regiment supported 53rd (Welsh) Division, in Holland fighting around 's-Hertogenbosch and the later crossing of the Maas. However, during the winter of 1944, it was hurried away to reinforce the pressure being put on the German "Bulge", and then in January returned to 79th Armoured Division, and re-equipped with Buffalo, to carry the troops of 15th (Scottish) Division, on the assault crossing of the Rhine March 15. For the last weeks of the war, the Regiment reconverted to Shermans, coming under the command of the Canadian Army clearing Holland. After the war the Regiment was stationed at Laboe (Kiel Estuary) until being placed in ‘suspended animation’ on the March 7, 1946. Brigadier Carver (later Field Marshal Lord Carver) considered The East Riding Yeomanry to be one of the best, if not the best, armoured regiment that he had come across. This is a troopers battle sword in every sense of the word, and with it's regimental markings it comes with it's own built-in provenence. It also has various ordnance inspection and issue marks and has obvious signs of combat use, but the blade is superb. This is truly a iconic example of a Great British Army cavalry trooper's sword, from of one of the great North of England volunteer regiments. It was to be replaced by the 1908/12 pattern sword, but, Yeomanry cavalry received the new pattern last of all, as the transition of sword replacement took, in some cases, many years, some not until after the war. Like so many other British Army regiments, a regiment that goes down in the annals of military history as deserving the greatest honour and respect, a force of men bathed in stories of nobility, heroism, glory, valour and self sacrifice.
A Fabulous 1929 Original Movie Poster. Hollywood Production Swedish Poster In superb condition, a stunning example of fabulous 1920's Art Deco Hollywood artistry. The Lost Zeppelin [Den Forsvunna Zeppelinaren] Tiffany-Stahl Productions (Los Ángeles) This film, like Capra's Dirigible, is also loosely based on the crash of the airship Italia, flown by Umberto Nobile, around May 25, 1928 near the North Pole, and the international rescue effort that cost early polar explorer Roald Amundson his life. The pilot who rescued Nobile also crashed when returning to rescue more survivors and had to be rescued himself. Starring; Conway Tearle as Commander Donald Hall Virginia Valli as Miriam Hall Ricardo Cortez as Tom Armstrong Duke Martin as Lieutenant Wallace Kathryn McGuire as Nancy Winter Hall as Mr. Wilson Richard Cramer as Radio Announcer (voice) Ervin Nyiregyhazi as Pianist (uncredited) William H. O'Brien as Radio Operator (uncredited). Poster sold unframed. [Reflections are due to temporary frame] 29 x 42 inches
A Fabulous and Extremely Scarce, Original, WW2 German Nebelwerfer 41 Rocket This is one of the very first ones we have seen in over 30 years. From a superb collection of German ordnance that has just arrived. This is our last Nebelwerfer Rocket from this collection. Nicknamed by the allies the 'Moaning Mini' due to it's unearthly scream as it flew. An original unfired example, and a simply remarkable piece of history, from the early German Third Reich's rocket technology, and part of a superb Third Reich collection we have been thrilled to acquire. An interesting fact, it is estimated 75% of all injured and killed allied troops fighting in Caen, the Normandy campaign, were injured so by nebelwerfers. Beautifully waffen amt marked and with original paint decoration. The Nebelwerfer ("Smoke Mortar") was a World War II German series of weapons. They were initially developed by and assigned to the Wehrmacht's so-called "chemical troops" (Nebeltruppen). This weapon was given its name as a disinformation strategy designed to lead spies into thinking that it was merely a device for creating a smoke screen. They were primarily intended to deliver poison gas and smoke shells, although a high-explosive shell was developed for the Nebelwerfers from the beginning. Initially, two different mortars were fielded before they were replaced by a variety of rocket launchers ranging in size from 15 to 32 centimetres (5.9 to 12.6 in). The thin walls of the rockets had the great advantage of allowing much larger quantities of gases, fluids or high-explosives to be delivered than artillery or even mortar shells of the same weight. With the exception of the Balkans Campaign, Nebelwerfers were used in every campaign of the German Army during World War II. A version of the 21 cm calibre system was even adapted for air-to-air use against Allied bombers. The name was also used to fool observers from the League of Nations, who were observing any possible infraction of the Treaty of Versailles, from discovering that the weapon could be used for explosive and toxic chemical payloads as well as the smoke rounds that the name Nebelwerfer suggested. Rocket development had begun during the 1920s and reached fruition in the late thirties. This offered the opportunity for the Nebeltruppen to deliver large quantities of poison gas or smoke simultaneously. The first weapon to be delivered to the troops was the 15 cm Nebelwerfer 41 in 1940, after the Battle of France, a purpose-designed rocket with gas, smoke and high-explosive warheads. It, like virtually all German rocket designs, was spin-stabilized to increase accuracy. One very unusual feature was that the rocket motor was in the front, the exhaust venturi being about two-thirds down the body from the nose, with the intent to optimize the blast effect of the rocket as the warhead would still be above the ground when it detonated. This proved to greatly complicate manufacture for not much extra effect and it was not copied on later rocket designs. It was fired from a six-tube launcher mounted on a towed carriage adapted from that used by the 3.7 cm PaK 36 and had a range of 6,900 metres (7,500 yd). Rocket-projector troops are employed as battalion and regimental units, in keeping with their task of destroying hostile forces by concentrated fire. One of the advantages of the Nebelwerfer 41 is that it can mass its projectiles on a very small target area. By means of a shrewd disposition of the batteries, a carefully planned communication system, and a large number of observation posts with advanced observers, the infantry can assure for itself manoeuvrability and a concentration of its fire power upon the most important points. Projectors are placed well toward the front—almost without exception, at points forward of the artillery—so that they will be able to eliminate hostile command posts, destroy hostile positions, and even repulse sudden attacks effectively. The firing positions of the projectors are always carefully built up so that the weapons can give strong support to the infantry. In Russia, during the winter of 1942-43, many breakthrough attempts by hostile forces were repulsed by direct fire from rocket-projector batteries. The projectile itself resembles a small torpedo—without propeller or tail fins. The base is flat, with slightly rounded edges. The rocket jets are located about one-third of the way up the projectile from the base, and encircle the casing. The jets are at an angle with the axis of the projectile so as to impart rotation in flight, in "turbine" fashion. The following note on the operation of the Nebelwerfer 41 is reproduced from the original WW2 German Army periodical Die Wehrmacht. The Nebelwerfer 41, or Do-Gerät, is unlimbered and placed in position by its crew of four men. As soon as the protective coverings have been removed, the projector is ready to be aimed and loaded. The ammunition is attached to the right and to the left of the projector, within easy reach, and the shells are introduced two at a time, beginning with the lower barrels and continuing upward. Meanwhile, foxholes deep enough to conceal a man in standing position have been dug about 10 to 15 yards to the side and rear of the projector. The gunners remain in these foxholes while the weapon is being fired by electrical ignition. Within 10 seconds a battery can fire 36 projectiles. These make a droning pipe-organ sound as they leave the barrels, and, while in flight, leave a trail of smoke. After a salvo has been fired, the crew quickly returns to its projectors and reloads them. Inert and safe, no restrictions to ownership, but only for sale to over 18's and not suitable to export. Copy and paste for original film of Nebelwefer in use; www.youtube.com/watch?v=loNLz1_Zf1c
A Fabulous and Fine Original Imperial Russian Poster Of A Zeppelin 1914 Romanov Period 'War in the Air' Lithograph printed in Moscow. It shows an attack by bi-planes and the destruction of the airship. One of the most artistically merit worthy posters of it's type we have ever seen, and likely ever created. It's execution shows incredible flair and skill and it's interpretation of the scene of aeronautical destruction and close combat is incredible. This would truly be the centrepiece of any display whether of a military nature or not. Simply stunning. 16 inches x 23 inches
A Fabulous German 'Imperial & Weimar' Period Battle Flag, Freikorps Parade. On it's original detachable two part flag pole [around 9 foot high in total] with flag pole top, and later honour ribbons dated and the Imperial German Battle Flag with gold bullion fringing. Fabulous quality. Two sided, and with areas of old moth hole and small tears. A fabulous display piece and remarkably rare piece of history. Between World War I and World War II the term was used for the paramilitary organizations that arose during the Weimar Republic. An entire series of Freikorps awards also existed, mostly replaced in 1933 by the Honour Cross for World War I veterans. This parade banner was used, during the interwar period, by the Freikorps as an symbol of old comeradeship on their marches and drive protests through the streets of Berlin and Cities of the pre and early German Third Reich. It is from these men that the future SA and SS men were recruited and volunteered In 1920, Adolf Hitler had just begun his political career as the leader of the tiny and as-yet-unknown Deutsche Arbeiterpartei/DAP German Workers Party, which was soon renamed the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei/NSDAP (National Socialist German Workers Party) or Nazi Party in Munich. Numerous future members and leaders of the Nazi Party had served in the Freikorps, including Ernst Röhm, future head of the Sturmabteilung, or SA, Heinrich Himmler, future head of the Schutzstaffel, or SS, and Rudolf Höß, the future Kommandant of the Auschwitz concentration camp. Hermann Ehrhardt, founder and leader of Marinebrigade Ehrhardt, and his deputy Commander Eberhard Kautter, leaders of the Viking League, refused to help Hitler and Erich Ludendorff in their Beer Hall Putsch and conspired against them. Hitler viewed some of them as threats. A huge ceremony was arranged on November 9, 1933 in which the Freikorps leaders symbolically presented their old battle flags to Hitler's SA and SS. It was a sign of allegiance to their new authority, the Nazi state. When Hitler's internal purge of the party, the Night of the Long Knives, came in 1934, a large number of Freikorps leaders were targeted for killing or arrest, including Ehrhardt and Röhm. Historian Robert GL Waite claims that in Hitler's "Röhm Purge" speech to the Reichstag on July 13, 1934, he implied that the Freikorps were one of the groups of "pathological enemies of the state". Flag is 55 inches x 37 inches
A Fabulous Group Of WW2 Medals 39-45, Africa, Atlantic, Italy & Burma Stars With the North Africa 1942-3 bar, the Pacific bar, and the War Medal. Awarded to a WW2 RAF officer, and just one medal short [the defence medal] of the maximum amount of medals any man serving in the Army, Navy or RAF could have been awarded for the entire war. This is an incredible symbol of an extraordinary service career in the war.
A Fabulous Huge 1909 Poster For Schichtl's Marine-Theater A variety theatre that put on a production depicting Imperial Germany's Maritime and Aeronautical might for the amazement of the viewing public. Set's and artists provided a theatrical view of Germany's Grand Fleet and Airships using clever sets, backdrops and marionettes. A little like America's P.T.Barnum's circus and curiosity side shows, but more typically Germanic, having a greater militaristic perspective. Schichtl's Marine-Theater Werbeplakat, feine Farblithographie, Hamburg 1909, 71 x 95 cm, gemarkt "Lith. Adolph Friedländer, Hamburg", selten.
A Fabulous Imperial German Air Service Reservists Flask & Cigarette Case This is just the epitome of all things Imperial German from the time of Kaiser Willhelm and Baron von Richthofen. The reservists flask was a peculiarly German artifact, and alongside the bier stein absolutely typical of the Germanic age of the early 20th century. The flask is an alloy depicting an embossed Zeppelin, an embossed plane and another, an anchor and a panel for luftschiff reserve service, and a similar for the flieger reserve service. It has a mono plane cup holder with a young pilot and his fraulein drinking and reveling. The front panel opens on a hinge revealing a picture behind the flask and a holder for cigarettes. It has wear and aging, but for the Imperial German WW1 reservist flask and stein collector you could probably not find a better or more desirable example. Overall 9 inches tall by 5 inches wide by 2 inches deep
A Fabulous Imperial German Air Service Reservists Flask & Cigarette Case A Fabulous Imperial German Air Service Reservists Flask This is just the epitome of all things Imperial German from the time of Kaiser Willhelm and Baron von Richthofen. The reservists flask was a peculiarly German artifact, and alongside the bier stein absolutely typical of the Germanic age of the early 20th century. The flask is an alloy depicting an embossed Zeppelin, an embossed plane and another, an anchor and a panel for luftschiff reserve service, and a similar for the flieger reserve service. It has a mono plane cup holder with a young pilot and his fraulein drinking and reveling. The front panel opens on a hinge revealing a picture behind the flask and a holder for cigarettes. It has wear and aging, but for the Imperial German WW1 reservist flask and stein collector you could probably not find a better or more desirable example. Overall 9 inches, repaired plane wing.
A Fabulous Iron Cross Symbol From Shot Down WW1 German Albatros Fighter Part of the painted Iron Cross symbol cut from the skin of the tail from the first German two seat Albatros aircraft shot down behind British lines, in Sept. 1915, by W Hoxley. Bought from W Hoxley's great grandson. It would look stunning framed with a print of an Albatros. The plane was shot down by Lt Scott Shield RFC for which he was awarded the Military Cross. Born in 1895, he joined the Durham Light Infantry and passed his flying certificate in a Maurice Farman Biplane at the Military School, Farnborough on May 2nd, 1915. He was awarded the Military Cross in October 1915 for bringing down the first German two seat Albatros aircraft behind British lines. The Albatros C.I was the first of the successful C-series of two-seat general-purpose biplanes built by Albatros. He was twice mentioned in dispatches and promoted to field rank in 1917 at the age of 21 and went on to command 48 squadron. No. 48 Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps was formed at Netheravon, Wiltshire, on 15 April 1916. The squadron was posted to France in March 1917 and became the first fighter squadron to be equipped with the Bristol Fighter. One of the squadron's commanders was – then Major – Keith Park who later led No. 11 Group of Fighter Command during the Battle of Britain as an Air Vice Marshal. The squadron became part of the Royal Air Force when the Royal Flying Corps merged with the Royal Naval Air Service in 1918. The squadron had 32 aces serve in it. Squaron Leader Scott Shield MC left the Royal Air Force in August 1919, and formed the Golden Eagle Aviation Company which provided pleasure flights over Blackpool, Lytham & St.Annes. For much of the war RFC pilots faced an enemy with superior aircraft, particularly in terms of speed and operating ceiling, and a better flying training system. The weather was also a significant factor on the Western Front with the prevailing westerly wind favouring the Germans. These disadvantages were made up for by determined and aggressive flying, albeit at the price of heavy losses, and the deployment of a larger proportion of high-performance aircraft. The statistics bear witness to this with the ratio of British losses to German at around 4 to 1. Mr W Hoxley was one of two men on the scene as it was shot down and crashed, who cut souvenirs from the German fighter. Mr Hoxley's details and accounts of it's provenence are written by hand in purple ink on the top left reverse of the fabric. 26 inches X 12 inches approx . As with all our items it is supplied with our unique [Lifetime Guarantee] Certificate of Authenticity, detailing it's known history and provence
A Fabulous Original Lithograph Poster Zeppelin 3006 Kolossal! 1914 Armengol One of the great illustrators of the early 20th century. Caricature; World War I scene. Gigantic "Zeppelin 3006" tows the Eifel Tower, a fountain, the Great Sphinx, and the Kremlin as it approaches [Spain]; three soldiers and Don Quixote observe from the ground, below. There is a copy of this poster in Princeton University Library. H. Armengol [Henri Armengol-Duriez] (1880 - 1939). In complimentary free frame, 24 inches x 20.75 inches but if purchased outside of the UK it will be despatched without the frame.
A Fabulous Original WW1 Gordon Highlander Machine Gun Corps Collection All belonging to WW1 veteran, Pvt L. Jackson, the Gordon Highlanders, Machine Gun Corps. Comprising of his Glengarry cap with badge and tartan patch, his pair of WW1 service medals [named], his sporran with belt, his pair of gaiters in canvas, shoulder titles both Gordons and Machine Gun Corps, his Machine Gun Corps cap badge and sock tassles. Photos for illustration only including a Gordon Highlanders machine gun corps, photographed in June 1914. Captain Hume Gore, who was later to lead George Ramage's platoon, is seated third from right in the front row. [National Library of Scotland reference: Acc.7660 (part)]. The Regiment raised a total of 21 battalions and was awarded 57 battle honours, 4 Victoria Crosses and lost 8,870 men during the course of the war. The Gordon Highlanders was an Infantry Battalion that would have had an MG Section as part of its Battalion Headquarters. These weapons would have been brigaded when the Machine Gun Corps was formed in 1915. The guns, and crews, would have been formed into a Machine Gun Company. The 1st Battalion landed at Boulogne-sur-Mer as part of the 8th Brigade in the 3rd Division in August 1914 for service on the Western Front; they suffered heavy losses at the Battle of Le Cateau in August 1914. The 2nd Battalion landed at Zeebrugge as part of the 20th Brigade in the 7th Division in October 1914 for service on the Western Front and then moved to Italy in November 1917. Territorial Force The 1/4th (City of Aberdeen) Battalion landed at Le Havre as part of the 8th Brigade in the 3rd Division in February 1915 for service on the Western Front. The 1/5th (Buchan and Formartin) Battalion landed at Boulogne-sur-Mer as part of the 153rd Brigade in the 51st (Highland) Division in May 1915 for service on the Western Front. The 1/6th (Banff and Donside) Battalion landed at Le Havre as part of the 20th Brigade in the 7th Division for service on the Western Front. The 1/7th (Deeside Highland) Battalion landed at Boulogne-sur-Mer as part of the 153rd Brigade in the 51st (Highland) Division in May 1915 for service on the Western Front. New Armies The 8th (Service) Battalion landed at Boulogne-sur-Mer as part of the 26th Brigade in the 9th (Scottish) Division in May 1915 for service on the Western Front.[10] The 9th (Service) Battalion and the 10th (Service) Battalion landed at Boulogne-sur-Mer as part of the 44th Brigade in the 15th (Scottish) Division in July 1915 for service on the Western Front. The folk singer and Scottish Traveller Jimmy MacBeath served with the regiment during the war . Just some of the engagements he may have taken part in with his regimental comrades; During 1916 The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin and the attacks on High Wood, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of Guillemont, Operations on the Ancre. The attacks on High Wood, The Battle of the Ancre. During 1917 The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle, The Second Battle of Passchendaele. The First and Second Battles of the Scarpe, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Menin Road Ridge, The capture of Bourlon Wood, part of the Cambrai Operations. Nov 1917 Moved to Italy to strengthen the Italian resistance. 04.11.1918The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of the Tardenois, The Battle of the Scarpe, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Selle, Final Advance in Picardy.
A Fabulous Piece of WW2 'Arnham' Paratrooper Memorabilia An early WW2 German Fallshirmjager's [Paratrooper] WW2 issue close combat boot knife, with Luftwaffe inspection stamp. The grip has three 'cuts' on the obverse these represent 3 fatal close combats of the Lance Corporal. Used by a Commando at Arnhem and continually up to the end of the war, by a C Company '2 Para', [Lance Corporal] Wallace who landed at Arnhem with his regiment to capture the bridge, in 'Operation Market Garden'. During the bridge attempt, and failure of objective, he was ordered to fall back to Defence HQ in the town, where he and subsequently few others managed to withdraw and cross the river to be picked up by the Polish Paras, that had been dropped at the wrong drop zone at the beginning of the operation. This close combat knife he used instead of his issue FS knife. It was his souvenir war trophy, apparently from a German Fallshirmjager taken earlier in his war. Operation Market Garden 1944, Arnhem. The British faced a number of serious problems in the landing zone. Nearly all the vehicles used by the Airborne Reconnaissance Squadron were lost when the gliders carrying them failed to land. Therefore the advance into Arnhem itself was delayed but also had to be done almost entirely on foot. The job of the Reconnaissance Squadron was to move off in jeeps etc. in advance and secure bridges and roads. This they could not do after the loss of their vehicles. The maps issued to officers also proved to be less than accurate. The British paratroopers came under German fire. Only the 2nd Battalion lead by Lt. Col. Frost moved forward with relative ease but even they were occasionally halted by German fire. Frost's men were the most southerly of the British units and the Germans had covered their route to Arnhem less well than the other routes the British were to use. When Frost got to the bridge at Arnhem, he only had about 500 men. He secured the northern end of the bridge and the buildings around it but he remained heavily exposed to a German attack across the bridge as the British had failed to secure the southern end of the bridge. Around Arnhem, British troops, engaged in combat with the SS, took heavy casualties. By now, the Germans were being reinforced with Tiger tanks. Despite being short of ammunition and with no food or water, Frost's men continued fighting. A German who fought in the final battle for the bridge wrote: "(The fighting was) an indescribable fanaticism…and the fight raged through ceilings and staircases. Hand grenades flew in every direction. Each house had to be taken this way. Some of the British offered resistance to their last breath." All his details were given to us by his surviving friend, Ivor [The Diver] Bevis formerly of 44 Para Commando Recon Force [South Africa] who fought in Angola and the Nigerian-Biafra War [after WW2]. Lance Corporal Wallace [it may have been spelled Wallis] told Ivor "this knife has the blood of German men on it". We also have Ivor's huge Tru-Bal combat-throwing knife that he used in 44 Para Commando [sold separately]
A Fabulous, Complete And Rare WW2 German Mobile Artillery Case Used by SS and Heer mountain troops and Luft Fallshirmjager, the small mobile artillery cannon was small enough to be transported through mountain terrain and even dropped on parachute troops. This is a complete shell and detonator case that takes 3 shells and complete with 2 fuze heads and 3 charge detonator bases with adjustable charge discs. This case is clearly marked Luft so likely for issue and use Luftwaffe Fallshirmjager. The 7.5 cm Leichtgeschütz 40 could be air-dropped and had a maximum range of 6,800 m. Para-trained commandos of II/KG200 (also known as the 3rd Staffel of Kampfgeschwader 200), were a Luftwaffe special forces unit who were para-trained commandos. II./KG 200 remain a mostly unheard of arm of Germany's World War II parachute forces due to the nature of their role and were listed on II./KG 200's ORBAT as the 3rd Staffel. Shown with three complete shells heads and cases for demonstration only, but only two shells with heads are included, but with 3 steel shell cases
A Fabulous, Original, Cased Set of 3 German 15cm Howitzer Steel Shell Cases The box case still with it's original German Army camouflage paint. Each shell case is dated 1943. The 15 cm schwere Feldhaubitze 18 or sFH 18 (German: "heavy field howitzer, model 18"), nicknamed Immergrün ("Evergreen"), was the basic German division-level heavy howitzer during the Second World War, serving alongside the smaller but more numerous 10.5 cm leFH 18. It was based on the earlier, First World War-era design of the 15 cm sFH 13, and while improved over that weapon, it was generally outdated compared to the weapons it faced. It was, however, the first artillery weapon equipped with rocket-assisted ammunition to increase range. The sFH 18 was also used in the self-propelled artillery piece schwere Panzerhaubitze 18/1 (more commonly known as Hummel). The sFH 18 was one of Germany's three main 15 cm calibre weapons, the others being the 15 cm Kanone 18, a corps-level heavy gun, and the 15 cm sIG 33, a short-barreled infantry gun. The gun originated with a contest between Rheinmetall and Krupp, both of whom entered several designs that were all considered unsatisfactory for one reason or another. In the end the army decided the solution was to combine the best features of both designs, using the Rheinmetall gun on a Krupp carriage. The carriage was a relatively standard split-trail design with box legs. Spades were carried on the sides of the legs that could be mounted onto the ends for added stability. The carriage also saw use on the 10 cm schwere Kanone 18 gun. As the howitzer was designed for horse towing, it used an unsprung axle and hard rubber tires. A two-wheel bogie was introduced to allow it to be towed, but the lack of suspension made it unsuitable for towing at high speed. The inability of heavy artillery like the sFH 18 to keep up with the fast-moving tank forces was one of the reasons that the Luftwaffe invested so heavily in dive bombing, in order to provide a sort of "flying artillery" for reducing strongpoints. The gun was officially introduced into service on 23 May 1935, and by the outbreak of war the Wehrmacht had about 1,353 of these guns in service. Production continued throughout the war, reaching a peak of 2,295 guns in 1944 Inert empty and safe, but not suitable for export or for sale to under 18's.. Shown with three shells for demonstration but only two are included
A Fascinating WW1 British Army Tunneller's Belt With Badges and Buttons With badges and collar badges and buttons of the Rifle Brigade, the Royal Engineers [tunneling companies], and The Labour Corps. A souvenir from a soldier serving in a special emplacement in WW1 that had a detachment of all three men. Such as the tunnel companies at Messines to set giant mines under German lines. It is said and portrayed in a few films and documentaries that this work was some of the most horrifically awful imaginable. Digging underground is frightful enough, but to then to be dug into the British tunnel by the German counter-tunnellers, and to then face fearfull hand to hand combat with German assault troops, must have been simply terrifying. General Plumer had begun plans to take the Messines Ridge a year early in early-1916. Meticulous in manner, Plumer preferred to plan for limited successes rather than gamble all on a significant breakthrough. In preparing for the Messines battle he had authorised the laying of 22 mine shafts underneath German lines all along the ridge, his plan being to detonate all 22 at zero hour at 03:10 on 7 June 1917, to be followed by infantry attacks so as to secure the ridge from the presumably dazed German defenders, the infantry heavily supported by the use of artillery bombardments, tanks and the use of gas. Work on laying the mines began some 18 months before zero hour. One mine, at Petite Douve Farm, was discovered by German counter miners on 24 August 1916 and destroyed. A further two mines close to Ploegsteert Wood were not exploded as they were outside the planned attack area. In the face of active German counter-mining, 8,000 metres of tunnel were constructed under German lines. Occasionally the tunnellers would encounter German counterparts engaged in the same task: underground hand to hand fighting would ensure.
A Fascinating WW1 German Sniper's Shield Loophole With Bullet Hits. Soldiers in front-line trenches suffered from enemy snipers. These men were usually specially trained marksmen that had rifles with telescopic sights. German snipers did not normally work from their own trenches. The main strategy was to creep out at dawn into no-man's land and remain there all day. Wearing camouflaged clothing and using the cover of a fake tree, they waited for a British soldier to pop his head above the parapet. A common trick was to send up a kite with English writing on it. Anyone who raised his head to read it was shot. They also used a steel plate with a loophole for their Mauser sniper rifle. This is a super example and it shows at least one bullt strike upon it. There were many variants in these shields from lightweight models to huge, fully wheeled contraptions. This is the 'standard' German model, the 'Infanterieschild' from 1916. The front has curved edges to protect the user from bullet splash or richochets. The position of the opening allows maximum protection for right handed soldiers and normally a movable cover is fitted to protect the rifle slot. To the rear there used to be supports to allow the shield to be self-supporting on flat terrain. Many were designed to be portable on the battlefield. Normally they would have been dug into the trench system or used in large numbers as part of short term or even semi-permanant strong points or sniper posts in trench systems. 18 inches x 23.5 inches
A Fascinting Early Ern Shaw Labour Party Propaganda Poster A rare collectors piece. He created cartoon propaganda cartoon posters for the Labour Party and for election campaigns from the 1920's, and this is one of his most unusual and rarest to survive. A very fine original example and perfect for the political collector or as a piece of highly evocative art of the pre war style. Ern Shaw was a prolific cartoonist in the city of Hull. His pen strokes covered every area from newspapers and magazines to card games, puzzles and children's colouring books. Born in Hull in 1891, his opening into cartoonery came at the age of 12 when he published his first cartoon - the result of a competition organised by the local press - seen as the seed of Ern Shaw's 70 year-long career. Dingbats, Binky, Toodles, Twanky Scamp and Giddy Goat were some of the cartoon characters he had drawn up. Shaw spent a lifetime creating colourful characters. His only artistic training was via a correspondence course, which he took several years after leaving school. 20 x 30 inches sold unframed.
A Fine 1889 Pattern German Infantry Officer's Sword of The Great War However, it does have a combat-broken two piece blade. Likely this sword was brought back to England by a soldier who took it from an officer he fought or took surrender from. Due to the dishonour of surrender it was not ususual for a German officer, upon capture in battle, to snap his swords blade in two, in disgust, and to caste in down at the feet of his victorious protagonist. 1889 Pattern Prussian Officers sword with folding Eagle guard and black steel combat scabbard. Used by an Infantry officer serving in the Great War. The gilt hilt shows signs of gilt wear but this is to be expected and was was used in most uncomfortable circumstances in the trenches of WW1. Many of these swords were also used in the 3rd Reich by veteran officers serving in WW2. Numerous Vintage photographs of WW2 German Officers show them wearing this pattern of sword. Priced to reflect the condition of the blade. However, it could be weld repaired [by a skilled steel welder].
A Fine Original Chapka Plate for the 9th Royal Lancers WW1 Issue With all battle honours up to the Boer War. The last Lancer regiment to engage in Lance on Lance combat in WW1. The chapka was a type of helmet worn by 19th century Polish light cavalry and later adopted by another nations, including Britain. During the Second Boer War, 1899-1902, the Lancers took part in the following actions: Belmont, Battle of Modder River, Magerfonstien, Relief of Kimberley, and the following Battle of Paardeberg which resulted in Cronje’s surrender. They provided Lord Roberts’ escort for his state entry into Bloemfontein. After the war, the 9th returned to Sialkot in the Punjab Although engaged in combat for the whole of the war the Lancers only operated as a cavalry unit during 1914. This was due to the widespread use of machine guns and shelling and also the advent of the tank. For the remainder of the war they operated as infantry in the trenches. Notable events included a Victoria Cross for Captain Francis Octavius Grenfell for his actions in saving the guns of 119th Battery, Royal Field Artillery on 24 August 1914 (he was later killed in action on 24 May 1915, as was his twin brother, Riversdale, a yeomanry officer who attached to 9th Lancers), and the regiment's participation in the final "lance on lance" action of the First World War on 7 September 1914 at Moncel in which Lieutenant Colonel David Campbell led a charge of two troops of B Squadron and overthrew a squadron of the 1st Guard Dragoons. After Campbell left on promotion he was replaced as commanding officer by Desmond Beale-Browne. . By the end of the war 274 Lancers had died. In August 1914 Hume's regiment was in Belgium with the British Expeditionary Force (BEF). On 24 August during the Battle of Mons, they charged a large body of German infantry who were advancing to encircle the 5th Division at Audregnies. This famous action saw Captain Francis Grenfell win the Victoria Cross. The 9th Queen's Royal Lancers, or the Delhi Spearmen, were a cavalry regiment of the British Army. They are best known for their roles in the Indian mutiny of 1857, the WW1 Charge at Mons, and for their part in the North African campaign of World War II including the retreat to and the battle of El Alamein in 1942.The 9th Queen's Royal Lancers were originally formed during the Jacobite Risings in 1715. They were formed by Major-General Owen Wynne and were the second cavalry regiment in the British Army. They were initially known as the "9th Dragoons" or "Wynne's Dragoons". In 1717, the regiment embarked for Ballinrobe, in Ireland, and was placed on the Irish establishment. In 1783 they converted into Light Dragoons, becoming the 9th Light Dragoons, and served in the Irish Rebellion of 1798, Sir Samuel Auchmuty's expedition to the River Plate in 1803, the occupation of Montevideo and Wellington's Peninsula War between 1811 and 1813. In 1816 they were constituted Lancers and in 1830 were given the distinguished title of "Queen's Royal", in honour of Queen Adelaide, consort of William IV, hence becoming the 9th Queen's Royal Lancers. The Lancers were first posted to India during the Gwalior Campaign of 1843. They subsequently took part in the First Anglo-Sikh War of 1845-46 and the Second Anglo-Sikh War of 1848-49 where they were often led by Sir Hope Grant and were the first recipients of the Bronze Star Medal. During the Indian mutiny of 1857, the 9th Lancers earned the name the Delhi Spearmen, a name which is believed to have been given to them by the mutineers themselves. 9th Lancers was present in all three of the most notable events associated with the Indian mutiny, namely, the seizure of Delhi, the seizure of Lucknow and the relief of Lucknow. For their actions the Lancers were awarded twelve Victoria Crosses, more than any other cavalry regiment. They were described by an ally as:- "The beau ideal of all that British Cavalry ought to be in Oriental countries".
A Former Private Museum Collection of WW2 German Medals and Awards Collected by a former WW2 Veteran, who acquired these after the war for his own private museum. However, although up to 70 years old, none are WW2 authentic pieces. Some were made only a year after the war, and if genuine would have a combined value well in excess of £10,000. The Knight's Cross of the War Merit Cross with Swords alone would be worth a high four figure sum, and so would the 50 grade General Assault award be very valuable. A fabulous vintage collection that gives every first impression appearance of originality. Ideal for the historical collector of early copies that does not wish to make the enormous outlay that would be required to acquire them as original examples, and, none of the risk! Would look superb framed as they once were. The Knights Cross to the War Merit Cross (Ritterkreuz des Kriegsverdienstkeuzes), was introduced on August 19th, 1940 at the same time as the War Merit Medal.  Its ranking in the German award structure was above the German Cross in Silver and Gold, but below the Knights Cross to the Iron Cross. It was awarded sparingly over the war years, and because so few were presented the Cross was held in high regards by the Nazi hierarchy, giving it an aura of exclusivity which it may not have fully deserve since it ranked below the Knights grade of Iron Cross. Great ceremonies were normally staged around recipients, with Hitler almost always presenting the award in front of high ranking Military and party officials . In the last year of the War, the Knights Cross in Gold was introduced as the highest grade of the War Merit Cross. Partly due to its late introduction date, this award was presented only a handful of times. The U-boat War Badge was originally instituted during the First World War on February 1, 1918. It was awarded to recognize U-boat crews who had completed three war patrols. The badge was worn on the lower left side of the uniform and was oval shaped resembling a wreath of laurel leaves. A submarine lay across the center and the German State Crown (Reichskrone) was inlaid at the top center of the wreath. The General Assault Badge (German: Allgemeines Sturmabzeichen) was a military decoration awarded during World War II to personnel of the German Army, Waffen-SS and Ordnungspolizei who participated in infantry attacks but were not part of specific infantry units and therefore did not qualify for the Infantry Assault Badge. It was instituted by General Walther von Brauchitsch on 1 June 1940 From 6 June 1943, the medal was adapted with a small plate at the base with 50 for those soldiers that had taken part in numerous attacks. On October 13, 1939, the U-boat War Badge was reinstituted again, shortly after the war began. It was very similar to the original badge with the exception of the Prussian crown which was replaced with a German Eagle, a swastika was added, and a more modernized submarine now facing towards the left was used. There were several ways to be awarded this medal. The most common would be the completion of two war patrols. Although the completion of two war patrols might seem a lowly requirement, but a typical U-boat war cruise would often run into months at a time. As a contrast, the Infantry Assault Badge was awarded after three combat actions, which meant that they could be earned on three separate actions all under a week. Completing two war patrols was not only longer, but it was equally dangerous as the U-boat has to endure constant attacks by Allied aircraft and warships. The German Luftwaffe Pilots Badge was instituted on August 12th, 1935 by the order Reichsmarschall Herman Goering. The badge takes the form of a massive swooping eagle clutching a mobile swastika in it's talons . The Eagle is superimposed on a wreath of half laurel (left) and half oak leaves. This Luftwaffe Pilots Badge portrays an image of unbridled aggression and ferocity. The Minesweeper War Badge or Minesweepers, Sub-Chasers and Escort-Vessel War Badge (German: Kriegsabzeichen für Minensuch-, U-Boot-Jagd- und Sicherungsverbände) was a World War II German military decoration awarded to Kriegsmarine members for service on minesweepers vessels. The award was instituted on 31 August 1941 by Grand Admiral Erich Raeder
A Framed Set of Souvenirs From the WW2 RAF Crash of Queen Elizabeth's Uncle HRH Prince George Edward Alexander Edmund, first Duke of Kent. Who tragically died with all his crew bar the tail gunner during WW2, in August 1942, in an RAF Sunderland plane crash in Scotland. This framed set was donated by Robert McIntyre SNP [Scottish National Parliament] in 1984 to the late Paul Raymond [formerly known as Britain's richest man] and owner of the now closed museum. It contains a portion of parachute silk, a photograph of the site, and part of the plane's canopy perspex. The son of King George Vth, great grandson of Queen Victoria, brother of King George Vith and uncle of HM Queen Elizabeth. Prince George was born on 20 December 1902 at York Cottage on the Sandringham Estate in Norfolk, England. His father was George, Prince of Wales (later King George V), the eldest surviving son of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra. His mother was the Princess of Wales (later Queen Mary), the daughter of the Duke and Duchess of Teck. At the time of his birth, he was fifth in the line of succession to the throne, behind his father and three older brothers. As a grandchild of a British monarch in the male line, he was styled His Royal Highness Prince George of Wales. George was baptised in the Private Chapel at Windsor Castle on 26 January 1903 by Francis Paget, Bishop of Oxford. Unlike many previous royal baptisms, George was christened using local water, rather than water from the River Jordan. In 1937, he was granted a commission in the Royal Air Force as a group captain. He was also made the Honorary Air Commodore of No. 500 (County of Kent) Squadron Auxiliary Air Force. Just before war broke out he became an RAF Air Vice-Marshal (approximately equal in rank to his Rear Admiral status earlier in the Royal Navy). In a characteristic gesture, he relinquished that rank in 1940 so that he would not be senior to more experienced officers, becoming a lower-ranked group captain and, in July 1941, an air commodore in the Welfare Section of the RAF Inspector General's Staff. In this role he went on official visits to RAF bases to help boost wartime morale Prince George died on 25 August 1942, at the age of 39, along with fourteen others, on board RAF Short Sunderland flying boat W4026, which crashed into a hillside near Dunbeath, Caithness, Scotland, while flying from Invergordon, Ross and Cromarty, to Iceland. Handcuffed to the Duke's wrist was a briefcase full of Swedish 100 Kroner notes which could not be exchanged in Iceland at the time. Such notes then had a value only in Sweden. The Duchess of Kent had given birth to their third child, Prince Michael of Kent, only six weeks earlier. The Duke's body was transferred initially to St. George's Chapel, Windsor. He was buried in the Royal Burial Ground, Frogmore, directly behind Queen Victoria?'?s mausoleum, and was succeeded as Duke of Kent by his eldest son, Edward. Robert Douglas McIntyre (15 December 1913 – 2 February 1998) was a Scottish physician and a Scottish National Party politician and Member of Parliament. McIntyre studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh and the University of Glasgow, and worked as a GP and a consultant pulmonologist. He came to political prominence in 1945 when he won the Motherwell by-election, becoming the SNP's first ever Member of Parliament (MP). McIntyre served as the Leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP) from 1947 to 1956, and as President of the SNP from 1958 to 1980. He was the Provost of Stirling from 1967 to 1975. Known affectionately as "Doc Mac", he was often referred to as the "Father of the SNP
A Framed WW1 Baden Iron Cross Gallantry Pair of Medals Combined with the Imperial Germany - Kingdom of Baden: Meritorious Service medal of Friedrich II, Silver Class. This version, with the portrait of Grand Duke Friedrich II, was established in 2 classes (silver and gold) and was issued from 1907 until the end of WW1, in 1918. This is the rare silver plated example that was issued during the period 1908-1916. After 1916, due to the war shortages the medal was produced in zinc alloy. With original ribbon, 3 piece construction. Probably the most famous German medal for heroism in battle ever made. The Iron Cross (German: Eisernes Kreuz] is a cross symbol typically in black with a white or silver outline that originated after 1219 when the Kingdom of Jerusalem granted the Teutonic Order the right to combine the Teutonic Black Cross placed above a silver Cross of Jerusalem. The military decoration called the Iron Cross which existed in the Kingdom of Prussia, and later in the German Empire and Third Reich, was established by King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia and first awarded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau, during the Napoleonic Wars. The recommissioned Iron Cross was also awarded during the Franco-Prussian War, the First World War, and the Second World War.
A German 1930's and WW2 Armband on Yellow Cloth This Deutsche Wehrmacht armband is the yellow colour all cotton type. The words, “Deutsche Wehrmacht” are printed. These armbands were issued to people who assisted the German armed forces.
A German 1939 SA/Political Cap Eagle RZM M1/45 Left facing, second pattern in zinc alloy, 54.8mm, wing tip to wing tip, 36mm north to south very fine. Two brass pins complete.
A German Army Officers Sword By Eikhorn of Solingen Doves head pommel with acorn leaf engraved p hilt, acorn leaf engraved backstrap and eagle and swastika langet. A gilded alloy hilt and the gilding is surface flaking with age. Swords made in the closing years up to the war tended to have alloy hilts [as opposed to brass or steel earlier on] that was then over gilded with thin pure gold. The blade is excellent and the steel blackened scabbard has no denting. The German Army (German: Heer, was the land forces component of the Wehrmacht, the German armed forces, from 1935 to 1945. The Wehrmacht also included the Kriegsmarine (Navy) and the Luftwaffe (Air Force). During World War II, a total of about 15 million soldiers served in the German Army, of whom about seven million became casualties. Separate from the army, the Waffen-SS (Armed SS) was a multi-ethnic and multi-national military force of the Third Reich. Growing from three regiments to over 38 divisions during World War II, it served alongside the army but was never formally part of it. Only 17 months after Hitler announced publicly the rearmament program, the Army reached its projected goal of 36 divisions. During the autumn of 1937, two more corps were formed. In 1938, four additional corps were formed with the inclusion of the five divisions of the Austrian Army after the Anschluss in March. During the period of its expansion by Adolf Hitler, the German Army continued to develop concepts pioneered during World War I, combining ground (Heer) and air (Luftwaffe) assets into combined arms teams. Coupled with operational and tactical methods such as encirclements and the "battle of annihilation", the German military managed quick victories in the two initial years of World War II, prompting the use of the word Blitzkrieg (literally lightning war, meaning lightning-fast war) for the techniques used. The German Army entered the war with a majority of its infantry formations relying on the horse for transportation. The infantry remained foot soldiers throughout the war; artillery also remained primarily horse-drawn. The motorized formations received much attention in the world press in the opening years of the war, and were cited as the main reason for the success of the German invasions of Poland (September 1939), Norway and Denmark (April 1940), Belgium, France and Netherlands (May 1940), Yugoslavia (April 1941) and the early campaigns in the Soviet Union (June 1941). However their motorized and tank formations accounted for only 20% of the Heer's capacity at their peak strength.
A German Demjansk Combat Award Shield It’s die struck alloy with traces of silver wash with four affixing lugs and the original green mounting cloth for army or waffen ss. The Demjansk Shield was instituted on April 25th, 1943, to commemorate those troops who fought in the Demjansk pocket during 1942. The centre top the shield has an eagle with down spread wings clutching a wreath that surrounds swastika. On each side of the swastika there are two pillboxes of a trapezoid shape with a gun opening in the centre. Below then is a box with word “DEMJANSK” in capital letters. The main body of the shield has undulated sides, with its main design being a single engine reconnaissance aircraft and two crossed, large military swords.& Two variations of the aircrafts’ propeller exist, as some shields show it curved while others show it straight. [This one is curved] Located below the swords is the year “1942”. The shield was die struck and produced in silver washed zinc and later in plain zinc. It was affixed to the uniform via a cloth that matched the colour of the uniform of the recipient. Green for Heer and Waffen SS The Demjansk Pocket On February 8th 1942, the Russians encircled the 2nd Army Corp in the small town of Demjansk, located in the northern section of the Russian front about 100 miles north-east of Cholm. Trapped in the pocket were the 12th, 30th, 32nd, 223rd and 290th Heer Infantry Divisions, as well as the 3rd SS “Totenkopf” Division. There were also RAD, Police, Todt organization, and other auxiliary units who were trapped and assisted in the battle. Their commander was General der Infanterie Graf Brockdordd-Ahlefeldt. Ordered to resist, the garrison was extensively and appropriately supplied by the Luftwaffe. During their besiegement the group offered the Russians stiff and determined resistance, tying up three Soviet Armies (composed of 18 Infantry Divisions and three brigades) for the length of 14 months. The battle group was able to break out of the siege on the 21st of April, but the battle had taken a toll. Out of the approximately 100,000 men trapped there were 3,335 never returned, and over 10,000 were wounded. However, their heroic struggle had denied the Soviet High Command of numerous units at a critical moment, units that would have otherwise been used elsewhere in the Eastern front. Even thought they were no longer trapped, fighting in the area continued until October of 1942. For his excellence in command in the particularly fierce fighting of his elite unit, Totenkopf commander SS Obergruppenfuhrer und General der Waffen SS Theodor Eike was awarded the Oak Leaves to the Knights Cross (88th) on May 20th, 1942. Award Criteria, Statistics and Wear The garrison commander presented the shield to members of the Wehrmacht and auxiliary units in good standing who meet the following criteria, Heer/Auxiliary To have served honourably in the besieged area for 60 days.To have wounded in the besieged area.To have earned a bravery award while serving in the besieged area. Luftwaffe To have flown 50 combat missions over the besieged and surrounding area.To have flown and landed 50 supply missions Company commanders were responsible for reporting the list of eligible men under their command by December 31, 1943. The award ceased to be presented on July 4th, 1944. Each recipient was entitled to five copies of the shield, and in case of death, a single shield and an entitlement certificate was presented to the next of kin. It is worthy of note that it was to be worn above the SS arm eagle.
A German Extra Long Mauser WW1 Pattern 1898, "Neuer Art" Sword Bayonet It was a German response to the long French 1886 Lebel bayonet. Manufactured from 1902 to about 1917. This is a most lengthy bayonet, and one of the earliest made with two grip slabs. It is most scarcely seen compared to the shorter, German WW1 so-called 'butcher' bayonet. Very nicely Imperial inspector marked, dated 1902. Used from the very beginning of WW1 right through to the German surrender in 1918. Rarely seen and very desirable to collectors of good early German bayonets. For the German, close combat and trench warfare 'Shock Troop', this was a very sought after weapon in the his armoury. With it affixed to his Mauser Gew 98 rifle, he had a considerably longer reach than his British, French or Belgian counterpart, and standing in his trench, defending from attack from above, his reach was as long as a spear and deadly to an advancing Tommy. Full length 26.5 inches. Blade 20.25 inches long. 6 inches longer than the German Butcher bayonet.
A German Extra Long Mauser WW1 Pattern 1898, "Neuer Art" Sword Bayonet Regimentally marked to a German Ersatz Infantry battalion. It was a German response to the long French 1886 Lebel bayonet. Manufactured from 1902 to about 1917. This is a most lengthy bayonet, and most scarcely seen compared to the shorter, German WW1 so-called 'butcher' bayonet. Slight shrinkage to the scabbard leather. Very nicely Imperial inspector marked, dated 1906. Used from the very beginning of WW1 right through to the German surrender in 1918. Rarely seen and very desirable to collectors of good early German bayonets. For the German, close combat and trench warfare 'Shock Troop', this was a very sought after weapon in the his armoury. With it affixed to his Mauser Gew 98 rifle, he had a considerably longer reach than his British, French or Belgian counterpart, and standing in his trench, defending from attack from above, his reach was as long as a spear and deadly to an advancing Tommy. Full length 26.5 inches. Blade 20.25 inches long. 6 inches longer than the German Butcher bayonet.
A German Police Polizei Dienst-Seitengewehr by Alexander Coppel With matching numbers S.M.I.142 to blade hilt and scabbard throat mount. Very good condition overall, no badge to staghorn grip. Due to badge lacking it is much less expensive that one with the badge present, this makes it a great early collectors example or for a collector who can find a replacement small badge. With badge complete they are now a four figure collectors item, and can be much more with interesting known history. Fully engraved eagle head pommel with plumage, and engraved oak leaf pattern quillon. The S.M. I. 142. mark means the sidearm was issued to the Schutzpolizei (of the Prussian Administrative District) Münster (Garrison) I (weapon inventory number) 142. The property marking predates the addition of the post-1936 police eagle on the grip. Bavaria did not use these style bayonets until after the nationalization of the police in 1936. The sunburst/k. This marking was the acceptance stamp of the Prussian Police Procurement Office after Hitler came to power, the many German Police organizations still operating through their respective states and provinces were centralized under the guidance of SS-Reichsführer Himmler. Their previous arm, a very long bayonet with clamshell addition, was altered to suit the newly formed Police. The new weapon was reworked and reissued having the following characteristics; the blade length was reduced to 13 inches [as is this one], the clamshell was removed, the grip was shortened, and the new 3rd Reich Police grip insignia replaced the Weimar six-sided grip insignia. Since adequate numbers of reworked bayonets were available, few newly produced weapons were required. This weapon's hilt consists of a nickel eagle head pommel, oak-leafed quillon, and stag grip plates The scabbard is leather with matching nickel mounts. Original leather frog. As you will see from the picture of the original poster we show for information purposes the Schutzpolizei officer not only wore these sidearm on full dress parade they wore them in combat service dress with combat helmets etc. as well. The Ordnungspolizei was separate from the SS and maintained a system of insignia and Orpo ranks. It was possible for policemen to be members of the SS but without active duties. Police generals who were members of the SS were referred to simultaneously by both rank titles during the war. For instance, a Generalleutnant in the Police who was also an SS member would be referred to as SS Gruppenführer und Generalleutnant der Polizei. In addition, those Orpo police generals that undertook the duties of both Senior SS and Police Leader (Höhere SS und Polizeiführer) gained equivalent Waffen-SS ranks in August 1944 when Himmler was appointed Chef der Ersatzheeres (Chief of Home Army), because they had authority over the prisoner-of-war camps in their area. Heinrich Himmler's ultimate aim was to replace the regular police forces of Germany with a combined racial/state protection corps (Staatsschutzkorps) of pure SS units. Local law enforcement would be undertaken by the Allgemeine-SS with the Waffen-SS providing homeland-security and political-police functions. Historical analysis of the Third Reich has revealed that senior Orpo personnel knew of Himmler's plan and were opposed to it.
A German SS Dagger Lapel Pin A most intriguing piece stamped DRGM to the reverse. Very possibly made post war, but more modern versions we have seen tend to have have very new style pins with safety catches. This was acquired in the 1950's or 60's [as original] but we could not say it is. Old repair to front enamel at the base. 62mm long.
A German Third Reich Parade Banner Two sided. In very good condition for age. With ring loop mountings. Standard NSDAP swastika emblem.Though a long and time-honoured tradition in German and Prussian history, military parades reached their pinnacle during the Third Reich, both as demonstrations of power and majesty and as an open and direct slap in the face to the Versailles Treaty.
A German WW1 Close Combat Knife In Original Scabbard With maker marked blade. While the conventional image of World War One trench warfare is of massed numbers of rifle-armed men going ‘over the top’ into a No-Man’s-Land of barbed wire, machine-gun fire, artillery barrage, and almost certain death, this was a high-cost tactic of the earlier part of the War, and had been largely abandoned by its later years. The widespread tactic was to dig advance trenches called Salients out from one’s own front trench, into No-Man’s-Land, and then bombard the enemy’s front trench, so that they would fall back to their auxiliary trenches behind. Units of men could then be sent across a short stretch of No-Man’s-Land from the Salients, to occupy the trench and hold it. These larger drives required much preparation and reconnaissance if they were to work, however, and so Trench Raiding became increasingly common as the War went on. In Trench Raiding, small numbers of hand-picked volunteers crept across No-Man’s-Land at night, unseen by the artillery ‘spotters’, lightly armed with firearms, grenades, bayonets, knives, steel piping and other improvised clubs, and weapons such as this. Whether intended for undertaking or repelling a Trench Raid, the size of the close combat knife combined with its ease of use in unskilled hands, was exactly what the average soldier needed. The intention was a quiet, quick surprise attack, to kill small numbers of men, destroy or seize larger weapons - such as heavy machine guns - map out the location and contents of the enemy trenches, seize communications and documents. This would generally keep the enemy in a sleepless, terrorised state therefore sapping their alertness and morale.
A German WW1 Fire Service Pickelhaub Helmet With the Imperial German garter star, as used by the German Guarde du Corps and foot guards. Leather skull, brass star, leather chinstrap peak and neck guard. Maker marked on the inner helmet disc. Stitching apart at the peak and strap broken at the midsection. An unusual helmet, scarcely seen, as very few were brought back as souvenirs after WW1.
A German WW1 Trench Art Imperial German Belt Buckle Cigarette Tobacco Box With the traditional silvered nickle German buckle centre with motto of 'Gott Mit Uns' with brass box and lid, possibly made from a shell casing. 4 inches x 2.5 inches x 1 inch high There is much evidence to prove that some trench art was made in the trenches, by soldiers, during the war. In With a Machine Gun to Cambrai, George Coppard talks about pressing his regimental buttons into the clay on the floor of the trench, then pouring molten lead from shrapnel balls into this impression to make lead replicas of the crest – trench art personified. Chalk carvings were also popular, with contemporary postcards showing carvings into the side of rocky outcrops around dug-outs etc., which again confirm their existence in the battle zone. Alongside items that, by their nature, had to be made in situ, it is fair to assume many smaller items—rings, paper knives, etc.--were made by soldiers either in front line or support trenches, especially in quieter parts of the line. In addition, wounded soldiers would be encouraged to do certain craftwork as part of the recuperation process, with embroidery and simple forms of woodwork being common. Again from With a Machine Gun to Cambrai, George Coppard recalls that, while recuperating from wounds at a private house in Birkenhead, “one kind old lady brought a supply of coloured silks and canvas and instructed us in the art of embroidery. A sampler which I produced under her guidance so pleased her that she had it framed for me.”.
A German WW2 Certificate For the Family of A Killed Soldier in Luftwaffe Of Jager Karl Muller 22nd January 1943. Signed by his officer, the Hauptmann und Kommander.
A German WW2 Ground Combat Badge. Erdkampfabzeichen der Luftwaffe In late 1941 the first Luftwaffe ground combat units were hastily formed to help replace the massive loss of men on the Eastern front, followed by the formation of the Brigade Meindl consisting of five Luftwaffe Field Battalions in February 1942. As a result of the formation of these new ground combat units Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring established the Luftwaffe Ground Combat Badge on March 31ST 1942, for award to all Luftwaffe personnel who had distinguished themselves in ground combat. Certain criteria had to be met for award of the badge with the main criteria being three separate ground combat actions. Of Note: Since the Luftwaffe had excess personnel on September 17th 1942 Göring announced the formation of new Luftwaffe field divisions also to replace the massive lose of men on the Eastern front. Due to the lack of training and poor performance in the field, of the twenty-two divisions formed, seventeen were either destroyed or disbanded before the end of the war. On introduction of the Ground Combat Badge, Luftwaffe personnel who had been awarded the Infantry, Panzer or General Assault badges previously, were required to exchange them for this badge. Prior to the introduction of this Ground Combat Badge, Flak personnel who had utilized their Flak guns against land or sea based targets three times were awarded the Flak War Badge. These personnel also exchanged their Flak War Badge for the Ground Combat Badge. Late war, single piece, injection moulded alloy construction, solid backed badge is in the form of a vertically oval, oak-leaf wreath with a Luftwaffe style eagle, clutching a canted swastika in one talon, superimposed to the top centre, encompassing a cut-out, dark, burnished matte grey washed cloud and downward striking, blitz style, lightning bolt. The badge has no visible manufacturer’s markings, however this example may be attributed to Anro Walpach.
A German WW2 High Seas Fleet Award Good condition, maker marked, pin lacking. R.S.& S (Richard Simm & Sohne]High Seas Fleet Badge (German: Das Flottenkriegsabzeichen) is a German military decoration (worn on the lower part of the left breast pocket of the naval service tunic, underneath the 1st class Iron Cross if awarded, or equivalent grade) awarded for service to the crews of the High Seas Fleet, mainly of the battleships and cruisers, but also those ships that supported them operationally for which there was no other award given. Required qualifications included e.g. active duty on 1 or more 12 week cruises, wounds or sinking in action. Although the award was instituted in April 1941, it could be awarded for actions that took place prior to this date and could highlight the struggle against the British fleet.To be eligible to receive the badge one must have twelve weeks service on a battleship or cruiser, with proof of distinction and good conduct. The number of weeks were reduced if one of these conditions were met: If the recipient was wounded or killed during the voyage. Outstanding achievements in an engagement. If the cruise was successful. Individual's ship was sunk in action. (Bismarck, Admiral Graf Spee, Blücher) For participation in “Rawalpindi” and “Jan Mayen”. All crew members of the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau received the award in view of the operational effectiveness of the ships. To every sailor who was present on the Tirpitz when it was bombed and sunk by the British R.A.F. in Tromsö Fjord on November 12th, 1944.
A German WW2 Infantry Combat Assault Clasp Award Silver grade. Silver plate over metal. A k98 Rifle affixed to a wreath of oak leaves. The Infantry Assault Badge was a German war badge awarded to Waffen SS and Wehrmacht Heer soldiers during WWII. This decoration was instituted on December 20th 1939 by the Oberstbefehlshaber des Heeres, Generalfeldmarschall von Brauchitsch. It could be awarded to members of non-motorized Infantry units and units of the Gebirgsjäger that had participated in Infantry assaults, with light Infantry weapons, on at least three days of battle in the front line as from January 1st 1940. When a counter offensive led to fighting at short distance, it could also apply. Award of the Infanterie Sturmabzeichen was authorized at regimental command level or above. The first two awards were given to an officer and a enlisted soldier on a special occasion on May 28th 1940, by von Brauchitsch himself. Photo in the gallery of SS Sturmbannfuhrer Otto Weidinger wearing , amongst his other decorations, his same Infantry Assault Badge.
A German WW2 Infantry [Heer] Service Combat Buckle & Belt Desireable Gott Mit Uns with Eagle and Swastika type. Maker marked. Leather belt with many affixing and adjusting holes.
A German WW2 Kriegsmarine Breast Eagle
A German WW2 Kriegsmarine Coastal Artillery BeVo Breast Eagle Green ground with yellow eagle. A nice original Kriegsmarine yellow example. Coastal artillery was the responsibility of the Kriegsmarine, and most of the weapons employed in this manner were captured or obsolete weapons, their role was a defence against invasion, rather than proper coast defence against naval attack many of these guns were mounted in defensive works of either turrets or casemates. Marine Artillery Units were trained as ground artillery. There are several accounts of Naval Artillery Forward Observers during the Market Garden operation. Coastal batteries were used against ground targets all the way up the French coast, that is, if they could be turned towards the landward side. Also, something to keep in mind, Naval Artillerymen are trained to hit moving targets such as ships, not much of a stretch to hit relatively stationary ground targets and the like such as a battalion area or a road junction. Coordinates, angles, grids, and trajectories are calculated much the same and a big shell is a big shell regardless of the target…
A German WW2 Messerschmitt Fighter Canon Shell From An ME109, ME262, ME110 Armour piercing shell. Fired by the MG151/20 cannon A fabulous but very scarcely seen original unfired 20mm cannon shell from a WW2 German fighter plane. All of the Messerschmitts including the jet, the ME262. Solid armour piercing late case shape. Inert, deactivated Not suitable for export. About the best, original 3rd Reich, small conversational piece, money can buy today. An ideal gentleman's desk ornament. All fully marked by German ordnance not suitable to export . For sale to over 18's only.
A German WW2 SA Dagger Belt hanging Mount. In early April 1931, elements of the SA under Walter Stennes attempted to overthrow the head of the Berlin section of the NSDAP (Nazi Party). As the section chief, Joseph Goebbels, fled with his staff, a handful of SS under Kurt Daluege were beaten trying to repel the SA. After the incident, Hitler wrote a letter of congratulations to Daluege, stating … SS-Mann, deine Ehre heißt Treue! ("Man of the SS, your honour is loyalty"). Soon afterwards, Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler, made the modified version of this sentence the official motto of the organisation. The Schutzstaffel translated to Protection Squadron or defence corps, abbreviated SS—was a major paramilitary organization under Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party (NSDAP). It began in 1923 as a small, permanent guard unit known as the "Saal-Schutz" made up of NSDAP volunteers to provide security for Nazi Party meetings in Munich. Later, in 1925, Heinrich Himmler joined the unit, which had by then been reformed and renamed the "Schutz-Staffel". Under Himmler's leadership (1929–45), it grew from a small paramilitary formation to one of the largest and most powerful organizations in the Third Reich. Hitler's faithful leader of the SA Storm troopers, and until his execution, Himmlers superior and thus leader of Himmler's SS as well. Due to the alleged conspiracy against Hitler by Rohm, that was simply invented by the psychotic Henrich Himmler, leader of the SS. Rohm, alongside his senior General staff, were executed in a classic putsch, in an event known as 'The Night of the Long Knives'
A German WW2 Silver Wound Badge Good order maker code 30. The Wound Badge (German: Verwundetenabzeichen) was a military decoration first promulgated by Kaiser Wilhelm II on 3 March 1918, which was awarded to wounded or frostbitten soldiers of the Imperial German Army, during World War I, the Reichswehr between the wars, and the Wehrmacht, SS and the auxiliary service organizations during the Second World War. After March 1943, due to the increasing number of Allied bombings, it was also awarded to injured civilians. It was ultimately one of the most highly prized, since it was earned "as a mark of honour for all who have risked their lives for the Fatherland and have been wounded or maimed". The silver grade of wound badge, awarded to service men and women wounded in combat and receiving several wounds numbering over three separate injuries but less than five wounds, suffering loss of a hand, foot or eye from hostile action (also partial loss of hearing), facial disfigurement or brain damage via hostile action. Just like the current Olympic medals, all German gold and silver class medals are not hallmarked solid gold or silver. A photo in the gallery of Major Hans Engelein wearing his silver wound badge. Lacking pin.
A German WW2 Type 25 A * Bomb Fuze From an Unexploded Bomb What an evocative item and a fabulous souvenir of the London Blitz. From a WW2 Bomb Disposal Engineers Collection]. With full waffenamt markings of the Luftwaffe, marked ELAZ [El.A.Z – Electrische Aufschlag Zünder (electrical impact fuze) ] 25 A* [for the 50 to 2500kg bombs]. Maker code gyx dated 1941 Batch 51e. The Wartime Bomb Disposal Organisation was created in the early part of the war to combat the unexploded ordnance dropping throughout England. In September 1939 the First Steps were made for the setting of priorities. In the beginning there were many conferences and meetings between The Home Office and The War Office as to who would be responsible for the disposal of unexploded bombs and missiles.It was agreed that the Armed Services should be responsible for all unexploded ordnance (UXO). The Royal Navy and the Royal Air Force would be responsible for UXO on their property and installations whilst the Army would be responsible for UXO on their property and installations plus all civilian areas. In the early days of Bomb Disposal, the responsibility of UXO of RAF property rested with the Armament personnel on nominated "X" Stations. Some primitive equipment and instruction was available for the purpose of these "X" Stations. The nominated personnel were known as "X" Station Demolition Squads and consisted of three Armament personnel of Senior Non Commissioned or Junior Non Commissioned Rank. At the time the "X" Squads were operating, there was little information available on German bombs and bomb components or even other types of enemy ammunition. The procedure followed by the "X" squads was to uncover or recover German bombs, unscrew the locking ring holding the electrical fuze and remove the fuze. The bomb was then demolished in situ or transported to a safe site for disposal later. One schematic in the gallery of a No 15 Fuze. In the centre is a sectioned drawing of a N0 15 Fuze The fuze however was sent post haste to BD Headquarters for examination and dismantling to find a method of immunisation. Once a method for a particular fuze was determined and the necessary equipment manufactured it was sent to all squads with instructions and correct procedures for its use in dealing with that particular type of fuze. 17 Th October 1939 first German bombs dropped in Hoy in the Orkney's, that failed to explode they were all 50Kg and were fuzed with the simple impact fuze type(15) which could be rendered safe using a crabtree discharger, a device that shorted out the electrical charge,contained in capacitors inside the fuze. Inert and safe approx 4.5 inches long. Not suitable for export.
A German WW2 West Wall Medal Issued to the constructors and men that manned the West Wall defenses built to protect the occupied and home territories of the Third Reich in WW2, against the allied invasion.
A Good an Most Intriguing M1916 German WW1 Combat Steel Helmet Lacking it's liner, but a very nice and sound honest German infantry combat trench helmet of the great war. The helmet's top skull bears an original small blast fracture crack from the inside out. This likely represents that the last wearer was above or near to a ground blast, which may well have destroyed the liner to the same condition as it's soldier. The basic helmet shell is formed from one steel disk, and went through at least nine stamping stages before it reached its final shape. The rivets at the lower side skirts fasten M1891 pickelhaube side posts, to attach M1891 pickelhaube chinstrap. The helmet liner is held in place with 3 split rivets. The liner was made of a leather or sheet metal band with three leather tabs with pads attached to it, which formed a very efficient internal sizing system. The liner was designed so that the helmet would remain 1 finger width away from the head at the sides, and two at the top. This was to prevent injuries to the head by objects striking the helmet and denting it. At the sides of the helmet are two large lugs, which served two functions. The first function was for ventilation of the helmet; and second function was to support a heavy armoured plate, called a Stirnpanzer. The plate was notched so that it could hang on the lugs, and was secured with a leather strap that fastened at the back of the helmet.
A Good and Most Scarce German WW1 Lancer Officer's Sword With scaccard and fine brass hilt with lion's head pommel, p hilt guard embellished with a stand of arms and the Iron Cross. The langets have a pair of lancer's sword with a pair of lances crossed, under a laurel wreath. The grip is black sharkskin, wire bound. The combat scabbard is blackened steel. The German lancers were recognised as some of the finest in Europe, and in 1914 they were used in charges and combat. However, some believe, it was only the German General Staff not utilising their formidable abilities to the best advantage, and transfering tactics to the lumbering slow shuffle of advancing and retreating infantry, that ultimately may well have bogged down the war into the trenches for so long. Areas of sharkskin wear. [Scabbard not shown in photos]
A Good German Heer Officers Sword With Eagle and Swastika Hilt Maker marked blade. By E F Horster. Solingen. Doves head pommel with acorn leaf engraved p hilt, acorn leaf engraved backstrap and eagle and swastika langet. A gilded alloy hilt and the gilding is surface flaking with age. Swords made in the closing years up to the war tended to have alloy hilts [as opposed to brass or steel earlier on] that was then over gilded with thin pure gold. The blade is excellent and the steel blackened scabbard has no denting. The German Army (German: Heer, was the land forces component of the Wehrmacht, the German armed forces, from 1935 to 1945. The Wehrmacht also included the Kriegsmarine (Navy) and the Luftwaffe (Air Force). During World War II, a total of about 15 million soldiers served in the German Army, of whom about seven million became casualties. Separate from the army, the Waffen-SS (Armed SS) was a multi-ethnic and multi-national military force of the Third Reich. Growing from three regiments to over 38 divisions during World War II, it served alongside the army but was never formally part of it. Only 17 months after Hitler announced publicly the rearmament program, the Army reached its projected goal of 36 divisions. During the autumn of 1937, two more corps were formed. In 1938, four additional corps were formed with the inclusion of the five divisions of the Austrian Army after the Anschluss in March. During the period of its expansion by Adolf Hitler, the German Army continued to develop concepts pioneered during World War I, combining ground (Heer) and air (Luftwaffe) assets into combined arms teams. Coupled with operational and tactical methods such as encirclements and the "battle of annihilation", the German military managed quick victories in the two initial years of World War II, prompting the use of the word Blitzkrieg (literally lightning war, meaning lightning-fast war) for the techniques used. The German Army entered the war with a majority of its infantry formations relying on the horse for transportation. The infantry remained foot soldiers throughout the war; artillery also remained primarily horse-drawn. The motorized formations received much attention in the world press in the opening years of the war, and were cited as the main reason for the success of the German invasions of Poland (September 1939), Norway and Denmark (April 1940), Belgium, France and Netherlands (May 1940), Yugoslavia (April 1941) and the early campaigns in the Soviet Union (June 1941). However their motorized and tank formations accounted for only 20% of the Heer's capacity at their peak strength.
A Good German WW1 Trench Knife This is an original German WW1 Trench Dagger. It has a carved ebony handle with brass crossguard. It has a clean 5 3/4" blade with medial ridge (10" long dagger overall). The blade is crisply marked by the manufacturer 'Acier Superieur Garanti' between 2 Anchors, a well recorded supplier to the Kaisers armed forces.
A Good German WW2 'Gladiator' Pattern Luftschutz Helmet, Liner and Strap Excellent decal, original liner and strap, good original blue paint and Luftschutzwarndienst (LSW), or in English, The Air Protection Warning Service. Some paint wear and surface russetting. The Luftschutzwarndienst was a civilian organization that was tasked with alerting the population of air raid attacks and for providing safety in air raid shelters, and for assistance to the civilian population after an air raid. First instituted in 1933, the service was originally voluntary up until 1943, when it was made mandatory for all German civilians, including women. The members were expected to purchase their own helmets and gear as their contribution to the war effort. In their role, members were required to interpret various communication reports regarding bomber formations flying over Germany, operate search lights, observe bomber formations, help keep order among civilians affected by bombing raids, and to utilize air raid sirens before and after attacks. Members of the Luftschutzwarndienst (Luftschutz) were typically volunteers assembled into area units within cities and towns that held the highest risk of being bombed. Many population centers were divided into area “blocks” with unit leaders assigned to each individual section of a city. Volunteer teams were expected to rotate shifts and sleep in large concrete bunkers that held all the provisions and amenities of a regular fortification. These also included the immense “flak towers” built around German cities upon which anti-aircraft batteries were stationed. On 2 April 1943 Hermann Göring mandated compulsory service in the Luftschutz for all German civilians. For the first time this order included women. Members of the Luftschutz were expected to supply their own helmets as part of the contribution to the German war effort. A variety of helmets were available for 5 Reich Marks each, but many volunteers chose to scavenge captured helmets of Czech, Polish, Dutch, French, and Russian origin.
A Good German WW2 High Seas Fleet Badge by R.S.&S. RS&S ( Richard Simm & Sohne] WW2 issue In zinc, wreath gilded (about 85% of the original gold wash remains). This is a German military decoration (worn on the lower part of the left breast pocket of the naval service tunic]. It was worn underneath the 1st class Iron Cross if awarded, [or equivalent grade) and awarded for combat service to the crews of the High Seas Fleet, mainly of the battleships and cruisers, but also those ships that supported them operationally for which there was no other award given. Required qualifications included e.g. active duty on 1 or more 12 week cruises, wounds or sinking in action. This striking design was created by the well known artist Adolf Bock of Berlin and the design was approved and adopted in 1941 by the then Grand Admiral Raeder, Commander in Chief of the German Navy. Although the award was instituted in 1941, awards could be rendered in retrospect of service from the beginning of World War II. Although the award was instituted in April 1941, it could be awarded for actions that took place prior to this date and could highlight the struggle against the British fleet.To be eligible to receive the badge one must have twelve weeks service on a battleship or cruiser, with proof of distinction and good conduct. The number of weeks were reduced if one of these conditions were met: If the recipient was wounded or killed during the voyage. Outstanding achievements in an engagement. If the cruise was successful. Individual's ship was sunk in action. (Bismarck, Admiral Graf Spee, Blücher) For participation in “Rawalpindi” and “Jan Mayen”. All crew members of the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau received the award in view of the operational effectiveness of the ships. To every sailor who was present on the Tirpitz when it was bombed and sunk by the British R.A.F. in Tromsö Fjord on November 12th, 1944.
A Good German WW2 M42 Combat Helmet with Liner Good old original rough texture paint in Heer green, liner with rubbed edge wear and stamped size 57. Maker stamped CKL. The M1942 design was a result of wartime demands. The rolled edge on the shell was eliminated, creating an unfinished edge along the rim. This edge slightly flared out, along the base of the skirt. The elimination of the rolled edge expedited the manufacturing process and reduced the amount of metal used in each helmet. Shell paint colours were typically matte gray-green (army) or gray-blue (Luftwaffe), and the decals were eliminated in 1943 to speed up production and reduce the helmet's combat visibility. Greater manufacturing flaws were also observed in M1942 helmets made late in the war. Until the winter of 1942-1943, the German army was victorious in an almost unbroken chain of battlefield successes. Europe lay under German domination. After a successful German advance in summer 1942, the battle for the city of Stalingrad in late 1942 proved a turning point. Soviet forces halted the German advance at Stalingrad on the Volga River and in the Caucasus. After this defeat, German troops were forced on the defensive, beginning the long retreat westward that was to end with Nazi Germany's surrender in May 1945, some three years later. Soviet forces launched a counteroffensive against the Germans arrayed at Stalingrad in mid-November 1942. They quickly encircled an entire German army, more than 220,000 soldiers. In February 1943, after months of fierce fighting and heavy casualties, the surviving German forces—only about 91,000 soldiers—surrendered. After Stalingrad, Soviet forces remained on the offensive for the remainder of the war, despite some temporary setbacks. A last German offensive of around 750,000 combatants at Kursk failed in the summer of 1943 against the vastly superior armed 2,000,000. Russians. The Soviets pushed the Germans back to the banks of the Dnieper River in 1943 and then, by the summer of 1944, to the borders of East Prussia. In January 1945, a new offensive brought Soviet forces to the banks of the Oder, in eastern Germany.
A Good Heavy Grade Imperial Prussian Sabre of The Great War Finely etched blade, steel p hilt, wirebound fishskin grip. The langet at the rear has the owner's name Trompeter Schultze, and regimental number 1/27. Fully etched deluxe blade. It is unusual to have the name of the owner of swords of these type, and may prove useful for reseach on the regiment and their role in WW1.
A Good Imperial German WW1 Wound Badge Souvenir of A WW2 D-Day Para The German Wound Badge was a German military award for wounded or frost-bitten soldiers of Imperial German Army in World War I, the Reichswehr between the wars, and the Wehrmacht, SS and the auxiliary service organizations during the Second World War. This form of award was in fact one of only two decorations awarded to Hitler in WW1 when he was wounded fighting in the trenches. After March 1943, due to the increasing number of Allied bombings, it was also awarded to injured civilians. It was ultimately one of the most highly prized, since it had to be "bought with blood". The badge had three classes: black (3rd class, representing Iron), for those wounded once or twice by hostile action (including air raids), or frost-bitten in the line of duty; silver (2nd class) for being wounded three or four times, or suffering loss of a hand, foot or eye from hostile action (also partial loss of hearing), facial disfigurement or brain damage via hostile action; and in gold (1st class, which could be awarded posthumously) for five or more times wounded, total blindness, "loss of manhood", or severe brain damage via hostile action. Badges exist in pressed steel, brass and zinc, as well as some base metal privately commissioned versions. Those of the First World War were also produced in a cutout pattern. All versions of the Wound Badge were worn on the lower left breast of the uniform or tunic. The badge was worn below all other awards on the left. We have the paras medal as well.
A Good Mons Star Medal For the 1st Dragoons The Mons star was authorized in April 1917 for award to those that served with the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces in France or Belgium on the establishment of a unit between 5th August 1914 and midnight on 22/23 November 1914. A rare star awarded to the few regulars who served at the very start of the war.The outbreak of the First World War found the Regiment again in South Africa, where they had helped quell the Johannesburg riots of 1913, earning praise for their restraint and judgement in this unpleasant duty. By October 1914, The Royal Dragoons were in Flanders, where for a short time they saw service in their normal cavalry role, during the intense activity which preceded the First Battle of Ypres. Thereafter the Regiment saw little mounted service - at first, in their role of mobile reserve, they were available to man trenches in their sector wherever the need was greatest, and so had to keep their horses close at hand, thereby suffering severe casualties among the horse holders from shellfire. Although throughout the war it was hoped to force a gap for the Cavalry to exploit, The Royals were only able to use the arme blanche twice. The first occasion was in a small but brilliantly successful charge alongside the 10th Hussars. The other occasion was during the final Allied offensive in 1918, when the Regiment formed part of an advanced guard; trenches, craters and wire restricted them, for most of the time, to patrolling. Their last action in the war was a charge, clearing positions around Honnechy which had impeded the Allied advance. However, for the greater part of the war The Royal Dragoons did hard and uncongenial work in the trenches, and did it with distinction, even though not properly equipped for an infantry role. The Regiment fought at the first and second Battle of Ypres, at Loos in 1915, opposite the Hohenzollern line in 1916, and against the Hindenberg line in 1917.
A Good Original Brangwyn WW1 Poster The Zeppelin Raids: the vow of vengeance. Drawn for "The Daily Chronicle" by Frank Brangwyn A.R.A. 'Daily Chronicle' readers are covered against the risks of bombardment by zeppelin or aeroplane During World War I, the impact of the poster as a means of communication was greater than at any other time during history. The ability of posters to inspire, inform, and persuade combined with vibrant design trends in many of the participating countries to produce interesting visual works. 20 XC 30.25 inches At the start of the twentieth century he was the one British artist whose work was revered by the European cognoscenti, and the Japanese recognised in his artistic endeavours a love of simplicity, geometric compositions, and clarity of colour. He worked for Bing and Tiffany and produced murals for four North American public buildings. A supremely charitable man with a reputation for being irascible; a pacifist whose brutal WWI poster Put Strength in the Final Blow (1918) reputedly led the Kaiser to put a price on his head. The man whom G K Chesterton described as ‘the most masculine of modern men of genius’ could also produce exquisitely delicate and serene works like St Patrick in the Forest (Christ’s Hospital murals); and his oils are as voluptuous in colour and form as his furniture is minimalist. Original WW1 Posters are becoming hugely popular yet some are still very affordable, prices for nice examples are reaching well into the thousands over the past couple of years now. If a 1920's Russian movie poster of the Battleship Potemkin will fetch over 100,000 pounds, just how much higher could contemporary propaganda posters easily go.
A Good Original Imperial German Pickelhaube [German Spiked Helmet] Case In pressed fibreboard and leather strapping. Overall in very nice condition but the straps have either partially of fully seperated. A rare collectable that is now very scarcely seen. Ideal to accompany any good pickelhaube, either spike or ball topped. The Pickelhaube was originally designed in 1842 by King Frederick William IV of Prussia, perhaps as a design based on similar helmets that were adopted at the same time by the Russian military. It is not clear whether this was a case of imitation, parallel invention, or if both were based on the earlier Napoleonic cuirassier. The early Russian type (known as "The Helmet of Yaroslav Mudry") was also used by cavalry, which had used the spike as a holder for a horsehair plume in full dress, a practice also followed with some Prussian models. Frederick William IV introduced the Pickelhaube for use by the majority of Prussian infantry on October 23, 1842 by a royal cabinet order. The use of the Pickelhaube spread rapidly to other German principalities. Oldenburg adopted it by 1849, Baden by 1870, and in 1887, the Kingdom of Bavaria was the last German state to adopt the Pickelhaube (since the Napoleonic Wars, they had had their own design of helmet, called the Raupenhelm. From the second half of the 19th century onwards, the armies of a number of nations besides Russia, (including Bolivia, Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, Portugal, Norway, Sweden and Venezuela,) adopted the Pickelhaube or something very similar. The Russian version initially had a horsehair plume fitted to the end of the spike, but this was later discarded in some units. The Russian spike was topped with a grenade motif. At the beginning of the Crimean War, such helmets were common among infantry and grenadiers, but soon fell out of place in favour of the fatigue cap. After 1862 the spiked helmet ceased to be generally worn by the Russian Army, although it was retained until 1914 by the Cuirassier regiments of the Imperial Guard and the Gendarmerie. The Russians prolonged the history of the pointed military headgear with their own cloth Budenovka in the early 20th century. All helmets produced for the infantry before and during 1914 were made of leather. As the war progressed, Germany's leather stockpiles dwindled. After extensive imports from South America, particularly Argentina, the German government began producing ersatz Pickelhauben made of other materials. In 1915, some Pickelhauben began to be made from thin sheet steel. However, the German high command needed to produce an even greater number of helmets, leading to the usage of pressurized felt and even paper to construct Pickelhauben. During the early months of World War I, it was soon discovered that the Pickelhaube did not measure up to the demanding conditions of trench warfare. The leather helmets offered virtually no protection against shell fragments and shrapnel and the conspicuous spike made its wearer a target. These shortcomings, combined with material shortages, led to the introduction of the simplified model 1915 helmet described above, with a detachable spike. In September 1915 it was ordered that the new helmets were to be worn without spikes, when in the front line
A Good Original WW2 German MP38/MP40 Sub Machine Gun Magazine Loader With heerswaffenamt stamp inspection mark 214 for Wilhelm Gustloff Werke. Gustloff Werke Weimar, was located in Weimar Germany, the facility was the lead firm of the Wilhelm Gustloff Foundation (Wilhelm-Gustloff-Stiftung), which was a state owned corporation founded upon nationalized Jewish property the National Socialist seized during its early consolidation phase 1933-1936. By 1938 the concern consisted of 5 branches:All original and rare. The MP38 & MP40 (Maschinenpistole 38 or 40, literally "machine pistol 38 or 40") was a submachine gun developed in Germany and used extensively by paratroopers and platoon and squad leaders, and other troops during World War II. The MP38 and it's successor the MP40 had a relatively lower rate of fire and low recoil, which made it more manageable than other contemporary submachine guns. The MP38/40 was often called the Schmeisser by the Allies, after weapons designer Hugo Schmeisser. Although the name was evocative, Hugo Schmeisser himself did not design the MP40, but helped with the design of the MP41 which was effectively a MP40 with an old-fashioned wooden rifle stock. It is impossible to reconstruct how Schmeisser was honoured with this legend, but it must have been inspiring for the soldiers: the German slang-word "Schmeisser" describes someone who throws something inaccurately, but with high force. Schmeisser did produce the MP40 magazines and his name was engraved on them, which may explain the confusion. Shown fitted onto a regular magazine for demonstration purposes only, not included.
A Good Russian Cold War Era Poster Original poster with interesting subject matter of military and maritime uniforms and ranks. This is one of a collection of Russian USSR posters we have acquired from the estate of an ex British Glider Pilot of WW2. This poster is folded and in condition as seen in the photos. 36.5 inches x 24 inches. This poster is a real and used item, not just for show, would look super nicely framed
A Good Scottish Highland Piper's Dress Horsehair Thistle Emblem Sporran With metal embossed thistle top mount, chain and leather belt, white horsehair with two black horsehair tassels with embossed thistle metal cones. Real leather back.
A Good War Merit Cross With Swords First Class Wide pin fixing, Alloy metal in good order. One of the highest awards for officer's, just under the Knights Cross award. With relief Swastika between the cross and swords. A medal for bravery when in military and maritime service but not necessarily when facing the enemy. For example, awarded for rescuing wounded in minefields, rescuing men from sinking ships, bomb disposal, or bravery during aerial bombardment. Curiously the bravery required to achieve this medal could be greater than was required to receive the traditional combat bravery medal, the Iron Cross Ist Class. Part of a group of souvenirs[ medals and badge]s from an old British war veteran. Both General Karl Wolff, & Friedrich Otto [SS-Oberstgruppenfûhrer] had and wore this form of award, as did SS-Oberstgruppenfûhrer BERGER
A Good WW1 14/15 Star 'South African' Trio With Transvaal Highlanders Badge 8th Infantry, and further badges. All medals named. He served in the 7th and 8th Infantry. British TOE in April, 1916: 1st Division (Major General AR Hoskins) 1st East African Brigade- 2nd Loyal North Lancs, 2nd Rhodesia Regiment, 130th Baluchis, 3rd Kashmir Rifles/3rd KAR (Composite Batt) 2nd East Afican Brigade- 25th Royal Fusiliers, 29th Punjabis, 129th Baluchis, 40th Pathans Divisional Troops- 17th Indian Cavalry (one squadron), East African Mounted Rifles, King's African Rifles Mounted Infantry (one company), East Africa Pioneer Corps (Mounted Section), 27th Mountain Battery, 5th Battery South African Field Artillery, # 6 Battery (four 12 pdrs manned by 2nd LNL), # 7 Battery (four 15 pdrs), 38th Howitzer Brigade (one section of two 5" Howitzers), Willoughby's Armored Car Battery, 2nd LNL Machine-gun Company. 2nd East African Division (Major General J Van Deventer) 1st South African Mounted Brigade- 1st SA Horse, 2nd SA Horse, 3rd SA Horse, 8th SA Horse (forming SA). 3rd South African Infantry Brigade- 9th SA Infantry, 10th SA Infantry, 11th SA Infantry, 12th SA Infantry. Divisional Troops- South African Scout Corps, 28th Mounted Battery (six 10 pdrs), 2nd Battery SA Field Artillery (four 13 pdrs), 4th Battery SA Field Artillery (four 13 pdrs), # 12 Howitzer Battery (two 5" Howitzers), East African Volunteer Machine-gun Company. 3rd East African Division (Major General C Brits) 2nd South African Mounted Brigade- 5th SA Horse, 6th SA Horse, 7th SA Horse, 9th SA Horse 2nd South African Infantry Brigade- 5th SA Infantry, 6th SA Infantry, 7th SA Infantry, 8th SA Infantry Divisional Troops- 1st Battery SA Field Artillery (four 13 pdrs), 3rd Battery SA Field Artillery (four 13 pdrs), 38th Howitzer Brigade (one section of two 5" Howitzers), # 5 Light Armoured Car Battery
A Good WW1 Imperial German Iron Cross With Small Jewellers Repair A very good medal with silver rim and iron centre. Original silk ribbon. Mounting ring bears maker hallmark. The small repair on the ring mount actually makes it a little more interesting than usual as it has been achieved so well. Next to the Victoria Cross, it is the most famous medal in the world. The Iron Cross was awarded for bravery in battle as well as other conspicuous military contributions in a battlefield environment. The Iron Cross 2nd Class came with a ribbon and was worn in one of two different methods: When in formal dress, the entire cross was worn mounted alone or as part of a medal bar. For everyday wear, only the ribbon was worn from the second hole in the tunic button. The Iron Cross is a black four-pointed cross with white trim, with the arms widening toward the ends, similar to a cross pattée. It was designed by the neoclassical architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel and reflects the cross borne by the Teutonic Knights in the 14th century. The ribbon for the 1813, 1870 and 1914 Iron Cross (2nd Class) was black with two thin white bands, the colours of Prussia. The non-combatant version of this award had the same medal, but the black and white colours on the ribbon were reversed. Initially the Iron Cross was worn with the blank side out. This did not change until 1838 when the sprig facing could be presented. Since the Iron Cross was issued over several different periods of German history, it was annotated with the year indicating the era in which it was issued. For example, an Iron Cross from the First World War bears the year "1914", while the same decoration from the Second World War is annotated "1939". The reverse of the 1870, 1914 and 1939 series of Iron Crosses have the year "1813" appearing on the lower arm, symbolizing the year the award was created. The 1813 decoration also has the initials "FW" for King Frederick William III, while the next two have a "W" for the respective kaisers, Wilhelm I and Wilhelm II. The final version shows a swastika. It was also possible for a holder of the 1914 Iron Cross to be awarded a second or higher grade of the 1939 Iron Cross. In such cases, a "1939 Clasp" (Spange) would be worn on the original 1914 Iron Cross. (A similar award was made in 1914 but was quite rare, since there were few in service who held the 1870 Iron Cross.) For the First Class award the Spange appears as an eagle with the date "1939" that was pinned above the Cross. Although two separate awards, in some cases the holders soldered them together. A cross was the symbol of the Teutonic Knights (a heraldic cross pattée), and the cross design (but not the specific decoration) has been the symbol of Germany's armed forces (now the Bundeswehr) since 1871. Photo in the gallery of Ernst Hess, Adolf Hitler's commanding officer in WW1 wearing his identical Iron Cross. As with all our items, each one comes with our unique, lifetime guarantee, certificate of authenticity
A Good WW2 German NSKK Service Belt Buckle. This buckle used by one of Hitler's 'Brownshirt' Stormtroopers, section NSKK Nationalsozialistisches Kraftfahrkorps. The National Socialist Motor Corps was the smallest of the Nazi Party organizations and had originally been formed as a motorized corps of the Sturmabteilung (SA). In 1934, the group had a membership of approximately ten thousand and was separated from the SA to become an independent organization. This action may have saved the NSKK from extinction, as shortly thereafter the SA suffered a major purge during the Night of the Long Knives, due to the alleged conspiracy against Hitler by Röhm [that was simply invented by the psychotic Henrich Himler, leader of the SS] Rohm, alongside his senior staff, was executed in a classic putsch, in an event known as 'The Night of the Long Knives'. The SA evolved out of the remnants of the Freikorps movement of the post-WWI years. The Freikorps were nationalistic organisations primarily composed of disaffected, disenchanted, and angry German combat veterans who believed that their government had betrayed Germany and sold them out by surrendering and submitting to the humiliating terms of the Versailles Treaty. The Freikorps were in opposition to the new Weimar Republic. Ernst Röhm was commander of the Bavarian Freikorps and was given the nickname "The Machine Gun King of Bavaria" because he was responsible for storing and issuing illegal machine guns to Freikorps units in Bavaria. He later became commander of the SA. During the 1920s and 1930s the SA functioned as a private militia that Hitler used to intimidate rivals and disrupt the meetings of competing political parties, especially those of the Social Democrats and the Communists. Also known as the "brownshirts" or "stormtroopers", the SA became notorious for their street battles with the Communists.The violent confrontations between the two groups contributed to the destabilisation of Germany's inter-war experiment with democracy, the Weimar Republic. In June 1932, one of the worst months of political violence, there were over 400 street battles, resulting in 82 deaths.This very destabilisation had been crucial in Hitler's rise to power, however, not least because it convinced many Germans that once Hitler became chancellor, the endemic street violence would end. When provided with 'evidence' of Röhm's conspiracy Hitler initially refused to believe the dossier provided by Himler's protégé, Heydrich, as he had liked Röhm and allways believed him loyal. Röhm had been one of his first supporters and, without his ability to obtain army funds in the early days of the movement, it is unlikely that the Nazis would have ever become established. The SA under Röhm's leadership had also played a vital role in destroying the opposition during the elections of 1932 and 1933. However, Adolf Hitler had his own reasons for wanting Röhm removed. Powerful supporters of Hitler had been complaining about Röhm for some time. The generals were fearful due to knowing Röhm's desire to have the SA, a force of over 3 million men, absorb the much smaller German Army into its ranks under his leadership. Further, reports of a huge cache of weapons in the hands of SA members, gave the army commanders even more concern. Industrialists, who had provided the funds for the Nazi victory, were unhappy with Röhm's socialistic views on the economy and his claims that the real revolution had still to take place. Matters came to a head in June 1934 when President von Hindenburg, who had the complete loyalty of the Army, informed Hitler that if he didn't move to curb the SA then Hindenburg would dissolve the Government and declare martial law. After the purge the organization of the SA [Sturmabeitlung] continued, but was from then on subordinate to Himler's SS, where before it was superior to the SS. Many NSKK men, thanks to their efficient transport training and acquired skills were later transferred to Panzer divisions in both the Heer and SS. There is some light surface rust that we have left 'as is'. It would likely remove completely with polishing if desired.
A Good WW2 German U-Boat Combat Badge In Zinc. Zinc U-boat badge in the Funcke & Brueninghaus design, with vertical pin mount, with good signs of typical sea water surface wear, as these badges weren't just combat awards they were badges of honour for all wolf pack crews in WW2, worn full time in the war on service duty, day or night, in combat and on leave. The original U-boat badge was instituted in WW1 in January 1918. At the outbreak of War Hitler re-instituted the submarine war badge, for combat service on 13 October 1939. The criteria for the award were: 1)To have been involved in a particularly successful mission. 2)To have completed or participated in more than three missions. 3)To have won a bravery decoration in one of these missions even if it was the first. 4)To have been wounded on a mission again even if it was the first time. 5)The badge with the citation was rendered to the next of kin of those lost at sea in a U-boat due to enemy action….. During World War II, U-boat warfare was the major component of the Battle of the Atlantic, which lasted the duration of the war. Germany had the largest submarine fleet in World War II, since the Treaty of Versailles had limited the surface navy of Germany to six battleships (of less than 10,000 tons each), six cruisers, and 12 destroyers. Prime Minister Winston Churchill wrote "The only thing that really frightened me during the war was the U-boat peril." In the early stages of the war the U-boats were extremely effective in destroying Allied shipping; initially in the mid-Atlantic where a large gap in air cover existed until 1942, when the tides changed. The trade in war supplies and food across the Atlantic was extensive, which was critical for Britain's survival. This continuous action became known as the Battle of the Atlantic, as the British developed technical defences such as ASDIC and radar, and the German U-boats responded by hunting in what were called "wolfpacks" where multiple submarines would stay close together, making it easier for them to sink a specific target. Later, when the United States entered the war, the U-boats ranged from the Atlantic coast of the United States and Canada to the Gulf of Mexico, and from the Arctic to the west and southern African coasts and even as far east as Penang. The U.S. military engaged in various tactics against German incursions in the Americas; these included military surveillance of foreign nations in Latin America, particularly in the Caribbean, to deter any local governments from supplying German U-boats. Because speed and range were severely limited underwater while running on battery power, U-boats were required to spend most of their time surfaced running on diesel engines, diving only when attacked or for rare daytime torpedo strikes. The more ship-like hull design reflects the fact that these were primarily surface vessels that could submerge when necessary. This contrasts with the cylindrical profile of modern nuclear submarines, which are more hydrodynamic underwater (where they spend the majority of their time), but less stable on the surface. While U-boats were faster on the surface than submerged, the opposite is generally true of modern submarines. The most common U-boat attack during the early years of the war was conducted on the surface and at night. This period, before the Allied forces developed truly effective antisubmarine warfare tactics, which included convoys, was referred to by German submariners as "die glückliche Zeit" or "the happy time."
A Good WW2 Japanese Arisaka Bayonet The Type 30 bayonet, sanjunen-shiki juken, was a bayonet designed for the Imperial Japanese Army to be used with the Arisaka Type 30 Rifle and was later used on the Type 38 and Type 99 rifles. It remained in front-line use from the Russo-Japanese War to the end of World War II. The Type 30 Bayonet was a single-edged sword bayonet with a 400 millimetres (15.75 in) blade and an overall length of 514 millimetres (20.24 in) with a weight of approximately 700 grams. The Type 30 bayonet is also known as the “Pattern 1897 bayonet”. Early Type 30 bayonets usually sported a hooked quillion guard which gave it a distinct look, but later models had a straight hand guard. The design was intended to give the average Japanese infantryman a long enough reach to pierce the abdomen of a cavalryman. However, the design had a number of drawbacks, some caused by the poor quality of forgings used, which tended to rust quickly and not hold an edge, and to break when bent. The weapon was manufactured from 1897 to 1945 at a number of locations, including the Kokura Arsenal, Koishikawa Arsenal (Tokyo) and Nagoya Arsenal, as well as under contract by private manufacturers including Matsushita, Toyoda Automatic Loom and others. Interestingly it was the bayonet the British Ordnance purchased and copied for it's SMLE rifle.
A Good WW2 RAF Squadron Leader's Medal Group Defence Medal, War Medal 39/45 Star and Africa Star. Squadron Leader E.G.Evans M.B.E. He was awarded the M.B.E distinction in the King's Birthday Honours list in 1944. From 1 April 1918 to 31 July 1919, the RAF used major as the equivalent rank to squadron leader. Royal Naval Air Service lieutenant-commanders and Royal Flying Corps majors on 31 March 1918 became RAF majors on 1 April 1918. On 31 August 1919, the RAF rank of major was superseded by squadron leader which has remained in continuous usage ever since. Promotion to squadron leader is strictly on merit, and requires the individual to be appointed to a Career Commission, which will see them remain in the RAF until retirement or voluntary resignation. Before the Second World War, a squadron leader commanded a squadron of aircraft. We have had no time at all to research these medals unfortunately.
A Good WW2 Semi Auto Holster Used by A German Officer in WW2 Overall in good order. A rare holster for an Axis power officer, most likely for a security officer due to it's compact and very small size 6.35mm cal. Pistol
A Good, Honest, German SA Dagger By Scarce Maker. Hugo Rader Circa 1939 early war period with good maker mark Hugo Rader, Solingen. Full motto blade, with small edge nick, and areas of light pitting. An honest SA dagger in worn condition overall and priced reflecting its condition. The original leader of the SA was Ernst Röhm, one of Hitler's most loyal and faithful of followers. However, due to the alleged conspiracy against Hitler by Röhm [that was simply invented by the psychotic Henrich Himler, leader of the SS] Rohm, alongside his senior staff, was executed in a classic putsch, in an event known as 'The Night of the Long Knives'. When provided with 'evidence' of Röhm's conspiracy Hitler initially refused to believe the dossier provided by Himler's protégé, Heydrich, as he had liked Röhm and always believed him loyal. Röhm had been one of his first supporters and, without his ability to obtain army funds in the early days of the movement, it is unlikely that the Nazis would have ever become established. The SA under Röhm's leadership had also played a vital role in destroying the opposition during the elections of 1932 and 1933. However, Adolf Hitler had his own reasons for wanting Röhm removed. Powerful supporters of Hitler had been complaining about Röhm for some time. The generals were fearful due to knowing Röhm's desire to have the SA, a force of over 3 million men, absorb the much smaller German Army into its ranks under his leadership. Further, reports of a huge cache of weapons in the hands of SA members, gave the army commanders even more concern. Industrialists, who had provided the funds for the Nazi victory, were unhappy with Röhm's socialistic views on the economy and his claims that the real revolution had still to take place. Matters came to a head in June 1934 when President von Hindenburg, who had the complete loyalty of the Army, informed Hitler that if he didn't move to curb the SA then Hindenburg would dissolve the Government and declare martial law.Wartime manufacture SA daggers a have been increasing in value by leaps and bounds over the past couple of years or so. His organization, the SA [Sturmabeitlung] continued, but was from then on subordinate to Himler's SS, where before it was superior to the SS.
A Good, Original WW1 German Iron Cross Next to the Victoria Cross, it is the most famous medal in the world. The Iron Cross was awarded for bravery in battle as well as other conspicuous military contributions in a battlefield environment. The Iron Cross 2nd Class came with a ribbon and was worn in one of two different methods: When in formal dress, the entire cross was worn mounted alone or as part of a medal bar. For everyday wear, only the ribbon was worn from the second hole in the tunic button. The Iron Cross is a black four-pointed cross with white trim, with the arms widening toward the ends, similar to a cross pattée. It was designed by the neoclassical architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel and reflects the cross borne by the Teutonic Knights in the 14th century. The ribbon for the 1813, 1870 and 1914 Iron Cross (2nd Class) was black with two thin white bands, the colours of Prussia. The non-combatant version of this award had the same medal, but the black and white colours on the ribbon were reversed. Initially the Iron Cross was worn with the blank side out. This did not change until 1838 when the sprig facing could be presented. Since the Iron Cross was issued over several different periods of German history, it was annotated with the year indicating the era in which it was issued. For example, an Iron Cross from the First World War bears the year "1914", while the same decoration from the Second World War is annotated "1939". The reverse of the 1870, 1914 and 1939 series of Iron Crosses have the year "1813" appearing on the lower arm, symbolizing the year the award was created. The 1813 decoration also has the initials "FW" for King Frederick William III, while the next two have a "W" for the respective kaisers, Wilhelm I and Wilhelm II. The final version shows a swastika. It was also possible for a holder of the 1914 Iron Cross to be awarded a second or higher grade of the 1939 Iron Cross. In such cases, a "1939 Clasp" (Spange) would be worn on the original 1914 Iron Cross. (A similar award was made in 1914 but was quite rare, since there were few in service who held the 1870 Iron Cross.) For the First Class award the Spange appears as an eagle with the date "1939" that was pinned above the Cross. Although two separate awards, in some cases the holders soldered them together. A cross was the symbol of the Teutonic Knights (a heraldic cross pattée), and the cross design (but not the specific decoration) has been the symbol of Germany's armed forces (now the Bundeswehr) since 1871. Photo in the gallery of Ernst Hess, Adolf Hitler's commanding officer in WW1 wearing his identical Iron Cross. As with all our items, each one comes with our unique, lifetime guarantee, certificate of authenticity
A Good, Original, Vintage Ship's Binnacle Compass A super original maritimecollectors item for someone with a naval bent. Brass case that is covered in wartime green paint [should strip beautifully]. Working liquid filled compass, patent markings. Oil lamp lighting section.
A Good, Scarce, German 14th Kavallerie Regimental Sword and Knot Used in WW2. Fully etched blade with full regimental name of the 14th Kavellerie and an etched panel of a cavalry charge, with all the troop wearing steel combat helmets. Steel p hilt black celluliod grip with wire binding. Black painted steel scabbard. The same type of sword worn by General der Kavallerie Edwin Graf von Rothkirch und Trach, who joined the 14th Kavellrie, aged 42, in 1930, as a major. In September 1939 he was made Chief of the General Staff of the XXXIV Corps Command. Serving in the war for two years on the Eastern Front he was promoted in November 1944 to Commanding General of the LIII Army. General Graf von Rothkirch und Trach was captured at Neunkirchen by Lieutenant Colonel Abrams' 37th Tank Battalion in March 1945. The remnants of Graf von Rothkirch und Trachs LIII Army Corps fell back across the Rhine River but was destroyed a month later in the Ruhr pocket. Kavallerie was drawn down somewhat in the German armed forces after the French campaign, but soon after the invasion of Russia it was realised an increase in Cavalry was essential for anti-partisan policing and for recce in terrain unsuitable for vehicles. In the picture gallery their shows an original photo of a WW2 German cavalry trooper who has his identical sword mounted on his saddle. Areas of wear to the scabbard paintwork and surface pitting on areas of the blade and hilt. Very bright polished overall
A Graf Zeppelin Circa 1924 Stereoscope in Original Case And 15 View Cards In very nice original condition.
A Great Carved Wooden German WW1 MG08 Trench Warfare Machine Gun Fully camouflage painted. An extraordinary and an amazingly convincing work of sculpture, superbly life-size modelled on the famous German machine gun of WW1. Made for use in an early film on WW1, and they were similarly made by Imperial German armed forces for training young recruits to the machine gun detachments. The Maschinengewehr 08, or MG 08, was the German Army's standard machine gun in World War I and is an adaptation of Hiram S. Maxim's original 1884 Maxim gun. It was produced in a number of variants during the war. The MG 08 served during World War II as a heavy machine gun in many German infantry divisions, although by the end of the war it had mostly been relegated to second-rate fortress units. The Maschinengewehr 08 (or MG 08)—so-named after 1908, its year of adoption—was a development of the license made Maschinengewehr 01. The firing rate depends on the lock assembly used and averages 500 rounds per minute for the Schloss 08 and 600 rounds per minute for the Schloss 16. It was water-cooled, using a jacket around the barrel that held approximately one gallon of water. Using a separate attachment sight with range calculator for indirect fire, the MG 08 could be operated from cover. Additional telescopic sights were also developed and used in quantity during the war. The MG 08, like the Maxim gun, operated on the basis of short barrel recoil and a toggle lock. Once cocked and fired the MG 08 would continue firing rounds until the trigger was released or until all available ammunition was expended. Its practical range was estimated at some 2,000 metres (2,200 yd) up to an extreme range of 3,600 metres (3,900 yd). The MG 08 was mounted on a sled mount (German: Schlittenlafette) that was ferried between locations either on carts or else carried above men's shoulders in the manner of a stretcher. See in the gallery two photos, one with the MG08 in place in a German trench, the other photograph show three moustachioed Great War combatants, two MG08s being carried by two German captured POWs being escorted by a jolly highlander carrying a small white bag containing his weekly ration of a quarter pound of boiled humbugs
A Great Father & Son's Medals & London Scottish Regimental Badges WW1 pair and a WW2 four medal group with their traditional Scottish Glengarry cap badges, a sharpshooters cross rifle qualification badge, and shoulder titles and a dog tag. The regiment raised three battalions during World War I, with the 1/14th (County of London) Battalion, The London Regiment (London Scottish) serving on the Western Front. The 1/14th Battalion was mobilized on the outbreak of war, departing for France on 15 September 1914. On 31 October 1914 the battalion encountered German forces at [[Battle of Messines (1914) (Messines) in Belgium. It was the first territorial unit to see active service in this war. Following ongoing action on the Western Front throughout 1914-18, the 1/14th formed part of the British army of occupation at Cologne. The 2nd Battalion of the London Scottish embarked for France in June 1916 but was then transferred to Salonika and Palestine. A third battalion served as a training and reserve unit, supplying reinforcements to the two fighting battalions of the London Scottish throughout the war. The London Scottish lost about 2,500 people who died in World War I. In 1918, two Victoria Crosses were awarded to soldiers of the regiment during fighting near Jerusalem. As in World War I, the London Scottish raised three battalions during World War II, two of which served overseas. Both of the overseas battalions served with the Middle Eastern Forces in Sicily and Italy. The battalions were: 1st Battalion - The regular peacetime battalion of the regiment, served as infantry within the 168th (London) Infantry Brigade (alongside the 1st London Irish Rifles and 10th Royal Berkshire Regiment), part of the 56th (London) Infantry Division (nicknamed "The Black Cats"), playing a significant part in the Italian Campaign, fighting in the Allied invasion of Sicily, fighting at Monte Camino, Battle of Anzio, Gothic Line (afterwards transferred to 167th (London) Infantry Brigade) and Operation Grapeshot, the final offensive in Italy in 1945.
A Great WW1 French Trench Fighting Knife Used In WW2 by German Military Stamped with the motto Le Vengeur De 1870 to represent the huge indignity suffered by France from Germany in the Franco Prussian War in 1870 and it represented the vengence that the French soldier would wreak on the German Invaders. The stamped metal cross guard is stamped on the upper reverse with a star B French military acceptance mark. Ironically it is now well known that these knives were captured in large numbers by the Germans in 1940 and re-used by the Heer and SS [after the French capitulation]. This knife came from a captured German in 1944. The knife/dagger 1916 is the last regulation French model of First World War and the only one they could tell to be of a manufacture well-manicured and made to last. This weapon was possibly made by Prodon of Thiers in 1915, and was retained in 1916 under the name of “couteau poignard Mle 1916 (knife dagger Mle 1916)”. It was used until the second world war. It was equipment for the infantry and the tank regiments. The extra hard steel blade could carry several markings, but not all have the mythical inscription "le vengeur de 1870". The blade was used as the inspiration for the M1918 US Knuckleduster Knife. No scabbard in overalL very good condition, and overall a most interesting dagger.
A Great, WW2 British Parachute Regt. Helmet & 2 Camouflage Smocks WW2 Pattern Para helmet [and used later with the post war smocks] with Light Aid Detachment decal. With a 1960's issue smock and a 1970's Northern Ireland and Falklands Campaign vintage sergeant's issue smock. A super lot from one of the great heroic regiments of the British Army covering 50 years. The WW2 pattern helmet is a particular gem, being late war pattern production and used in many of the campaigns in service till the mid 1980's. The Parachute Regiment, colloquially known as the Paras, is the Airborne Infantry of the British Army. One battalion is permanently under the command of the Director Special Forces in the Special Forces Support Group. The other battalions are the parachute infantry component of the British Army's rapid response formation, 16 Air Assault Brigade. It is the only line infantry regiment that has not been amalgamated with another unit since the end of the Second World War. Members of the Parachute Regiment are often colloquially known to the rest of the army and the British public as the "Paras". The Parachute Regiment was formed during the Second World War and eventually raised 17 battalions. In Europe, these battalions formed part of the 1st Airborne Division, the 6th Airborne Division and the 2nd Independent Parachute Brigade Group. Another three battalions served with the British Indian Army in India and Burma. The regiment took part in six major parachute assault operations in North Africa, Italy, Greece, France, the Netherlands and Germany, often landing ahead of all other troops. At the end of the Second World War, the regiment was reduced to three regular army battalions first assigned to the 16th Parachute Brigade and later the 5th Airborne Brigade. The reserve 16th Airborne Division was formed using the regiment reserve battalions in the Territorial Army. Defence cuts gradually reduced the TA formations to a parachute brigade and then a single reserve battalion. In the same time period, the regular army battalions have taken part in operations in Suez, Cyprus, Borneo, Aden, Northern Ireland, the Falklands, the Balkans, Sierra Leone, Iraq and Afghanistan, at times being reinforced by men from the reserve battalion.
A Hand Painted Side Drum WW1 1st Bn The Queen's Royal Regt. Rope tensioned. Made by Whaley, Royce and Co. Limited Toronto in Canada, dated 1916. Full regimental battle honours from Tangiers, 1662, up to Kohima in 1944. Of the 1,000 men of 1st Battalion The Queen’s Royal Regiment who landed in France in 1914 only 17 were alive at the Armistice. The Regiment formed 28 Battalions and was awarded 74 Battle Honours and 4 Victoria Crosses, losing 8,000 men during the course of the First World War. 1st Battalion 04.08.1914 Stationed at Bordon as part of the 3rd Brigade of the 1st Division. 13.08.1914 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including; 1914 The Battle of Mons and the subsequent retreat, The Battle of the Marne, The Battle of the Aisne, First Battle of Ypres. 08.11.1914 Transferred to I Corps Troops. 21.07.1915 Transferred to the 5th Brigade of the 2nd Division; 1915 The Battle of Festubert, The Battle of Loos. 15.12.1915 Transferred to the 100th Brigade of the 33rd Division; 1916 The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin, The attacks on High Wood, The capture of Boritska and Dewdrop Trenches. 1917 The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The actions on the Hindenburg Line, Operations on the Flanders coast (Operation Hush), The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, The Battle of Polygon Wood. 05.02.1918 Transferred to the 19th Brigade of the 33rd Division; 1918 The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of Bailleul, The defence of Neuve Eglise, The First Battle for Kemmel Ridge, The fighting for and recapture of Ridge Wood, The Battle of the Epehy, The Battle of the St Quentin Canal, The Battle of the Beaurevoir Line, The Battle of Cambrai, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Selle. 11.11.1918 Ended the war in Berlaimont, France. 14.25 inches high x 15 inches across approx
A Hindenberg 1974 Disaster Movie Prop, But Incredibly Authentic A fabulous and rare piece of Movie and Airship Zeppelin memorablia. The airship's passenger and crew list printed on handmade paper and so convincing it looks absolutely period and completely original. Except, all the passengers listed were fictitious characters from the book. This was made for the film, to be used in various scenes involving all the main stars. "The Hindenburg" A Hollywood's disaster thriller (USA 1974) with Anne Bancroft and George C. Scott, on the novel by Michael M. Mooney, based on real events that occurred in 1937 in the USA during it's flight from Berlin and the fateful disaster on mooring in America. The film stars George C. Scott. It was produced and directed by Robert Wise, and was written by Nelson Gidding, Richard Levinson and William Link, based on the 1972 book of the same name, The Hindenburg, by Michael M. Mooney. A. A. Hoehling, author of the 1962 book Who Destroyed The Hindenburg?, also about the sabotage theory, sued Mooney along with the film developers for copyright infringement as well as unfair competition. However, Judge Charles M. Metzner dismissed his allegations. A highly speculative thriller, The Hindenburg depicts a conspiracy leading to the destruction of the airship. In reality, while the Zeppelins were certainly used as a propaganda symbol by the Third Reich, and anti-Nazi forces might have had the motivation for sabotage, the theory of sabotage was investigated at the time, and no firm evidence for such sabotage was ever put forward. The possibility of Boerth's (i.e. Spehl's) deliberate sabotage is one theory of the fire that had been the subject of Mooney's book, published around the time of the film's development. It has never been proven definitively, and most airship experts tend to discredit this theory.
A Japanese Pacific Theatre British 4 Medal POW Medal Group With Pacific star with lifetime membership card of the Far Eastern Prisoner of War [1941-45] Association London. Formerly the medals of a British soldier. Sadly he taken prisoner by the Japanese during WW2. He fell into their hands and was treated with the respect and care that was usual within Japanese WW2 military hospitality. Amongst these kindnesses was to be hung up by the ears while forced to stand for hours on end, on a chair, on tip toe.Officers and men taken out onto the prison parade ground twice a day, with all their fellow inmates, and witnessing the camp commandant simply choose a British prisoner at random to shoot in the head, and further to watch prisoners force fed dried rice, followed by funnels of water, in order for their intestines to explode. All the previously detailed vile acts and sufferings of our poor soldiers [and too many more others to list] are a matter of highly detailed public record, and it further illustrates that a pow of the [WW2 period] Japanese military were 30 times less likely to survive incarceration than a pow of the German military. The medals will be sold with a donation made to the current POW Association.
A King Airship Co. of Washington, Historic Stock Certificate August 1920 On December 17, 1903, the Wright brothers were the first to fly in a powered and controlled aircraft. Previous flights were lighter than air vehicles, gliders (control but no power) or free flight (power but no control), but the Wright brothers combined both, setting the new standard in aviation records. There have been many booms and busts in the aviation industry. The earliest known aviation stock certificate for a company that actually made a flying airship called the Novelty Air Ship Company in 1888. The Novelty Air Ship Company manufactured the vehicle for Professor Peter C. Campbell who was the inventor. Unfortunately, the air ship was lost at sea in 1889 while being test flown by Professor Hogan during an exhibition flight. This historic document was printed by the Goes Company and has an ornate border around it with a vignette of a Bald eagle. This item has the signatures of the Company’s Secretary and the President and is over 93 years old.
A Large, Rare, Duraluminum Zeppelin Bowl It is a large bowl that might have been used for holding fruit or other such items. It is made from Duraluminum, a very expensive and seldom-used metal, except for the construction of zeppelins. Often when a zeppelin crashed in the early days, the framework was recycled and used to sell items such as this to the very patriotic German people. This bowl measures 9.25" x 11." It sports a likeness of Graf von Zeppelin and an early zeppelin in the sky. We have seen cups and bowls of this nature before, but this is the largest one we have ever seen.
A Long Service Good Conduct Naval Group of Four WW1 L.Britnell SHPT.2 RN HMS Magnolia. ACACIA class Fleet Sweeping Sloops, 24 ships, 2 lost - 1,200t, 16 knots, 2-12pdr/2-3pdr, 90 crew, 1915. Used for minesweeping until 1917, then as convoy escorts
A Luftwaffe Construction Engineer Corps Captain's Collar Tabs Pair Black felt uppers, wreathing with three gulls above in aluminum bullion wire, edges trimmed in fine twisted aluminum wire, extremely fine.
A Medal Invented by Lt Col Ridgeway, Sec. to C.in C. Gen Auchinleck A medal designed made and to be worn by General Sir Claude Auchinleck, Lt Col Ridgeway, Major General Geoffrey Bruce, Brigadier Desmond Young, Capt Causlan ADC, and Captain Mustafa Ali Khan, as a psuedo honour award for the visit to the King and Kingdom of Nepal, due to their visit to Katmandhu, Nepal, in October 1945. It was meant as a private jest at the expense of Major General Charles Lane who was apparently not so honoured. The lion circular badge was actually the symbol of the Katmandhu Water Board. The Commander-in-Chief of the Indian Army, General Sir Claude Auchinleck visits Kathmandu, capital of Nepal, and is decorated with the Star of Nepal by King Tribhuvan. General Sir Claude Auchinleck, Commander in Chief in India, paid his first visit to Nepal in October. While there he was decorated with the Most Refulgent Order of the Star of Nepal, First Class, and made an Honorary General of the Nepalese Forces, by the King of Nepal, Tribhubana Bir Vikram Sah. The King's speech to General Auchinleck is read by the Prime Minister's son, Gen. Sir Bahadur Shumshere Jungbahadur Rana (left) on the occasion of the C in C's visit. It is accompanied by an original letter written to describe what the honour was created for in 1945.
A Members Badge of the Magician's Club of London, of Houdini's Great Friend Both gilt and enamel from the 1920's, with blue water silk ribbon mount. Together with a Member of the Magic Circle Badge in gilt and enamel of Wilfred Allan, Douglas Dexter's principle pupil. The Magicians' Club of London was formed in 1911 by Harry Houdini along with others including Servais Le Roy, Chris Van Bern, Carl Stakemann, and Stanley Collins. It was a concept of Will Goldston who had taken umbrage with The Magic Circle (founded in 1905) and decided to start his own society. He wrote an article titled "The League of Magicians - A Suggestion by Will Goldston" in his Magician Annual for 1910-11. The first meeting was officially reported in Goldston's Magician Monthly. Houdini was elected president, the rest as Vice-Presidents with Stanley Collins as Secretary and Will Goldston as Treasurer. Nearly a hundred members were enrolled at the inaugural meeting on May 27, 1911. Houdini remained president until his death. After the death of Houdini in 1926, Will Goldston was unanimously elected to succeed him. He held this office for the next three years, relinquishing it to Louis Gautier in 1929, but continuing to serve as Treasurer The club seemed to have disbanded some time after Will Goldton passed away in 1948. In Goodliffe's Abracadabra magazine July 1949, inquiries were made regarding the Magicians' Club, London, since the death of Will Goldston asking if it had died a natural death along with its founder. As far as they were able to ascertain, it had. Wilfred Allan was the principle pupil of magician, and dear friend of co member Harry Houdini, Douglas Dexter. Douglas Dexter was once summoned to the Royal Palace for a personal Command Performance for the King, died in 1938 and Wilfred Allan died a year later in 1939.
A Mk IV Periscope An Interesting Piece of WW2 British Tank Equipment Marked the MK IV Periscope and dated 1945. Possibly the Vickers Mk IV Tank Scope, as used on the Churchill and the Sherman. Lenses a/f. Total length inc. handle 28 inches
A Most Attractive Coldstream Guards Pagri Badge, Silver Blue & Red Enamel In superb near mint condition ERII period. Worn upon the foreign service tropical helmet. It is the oldest regiment in the Regular Army in continuous active service, originating in Coldstream, Scotland in 1650 when General George Monck founded the regiment. It is one of two regiments of the Household Division that can trace its lineage to the New Model Army,The regiment received its current name, The Coldstream Guards, in 1855. In 1882 they were sent to Egypt against the rebels of Ahmed 'Urabi and in 1885 in the Suakin Campaign. In 1897, the Coldstreamers were reinforced with the addition of the 3rd battalion. The 1st and 2nd battalions were dispatched to South Africa at the outbreak of the Second Boer War. At the outbreak of the First World War, Coldstreamers were among the first British regiments to arrive in France after Britain declared war on Germany. In the following battles, they suffered heavy losses, in two cases losing all their officers. At the first Battle of Ypres the 1st battalion was virtually annihilated – by 1 November down to 150 men and the Lt Quartermaster. They fought in Mons, Loos, Somme, Ginchy and in the 3rd Battle of Ypres. They also formed the 4th (Pioneer) Battalion, which was disbanded after the war, in 1919. The 5th Reserve battalion never left Britain before it was disbanded. When the Second World War began, the 1st and 2nd battalions of The Coldstream Guards were part of the British Expeditionary Force in France; whilst the 3rd Battalion was on overseas service in the Middle East. Additional 4th and 5th battalions were also formed for the duration of the war. They fought extensively, as part of the Guards Armoured Division, in North Africa and Europe as dismounted infantry. The 4th battalion first became a motorized battalion in 1940 and then an armoured battalion in 1943. Helmet picture shown for information only, not included. Size 3.5 inches high x 2.75 inches.
A Most Attractive ERII Kings Troop Royal Horse Artillery Dolman Tunic Circa 1970's probably for bugler. After the Second World War, King George VI expressed the view that, following the mechanisation of the last batteries of horse-drawn artillery, a troop of horse artillery should be retained to take part in the great ceremonies of state. Accordingly the Riding Troop was reformed on 17 April 1946 at Shoeburyness as a six-gun Royal Horse Artillery battery for the Household Division. At the suggestion of Brigadier John Anquetil Norman, the King declared that the Riding Troop would be known as 'The King's Troop'. The King enacted his proclamation on 24 October 1947 by amending the page on the visitors' book by striking out the word "Riding" and inserting "King's". On her accession, Queen Elizabeth II declared that the name 'The King's Troop' would remain in honour of her father. On 6 September 1997, the coffin of Diana, Princess of Wales was carried on a gun carriage by members of the King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery. The King’s Troop was for 65 years stationed at St John's Wood Barracks before it was relocated to Napier Lines at the traditional Royal Artillery Barracks at Woolwich in February 2012. Because of the greater distance from central London, the troop can no longer ride to many ceremonial events but horses will be transported by vehicle to nearer stables for appearances at Hyde Park, Buckingham Palace and elsewhere. Signs of use wear, lining most worn, small size
A Most Attractive Silver & Enamel Demi Tasse Spoon With enamel paintings of a portrait bust of Graf Zeppelin, and a an airship. Gold plated with German hallmarks to rear. Superb condition and a most charming and collectable object d'art. Ferdinand von Zeppelin served as an official observer with the Union Army during the American Civil War. During the Peninsular Campaign, he visited the balloon camp of Thaddeus S. C. Lowe. Lowe sent the curious von Zeppelin to another balloon camp where the German-born aeronaut John Steiner could be of more help to the young man. His first ascent in a balloon, made at Saint Paul, Minnesota during this visit, is said to have been the inspiration of his later interest in aeronautics. Zeppelin's ideas for large dirigibles was first expressed in a diary entry dated 25 March 1874. Inspired by a recent lecture given by Heinrich von Stephan on the subject of "World Postal Services and Air Travel", he outlined the basic principle of his later craft: a large rigidly-framed outer envelope continuing a number of separate gasbags. In 1887 the success of Charles Renard and Arthur Krebs' airship La France prompted him to send a letter to the King of Württemberg about the military necessity for dirigibles and the lack of German development in this field. He went on to start the Zeppelin Airship Co. and his name lived on in German legend as the great airship pioneer of international travel and airship warfare.
A Most Beautiful Meckelenberg Infantry Officer's Pickelhaub Mecklenburg-Schwerin.During it's life as a collectable souvenir of the Great War, within the past 90 years, it has been sympathetically restored, including a replacement helmet centre plate. However, we reflect this in it's price, but the helmet is thoroughly delightful and a most beautiful example of a restored helmet. Silver star with the ovoid gold shield with the arms of Mecklenburg-Schwerin within wreath and ducal crown. Black lacquered leather body with gilt trim. Helmet body with excellent form and fine stitching. Interior original sweat leather and silk head liner all present and good. Visors undersides coloured. No extra holes in body. Exterior lacquer in good condition with minor crazing due to age. Round spike base with fluted spike and four star form fittings. Officer chinscales, leather lined with buckle. The House of Mecklenburg is a North German dynasty of West Slavic origin that ruled until 1918. The Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin was a territory in Northern Germany held by the House of Mecklenburg residing at Schwerin. It was a sovereign member state of the German Confederation and became a federated state of the North German Confederation and finally of the German Empire in 1871. In the early years of the French Revolutionary Wars Duke Frederick Francis I of Mecklenburg-Schwerin had remained neutral, and in 1803 he regained Wismar, which was pawned to him from Sweden. After Napoleon's victory at the Battle of Austerlitz and the final dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806, he joined the Confederation of the Rhine by a treaty of 22 March 1808. Napoleon, in preparation for the French invasion of Russia in 1812, disregarded this alliance; he offered the duchy to the Swedish heir apparent Jean Bernadotte for his support. Duke Frederick Francis was the first member of the confederation to abandon Napoleon, to whose armies he had sent a contingent, and in the following War of the Sixth Coalition he fought against the troops of the First French Empire —with the result that his new allies, Prussia and Russia, now offered his duchy to the Kingdom of Denmark. Instead, Denmark was promised the adjacent lands of Swedish Pomerania by the 1814 Peace of Kiel and the rule of the Mecklenburg dukes remained inviolate. At the 1815 Congress of Vienna, Frederick Francis joined the newly established German Confederation, and like his Strelitz cousin Charles II, was elevated to the title of a "Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin". In 1819 serfdom was finally abolished in his dominions. The Mecklenburg governance was still determined by the 1755 inheritance agreement (Landesgrundgesetzlicher Erbvergleich), which upheld the medieval hierarchy of the estates, which largely affected the social and economic development of both grand duchies. During the revolutions of 1848, the duchy witnessed a considerable agitation in favour of a liberal constitution. On 10 October 1849 Grand Duke Frederick Francis II (1823–1883) granted a new Basic law elaborated by his First Minister Ludwig von Lützow. In the subsequent reaction of the Mecklenburg nobility, backed by the Strelitz grand duke George, all the concessions which had been made to democracy were withdrawn and further restrictive measures were introduced in 1851 and 1852. In the dispute over neighbouring Holstein which culminated in the 1866 Austro-Prussian War, Frederick Francis II supported the Kingdom of Prussia, whom he aided with Mecklenburg-Schwerin soldiers. His grand duchy began to pass more and more under Prussian influence. In 1867 he joined the North German Confederation and the Zollverein. In the Franco-Prussian War (1870–1871), Prussia again received valuable assistance from Grand Duke Frederick Francis II, who was an ardent advocate of German unity and held a high command in her armies. In the course of the German unification in 1871, Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-Strelitz became states of the German Empire. There was now renewed agitation for a more democratic constitution, and the German Reichstag parliament gave some countenance to this movement. In 1897 Frederick Francis IV (b. 1882) succeeded his father Frederick Francis III (1851–1897) as the last grand duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. In 1907 the Grand Duke promised a constitution to his subjects. The duchy had always been under a feudal system of government, the grand duke having the executive entirely in his hands (though acting through ministers). The duchy shared a diet (Landtag), which met for a short session each year. At other times they were represented by a committee consisting of the proprietors of knights' estates (Rittergüter), known as the Ritterschaft, and the Landschaft, or burgomasters of certain towns. Mecklenburg-Schwerin returned six members to the Reichstag. Upon the suicide of his cousin Grand Duke Adolphus Frederick VI on 23 February 1918, Frederick Francis served as regent of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. Shortly afterwards, on 14 November, he was forced to renounce the Mecklenburg throne in the course of the German Revolution. We show post card photo of the Grand Duke wearing wearing his near identical pickelhaub with a cotton combat cover. 1 roundel lacking to the left of helmet.
A Most Desirable Ross Bayonet of The 1st Depot Battalion, 1st Quebec Regt. A veritable museum grade collectors piece. With superb regimental markings from the small number of conscripts of the ill fated, 1st Depot Batt. The Quebec Regt. Who suffered a terrible percentage of casualties at the Western Front. A fairly uncommon bayonet to find unmarked these days, but, very rare to find with good regimental markings, especially by such a small detachment of conscripts from a regiment of such noble history. A draft of Military Service Act, 1917 conscripts from the 1st Depot Battalion, Quebec Regiment, Montreal sailed on the S.S. Scandinavian March 25, 1918 arriving in England April 3, 1918. The total size of this draft at present is unknown probably about 500 soldiers. What is known is that 140 of this draft were channelled through the 23rd Reserve Battalion into the 14th (Royal Montreal) Battalion. Of this draft of 140 soldiers,100 were casualties with 22 deaths – all within the last 100 days of the war! Photo in the gallery of Headquarters, Depot Battalion, Quebec Regiment, Montreal, March 27, 1918, Lt.-Col. L.J. Daly-Gingras, D.S.O., O.C. A photo in the gallery of a mounted soldier, Onil Basette of Marieville, 1st Depot Battalion, 1st Quebec Regiment, taken in 1918. The bayonet metal is unusually painted red . Details of their noble and heroic service in just those 100 days are including in the following engagements; The Advance in Picardy (8 August – 3 September, 1918) Amiens 8-11 August 1918 The Breaking of the Hindenburg Line (26 August – 12 October, 1918) Arras, 1918 26 August – 3 September 1918 Scarpe, 1918 26-30 August 1918 Drocourt-Queant Line 2-3 September 1918 Hindenburg Line, Battles of the 12 September – 9 October 1918 Canal du Nord 27 September – 2 October 1918 Picardy (17 October – 11 November) Pursuit to Mons 11 November 1918
A Most Desirable Royal Army Medical Corps WW1 Trio Medical services in the British armed services go as far back as the formation of the Standing Regular Army after the Restoration of Charles II in 1660. This was the first time a career was provided for a Medical Officer (MO), known as the Regimental Surgeon, both in peacetime and in war. The Army was formed entirely on a regimental basis, and an MO with a Warrant Officer as his Assistant Surgeon was appointed to each regiment, which also provided a hospital. The MO was also for the first time concerned in the continuing health of his troops, and not limited to just battlefield medicine. This regimental basis of appointment for MOs continued until 1873, when a co-ordinated army medical service was set up. To join, a doctor needed to be qualified and single and aged at least 21, and then undergo a further examination in physiology, surgery, medicine, zoology, botany and physical geography including meteorology, and also to satisfy various other requirements (including having dissected the whole body at least once and having attended 12 midwifery cases); the results were published in three classes by an Army Medical School, which was set up in 1860 at Fort Pitt in Chatham, and moved in 1863 to Netley outside Southampton. There was much unhappiness in the Army Medical Service in the following years. For medical officers did not actually have military rank but “advantages corresponding to relative military rank” (such as choice of quarters, rates of lodging money, servants, fuel and light, allowances on account of injuries received in action, and pensions and allowances to widows and families). They had inferior pay in India, excessive amounts of Indian and colonial service (being required to serve in India six years at a stretch), and less recognition in honours and awards. They did not have their own identity as did the Army Service Corps, whose officers did have military rank. A number of complaints were published, and the British Medical Journal became vocal. For over two years after 27 July 1887 there were no recruits to the Army Medical Department. A parliamentary committee reported in 1890 highlighting the doctors’ injustices. Yet all this was ignored by the Secretary of State for War. The British Medical Association, the Royal College of Physicians and others redoubled their protests. Eventually, in 1898, officers and soldiers providing medical services were incorporated into a new body known by its present name, the Royal Army Medical Corps; its first Colonel-in-Chief was H.R.H the Duke of Connaught. The RAMC began to develop during the Boer War, but it was during the First World War that it reached its apogee both in size and experience. The RAMC itself lost 743 officers and 6130 soldiers killed in the war. During Britain's colonial days the RAMC had set up clinics and hospitals in countries where British troops could be found. Major-General Sir William Macpherson of the RAMC wrote the official Medical History of the War (HMSO 1922). Its main base was for long the Queen Alexandra Hospital Millbank Since the Victoria Cross was instituted in 1856 there have been 27 Victoria Crosses and two bars awarded to army medical personnel. A bar, indicating a subsequent award of a second Victoria Cross, has only ever been awarded three times, two of them to medical officers. Twenty-three of these Victoria Crosses are on display in the Army Medical Services Museum. The corps also has one recipient of both the Victoria Cross and the Iron Cross. One officer was awarded the George Cross in the Second World War. A young female member of the corps, Private Michelle Norris, became the first woman to be awarded the Military Cross following her actions in Iraq on 11 June 2006
A Most Fabulous, Intricately Carved Keris Dagger With Watered Steel Blade A stunning looking piece and a most impressive 20th century example with delightful pamor blade. Pamor is the pattern of white lines appearing on the blade. Kris blades are forged by a technique known as pattern welding, one in which layers of different metals are pounded and fused together while red hot, folded or twisted, adding more different metals, pounded more and folded more until the desired number of layers are obtained. The rough blade is then shaped, filed and sometimes polished smooth before finally acid etched to bring out the contrasting colours of the low and high carbon metals. The traditional Indonesian weapon allegedly endowed with religious and mystical powers. With probably a traditional Meteorite laminated iron blade with hammered nickle for the contrasting pattern. Small area of wood snake body lacking under the hilt.
A Most Interest Group Of Four Dutch WW2 Chivalric Decoration Medals Now confirmed as awarded to a Commander of a RNN U Boat, the Free Dutch Navy Submarine of WW2 HNMS O 19 (N 54). Capt. Van Dongen. An Order of Orange Nassau 'Officer' group in superb old quality. White enamel and silver gilt Maltese cross with ball-tipped finials and with deep blue enamel inset panels, with laurel wreath between the arms, on swivel crown suspension; the face with a circular central blue enamel and gilt medallion bearing a gilt Netherlands lion within a white enamel ring inscribed in gilt letters ‘JE MAINTIENDRAI’ (I will maintain); the reverse with a circular central blue enamel medallion bearing the gilt crowned cipher of Queen Wilhelmina, in whose name the Order was founded, within a white enamel ring inscribed in gilt letters ‘GOD ZY MET ONS’ (God be with us); age-toned; on original ribbon with rosette denoting an award of the ‘officer’ class. The Order was established by Queen Emma, Dowager Queen, acting as Regent for Queen Wilhelmina, on 4 April 1892 and may be awarded to both Dutch citizens and foreigners for meritorious service to the Dutch throne, state or society. A very good example of high quality and some age. An example of the of the calibre of WW2 srving officers who were awarded such a highly respected decoration was the heroic Canadian born, Royal Air Force fighter pilot ace RUSSEL, F/O Blair Dalzell, DSO, DFC (C1319) - Officer, Order of Orange-Nassau with Swords (Netherlands) Awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 January 1948 and AFRO 81/48 dated 6 February 1948. Public Records Office Air 2/9293 has recommendation drafted when he was a Wing Commander: In operational command of No.126 Wing, Royal Air Force, stationed at the aerodrome Volkel from September 1944 until February until April 1945, through his excellent work has greatly contributed to the liberation of the Netherlands. During World War II, the Order of Orange-Nassau was bestowed upon both members of the Netherlands military and members of foreign services who had helped liberate the Netherlands from Nazi Germany occupation, and those who helped liberate the former Dutch colonies in the Pacific. In the modern age, the Orange-Nassau is still the most active military and civil decoration of the Netherlands, and ranks after the Order of the Netherlands Lion. The Order is typically awarded each year on the Queen's official birthday (April 30) The Order is also used to honour foreign princes, ministers, dignitaries and diplomats. The second medal is the Dutch WW2 cross with 1940-45 bar (Oorlogsherinneringskruis) Followed by the Cross for Order and Peace, the Dutch medal for the police actions in the former Netherlands East Indies. This medal originates from 1947. The year clasps are given to an officer who was actually in armed combat with the Indonesian terrorists. Lastly the silver Officers Cross with year marking 'XXX' for 30 years service. The Dutch Navy at the beginning of the war with Germany in May 1940, consisted of 1 coastal defence ship, 5 cruisers, 9 destroyers, 27 submarines, 4 gun boats, 6 minelayers and other smaller vessels. The Dutch Navy fought in many parts of sea like North Sea, Mediterranean and the Pacific sea where the Dutch navy had to defend the Dutch colonies from the Japanese advance. Dutch naval forces had a contribution of sinking many enemy vessels, including 2 U-boats and also Japanese and even Italian submarines. But they also suffered many losses during the war, especially their submarine arm. They lost the coastal defence ship Soerabaja, the 3 cruisers De Ruyter, Java and Sumatra, 9 destroyers, 11 submarines and other smaller vessels. According to records the Royal Dutch Navy lost 59 warships during WWII [40%] Used by a Commander of a RNN U Boat, the Free Dutch Navy Submarine of WW2 HNMS O 19 (N 54)
A Most Interesting .88mm Tank & Anti-Personnel Cannon [Ground Use] Shell This shell was recovered in Norway, case dated and made in 1942, fired and reloaded in '45, impact fuze high velocity AZ23/28 head dated '45. In 1945 the Wehrmacht left around 200 .88mm cannon behind and shells to service them. This is one of those shells. The Third Reich Wehrmacht were especially sensitive to the protection of the Norwegian Heavy Water production plants and many cannon were strategically placed to defend these areas. During the German occupation of Norway in World War II, the heavy-water production plant was sabotaged by the SOE in order to prevent the Germans from making an atomic bomb. However, it was later discovered that the Germans were not as close to making an atomic bomb as had been initially feared. The production of heavy water was judged to be a serious enough threat that at least five separate attacks against it were launched by the allies and resistance forces during World War II. Inert and safe, not suitable for export or for sale to under 18's.
A Most Interesting Relic Of Zeppelin Z4 And It's Accompanying Certificate In traditional old German gothic print. A translation goes as follows; Announcement Trying to keep alive in Germany, with a visible keepsake, the memory of the days of August 4 and 5, 1908, which, by the fly-past of the Airship of his Excellency Graf Zeppelin became a milestone in the progression of human civilisation. I have, from the metal parts of airship Z 4 received through our sister company of Carl Berg AG in Eveking manufactured a quantity of spoons with appropriate engraving. Every such spoon bearing this engraving is guaranteed to have been part of the remnants of Airship Z 4, exclusively recycled by me. Luedenscheid in September 1908 Wilhelm Berg Aluminumworks and Metal Goods Factory
A Most Intriguing Full Size Austro German Crystal Sword A swept hilt style with blown crystal handle containing a spiral and a quatrefoil type blade. Undoubtedly a work of art, not by any means a functioning sword, but incredibly impressive with great presence. 39.5 long overall approx 2.5 kilos.
A Most Intriguing WW2 British Prisoner Of War Souvenir From His Escape Kit From a British officer who was liberated from his POW camp in 1944. The POW officers who were intending to escape often created a bespoke 'escape kit' in preparation of a break out. These kits often included forged documents, identity papers [essential] and German currency etc. In this particular case the officer came up with a topping wheeze of creating a forged SS armband. The SS when in civilian clothes would keep about their person an SS armband which they could adorn if the need arose, so that all and sundry about them, when in public, would know they were an SS officer, and thus he would not to be questioned, but if necessary obeyed. In theory, as an escapee, his thinking was, if there was checkpoint or a situation where members of the public were being questioned by officers of the Wehrmacht, by appearing to be an off-duty SS officer he would thus be left alone and possibly whisked through a checkpoint, in theory. This was potentially a jolly good idea, unless caught, when at that point it would have been a very, very, bad idea indeed. However, it was never put to the test as the Brit was liberated before he escaped, and his pseudo armband kept as a souvenir. It was constructed of red cotton, probably from a Nazi NSDAP flag, black cotton trim, and a black and white swastika, painted though for expediency, as opposed to printed or sown. When new it would have obviously looked a lot more convincing.
A Most Rare Japanese WW2 Torpedo Bomber Warning Plate Taken from a crashed Mitsubishi G4M Mitsubishi G4M Bomber in 1945, in Japanese it reads "Danger Do Not Turn Emgine May Fire Up" The Mitsubishi G4M was a two engine bomber used by the Imperial Japanese Navy in World War II. Codenamed "Betty" by allies, there were 2,435 GM4's produced by Japan between the years of 1941 and 1945. The Mitsubishi G4M was used as a bomber and a torpedo bomber. The Mitsubishi G4M was used in the sinking of The Prince of Wales and Repulse in 1941. It was also the aircraft that Admiral Yamamoto was in, when his Mitsubishi G4M was shot down by American P-38's. The Mitsubishi G4M was the aircraft that the Japanese attached (to the bottom) the Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka or "baka" rocket powered, kamikaze attack bomb/plane. The G4M would carry the bomb/plane with 2,000 lbs of explosives, underneath, until they were in range of a ship or target and then release it. The pilot would then glide the bomb/plane towards a target, then fire the solid fuel rockets, at the last, until it hit the vessel or target. The Mitsubishi G4M was powered by two, Kasei, fourteen cylinder, radial engines and had a top speed of 265 mph. The G4M had a service ceiling of almost 28,000 feet. The Mitsubishi G4M had extreme long range of over 3,000 miles. The Mitsubishi G4M was armed with one 20 mm auto cannon and four 7.7 mm machine guns. The Mitsubishi G4M could carry almost 2,000 lbs bombs or torpedoes. We do not know other than in the Pacific theatre of war whereabouts this plaque was recovered from the crashed plane.
A Most Rare Original WW2 German ‘Hertz Horn’ MineTrigger Made in lead alloy a tube that was filled with glass liners containing bio chromatic chemicals in order to break upon contact and ignite the mine in order to sink the allied ship. Used on such as the German Type GZ (the German designation was UMA). It had a small charge of only 66 pounds of high explosive because it was intended as an anti-submarine mine. Anti-shipping mines had much larger charges.
A Most Rare Set Of 12 Original Photographs Of The General Nobile Expedition Original Polar Expeditions collectables are most highly desirable and we have been delighted to acquire two such connected lots. These are 12 original photographic postcards, published at the time, by two publishers, Traldi and Ballerini & Fratini. For example one is entitled "La Spedizione Nobile - 11 - Esplorazioni di Alpini." Ed. A. Traldi, Milan, n.d. c. 1928. and another "General Nobile to edge of Italy before leaving." Umberto Nobile January 21, 1885 – July 30, 1978) was an Italian aeronautical engineer and Arctic explorer. Nobile was a developer and promoter of semi-rigid airships during the Golden Age of Aviation between the two World Wars. He is primarily remembered for designing and piloting the airship Norge, which may have been the first aircraft to reach the North Pole, and which was indisputably the first to fly across the polar ice cap from Europe to America. Nobile also designed and flew the Italia, a second polar airship; this second expedition ended in a deadly crash and provoked an international rescue effort.The N-class airship Italia was slowly completed and equipped for Polar flight during 1927-28. Part of the difficulty was in raising private funding to cover the costs of the expedition, which finally was financed by the city of Milan; the Italian government limited its direct participation to providing the airship and sending the aging steamer Città di Milano as a support vessel to Svalbard, under the command of Giuseppe Romagna. This time the airship used a German hangar at Stolp en route to Svalbard and the mast at Vadsø (Northern Norway). On May 23, 1928, after an outstanding 69 hour long flight to the Siberian group of Arctic islands, the Italia commenced its flight to the North Pole with Nobile as both pilot and expedition leader. On May 24, the ship reached the Pole and had already turned back toward Svalbard when it ran into a storm. On May 25, the Italia crashed onto the pack ice less than 30 kilometres north of Nordaustlandet (Eastern part of Svalbard). Of the 16 men in the crew, ten were thrown onto the ice as the gondola was smashed; the remaining six crewmen were trapped in the buoyant superstructure as it ascended skyward due to loss of the gondola; the fate of the six men was never resolved. One of the ten men on the ice, Pomella, died from the impact; Nobile suffered a broken arm, broken leg, broken rib and head injury; Cecioni suffered two badly broken legs; Malmgren suffered a severe shoulder injury and suspected injury to a kidney; and Zappi had several broken ribs. The crew managed to salvage several items from the crashed airship gondola, including a radio transceiver, a tent which they later painted red for maximum visibility, and, critically, packages of food and survival equipment which quick-witted engineer Ettore Arduino had managed to throw onto the ice before he and his five companions were carried off to their deaths by the wrecked but still airborne airship envelope and keel. As the days passed, the drifting sea ice took the survivors towards Foyn and Broch islands. A few days after the crash the Swedish meteorologist Malmgren and Nobile's second and third in command Mariano and Zappi decided to leave the immobile group and march towards land. Malmgren, who was injured, weakened and reportedly still depressed over his meteorological advice that he felt contributed to the crash, asked his two Italian companions to continue without him. These two were picked up several weeks later by the Soviet icebreaker "Krasin". However there were persistent rumors that Malmgren was killed and cannibalized by Zappi and Mariano
A Most Rare Survivor of the General Strike 1926, Strike Terminated Today An original four page newspaper bulletin printed and published for the General Council of the TUC, titled, "The British Worker". A newspaper/bulletin than only existed for under two weeks, printing 11 issues, from May 4th till May 17th. At the end of the strike on May 12th 1926. The 1926 general strike in the United Kingdom was a general strike that lasted 9 days, from 3 May 1926 to 12 May 1926. It was called by the General Council of the Trades Union Congress (TUC) in an unsuccessful attempt to force the British government to act to prevent wage reduction and worsening conditions for 1.2 million locked-out coal miners"". Some 1.7 million workers went out, especially in transport and heavy industry. The government was prepared and enlisted middle class volunteers to maintain essential services. There was little violence and the TUC gave up in defeat. In the long run, there was little impact on trade union activity or industrial relations. Keith Laybourn says that historians mostly agree that, "In no significant way could the General Strike be considered a turning point or watershed in British industrial history." It was the only general strike in British history, as union leaders such as Ernest Bevin, who had coordinated the strike, considered it a mistake. They decided that action by political parties was a better solution. On 12 May 1926, the TUC General Council visited 10 Downing Street to announce its decision to call off the strike if the proposals worked out by the Samuel Commission were respected and the government offered a guarantee there would be no victimization of strikers. The government stated that it had "no power to compel employers to take back every man who had been on strike". However, the TUC agreed to end the dispute without such an agreement. However, the country came close to a one-day general strike on 31 July 1972. over the imprisonment of the Pentonville Five. Worn condition with some separation but incredibly rare to survive, and the first copy we have seen in over 40 years.
A Most Rare WW2 German Mine Rescue Honour Medal Silver plate over hard metal base with eagle/swastika over crossed hammers to the obverse, and the dedication, 'Für Verdienste im Gruben-wehrwessen' to the reverse. Lacking ribbon. IInd class.
A Most Rare, Original German Zeppellin Award. Maker marked German Zeppelin crew award. Issued after the end of The Great War, in 1920, this badge was given to those servicemen who were assigned to either the Army and Navy Zeppelin Air services. Around 1000 were made for the Army and 1500 for the Navy and 1000 for ground crew. We believe this is a Navy example with the crown removed. Possibly to be worn as an Army badge. Two propaganda postcards are shown in the gallery showing the Zeppellins, two of them coming over to England ahead of the German fleet, and the other over the coast of England in 1915 [not included]
A Most Scarce and Attractive Irish Guards WW1 Officer's Trench Wrist Watch This is a most handsome watch used by an officer, a 2nd Lieutenant in the Irish Guards, a brother officer of fellow Irish Guards officer, John Kipling, son of one of England's greatest poets and novelists, Rudyard Kipling, who was declared missing presumed killed, at Loos 1915.The watch has a top winding crown. The watch has the very desirable, screw front, nickel case, and measures 39mm. Crown and cathedral hands are all original and really attractive. The movement is unsigned, Swiss made and running well and keeping time. Separate second dial, good numerals. Acquired with the officer's portrait miniature and his campaign eating set. The Irish Guards were formed on 1st April 1900 by order of HRH Queen Victoria to commemorate the bravery of the Irish people who fought in the Boer war. The Irish Guards played a major part in both World Wars, winning a total of six Victoria Crosses including the last to be presented in the Second World War and have seen armed conflict in many parts of the world since 1945. The strength of the Regiment on mobilisation in 1914 was 997. During the Great War 293 Officers and 9340 Other Ranks served as Irish Guardsmen of whom 115 Officers and 2235 Other Ranks gave their lives and a further 195 Officers and 5541 Other Ranks were wounded. The numbers don't add up because some of the individuals were wounded more than once and are counted accordingly. On the 8th September 1914 the Battle of Marne started and this was to be the turning point when the German advance from Mons was halted just east of Paris, and the Allies began the advance northwards towards AINSE where the 1st Battalion crossed by pontoon on the 14th September 1914. In mid-October the BEF was moved to cover the Channel Ports and from the 21st October to the 12th November 1914 the 1st Battalion fought continuously in the first battle of YPRES, losing more than 700 men. That winter saw the beginning of the long period of trench-warfare, which lasted until the final battles in 1918. Life consisted of mostly monotony, often intense discomfort from the cold and mud, but with an ever-increasing number of casualties from the shelling, machine guns, sniping, mortaring, mining and raids. From time to time they took part in great set-piece battles such as FESTUBERT, LOOS (this was the first time the Regiment's newly formed 2nd Battalion was in action) THE SOMME, YPRES, CAMBRAI and ARRAS. Each success or failure meant a few hundred yards gained or lost, but the lists of casualties were always large, right up until the last great offensives of the German army in 1918. The collapse of the Russian revolution in 1917 meant that the German eastern front was closed enabling them to redeploy those involved to the western front and against the Allies. On the 21st March sixty-four German Divisions were flung against the point where the British and French Armies met at HAZEBROUCK. The Germans were nearly successful in their attempt to reach the Channel Ports, however the tide was turned during the summer and in August 1918 the Allied Armies took the offensive at places such as HINDENBURG LINE and CANAL NORD. By November 1918 Germany was defeated and the Armistice was signed on the 11th November 1918, by which time the 1st Battalion were at MAUBEUGE, which was only a few miles from MONS, where they had first come under fire in 1914. Acquired with his trench watch and campaign, All to be sold separately. We do not know the officer's name unfortunately but it could possibly be traced through vintage officer group photos.
A Most Scarce British Morse Code Signalling Walking Stick Black wood and metal cane with celluloid ball top and retractable spring loaded button signaller. The top section of the cane contains a battery compartment and the bottom part of the top portion has a three hole opening of differing shapes that we presume to facilitate the plugging in of a three wire cable. The celluloid and metal handle unscrews from its wooden haft. We have heard of such of pieces in the past 40 years, but never actually owned first hand one of this most intriguing and rare form of gadget walking cane, and although we were informed from its source that it was from WW1, it appears to us to be more likely from WW2. It has a patent pending stamp but we can trace nothing quite like anywhere through our extensive reference works or on the net. It may have been made by such as the British Secret Intelligence Service [SIS] for foreign espionage, but frankly we have little idea other than that. If so, it was possibly designed and made at Station XVB hidden within the walls of the British Natural History Museum. Each one of the six Station XVB rooms had their own particular theme, such as ‘Incendiaries and Demolition Charges’ and the ‘Explosives Camouflage Section’. London Zoo supplied sample animal droppings relevant to the various theatres of war. Then, for Europe, plaster cowpats and horse manure would be made and packed with plastic explosives – whereas camel dung was all the rage for North Africa. Plaster-cast coal was another favourite: leave it in the right place and the enemy would light their own explosive end. In other galleries machine guns were concealed inside fish, wireless sets in books, and country-specific clothes and shoes were made and artificially aged. A Jewish refugee from Berlin was employed to tailor authentic German clothes for agents – who were only ever a few missed stitches away from having their cover blown. The SOE’s connection to the Museum dropped out of history after the war. I screw lacking the other replaced. [ideally needs two others]
A Most Scarce German WW2 Officer's Sword Bag. Original bag made by the swordmakers for officer's to transit their swords on campaign. Very good condition overall for age. Brushed cotton with grey cotton piping. Made with a single hole to one side for the scabbard ring mount protrusion. Universal size for all patterns. 40 inches long overall.
A Most Scarce German WW2 Purple Piped Nebeltruppe Cap [Smoke Troops]. In good condition for age. A little light mothing, nicely supplier marked, and a good unusual cap ideal for the collector of desirable German army caps of WW2. Nebeltruppen smoke troops are general chemical warfare troops, who were trained for both smoke and gas operations, and in the event of chemical warfare breaking out, the offensive role will be borne primarily by them. Specifically with reference to the use of smoke, it should be borne in mind that when smoke is required in limited areas it is produced generally by smoke-producing ammunition fired by the combat units' organic weapons, such as artillery and mortars; in operations involving the use of smoke in large quantities the specially trained and equipped, smoke troops are used. A number of these units was reported destroyed at Stalingrad. Three smoke batteries were also reported in North Africa. It was known that the Grossdeutschland Division and probably 20 divisions formed since December 1941, include an organic smoke battery. "It is well to point out here that the Germans distinguish between the blinding screen and the area screen, a distinction not specifically made by General von Cochenhausen. The blinding screen is laid to blind hostile observation. The area screen is laid over an extensive area and fighting is carried out within the screen under conditions similar to a natural thick fog." The previous details were in part taken from a report on German smoke tactics in WWII, from Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 32, August 26, 1943. US War Dept.
A Most Scarce Luftwaffe General's Visor Cap Wreath and Cockade Gilt metal one piece wreath and cockade. I pin mount remaining. Made for a Luftwaffe General, such as Fighter Ace and later General, Adolf Galand. An invaluable original rarity if one needs one. A good, original, complete, Luftwaffe general's visor cap would be up to £3,000 or so.
A Most Scarce Police Lantern For Special Patrols In WW1 Maker marked and dated 1917. Used for special protection patrols, and on railway protection in order to warn oncoming trains for imminent danger from Zeppelin raids. Also used in Railway marshalling yards. a larger than usual example, with oil lamp, and concealing light fitting [but lacking catch] for officers to conceal themselves, without being seen, but availing the officer with instant access to light. Also vital for long distance signaling. Small crack to lens.
A Most Scarce Royal Guernsey Light Infantry Helmet Plate Circa 1916 Royal Guernsey Light Infantry was a regiment in the British Army that was formed from the Royal Guernsey Militia in 1916 to serve in World War I. They fought as part of the British 29th Division. Of the 2280 Guernseymen who fought on the western front with the RGLI, 327 died and 667 were wounded. Many Guernsey men had already volunteered for regiments in the British Army before the RGLI was formed. The RGLI was created because there was no Guernsey-named regiment to underline the island's devotion to the Crown. The regimental motto, Diex Aix, derives from the battle cry used by the Normans at the Battle of Hastings. The Regiment lives on in the Guernsey Army Cadet Force (Det.) Light Infantry, who, although they do not wear the RGLI Cap Badge, still keep alive the history of the Regiment within the Detachment.
A Most Scarce Spanish Civil War Period Fascist Falangist Youth Buckle The symbol of the yoke and the arrows. The Spanish equivalent to the German Hitler Youth of the same period. Silver metal, higher quality than usual. After Franco seized power on 19 April 1937, he united under his command the Falange with the Carlist Comunión Tradicionalista, forming Falange Española Tradicionalista y de las JONS (FET y de las JONS), whose official ideology was the Falangists' 27 puntos—reduced, after the unification, to 26. Despite this, the party was in fact a wide-ranging nationalist coalition, closely controlled by Franco. Parts of the original Falange (including Hedilla) and many Carlists did not join the unified party. Franco had sought to control the Falange after a clash between Hedilla and his main critics within the group, the legitimistas of Agustín Aznar and Sancho Dávila y Fernández de Celis, that threatened to derail the Nationalist war effort.
A Most Scarce WW1 Officers Pocket Trench Torch and Signalling Lamp A very interesting rare WW1 electric battery operated trench torch and signalling lamp which is a rarely seen alternative version of the more common Orilux officers trench torch. The torch is in overall nice dent free condition complete with original battery [that now seems to have lost its power]. No bulb or fitting.
A Most Scarce, Free Polish, Second Infantry Fusiliers Division, Medal, 1942 A very rarely seen Free Polish Army medal awarded at Christmas in 1942, to the Free Polish Army, 2nd Division, that fought in the Battle of France to defend Paris, and retreated to escape the German advance, to Switzerland, to then be interned. The medal has a Polish Eagle to the centre,and within the rim, Boze Narodze w Szajcar.I.I. D.S.P. On the obverse, a bust of a soldier, facing left, within the rim, Noel En Suisse Des Internes 1942. Signed. Huquenin. Awarded to Polish soldiers interned in Switzerland. 30.5 mm with eyelet. White metal silver plated. After Poland's defeat after the joint Russian and German invasion, the government in exile quickly organized in France a new fighting force originally of about 80,000 men. Their units were subordinate to the French Army. Meanwhile an Anglo-Polish Naval Agreement on 18 November 1939 organised the serving of Polish Naval units alongside the Royal Navy. And in early 1940 a Polish Highland Brigade took part in the Battles of Narvik in Norway. A Polish Independent Carpathian Brigade was formed in French-mandated Syria, to which many Polish troops had escaped from Poland. Two Polish divisions (First Grenadier Division, and Second Infantry Fusiliers Division) took part in the defence of France, while a Polish motorized brigade and two infantry divisions were being formed. During these dramatic events a number of Poles escaped across the Romanian, Czech and Hungarian borders and eventually joined the Polish Forces in France. Other Poles were captured by the advancing Soviet Army and taken as forced labour to Siberia and Northern Russia. The Polish Nation was divided: this effectively created the strands of two stories. Poles in France formed and trained. Some Poles were sent to the defence of Norway and were with the British in the spring of 1940. The combined British, French and Polish Force saw action against the Germans at Narvik in Norway and was eventually evacuated 10 May 1940. Germany attacked France on 26 May 1940. The Free Polish Forces prepared to defend Paris. But the Battle for France was over quickly and on 22 June an armistice was signed between Germany and France. The capitulation by the French again left them in a quandary. Units continued to fight despite Pétain’s disgraceful call for armistice and demobilization on 16th June 1940 while the Poles covered the retreat. Polish units were cut off by the retreat and many decided to sneak around German strongholds to avoid capture (Piotowski, 1943). Brigadier-General Bronislaw Prugar-Kietling defended the Belfort area with 545 senior officers, 2,373 officers and 12,912 troops. The First Division fought on until the 18th June and the 2nd Division decided to escape across the border into Switzerland on the 20 - 21st June 1940. Brigadier-General Prugar-Kietling crossed into Switzerland at 5.30am as the first German tanks overran the remains of the Franco-Polish defences. At the border the Polish soldiers abandoned their arms and became interned under the control and protection of General Henri Guisan. After the war's end, to the principal allies eternal shame, the Free Polish forces were not even permitted to partake in the British Victory parade through the streets of London, in order not to offend 'Uncle' Joe Stalin, even though tens of thousands of Poles had fought and died alongside their allied brethren throughout the whole war. Although, to Britain's great credit, we principally entered the war in defence of Poland, and not in defence of ourselves, critical political pressure was 'brought to bear' upon Churchill not to permit the Poles to partake in the Victory Parade.
A Most Unusual Imperial German WW1 Boys Military Sword Lions head pommel, traditional brass P hilt guard, triple wire bound leather grip, crossed sabre langet. Blade maker marked WKC of Solingen. Black steel scabbard. An identical version of a regular sized Imperial German officers sabre but two thirds the size. Just returned from our conservation artisan and after many, many hours it is now far more presentable but with signs of natural age and use wear. Photo in the gallery of young Hans von Minning, boy-mascot of a German regiment--symbolic of Germany's youth which appreciated all things military, just like the Kaiser they so admired. Boy Soldiers’ fighting in World War One remained a controversial issue throughout the war. By the time World War One had ended many thousands of youths too young to legally enlist had been either killed or wounded. When World War One was declared in August 1914, a huge number of men wanted to enlist. Their enthusiasm was shared by many aged 15 to 18. The war was sold to the general public as a war that would be over by Christmas 1914. Therefore recruitment offices had to handle tens of thousands of men and youths who wanted to show their patriotic fervour. Few, if any, of the recruitment officers had time and probably the inclination to check the age of the volunteers. The rule of thumb seemed to be perfectly simple: if the volunteer wanted to fight for his country and was physically fit enough to do so, why stop him? In this way it is thought that as many of 250,000 ‘Boy Soldiers’ were recruited and fought in World War One. Although 18 was the youngest official age to volunteer it was routinely bypassed by enthusiastic young boys. On the first day of the Battle of the Somme in 1916, 500 ‘Boy Soldiers’ were killed and 2,000 wounded. By the time the battle had ended, 18,000 ‘Boy Soldiers’ had been killed or wounded. One of the youngest British soldiers that fought at the Somme was later discovered to have been 12 years old. He was later discharged and sent home. Overall 30.25 inches long.
A Most Unusual Straight Quillon Spanish Civil War Fighting Knife We last saw one like this, with a slight S shaped quillon, illustrated in Gordon Hughes's Primer of Military Knives Part One. A most similar three rivet celluloid gripped fighting knife, a dagger used by the Militia members of “El Battalion de la Muerte” (Battalion of Death). They were one of the International Brigades of Communists and Socialists. Volunteers from all over Europe to fight against General Franco's fascists. Their knives can be seen in this photo in the gallery, worn at the waist, and this fine piece is most similar but with the owner's khaki scabbard camouflage covering. The other knife we saw in Hughes book had a central fuller groove, this one is lacking that, although it has been field sharpened. This was an item that it is believed to have been used by a British fighter member, possibly an Empire colonial. It's similarity to the WW2 British FS knife must only compliment it's designer's efforts in creating a most effective fighting weapon.
A Most Unusual, Original, Vintage Sword, For An Officer Of the King Of Siam A rare opportunity to own a beautiful pattern of sword that appears most infrequently on the collector's market. With the elephant pommel and Royal Arms of the King. Gilt bronze mounts, leather and gilt scabbard and plain blade. The sword was initially designed and contracted to the Wilkinson Sword Co. in the 1870's. However, this example was likely not made by Wilkinson, and commissioned in or around the 1920's.
A Museum Grade Baby's Gas Mask Dated 1939 A most evocative memory piece of WW2. A baby's respirator with metal backing frame. Pump action and in very good condition. Ideal for the collector of WW2 respirators or for a film or theatre costumier hire company.
A National Socialist Motor Corps Enlisted Man's Side Cap Eagle Badge an eagle sitting, its talons gripping a wreath swastika below, with a ribbon banner above inscribed "NSKK", -
A Nazi German Occupation WW2 Public Notice Wanted Poster 1944 Listing in two languages, German and East European [possibly Slovenian] 55 Communist Bandits and their helpers. Various torn areas but vital to be kept as a piece of unique WW2 history. Would be perfect framed for display. In the aftermath of Munich, Slovak politicians from the democratic parties (Republican Party of Farmers and Peasants, Czechoslovak Social Democratic Party, and Czechoslovak National Socialist Party) organized a resistance movement. Individual underground cells sprang up in towns and villages throughout Slovakia. A campaign of "whispering" propaganda was initiated to alert the acquiescent Slovak population to the true nature of the Tiso regime. The goal of the democratic resistance was the restoration of the Czechoslovak Republic, but with greater participation for Slovakia. In the spring of 1939, the "Zeta" headquarters was established in Bratislava to coordinate with the Czech resistance and to transmit intelligence information to the liberation movement abroad. Party Communists remaining in Slovakia formed the underground Communist of Slovakia (Komunisticka strana Slovenska--KSS) and until 1943 favored the creation of an independent "Soviet Slovakia." The shortage of qualified personnel enabled resistance members to infiltrate all levels of the Tiso administration, where they promoted economic sabotage. Mutiny within the Slovak army (marshaled by the Axis powers for combat against Poland and, later, the Soviet Union) was encouraged and became commonplace. At Kremnica, on September 15, 1939, approximately 3,500 Slovak soldiers abandoned their transport train and marched into the city. Members of the underground Slovak Revolutionary Youth set fire to machinery in factories, emptied the fuel tanks of locomotives, and exploded munitions in warehouses. Slovak youth turned increasingly against the Tiso regime. In his Christmas broadcast of 1942, Benes called for resistance groups in Slovakia to increase their activity in preparation for a seizure of power. The groups worked to unify their efforts. The following November, negotiations between democratic and communist resistance leaders culminated in the signing of the Christmas Agreement of 1943. The agreement called for the creation of the Slovak National Council to represent the political will of the Slovak nation. The Slovak National Council would act in concert with the Czechoslovak government and liberation movement abroad. The postwar Czechoslovak state would be democratic and organized on the basis of national equality. The Christmas Agreement provided also for a close association with the Soviet Union in foreign policy and military affairs. Benes endorsed the agreement on March 27, 1944. The Allied powers agreed that Slovakia would be liberated by Soviet armies. In March 1944, with Benes's approval, the Slovak National Council authorized Lieutenant-Colonel Jan Golian to prepare for a national coup to be coordinated with the arrival of Soviet troops. Golian organized a secret military center at Banska Bystrica and created Slovak partisan units composed of escaped prisoners of war and army deserters. The Slovak National Uprising of August 29, however, was premature. The Soviet government, regarding the Slovak resistance as politically suspect, failed to inform the Slovaks of a change in Soviet strategy. Despite American efforts to assist the uprising, the German Wehrmacht occupied Slovakia, and Banska Bystrica fell on October 27. Nonetheless, local partisan warfare continued up to the liberation.
A Near Mint Early WW2 Coldstream Guards 'Battle Honour' Wilkinson Sword An absolute historical beauty, from a B.E.F. WW2 serving officer, with it's original frog. Commissioned from Wilkinson's by it's owner in early-mid 1939. Deluxe grade with the regiments battle honours, up to 1918, in high grade etched detailing, within scrolls down the length of both sides of the blade. The Grenadier Guards is an elite infantry regiment of the British Army. It is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. During the Second World War the regiment was expanded to six service battalions, with the re-raising of the 4th Battalion, and the establishment of the 5th and 6th Battalions. The Grenadier Guards' first involvement in the war came in the early stages of the fighting when all three regular battalions were sent to France in late 1939 as part of the British Expeditionary Force. The 1st and 2nd Battalions were serving in the 7th Guards Brigade, which also included the 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards, and were part of the 3rd Infantry Division, led by Major General Bernard Law Montgomery. The 3rd Battalion was in the 1st Guards Brigade attached to the 1st Infantry Division, commanded by Major General Harold Alexander. As the BEF was pushed back by the German blitzkrieg during the battles of France and Dunkirk, these battalions played a considerable role in maintaining the British Army's reputation during the withdrawal phase of the campaign before being themselves evacuated from Dunkirk. After this they returned to the United Kingdom where they undertook defensive duties in anticipation of a possible German invasion. Between October 1940 and October 1941, the regiment raised the 4th, 5th, and 6th Battalions. Later, in the summer of 1941, there was a need to increase the number of armoured and motorised units in the British Army and as a result many infantry battalions were converted into armoured regiments and so the 2nd and 4th Battalions were re-equipped with tanks, while the 1st Battalion was motorised. The 1st and 2nd (Armoured) Battalions were part of the 5th Guards Armoured Brigade, attached to the Guards Armoured Division, and the 4th Battalion was part of 6th Guards Tank Brigade Group. They subsequently served in the North West Europe Campaign of 1944–45, taking part in several actions including the Battle for Caen, particularly in Operation Goodwood, as well as Operation Market Garden, the Battle of the Bulge and Operation Veritable. The 3rd, 5th and 6th Battalions served in the North African Campaign and in the final stages Tunisia Campaign, under command of the British First Army, where they fought significant battles in the Medjez-el-Bab and along the Mareth Line. The regiment took part in the Italian Campaign at Salerno, Monte Camino, Anzio, Monte Cassino, and along the Gothic Line. The 3rd Battalion, still with 1st Guards Brigade, were attached to the 78th Battleaxe Infantry Division for two months in Tunisia until it was exchanged for the 38th (Irish) Infantry Brigade and became part of the 6th Armoured Division and would remain there for the rest of the war. The 5th Battalion was part of 24th Guards Brigade and served with the 1st Division during the Battle of Anzio. After suffering devastating casualties it was relieved in March 1944 and disbanded later that year. The 6th Battalion served with the 22nd Guards Brigade, later redesignated 201st Guards Motor Brigade, and served with the brigade until late 1944 when the battalion was disbanded due to an acute shortage of Guards replacements. Throughout the course of the conflict two men of the regiment were awarded the Victoria Cross. They were Lance Corporal Harry Nicholls of the 3rd Battalion, during the Battle of Dunkirk, and Major William Sidney of the 5th Battalion during the Battle of Anzio in March 1944
A Northamptonshire Yeomanry Lapel Badge In blue enamel and silver The Northamptonshire Yeomanry was a unit of the British Army, formed in 1794 as volunteer cavalry. It later served in an armoured role before being reduced to squadron level in 1956. It ceased to have a separate existence in 1969. In accordance with the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907 (7 Edw.7, c.9), which brought the Territorial Force into being, the TF was intended to be a home defence force for service during wartime and members could not be compelled to serve outside the country. However, on the outbreak of war on 4 August 1914, many members volunteered for Imperial Service. Therefore, TF units were split in August and September 1914 into 1st Line (liable for overseas service) and 2nd Line (home service for those unable or unwilling to serve overseas) units. Later, a 3rd Line was formed to act as a reserve, providing trained replacements for the 1st and 2nd Line regiments. The 2/1st Northamptonshire Yeomanry was formed in September 1914. In February 1915, the regiment joined the 59th (2nd North Midland) Division. In April 1917, the regiment began to split up, with the RHQ and A Squadron joining the 69th (2nd East Anglian) Division. One Squadron was attached to the 67th (2nd Home Counties) Division in October 1916. During the following winter, the remaining squadron went to France, where it was absorbed into the Tank Corps around August 1917. Of the two squadrons remaining in the United Kingdom, one was absorbed into the 6th Reserve Cavalry Regiment in March 1917, the other was disbanded. During World War II, 1st Northants Yeo (TA) remained in the United Kingdom and from 1941 - 1942 were part of the Coats Mission, the plan to evacuate the Royal Family in the event of a German invasion. In 1944, now as a part of the 33rd Armoured Brigade, they participated in the Normandy Landings on D Day, 6 June. The brigade's three regiments, which included the East Riding of Yorkshire Yeomanry and the 144 Regiment RAC, landed on Gold Beach in Normandy. Their role was to support any infantry who were in need of armour support, therefore the Brigade rarely fought as one entity. One of the occasions when the Brigade did undertake an operation on its own was at Le Mesnil-Patry, Rots on 11 June 1944. Further battles they were involved in were around Caen, including Operation Charnwood 7 July, the battle to capture Caen. On 16 July 1944, it was involved in Operation Pomegranate, where it come under the command of the 59th (Staffordshire) Infantry Division. On 8 August 1944, it was involved in Operation Totalize, a planned breakout from the Caen Salient. It was during Operation Totalize that Joe Ekins, a Sherman Tank gunner of the Northamptonshire Yeomanry, gained recognition for killing the renowned German tank commander, Michael Wittmann, the 4th top scoring tank ace in history, near St. Aignan de Cramesnil, France. The regiment was briefly attached to the 51st (Highland) Division for the actions around the Battle of the Bulge. The Regiment was reformed and re-equipped with LVT 4 Buffalo amphibious armoured fighting vehicles, for the Rhine crossing and was placed under the command of the 79th Armoured Division
A Pair of 'Troubles' Era, Dated 1973, Bomb Disposal Officer's Goggles In original case, Anti Mine goggles. Acquired from a former British Army Bomb Disposal officer who served in the 1970's in Northern Ireland 321 EOD & Search Squadron 11 EOD Regiment RLC is a unit of the British Army responsible for Explosive Ordnance Disposal and Search duties in Northern Ireland. The unit was previously titled 321 EOD Unit, then 321 EOD Company RAOC Royal Army Ordnance Corps and was re-badged as a unit of the Royal Logistic Corps in April 1993, now part of 11 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Regiment RLC. With its Headquarters at Aldergrove Flying Station near Antrim, the unit covers the entire province of Northern Ireland. The unit is honoured at the Palace Barracks memorial garden and today remains the most decorated unit in the British Army. 321 is a well equipped unit and has been at the forefront of developing new equipment
A Pair of 1930's German Luftwaffe Officer's Dagger Straps In fair condition, with just one buckle, and with belt clip lacking spring action.
A Pair of Afrika Korps German Helmet Shields Maker marked and dated 1941. One mounting pin remaining. The Afrika Korps or German Africa Corps was the German expeditionary force in Africa during the North African Campaign of World War II. First sent as a holding force to shore up the Italian defense of their African colonies, the formation fought on in Africa, under various appellations, from March 1941 until its surrender in May 1943. The term "Afrika Korps" is pseudo-German (so-called "cod-German"), deriving from an incomplete German title. The German term referred solely to the initial formation, the Deutsches Afrikakorps (DAK), which formed part of the Axis command of the German and Italian forces in North Africa. The name stuck, with both news media and Allied soldiers, as the name for all subsequent German units in North Africa. The unit's best known commander was Field Marshal Erwin Rommel. The Afrika Korps formed on 11 January 1941 and one of Hitler's favorite generals, Erwin Rommel, was designated as commander on 11 February. The German Armed Forces High Command (Oberkommando der Wehrmacht, OKW) had decided to send a "blocking force" to Libya to support the Italian army. The Italian army group had been routed by the British Commonwealth Western Desert Force in Operation Compass (9 December 1940 – 9 February 1941). The German blocking force, commanded by Rommel, at first consisted of a force based only on Panzer Regiment 5, which was put together from the second regiment of the 3rd Panzer Division. These elements were organized into the 5th Light Division when they arrived in Africa from 10 February – 12 March 1941. The Afrika Korps was restructured and renamed in August 1941. "Afrikakorps" was the official name of the force for less than six months but the officers and men used it for the duration. The Afrika Korps was the major German component of Panzerarmee Afrika, which was later renamed the Deutsch-Italienische Panzerarmee and finally renamed Heeresgruppe Afrika (Army Group Africa) during the 27 months of the Desert campaign
A Pair of Falschirmjager Collar Tabs, Silver Bullion Over Gold Cloth Over a buckram base. Original WW2. For hauptmann [captain] During World War II. The German Air Force (Luftwaffe) raised a variety of airborne light infantry (Fallschirmjäger) units. The Luftwaffe built up a division-sized unit of three Fallschirmjäger regiments plus supporting arms and air assets, known as the 7th Flieger Division. Throughout World War II, the Fallschirmjäger overall commander was Kurt Student. Fallschirmjäger participated in many of the famous battles of World War II. As elite troops they were frequently deployed at the vanguard of attacks and as the bulwark of a defence. They would see action in the Norway and Denmark campaign and in Belgium, the Netherlands and France in 1940. Major actions in the Balkans Campaign, Crete, Italy, and on both the Eastern Front and later the Western Front would follow. The skillful airborne seizure of Fort Eben-Emael permitted the early capture of Belgium and, alongside successful operations in the Netherlands, was crucial for the speed of the German victories in 1940. The Battle of the Netherlands began on May 10, 1940 and ended in a German victory on May 14, 1940. German paratroopers had extreme success due to the element of surprise that occurred because of the unpreparedness of the Dutch. The Dutch were caught by surprise because of intelligence failures and miscommunication between important leaders of the Dutch military. Paratroopers played an important role in this victory because they were able to capture important targets such as the Moerdijk and Waalhaven airfields. Paratroopers also captured and defended the Moerdijk Bridge that allowed the Germans to gain a passage from Dordrecht to Amsterdam by train. This gave German soldiers an easier and quicker way important targets and to conquer the Netherlands. The major airdrops in Norway and Denmark in April 1940 were also vital to the success of the campaigns there, although they, along with the amphibious forces, suffered heavy casualties. The Battle of Crete began on May 20, 1941 and ended on June 1, 1941. Crete was an important target for Germany because it provided territory close to the Mediterranean sea that could be used for offensive air and naval operations. German control over Crete would have also denied the Allied powers access to Germany's Ploie?ti oil fields in Romania where Germany gathered fifty percent of its oil. Germany launched a large-scale airdrops in which the entire 7th Air Division was deployed with the German 5th Mountain Division as the follow-up. Crete was captured after fierce fighting against the Allied troops, but the high casualties suffered by the Fallschirmjäger as they parachuted in (like the brothers von Blücher) convinced Hitler that such mass airdrops were no longer feasible. High casualties occurred because the Allied powers knew of the Operation Merkur which meant the surprise attack on Crete. Allied soldiers set up anti-air defense against the paratroopers. This resulted in a high casualty count, over 3250 airborne soldiers killed or MIA and 3400 wounded.[8] This battle however, resulted in a German victory but due to the inefficiency and high loss of paratroopers Hitler halted the use of large airborne attacks. In the Battle of Monte Cassino, 1st Fallschirmjäger division[9] held the ground near the Monastery of Monte Cassino. After the monastery had been bombed by the Allies, the Germans moved into protected positions among the bricks and cellars. The Fallschirmjäger held out for months against repeated assaults and heavy bombardment. Here they gained the nickname "Green Devils" from the Allied forces for their distinctive jackets and their tenacious defence. Inflicting huge losses on the Allied forces, they ultimately retreated from their positions only to avoid being outflanked. Fallschirmjäger also played a key role defending positions in France against much larger forces in 1944, even holding on to some of the German-occupied regions until the surrender of Germany. Thousands of German paratroopers were killed in action. Fallschirmjäger were awarded a total of 134 Knight's Crosses between 1940 and 1945.
A Pair of Franco Period Late1930's Spanish Nationalist Officers Epaulettes On green wool cloth with gilt bullion.
A Pair Of German Artillery Shell Trench Art Vases Dated August 1917 In need of tender hand polishing that would reveal superb results. 9 inches high
A Pair of WW1 Royal Flying Corps Shoulder Flashes The invention of powered Aircraft at the turn of the century was quickly exploited by the military. At first they acted as observers from the air. They progressed to dropping darts on the enemy.Aircraft were later fitted with machine guns and bombs. Aerial combat was born. Naturally more RFC men acted as ground crew than actually flew. RFC members wore a similar kakhi drab uniform as the infantry but cut with a distinctive fly front covering the chest.It was known in jest as a "maternity smock". On each shoulder was a cloth title ,white on dark navy blue "Royal Flying Corps" The RFC wore the pattern of side cap adopted by the army in the Second World War. The Admiralty operated The Royal Naval Air Service In April 1918 the RFC and the RNAS were combined to form the RAF.
A Pair Of WW2 British Army Captain's Bullion Dress Epaulettes With two sets of three pips on a rope twisted bullion mount. In very good condition for age. Photo of [HRH Prince] Capt. Harry Wales [God bless him] adorned with current bullion captain's eppaulettes.
A Pair of WW2 Gas Shield Eye Protectors 'Rommel' Type Made of an early form of clear celluloid. Used to great effect by the Desert Rats in North Africa for sand protection. In fact Rommel used the very same protectors for that purpose, as one can see from the photos of Rommel, taken in Africa in 1943. Presumably he used captured British kit. Eye protectors Dated November 1942
A Pair of WW2 Gas Shield Eye Protectors 'Rommel' Type Made of an early form of clear celluloid. Used to great effect by the Desert Rats in North Africa for sand protection. In fact Rommel used the very same protectors for that purpose as one can see from the photos of Rommel taken in Africa.Presumably he used captured British kit..
A Piece Of Zeppelin L32 Shot Down 24.9. 1916 In Ring Form 5.2 cm Across Made into the form of a gigantic finger ring. Beautifully constructed. Group Captain Frederick Sowrey, DSO, MC, AFC (25 July 1893 - 21 October 1968) began his career as a World War I flying ace credited with thirteen aerial victories. He was most noted for his first victory, when he shot down Zeppelin L32 during its bombing raid on England. Having risen rapidly in rank during the war, he remained in service until 1940. Piece of the framework of German naval airship L32. This airship was shot down by 2nd Lieutenant Frederick Sowrey of 39 Squadron RFC on the night of 23/24 September 1916. It crashed near Billericay in Essex resulting in the death of all 21 crew members. The airship was under the command of Oberleutnant zur See Werner Peterson. Sowrey was decorated with the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) for his action.
A Polish Republic Order Of Merit Medal with Miniature in Original Box Originated in 1923. At the time of its establishment in 1923, the Cross of Merit was the highest civilian award in Poland. It was awarded to citizens who went beyond the call of duty in their work for the country and society as a whole. May be awarded twice in each grade to the same person. 1950's PRL centre
A Post 1953 Scarce, Large Irish Regimental Helmet Plate Plume Holder With lyre, shamrocks and battle honours of South Africa 1900-02 . A rarely seen badge probably for the bandsman's fur cap. Multi piece construction. 3.25 inches x 2.5 inches
A Pre WW2 German Nazi Day Badge. 1939 Issued on the Workers day in 1939 on the 1st of May. The first Nazi Party rallies took place in 1923 in Munich and in 1926 in Weimar. From 1927 on, they took place exclusively in Nuremberg. The Party selected Nuremberg for pragmatic reasons: it was in the center of the German Reich and the local Luitpoldhain was well suited as a venue. In addition, the Nazis could rely on the well-organized local branch of the party in Franconia, then led by Gauleiter Julius Streicher. The Nuremberg police were sympathetic to the event. Later, the location was justified by the Nazi Party by putting it into the tradition of the Imperial Diet (German Reichstag) of the Holy Roman Empire, considered as the First Reich. After 1933, the rallies took place near the time of the Autumn equinox, under the title of "The German people's National Party days" (Reichsparteitage des deutschen Volkes), which was intended to symbolize the solidarity between the German people and the Nazi Party. This point was further emphasized by the yearly growing number of participants, which finally reached over half a million from all sections of the party, the army and the state.
A Presentation Light Infantry Officer's Sword of a WW1 War Hero Of Captain Edward Allen Roe. MC & bar. Presented to Lieutenant Roe from the Sergeant's Mess 4th V.B. Queens West Surrey Regt. with their Respect and Esteem. Connected to a rare RNB sword , but sold seperately. He served with the East Surrey Regiment. attd. 2nd/4th Bn., The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment), and was Killed in action on the 2 September 1918. Age 23. He was the son of Frederick Edward and Lucy Isabel Roe, of "The Ridgeway," 58, Canterbury Grove, West Norwood, London. Buried at RENINGHELST NEW MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium Grave Ref. V. B. 3. Lt Col. Freyberg was a VC winner and another great hero of the regiment, and with his concurrent service with the Royal Naval Brigade, and the connection between these two regimental and naval swords is most intriguing. Freyberg was one of the most highly decorated officers of WW1. Gaining the VC, The DSO and two bars, five Mid's and the Croix De Guerre. When he was transferred to the Western front he was attached with the Royal West Surreys but still as an officer of the RNB Hood Division. In late 1914 Freyberg met Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty, and persuaded him to grant him a Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve commission in the Hood Battalion of the newly-constituted Royal Naval Division. In 1915 Freyberg became involved in the Dardanelles campaign. During the initial landings by Allied troops following the unsuccessful naval attempt to force the straits by sea, Freyberg was appointed as the Gallipoli Landings diversion Single handedly he swam ashore in the Gulf of Saros. Once ashore, he began lighting flares so as to distract the defending Turkish forces from the real landings taking place at Gallipoli. Despite coming under heavy Turkish fire, he returned safely from this outing, and for his action he received the Distinguished Service Order. He received serious wounds on several occasions and left the peninsula when his division evacuated in January 1916. In May 1916 Freyberg was transferred to the British Army as a captain in the Queen's (Royal West Surrey) Regiment. However, he remained with the Hood Battalion as a seconded temporary major and went with them to France. During the final stages of the Battle of the Somme, when commanding a battalion as a temporary lieutenant-colonel, he so distinguished himself in the capture of Beaucourt village that he was awarded the Victoria Cross. On 13 November 1916 at Beaucourt-sur-Ancre, France, after Freyberg's battalion had carried the initial attack through the enemy's front system of trenches, he rallied and re-formed his own much disorganised men and some others, and led them on a successful assault of the second objective, during which he suffered two wounds, but remained in command and held his ground throughout the day and the following night. When re-inforced the next morning he attacked and captured a strongly fortified village, taking 500 prisoners. Though wounded twice more, the second time severely, Freyberg refused to leave the line until he had issued final instructions. The regiments Battle Honours for the Great War are as follows; The Great War (25 battalions): Mons, Retreat from Mons, Marne 1914 '18, Aisne 1914, Ypres 1914 '17 '18, Langemarck 1914, Gheluvelt, Aubers, Festubert 1915, Loos, Somme 1916 '18, Albert 1916 '18, Bazentin, Delville Wood, Pozières, Guillemont, Flers-Courcelette, Morval, Thiepval, Le Transloy, Ancre Heights, Ancre 1916 '18, Arras 1917 '18, Scarpe 1917, Bullecourt, Messines 1917, Pilckem, Menin Road, Polygon Wood, Broodseinde, Passchendaele, Cambrai 1917 '18, St. Quentin, Bapaume 1918, Rosières, Avre, Villers Bretonneux, Lys, Hazebrouck, Bailleul, Kemmel, Soissonais Ourcq, Amiens, Hindenburg Line, Épéhy, St. Quentin Canal, Courtrai, Selle, Sambre, France and Flanders 1914-18, Piave, Vittorio Veneto, Italy 1917-18, Suvla, Landing at Suvla, Scimitar Hill, Gallipoli 1915, Rumani, Egypt 1915-16, Gaza, El Mughar, Jerusalem, Jericho, Tell 'Asur, Palestine 1917-18, Khan Baghdadi, Mesopotamia 1915-18, N W Frontier India 1916-17. This sword has overall service use salt and pepper pitting, and service combat dents to the bottom of the scabbard.
A Presentation Type Gurkha Kukri Elaborately Engraved and Decorated In red leather scabbard with a single bi-knife. Some say the kukri originated from a form of knife first used by the Mallas who came to power in Nepal in the 13th Century. There are some Khukuris displaying on the walls of National Museum at Chhauni in Kathmandu which are 500 years old or even older, among them, one that once belonged to Drabya Shah, the founder king of the kingdom of Gorkha, in 1627 AD. But, some say that the Khukuri's history is possibly centuries older this. It is suggested that the Khukuri was first used by Kiratis who came to power in Nepal before Lichchhavi age, in about the 7th Century. In the hands of an experienced wielder Khukuri or Kukri is about as formidable a weapon as can be conceived. Like all really good weapons, Khukuri's or Kukri's efficiency depends much more upon skill than the strength of the wielder. And thus so that it happens, that a diminutive Gurkha, a mere boy in regards to his stature, could easily cut to pieces a gigantic adversary, who simply does not understand the little Gurkha's mode of attack and fearsome skill. The Gurkha generally strikes upwards with his Kukri, possibly in order to avoid wounding himself should his blow fail, and possibly because an upward cut is just the one that can be least guarded against however strong his opponent. Just one bi-knife present in the rear pouch.
A Pristine Post 1953 ERII British Infantry Officers Sword in FS Scabbard As close to mint condition that a vintage original sword can be. Beautiful for a collector, display, and absolutely ready for a current service officer. Made when a British bespoke officers sword was entirely made in England, and completely up to the exalted standards as was once demanded of them. The 1897 pattern Infantry officer's sword has remained unchanged to the present day. By the time of its introduction, the sword was of limited use on the battlefield against rapid-firing rifles, machine guns and long-range artillery. However, the new sword was regarded, when needed, as a very effective fighting weapon. Reports from the Sudan, where it was used in close-quarters fighting during the Reconquest of the Sudan 1896-99, were positive. Field Marshal Montgomery advanced with his 1897 Pattern drawn during a counter offensive in the First World War. The actual sword he carried is exhibited in the Imperial War Museum, London. The blade is described in the pattern as being 32+1/2 inches (830 mm) long and 1 inch (25 mm) wide at the shoulder, with the complete sword weighing between 1 lb 12oz and 1 lb 13 oz (794-822g). The blade is straight and symmetrical in shape about both its longitudinal axes. The thick blade has a deep central fuller on each side and is rounded on both its edge and back towards the hilt, giving a “dumbbell” or “girder” cross section. Through a gradual transition, the blade becomes double edged towards the tip, and the last 17 inches (430 mm) were sharpened when on active service. The blade ends in a sharp spear point. The guard is a three-quarter basket of pressed, plated steel. It is decorated with a pierced scroll-work pattern and had the royal cypher of the reigning monarch set over the lower knuckle bow. The grip, between 5 and 5 ¾ inches (127-146mm) long to suit the hand of the owner, was generally covered in ray or sharkskin and wrapped with German-silver wire. The grip is straight, with no offset to the blade. The sword shows a number of features that indicate its intent as a thrusting weapon. The spear point and double edge towards the point aids penetration and withdrawal by incising the wound edges. The blade, whilst quite narrow, is thick and its dumbbell section gives it good weak-axis buckling strength whilst maintaining robustness in bending for the parry. The blade tapers in both width and thickness and, with the substantial guard, has a hilt-biased balance, aiding agility at the expense of concussive force in a cut.
A Rare 'Left Handed' WW1 .455 British Service Revolver Holster Maker marked and dated 1918. Superb piece and really rare left handed type. These .455 Webley revolver holsters are highly desirable and now original examples are very scarce, but the left handed versions are undoubtedly the rarest of them all. Superb multi riveted type. Excellent condition overall.
A Rare 1928 Graf Zeppelin Porcelain Wall Plaque Depicting the LZ127 Graf Zeppelin. By Heinrich and Co. Inscribed on the reverse Forrngebung Fachoberiehrer, W-Veit Decoration Facheihrer Otto Keitel, Entwurf begutachtet una genehmigt von der Luftshiffbau Zeppelin Gmbh Friedrichshafen 1928, Ges Geschutzt -- 9.75in. (25cm.) diameter The LZ-127, Graf Zeppelin, was arguably the most important zeppelin ever, the airship that put post WW I German aviation back on the map. Ferdinand Graf von Zeppelin inaugurated German lighter-than-air aviation at the turn of the 20th Century. His zeppelins caught the German public’s imagination, and they became extremely popular. During WW I, his zeppelins flew for both the Army and Navy. Once more, the zeppelins caught the German people’s imagination. Even civilians and military officers who were bombing targets, both on the continent and in England, were impressed by the giant machines. Graf von Zeppelin died in 1917, and his company, which passed to Hugo Eckner’s management, faced difficult times in post WW I Germany. As a part of Germany’s war reparations, the Zeppelin Company built and delivered the LZ-126 (eventually renamed the U.S.S. Los Angeles) to the U.S. Navy in 1924. Eckner personally commanded the LZ-126 on the flight to the U.S. The engendered excitement allowed the company to build the LZ-127, eventually known as the "Graf Zeppelin." It was placed in service in 1928. The Graf Zeppelin remained in service from September 1928 until a month after the Hindenburg exploded in New Jersey in May 1937. During this time, the "Graf Zeppelin" flew almost six hundred flights and covered more than one million miles. With the destruction of the "Hindenburg," the zeppelin era sadly came to an end. During her nine years of flight, the LZ-127 circled the globe, flying from Europe to the USA and on to Asia. She even had numerous voyages to South America. It was travel on a grand scale for less-than-thirty lucky people at a time. A crew of about twenty-four served the passengers. Trips from Germany to the U.S. were much faster than any other vessel of the time. Life aboard the "Graf Zeppelin" was very gracious.
A Rare 1944 'D-Day' Pattern British Army Helmet with Camouflage British D-Day issue helmets are now pretty rare but with original camouflage paint is extraordinarily rare. The Mk III Helmet was a steel military combat helmet first developed for the British Army in 1941 by the Medical Research Council. First worn in combat by British and Canadian troops on D-Day, the Mk III was used alongside the Brodie helmet for the remainder of the Second World War. It is sometimes referred to as the "turtle" helmet by collectors, because of its vague resemblance to a turtle shell, as well as the 1944 pattern helmet.The Mark III helmet was designed to provide better protection for the side of the head than its predecessor. It was a deeper helmet with a smaller brim and provided 38% more protection than the Mark II, particularly at the sides (total area of head protection was increased by 12%, horizontal protection was increased by 15% and from items falling from overhead by 11%). The Mark III helmet was issued primarily to assault troops for the Normandy invasion in June 1944, and a large number of helmets from British stocks were issued to the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division in addition to British units. Small numbers also went to the 2nd and 4th Canadian Divisions. All Mark III helmets in Canadian stores were returned to the UK shortly after the end of World War II. After a brief period the MK III was replaced with the MKIV.
A Rare 1953 Royal Ulster Constabulary 'Night' Helmet Plate The Royal Ulster Constabulary served the people of Northern Ireland for almost 80 years, many with valour and distinction, from 1922 up until 2001. Many members, unfortunately, of the RUC paid the ultimate sacrifice and gave their lives for the safety of the community as a whole. By the early years of this century the Royal Irish Constabulary had become an integral and widely accepted part of Irish life. The turbulent years that followed, leading up to partition and immediately after, witnessed considerable suffering on the part of many of those directly involved, not least policemen and their families. It was against this lawless and uncertain background that the new Government of Northern Ireland assumed responsibility for law and order. Under Section 60 of the Government of Ireland Act the R.I.C. in the six counties making up Northern Ireland were placed under its authority. On the 31st January Dawson Bates, the first Minister of Home Affairs, appointed a committee of inquiry on police organization in Northern Ireland. They were asked to advise on any alterations in the existing police necessary for the formation of a new force (i.e. recruitment and conditions of service, its composition, strength and cost). An interim report was published on the 28th March 1922, the first official report of the new Parliament, and it was subsequently accepted by the Northern Ireland Government. On the 29th April 1922 King George V granted that the force could be called the Royal Ulster Constabulary. In May the Parliament of Northern Ireland passed the 1922 Constabulary Act and the R.U.C. officially came into existence on 1st June. The Headquarters of the force was established at Atlantic Buildings, Waring Street, in the centre of Belfast, and Charles Wickham became the first Inspector General. The uniform and insignia of the R.U.C. remained essentially the same as the R.I.C. From the beginning it had a dual role, unique among United Kingdom police forces, of providing a normal law enforcement police service while protecting Northern Ireland from the terrorist activities of outlawed groups. For personal protection its members were armed (a continual requirement since the formation of the constabulary in 1822). The R.U.C. was to be a 3000 strong force for the whole of the province. It had the support of the Ulster Special Constabulary, a volunteer body of part-time auxiliary police who were given uniforms and training. The R.U.C.'s senior officer, the Inspector General, was appointed by the Governor of Northern Ireland and was responsible to the Minister of Home Affairs in the Northern Ireland Government for the maintenance of law and order. Neither the newly established Irish Free State nor the state of Northern Ireland had an auspicious beginning. The polarized political climate in Northern Ireland resulted in violence from both sides of the political and religious divide. Photo of the badge on it's helmet for illustration purposes only. 2.5 inches high
A Rare And Interesting Imperial German Postal Official's Sword & Portopee. With imperial German eagle motif on the shell guard, wire boung grip. Brass mounted leather scabbard. Upon the Austro-Prussian War of 1866 and the break-up of the German Confederation in the Peace of Prague, the North German Confederation was established, instigated by the Prussian minister-president Otto von Bismarck. Originally a military alliance, it evolved to a federation with the issuing of a constitution with effect from 1 July 1867. In the course of the war, Prussian troops had occupied the Free City of Frankfurt and the Kaiser had purchased the remnants of the Thurn-und-Taxis Post organisation. According to article 48, the federal area of the Northern German states, de facto an enlarged Prussia, came under the united postal authority, led by director Heinrich von Stephan. With the German unification upon the Franco-Prussian War of 1870/71, the Deutsche Reichspost was established as a state monopoly and became the official national postal authority of the German Empire including the annexed province of Alsace-Lorraine. Its official name was Kaiserliche Post und Telegraphenverwaltung. The Southern German federated states of Baden (until 1872), Württemberg (until 1902) and Bavaria initially maintained separate state post authorities, that nevertheless were integrated into the nation-wide administration. On 1 January 1876 a Reichspostamt under Postmaster General von Stephan was split off Bismarck's Reich Chancellery as a government agency in its own right. In World War I, a Reichsabgabe tax was levied on the postal traffic from 1 August 1916 in order to finance the war expenses. The main photograph is a tad unkempt as it's size is difficult to photograph.
A Rare Ceramic 'Pull' Toggle for a German WW2 Stick Grenade If you can't get a stick grenade, or, as is more usual, you have a grenade and the toggle is missing [they often are] this is an absolute 'must have' for only £8. Recovered from Norway. The last photo shows a complete grenade stripped down [for illustration purposes only]
A Rare Ceramic 'Pull' Toggle for a German WW2 Stick Grenade If you can't get a stick grenade, or, as is more usual, you have a grenade and the toggle is missing, a 'must have' for only £8. Recovered from Norway. The last photo shows a complete grenade stripped down [for illustration purposes only]
A Rare Ceramic 'Pull' Toggle for a German WW2 Stick Grenade If you can't get a stick grenade, or, as is more usual, you have a grenade and the toggle is missing [they often are] this is an absolute 'must have' for only £8. Recovered from Norway. The last photo shows a complete grenade stripped down [for illustration purposes only]
A Rare Ceramic 'Pull' Toggle for a German WW2 Stick Grenade If you can't get a stick grenade, or, as is more usual, you have a grenade and the toggle is missing [they often are] this is an absolute 'must have' for only £8. Recovered from Norway. The last photo shows a complete grenade stripped down [for illustration purposes only]
A Rare Chinese Nationalist Army Officer's Dagger Model 1924, Used In WW2 A rare original example of these much modern copied pre war Chinese daggars. Used by officer's trained under Chiang Kai-shek, that fought the Japanese in WW2. With tortoishell wire bound grip with twin panels. Double sided blade in a steel scabbard with brass emblematic mounts. In untouched 'sleeper' condition for the past 65 plus years, so it appears rather surface untidy, but the steel should polish very well indeed [but the brass should be left with it's natural patina]. Likely awarded at the Whampoa Military Academy before WW2. China in 1937 was still a deeply divided country, and the KMT government could not rely on all its nominal forces equally. Rebellions and other disloyalties by various regional military commanders throughout the 1930s had made Chiang Kai-shek very suspicious of a large part of his forces. The most loyal and therefore best-trained and equipped troops were aproximately 380,000 men of Chiang Kai-shek’s own pre-1934 army, most of whom had been trained by German instructors. They were commanded by graduates of the Whampoa Military Academy in Canton, which Chiang had himself commanded in 1924, creating an educated and politically reliable officer corps for the KMT army. Picture in the gallery of Chairman Chiang Kai-shek
A Rare Imperial German 'Upgraded' WW2 Kriegsmarine Officer's Dirk A World War I Imperial German naval officer's dagger that has been upgraded for service in the Third Reich era and WW2. Most usually daggers of this rarity were the preserve of senior naval officers of WW2, that had served as young officers in the WW1 Imperial German navy, and allowed to upgrade their old service officer's dirk into a current WW2 service pattern dirk. It has a stunning Imperial period hammered deluxe grade scabbard [1902 pattern] with oak leaf hanger bands and rope twist ring hangers. A double sailing ship etched Imperial blade [tip shortened] with two sailing ships and traditional fouled anchor, and an upgraded Third Reich eagle and swastika hilt pommel with wire bound ivorine grip. Much of the original gilt is present and the blade bears just a little age staining. Daggers of this form are now exceedingly rare, highly desirable, and much sought after by collectors. Admiral Doenitz carried the same kind of dagger from his WW1 service into WW2.
A Rare Imperial German Postal Sword Nickel plated hilt, wire grip, plain single shell guard, single edged etched blade. This is a very scarce sword, we have only previously had the Prussian type [with Prussian Eagle Guard] see page 399 John R Angolia 'Swords of Germany 1900/1945'. This has the plain guard for a different Imperial State's service.No scabbard.
A Rare Lot A Superb FS Knife and Badges of a D.Day Free French SAS Commando Original WW2 Fairbairn Sykes 'FS' Special Forces knife with ribbed metal grip marked mould number 3, with original scabbard. Straight crossguard and blued double edged diamond section blade. Leather scabbard very combat worn but still present. With his original, rare, WW2 'Free French Libres' Cross of Lorraine enamel Commando issue breast badge, with original reg. number to the reverse. The badge that was first officially issued to the naval officers of the Forces Navale Francaises Libres, then to SAS and commandos. Also his post D Day invasion badge of a red, white and blue wooden badge, mounted on a small orange ribbon, with English message 'Welkom' in orange. Given to him by joyous liberated Netherlanders during his April 1945 SAS operation to capture Dutch canals and prevent their use by the Germans. Operation Dingson (5–18 June 1944) was an operation in the Second World War, conducted by 17 Free French paratroops of the 4th Special Air Service (SAS), commanded by Colonel Pierre-Louis Bourgoin, who jumped into German occupied France near Vannes, Morbihan, Southern Brittany, in Plumelec, on the night of 5 June 1944 (11 h 30) with Captain Pierre Marienne and 17 men, then advanced to Saint-Marcel (8–18 June). At this time, there were approximately 100,000 German troops, and artillery, preparing to move to the Normandy landing areas. Immediately upon landing in Brittany, on the night of 5 June 1944 (11 h 30), the Free French SAS who jumped in near Plumelec, went into action fighting against German troops (Vlassov's army). One hour later (0 h 40), the first victim of the liberation of his country, Corporal Emile Bouétard (born 1915 in Brittany) was killed near Plumelec. The Free French SAS established a base (Saint-Marcel) and began to arm and equip members of local resistance fighters, operating with up to 3,000 Maquis fighters. However, their base was heavily attacked by a German paratroop division on 18 June and was forced to disperse. Captain Pierre Marienne with 17 of his companions (6 paratroopers, 8 resistance fighters and 3 farmers) died a few weeks later in Kerihuel, Plumelec, (12 July at dawn). The Dingson team was joined by the men who had just completed Operation Cooney. Dingson was conducted alongside Operation Samwest and Operation Lost. The Netherlands action was called Operation Amhers, it was a Free French and British SAS attack designed to capture intact Dutch canals, bridges and airfields during World War II. It was led by Brigadier Mike Calvert of Chindit fame. The operation began with the drop of 700 French Special Air Service troopers of 3 and 4 SAS (French) on the night of 7 April 1945. The teams spread out to capture and defend key facilities from the Germans. Advancing Canadian troops of the 8th Reconnaissance Regiment relieved the isolated French SAS.
A Rare Original Easter Rising Period, Zeppelin Raid WW1 Newsagent's Poster Headlines from the days edition of the Morning News Tuesday, April 25th 1916, reporting the news from the day before. On that Monday, the 24th Rebels failed to take Dublin Castle The rebels turn out in reduced numbers in Dublin and begin operations at noon, seizing the General Post Office, Boland's Mill, the South Dublin Union, Jacob's factory and other buildings. The rebels fail to capture the largely undefended centre of the administration at Dublin Castle but occupy the adjacent City Hall instead. Patrick Pearse reads the Proclamation of the Irish Republic outside the GPO. Transport and distribution services break down throughout the city. Large scale looting begins in the O'Connell St area. During the night, government troops quietly occupy the Shelbourne Hotel, occupying a commanding position overlooking the Citizen Army positions in St Stephen's Green. There are German Zeppelin raids on the coasts of Norfolk and Suffolk and an aeroplane attack on Dover. The poster headlines the Zeppelin Raid, The heavy fighting in Egypt and the German defeat in South West Africa. Sold unframed. 25inches x 19 inches unframed
A Rare Pair of WW2 Royal Australian Airforce Pilot's Wings in Cloth Very scarce and highly collectable pair of pilots wings in jolly nice order just a little faded. When war against Germany was declared approximately 450 Australian pilots were serving with the Royal Air Force (RAF) in the United Kingdom (UK). Personnel from No 10 Squadron were also en route to the UK to take delivery of nine Short Sunderland flying boats. They remained in Britain for the duration of the War operating with RAF Coastal Command, earning an outstanding reputation. Representatives of Great Britain, Canada, Australia and New Zealand reached agreement at Ottawa, Canada, on 27 November 1939 to participate in the Empire Air Training Scheme (EATS). This scheme was to train aircrew for service with the Royal Air Force. Basic training was completed in Australia before undertaking advanced training in Canada (674 personnel also received training in Rhodesia) before service with the RAF. The first 34 Australians graduated from RAAF Service Flying Training Schools on 18 November 1940, with a further 37,000 aircrew eventually trained in Australia. To meet this commitment, the RAAF established 2 Air Navigation Schools, 3 Air Observers Schools, 3 Bombing and Gunnery Schools, 12 Elementary Flying Training Schools, 6 Initial Flying Training Schools and 8 Service Flying Training Schools. In addition, 7 Schools of Technical Training and other specialised technical schools were established to train ground crews in the maintenance of aircraft and equipment. The duration of World War II saw 15,746 RAAF pilots, navigators, wireless operators, gunners and engineers sent to British squadrons and 11,641 to Australian squadrons. These men exemplified themselves in every major campaign front from the Battle of France, Battle of Britain, Normandy invasion, Egypt, the Middle East, Germany, Battle of the Atlantic, the defence of Malta, liberation of Italy, the Battles of the Coral and Bismarck Seas, Defence of Australia, to fighting in India, Burma, China, Singapore, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea and Pacific. When the armistice with Japan was signed on 15 August 1945, the RAAF in the Pacific had a total strength of 131,662 personnel and 3,187 front line aircraft. First Tactical Air Force, the major operational formation, had grown to 18,894 men in April 1945 and operated 20 operational squadrons. In addition to its execution of numerous air operations, the RAAF had also pioneered the development and operation of radar and operated its own shipping in the South West Pacific Area. The RAAF legacy of the Second World War is a proud one, with it now the world's 4th largest Air Force.
A Rare Un-issued SA Sports Award in Original Box And Urkunde Record Book SA Wehrabzeichen Urkunde Certificate book for the issue of the three grades of the award with an original award in it's case, complete. It has been over 30 years since we have seen one the original boxes for the award, and we have never seen a complete un-issued set. Pin back, complete pin with maker markings. Photos in the gallery of the SA award poster and two early SS men wearing their awards. The tests for the award consisted of three groups: physical exercises, defence exercises and field exercises: Group 1. Physical Exercise a) 100 yard sprint b) Long Jump c) Putting the Weight d) Long-distance throw (with dummy grenade) e) 3000 metre run Group 2.Defence Exercise (Wehrsport) a) 25 kilometre route march with a 27.5 lb pack b) Small calibre arms fire c) Aimed grenade throwing d) 200 metre race in gas-mask, over 4 obstacles a miniature "assault course" e) Swimming or cycling speed test f) Test of elementary First Aid techniques Group 3. Field Exercises (Gelandedienst) a) Map reading b) Judging terrain and estimating ranges c) Signalling d) Reconnaissance work Only members of the SA was eligible for this award 1933-1935. Instituted as the SA
A Rare World War I Turkish Officer's “Enveriye” Gallantry Honour Dagger, Awarded for gallantry to German and Turkish officers serving in the Gallipoli Campaign and the Ottoman warfare region against the British, Russians and Australians in WW1. The 8” blade is impressed on one side with the “shahada” Islamic decoration of faith, and on the other side with the tughra mark of Sultan Mehmed V, star and crescent, Arabic date 1334 (1918), serial number 2039, etc, the hilt and sheath embossed with brass panel pattern retaining traces of red background, the sheath with flat pierced bar for suspension which is also stamped with the serial number. Very good condition: The “Enveriye” dagger was an honour award for military gallantry bestowed by the Turkish War Minister Enver Pasha on deserving Turkish and German officers serving with the Turkish army between 1914 and 1918, and fewer than 5000 were ever awarded. In British terms it would be the equivalent to the George Cross Medal, in America the Silver Star Medal. The Middle-Eastern theatre of World War I saw action between 29 October 1914 and 30 October 1918. The combatants were, on one side, the Ottoman Empire (including Kurds and some Arab tribes), with some assistance from the other Central Powers; and on the other side, the British (with the help of some Jewish volunteers, Greeks, Assyrians and the majority of the Arabs), the Russians (with the help of Armenians) and the French from among the Allies of World War I. There were five main campaigns: the Sinai and Palestine Campaign, the Mesopotamian Campaign, the Caucasus Campaign, the Persian Campaign, and the Gallipoli Campaign. There were also several minor campaigns: the Senussi Campaign, Arab Campaign, and South Arabia Campaign. The Ottoman Empire joined the Central Powers through the secret Ottoman-German Alliance, which was signed on 2 August 1914. The main objective of the Ottoman Empire in the Caucasus was the recovery of its territories that had been lost during the Russo-Turkish War, 1877–78, in particular Artvin, Ardahan, Kars, and the port of Batum. Success in this region would force the Russians to divert troops from the Polish and Galician fronts. German advisors with the Ottoman armies supported the campaign for this reason. From an economic perspective, the Ottoman, or rather German, strategic goal was to cut off Russian access to the hydrocarbon resources around the Caspian Sea. Germany established an Intelligence Bureau for the East on the eve of World War I. The bureau was involved in intelligence-gathering and subversive missions to Persia and Egypt, and to Afghanistan, to dismantle the Anglo-Russian Entente. Ottoman War Minister Enver Pasha claimed that if the Russians could be beaten in the key cities of Persia, it could open the way to Azerbaijan, as well as the rest of the Middle East and the Caucasus. If these nations were to be removed from Western influence, Enver envisioned a cooperation between these newly established Turkic states. Enver's project conflicted with European interests which played out as struggles between several key imperial powers. The Ottomans also threatened Britain's communications with India and the East via the Suez Canal. The Germans hoped to seize the Canal for the Central Powers, or at least to deny the Allies use of the vital shipping route. We show in the gallery a picture of an officer wearing his [not included for information only]
A Rare WW1 Royal Flying Corps Creagh Osbourne Air Compass For Fighters In it's original case, with mounting base plate and screws. Constructed of brass, aluminum, and glass, the compass proper is supported by three arms projecting horizontally from a vertical circular aluminum base plate. Baseplate has four holes for mounting to A/C instrument panel. Compass is ball shaped, with glass viewing port. A brass correction device is brazed to the top of the compass. A circular compass needle is mounted on a needle point inside the compass body, with enamelled direction marks. The viewing glass is held in place by a brass retaining ring, which is marked: "Air Compass Type 5/17 No. 44693H." An ID plate is mounted on the base plate and marked "H. Hughes & Son Ltd./ London/ Creagh Osbourne/ Patent 1148/ 15, 17736/ 15……It is set in it's original RFC wooden case with affixing screws for the aircraft and an attached small electrical wired tube with screw thread." Captain Frank Osborne Creagh-Osborne (1867/1943) was Superintendent of Compasses at the Admiralty and a British inventor. He developed several compass systems which were manufactured by H. Hughes & Son Ltd, Dent & Co & Johnson Ltd and also by Sperry Gyroscopes and wrote several books about the development and use of aerocompassesHenry Hughes was born in 1816. In 1838 Henry Hughes & Son was founded at 120 (later at 59), Fenchurch Street, London as a maker of chronographs and scientific instruments. Henry died in 1879 and his son Alexander J. succeeded him as chairman. The firm was incorporated as Henry Hughes & Son Ltd in 1903. Hughes & Son worked together with Captn. Creagh-Osborne among other inventors. During the early part of the war, the RFC supported the British Army by artillery co-operation and photographic reconnaissance. This work gradually led RFC pilots into aerial battles with German pilots and later in the war included the strafing of enemy infantry and emplacements, the bombing of German military airfields and later the strategic bombing of German industrial and transportation facilities. At the start of World War I the RFC, commanded by Brigadier-General Sir David Henderson, consisted of five squadrons – one observation balloon squadron (RFC No 1 Squadron) and four aeroplane squadrons. These were first used for aerial spotting on 13 September 1914, but only became efficient when they perfected the use of wireless communication at Aubers Ridge on 9 May 1915. Aerial photography was attempted during 1914, but again only became effective the next year. By 1918, photographic images could be taken from 15,000 feet, and interpreted by over 3,000 personnel. Parachutes were not available to pilots of the RFC's heavier than air craft – nor were they used by the RAF during the First World War – although the Calthrop Guardian Angel parachute (1916 model) was officially adopted just as the war ended. By this time parachutes had been used by balloonists for three years. On 17 August 1917, South African General Jan Smuts presented a report to the War Council on the future of air power. Because of its potential for the 'devastation of enemy lands and the destruction of industrial and populous centres on a vast scale', he recommended a new air service be formed that would be on a level with the Army and Royal Navy. The formation of the new service would, moreover, make the under utilised men and machines of the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) available for action across the Western Front, as well as ending the inter service rivalries that at times had adversely affected aircraft procurement. On 1 April 1918, the RFC and the RNAS were amalgamated to form a new service, the Royal Air Force (RAF). The RAF was under the control of the new Air Ministry. After starting in 1914 with some 2,073 personnel, by the start of 1919 the RAF had 4,000 combat aircraft and 114,000 personnel in some 150 squadrons.
A Rare WW1 Russian Romanov Era Poster of Czar Nicolas Iind Period Showing a monoplane crashing into a Zeppelin and the men jumping for their lives. Published date of 1914. Early Russian posters are now becoming extraordinarily collectable. Another poster for the Battleship Potemkin Russian movie, designed by the Stenberg brothers in 1925, sold in November 2012 for 103,250 Pounds Sterling at Christies Auction in London. It arranged class elements into a powerful design of revolutionary upheaval. Approx 21 inches x 15.75 inches sold unmounted
A Rare WW2 British 'Cromwell' Type Composite Helmet WW2 British Cromwell helmet. Manufactured from a Composite Fibre material, intended for use by emergency services, and in ammunition factories in war service. The helmet is in very good condition, complete with original liner. A most rarely found helmet these days. Private Purchase Helmets ( Non Metal Type ) After the fall of Dunkirk steel helmets were scarce and priority of steel helmets went to the Government and armed services. So some manufacturers started making the Non-Metal type that could be bought privately. Such as Bakelite/Plastic helmet made by Plasfort. A Fiber/Cardboard helmet called the Cromwell Protector made by the firm Cromwell. All 3 types were used mainly in Ammunition Factory's and had a leather or rubberised chinstraps,
A Rare WW2 Japanese Jungle Sword, Made from a Captured Dutch Sword Under German occupation itself, the Netherlands had little ability to defend its colony against the Japanese army, and less than three months after the first attacks on Kalimantan the Japanese navy and army overran Dutch and allied forces, ending 300 years of Dutch colonial presence in Indonesia. A lot of their weaponry was captured, and some were converted for use by the Imperial Japanese Army. The Dutch cutlass or klewang was one such weapon. These Japanese adapted weapons have very distinctive features such as the cutlass bowl hilt being removed, and the swords were then re-issued to the Japanese forces for use in the Jungles of Burma etc. They are very scarcely seen rare items these days and highly sought after. There is a near identical example to be seen in the British Royal Maritime Collection.
A Rare, Early Soviet CCCP Propaganda Poster, Pre WW2. Showing in the foreground an armed worker with rifle over his left shoulder and a hammer in his other hand. Striding alongside a female rather oddly depicted wearing a gasmask, also with a rifle with bayonet over her right shoulder. The background shows a dam, airships emitting lightning, biplanes, factories, a tractor, marching soldiers with workers and a tank. Printed and published in the early years following the October Revolution. Soviet posters of the first two decades following the October Revolution – the period when a grandiose attempt to build a new society and a new world in Russia was most intense and driven by their belief in the real possibility to do that. In other words, it was driven by a vision of Utopia, that was quickly followed by the equally fictional Dystopia, that was actualy closer to their reality of suffering, than was the dream of Utopia. Sold unmounted. 25.5 inches x 36 inches Would look stunning with a fine quality frame.
A Rare, Nazi, Zeppelin Napkin Ring, in Hallmarked German Silver by Wellner From an exclusive small collection of Zeppelin memorabilia we have acquired. We have only ever had two of these Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei napkin rings before in the last 10 years, all made by Wellner. Made by one of Hitler's two most favoured personal silversmiths. The design has the German Zeppelin Co. logo, of the Third Reich Zeppelin, the Hindenburg, flying across the globe, with the eagle and swastika, the Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei. In March 1935, the South Atlantic flights became the responsibility of Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei, after this company had been set up jointly by Luftschiffbau Zeppelin, the German Air Ministry and Deutsche Lufthansa. The even larger airship, the LZ 129 'Hindenburg' joined the 'Graf Zeppelin' in 1936, and, in addition to South Atlantic flights with its parter, inaugurated a service over the North Atlantic, between Frankfurt and Lakehurst in New Jersey, in the summer. Also in 1936 the South American route was extended to Rio de Janeiro. Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei ceased operations as the commercial use of airships came to an abrupt end on 6 May 1937, when the 'Hindenburg' exploded at Lakehurst. The napkin ring is made of German hallmarked silver, 925 grade, and was the product of the same silver company that made the Hitler smoking sets and other silver objects for the Third Reich hierarchy - Wellner. Wellner was the maker of most of the Fuhrer's formal dinnerware, and the Reich chancellery dinnerware pieces. Many items by Wellner were used in all of Hitler's residences and state offices. The Zeppelin Corps became one of the shortest-lived German service branches of World War II. After the German invasion of Poland in 1939, the Luftwaffe ordered the last two Zeppelin airships moved to a large Zeppelin hangar in Frankfurt. In March of 1940, Goring ordered their destruction and the aluminum fed into the Nazi war industry. In May, a fire broke out in the Zeppelin facility which destroyed most of the remaining parts. The rest of the parts and materials were soon scrapped with almost no trace of the German "Giants of the Air" remaining by the end of the year. Approx I.5 oz troy.
A Red Army Russian Service Belt From A WW2 Veteran Just acquired from it's original owner who served in the USSR's Red army in WW2 and in the early Cold War Era. This was his Red Star service belt that he wore, and another belt we show in the gallery was from his comrade who served in the USSR navy. With it's original leather belt. A most scarce original example straight from it's original owner. The Red Workers' and Peasants' Army was the name given to the army and the air force of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic and from 1922 the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. It was established in the immediate period after the 1917 October Revolution (Red October or Bolshevik Revolution), when the Bolsheviks constituted an army during the Russian Civil War opposite the military confederations (especially the combined groups summarized under the preamble White Army) of their adversaries. From February 1939, the Red Army, who together with the Soviet Navy, embodied the main component of the Soviet Armed Forces, took the official name "Soviet Army" until its dissolution in December 1991.
A Regimental Cap Badge of the Lanarkshire Yeomanry The Lanarkshire Yeomanry was a yeomanry regiment of the British Army, first raised in 1819, which served as a dismounted infantry regiment in the First World War. The regiment mobilised into the Lowland Mounted Brigade in August 1914, but remained in England until 1915. They landed at Gallipoli in September 1915, serving as dismounted infantry, and were attached to 52nd (Lowland) Division in October; they were withdrawn in January 1916 and moved to Egypt. In early 1917 the regiment was amalgamated with The Ayrshire Yeomanry to form the 12th (Ayr and Lanark Yeomanry) Battalion of the Royal Scots Fusiliers in 74th (Yeomanry) Division, seeing service in the Palestine campaign before moving to the Western Front in May 1918. Whilst on the Western Front, Sergeant Thomas Caldwell of the regiment was awarded a Victoria Cross.
A Relic WW1 German Stick Grenade, Battle Field Trench Recovery As one can see from the photos it is in somewhat 'tired' condition. However, the best part of it, is that it certainly never killed a British Tommy, so that makes it a particularly good WW1 German grenade. It is also an incredible surviving artifact of WW1 and an iconic piece of trench warfare. The stick grenade was introduced in 1915 and the design developed throughout World War I. A friction igniter was used; this method was uncommon in other countries but widely used for German grenades. A pull cord ran down the hollow handle from the detonator within the explosive head, terminating in a porcelain ball held in place by a detachable base closing cap. To use the grenade, the base cap was unscrewed, permitting the ball and cord to fall out. Pulling the cord dragged a roughened steel rod through the igniter causing it to flare-up and start the five-second fuse burning. This allowed the grenade to be hung from fences to prevent them from being climbed; any disturbance to the dangling grenade would cause it to fall and ignite the fuse. The first stick grenades featured a permanently revealed pull cord which came out from the handle near the bottom (rather than tucked inside the removable screw-capped base). These exposed pull cords had a tendency to accidentally snag and detonate the grenades while being carried, causing severe (usually fatal) injuries. Stick grenades were stored in cases for transport, and their fuse assemblies inserted prior to going into combat — a reminder for the user was stenciled on each explosive charge ("Vor Gebrauch Sprengkapsel einsetzen", in English: "Before use insert detonator"). The stick provided a lever, significantly improving the throwing distance. The Model 24 could be thrown approximately 30 yards (27 m) to 40 yards (37 m), whereas the British Mills bomb could only be thrown about 15 yards (14 m) (however the British War Office report "WO 291/472 Performance and handling of HE grenades" gives an average figure for a standing throw of a Mills bomb as 30 yards (27 m), when crouched 25 yards (23 m) and lying 24 yards (22 m)). The stick design also minimized the risk of the grenade rolling downhill back towards the thrower when used in hilly terrain or in urban areas. However, the additional length of the handle meant that fewer could be carried. The grenades were extremely useful for clearing out entrenched infantry positions. Although they were not individually very effective against armoured vehicles and fortifications, the grenade could be used in an improvised "bundle" style with another six explosive heads (without their sticks) wired around the central stick grenade. These were known as Geballte Ladung ("concentrated load"). Often used by special assault troops and dropped from aircraft. Inert and safe. Not suitable for Export. All safe and inert.
A Relic, Trench Recovered French WW1 Citroen Grenade French Trench Citroen Foug Grenade TM-03. As soon as April 1915, the military manufacture of Foug, in Meurthe et Moselle near Toul, began to produce simple grenades models, including a copy of the famous German stick grenade, and two 'asparagus' grenades (a long then a shorter) in prefragmented steel equipped with a rudimentary wooden igniting percussion plug. The grenade Citron Foug modèle 1916 is a evolution of this 'asparagus' grenade, mainly designed to reduce the weight and improve the fragmentation properties. This latter point conditionned precisely the profile of the body, whose influence had been found to be higher on the fragmentation then the shape of the grooves themselves. The igniting system was rudimentary, made of a percussion block moving inside a wooden plug equipped with a starter, and linked to a detonator. With no other safety device than a simple spring, it was quite dangerous despite the addition of a removable safety cap in thin iron plate (with flat, then conical, then hemispheric top) covering the ignition plug during transportation. Its 'citron' ('lemon') nickname was obviously given by its very recognizabe profile. Despite its rudimentary design and its relative dangerosity, its lean manufacturing cost and process allowed this grenade to be made by a lot of manufacturers and available in big quantities, and therefore massively used from 1916 until the end of the war. Inert empty and safe, but not suitable for export or for sale to under 18's..
A Royal Marine Commando's Knives and Swagger Stick Used In Borneo Campaign Just acquired from a past serving Royal Marine Commando, A.R.Ryda R.M. These two knives and his cane were his, and used by him in his service in the Borneo campaign and after. The slightly smaller jungle knife is dated 1963. The larger one the 'D' type Wilkinson he rescued from the crash site of his Bell Soiux helicopter that crashed while in service with the 3rd Commando Brigade in Sarawak in 1963. The chopper was written aff as were all the other supplies within it. An early issue British military Wilkinson Sword type D survival knife, the blade is 180mm, just over 7" with makers mark 'Wilkinson Sword Ltd ' and regd design app for on one side and 1B/4594 with arrow mark on the other side the 1B prefix was used by both Army and RAF, wooden grip plates with screw bolt fixings, it is complete with it's original leather sheath, British Aircrew and Special Forces D type survival fighting knife - Wilkinson Sword. In excellent condition. This is a lovely quality fighting knife as you would expect coming from Wilkinson Sword, nicely marked with issue number and Wilkinson logo. These fighting knives are purposefully heavy and seriously robust. A scarce and sought after knife. This was originally manufactured by Wilkinson Sword Co for British special forces and has been regarded as one of the most practical survival and field knives designed with the hand-ground full convex grind blade. With the combat conflict stating in 1963 border clashes between British and Commonwealth troops and Indonesian units continued throughout and into 1965. It was on one of General Lea's cross border operations that Lance Corporal Rambahadur Limbu of the 2/10th Ghurkha Rifles won the Victoria Cross, in the border area of the First Division near Bau. 1965 also saw the Indonesian raiders introduce simple wooden 'cigar-box' anti-personnel mines along border tracks. This added a macabre and sickly note into patrolling and a number of legs and feet were lost. In his attempt to gain assistance from China, Sukarno had flirted with the Communist Party and this had seriously undermined his position and he was reduced to the status of a puppet president when General Suharto took over effective leadership of the nation in March 1966. Peace feelers were put out and culminated in a peace agreement signed in Jakarta on 11th August 1966. Fighting had continued in small skirmishes right up until the agreement was signed. Gurkhas board heloIn the fighting, the eight Ghurkha battalions had suffered 43 killed and 87 wounded, the Royal Marine Commandos 16 killed and 20 wounded and the British battalions 16 killed and 51 wounded. Officially Indonesian casualties were put at 600 killed but it is certain that they were considerably greater as a result of the British cross border operations. The campaign was a victory for the British and Malaysian forces, and the Minister of Defence at that time, Mr. Denis Healy declared in the House of Commons that the Borneo Campaign would be recorded 'in the history books …as one of the most efficient uses of military force in the history of the world.
A Royal Warwickshire 'Birmingham Pals' Regt. Cap Badge The Birmingham Pals were the three infantry battalions of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment of the British Army raised from men volunteering in the city of Birmingham in September 1914, shortly after the outbreak of the Great War. They consisted of men volunteering for Kitchener's New Armies and the battalions became, respectively, the 14th, 15th and 16th (Service) battalions of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. A further battalion, 17th, was formed in June 1915 as a reserve battalion, and was reformed in September 1916. The cap badge of the Birmingham Pals was that of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, with an additional scroll beneath the regimental title bearing the additional title 1st, 2nd or 3rd Birmingham Battalion. The three City of Birmingham battalions were all deployed to the Western Front in France on 21 November 1915. The 14th (Service) Battalion (1st Birmingham) formed part of 95th Brigade, 32nd Division, though on 28 December 1915 it was transferred to 13th Brigade, 5th Division. The battalion was moved to the Italian Front with the rest of the 5th Division in November 1917, but returned to the Western Front to take part in the defence against the major German offensives of April 1918. On 5 October 1918 it became the Pioneer Battalion of the 5th Division.[2] The 15th (Service) Battalion (2nd Birmingham) was also attached to 95th Brigade, 32nd Division, though on 28 December 1915 it was transferred to 14th Brigade of the 5th Division. It was again transferred, to 13th Brigade, 5th Division, on 14 January 1916, and moved to Italy with the 5th Division in November 1917. It too was returned to France April 1918. On 6 October 1918 the 15th (Service) Battalion was disbanded, with personnel being posted to the 14th and 16th battalions.
A Russian Scud Missile Launcher 'Level' Site A war trophy of the first gulf war, a Russian Scud Missile Rocket Launcher Level Site on adjustable tripod stand.Originaly designed for use with the USSR Red Army 'Frog' nuclear rocket.
A Russian WW1 Poster Showing the Eastern Front, Published Moscow, Showing a huge battle across a river pontoon bridge assault, between Imperial German and Imperial Russian infantry with cannon, and planes and zeppelin at the Neman river. The Eastern Front, 1914-17 Russia's decision to embark prematurely on military operations on the Eastern Front in mid-August 1914 bought its Western allies welcome breathing space in Belgium and France. But it produced mixed results on the battlefield. Tannenberg In Eastern Prussia, the northern Russian armies were crushed by German forces at the Battles of Tannenberg and the Masurian Lakes in late August and early September. Tannenberg, in particular, became an early symbol of Great War carnage: almost 70,000 Russian soldiers were killed and wounded during the five days of fighting, with a further 100,000 taken prisoner. Further south, in the Habsburg province of Galicia, Russian forces fared much better, winning an important victory at the Battle of Lemberg (23 August-1 September 1914) and forcing Germany to send reinforcements to support its stumbling Austrian ally. 28 x 21.75 inches
A Russian WW1 Poster Showing the Eastern Front, Published Moscow, 1914 Showing a huge battle between Imperial German and Imperial Russian cavalry with cannon, and aerial dogfights, with bi-planes monoplanes and zeppelins. The Eastern Front, 1914-17 Russia's decision to embark prematurely on military operations on the Eastern Front in mid-August 1914 bought its Western allies welcome breathing space in Belgium and France. But it produced mixed results on the battlefield. Tannenberg In Eastern Prussia, the northern Russian armies were crushed by German forces at the Battles of Tannenberg and the Masurian Lakes in late August and early September. Tannenberg, in particular, became an early symbol of Great War carnage: almost 70,000 Russian soldiers were killed and wounded during the five days of fighting, with a further 100,000 taken prisoner. Further south, in the Habsburg province of Galicia, Russian forces fared much better, winning an important victory at the Battle of Lemberg (23 August-1 September 1914) and forcing Germany to send reinforcements to support its stumbling Austrian ally. 34 inches x 24.75 inches
A Scarce 'Wilkinson' ERII Emperor Haile Selassie, Ethiopia Regimental Sword Only the second we have had in over 35 years. Made for the military service of Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia. Bright steel half basket hilt with Ethiopian Crest, traditional wire bound sharkskin grip. Fully mirror bright blade with counter frosting. Very fine deluxe bespoke blade with the Emperor's symbol and crest and his inscription, written in Ge'ez: the ancient language used by the Ethiopian Coptic Church. Part of the inscription reads; Ethiopia reaches out to to God. He was the last Emperor of the Solomonic dynasty, Conquering Lion of the Tribe of Judah, King of Kings and Elect of God. The Emperor, 23 July 1892 – died 27 August 1975, was born Tafari Makonnen Woldemikael, he was Ethiopia's regent from 1916 to 1930 and Emperor of Ethiopia from 1930 to 1974. He was the heir to a dynasty that traced its origins by tradition from King Solomon and Queen Makeda, Empress of Axum, known in the Abrahamic tradition as the Queen of Sheba. Haile Selassie is a defining figure in both Ethiopian and African history. At the League of Nations in 1936, the Emperor condemned the use of chemical weapons by Italy against his people during the Second Italo–Ethiopian War. His internationalist views led to Ethiopia's becoming a charter member of the United Nations, and his political thought and experience in promoting multilateralism and collective security have proved seminal and enduring. His suppression of rebellions among the nobles (mekwannint), as well as what some critics perceived to be Ethiopia's failure to modernize adequately, earned him criticism among some contemporaries and historians. He has also received criticism from groups such as Human Rights Watch for allegedly ruling in a repressive and undemocratic manner. He spent decades trying to reduce the power of the nobles and decrease the burden of taxes on the peasantry. On 27 August 1942, Haile Selassie abolished the legal basis of slavery throughout the empire and imposed severe penalties, including death, for slave trading. In keeping with the principle of collective security, for which he was an outspoken proponent, he sent a contingent under General Mulugueta Bulli, known as the Kagnew Battalion, to take part in the Korean War by supporting the United Nations Command. It was attached to the American 7th Infantry Division, and fought in a number of engagements including the Battle of Pork Chop Hill.Haile Selassie contributed Ethiopian troops to the United Nations Operation in the Congo peacekeeping force during the 1960 Congo Crisis, to consolidate Congolese integrity and independence from Belgian troops, per United Nations Security Council Resolution 143. Haile Selassie contributed Ethiopian troops to the United Nations Operation in the Congo peacekeeping force during the 1960 Congo Crisis, to consolidate Congolese integrity and independence from Belgian troops, per United Nations Security Council Resolution 143. While he had fully approved of, and assured Ethiopia's participation in, UN-approved collective security operations, including Korea and Congo, Haile Selassie drew a distinction with the non-UN approved foreign intervention in Indochina, and consistently deplored it as needless suffering, calling for the Vietnam War to end on several occasions. At the same time he remained open toward the United States and commended it for making progress with African Americans' Civil Rights legislation in the 1950s and 1960s, while visiting the US several times during these years. Among the Rastafari movement, whose followers are estimated at between 200,000 and 800,000, Haile Selassie is revered as the returned messiah of the Bible, God incarnate. Beginning in Jamaica in the 1930s, the Rastafari movement perceives Haile Selassie as a messianic figure who will lead a future golden age of eternal peace, righteousness, and prosperity Outside of Ethiopia, Haile Selassie continued to enjoy enormous prestige and respect. As the longest-serving head of state in power, he was often given precedence over other leaders at state events, such as the state funerals of John F. Kennedy and Charles de Gaulle, the summits of the Non-Aligned Movement, and the 1971 celebration of the 2,500 years of the Persian Empire. In 1970 he visited Italy as a guest of President Giuseppe Saragat, and in Milan he met Giordano Dell'Amore, President of Italian Savings Banks Association. He visited China in October 1971, and was the first foreign head of state to meet Mao Zedong following the death of Mao's designated successor Lin Biao in a plane crash in Mongolia. However, after a coup his family were deposed and the Emperor put under house arrest. On 28 August 1975, the state media reported that the "ex-monarch" Haile Selassie had died on 27 August of "respiratory failure" following complications from a prostate operation. His doctor, Asrat Woldeyes, denied that complications had occurred and rejected the government version of his death. Some imperial loyalists believed that the emperor had in fact been assassinated, and this belief remains widely held to this day. Photo in the gallery of Emperor Hialie Selassie on Time Magazine cover in 1930…ryob
A Scarce 10th Hussars 1912 Pattern Regimental Sword In worn condition, with much discolouration to the blade and some to the hilt, made by Wilkinson's to a special pattern solely for the 10th Hussars, and monogrammed for the officer owner. Blade bears the devices of the Xth Hussars. This will need considerable TLC to restore but likely well worth the effort for such a sword so scarcely seen
A Scarce British Indian Army 12th Frontier Force Rifles Gold & Enamel Badge For a Sikh regiment. A very disireable collectors item, and a stunning piece of fine jewellery. Maker marked on the pin. Made in the WW2 period. The 12th Frontier Force Regiment’s origins lie in the four infantry regiments of the Frontier Brigade authorised in 1846 and raised by Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Lawrence, the agent (and brother) of the Governor-General of the Punjab frontier region (John Lawrence, 1st Baron Lawrence), from veterans of disbanded opposition forces after the First Anglo-Sikh War. The 1st Sikhs were raised by Captain J. S. Hodgson at Hoshiarpur, the 2nd Sikhs by Captain J.W.V. Stephen at Kangra, the 3rd Sikhs by Captain F. Winter at Ferozpur and the 4th Sikhs by Captain C. MacKenzie at Ludhiana. Even at the start the Sikhs, although in the majority, were not in the preponderance, the unit names referring to their origins in the disbanded Sikh Army rather than their racial mix. The nuclei of the regiments consisted of a few men from the regular Native Infantry regiments of the line and police officers. The Governor-General issued a regulation in September 1847 which included the discontinuation of the term "Frontier Brigade" and renamed the four regiments the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Regiments of Sikh Local Infantry .In the 1922 reorganisation of the British Indian Army, the four Sikh regiments became the first four battalions of the newly-constituted 12th Frontier Force Regiment. The two infantry battalions of the Corps of Guides became its 5th and 10th (training) battalions. At the same time the first battalion became the 1st battalion (Prince of Wales' Own Sikhs) whilst the 3rd battalion was made the 3rd Royal Battalion (Sikhs) in 1935. The Corps of Guides, being the senior unit, were entitled to have become the 1st battalion but agreed to allow the four Sikh battalions to retain their historical 1 to 4 numbering although the in a later incarnation the precedence was restored in the 1957 reorganisation of the Pakistan Army when the Guides battalion became the 2nd battalion of the new regiment, following the Scinde Rifles battalion from the Frontier Force Rifles regiment. The location of the training battalion, later to grow into the Regimental Centre, was first at Mardan but moved to Sialkot in 1929. During the Second World War the regiment's battalions (expanded in number by seven war-formed units) saw service in East Africa, North Africa and the Middle East, Italy, India, Malaya and Burma. The Regiment's casualties in the war totalled 1,444 dead and 3,503 wounded. Regular battalions1/12th (Prince of Wales's Own Sikhs) Frontier Force Regiment In 1939 the 1/12th Frontier Force Rifles were part of the Bannu Brigade based in Bannu India and took part in operations in the Ahmedzai Salient in February and March 1940 while under command of the Jhelum Brigade. In the autumn of 1940 the battalion transferred to the Delhi Cantonment and on 15 May 1941 the battalion was transferred to the 17th Indian Infantry Brigade, part of the 8th Indian Infantry Division which was being raised in Bombay, and with which it remained for the rest of the war. The 1/12th served in Iraq and Syria before it was sent to fight in the Italian Campaign on 24 September 1943
A Scarce First World War Gilt and Enamel National Reserve Badge Cambridge badge, the reverse with maker's details "J.R.Gaunt. London" Good condition, original buttonhole fitting, enamel with minor service wear. Height 28mm. The National Reserve was a register maintained by Territorial Force County Associations. Registration was voluntary but complex rules of eligibility applied. Its strength as at 1 October 1913 was 215,000 of all ranks. Detail of the National Reserve In October 1914 the National Reserve was formed into Protection Companies, which were attached to existing TF battalions, for the guarding of railways and other vulnerable points in Britain. That November, all Class I and II men were ordered to present themselves for enlistment. In March 1915 the Protection Companies were redesignated as Supernumerary Companies TF. In July 1915 there was a widescale trawl of these companies to identify men capable of marching 10 miles with a rifle and 150 rounds of ammunition. Those who were classified as medical Category A went to Service battalions, while Category C’s were posted to Provisional battalions. Cat B men were formed into the 18th-24th Battalions of the Rifle Brigade. These battalions were sent to Egypt and India at the end of 1915 to replace TF units committed to Gallipoli and Mesopotamia.
A Scarce German Hanseatic Cross Hamburg Medal 1914 Red Enamel & Silver. Simply stunning example. The Hanseatic Cross (Hanseatenkreuz) was a decoration of the three Hanseatic city-states of Bremen, Hamburg and Lübeck, who were members of the German Empire during World War I. Each republic established its own version of the cross, but the design and award criteria were similar for each. The Hanseatic Cross came in only one class, a cross worn from a ribbon on the left chest. The cross was a red-enameled silver cross pattée which bore the arms of the city-state of Hamburg on the centre medallion. The reverse centre medallion bears the phrase "Für Verdienst im Kriege" ("for merit in war") and the date "1914". One of the most beautiful medals made in WW1 by the German armed forces.The cross was awarded for merit in war, and could be awarded to civilians as well as military personnel. When awarded for bravery or combat merit, it was the three cities' equivalent of the Prussian Iron Cross. Issued in differring forms by Hamburg, Bremen and Lubeck. This is a list of the recipients of the medal awarded three times; Eduard von Capelle - Admiral and State Secretary of the Imperial Naval Office Franz von Hipper - Admiral and Commander of the High Seas Fleet Prince Leopold of Bavaria Felix von Luckner - Corvette Captain and commerce raider Karl August Nerger - Captain at Sea and commerce raider Rupprecht, Crown Prince of Bavaria Otto von Stülpnagel - General of Infantry in World War II Wilhelm II, German Emperor. Notable recipents of just the Hamburg medal were Günther Angern - Lieutenant General in World War II Wilhelm von Apell - Lieutenant General in World War II Lothar von Arnauld de la Perière, Vice Admiral and submarine ace of aces Hans-Jürgen von Arnim - Colonel General in World War II Walter Assmann - Lieutenant General in World War II Paul Bader - General of Artillery in World War II Curt Badinski - Lieutenant General in World War II Hermann Bauer - Admiral and Commander of Submarines Hans Behlendorff - General of Artillery in World War II Hans-Georg Benthack - Major General in World War II Hans Berr - First Lieutenant and fighter ace Helmuth Beukemann - Lieutenant General in World War II Erich Bey - Rear Admiral in World War II Bruno Bieler - General of Infantry in World War II Georg von Bismarck - Lieutenant General in World War II
A Scarce Italian WW2 Combat Helmet Unusually fitted with a WW2 British helmet liner. This may have been a field service replacement, fitted during the Africa campaign, with a liner taken from a captured British Tommy helmet.
A Scarce Old Scottish Banknote of the Linen Bank Issued in 1960, very nice condition. The Edinburgh-based British Linen was "the only British bank to be formed on the basis of an industrial charter" and, as the name suggests, its roots lay in the Scottish linen industry. The original driving force behind the formation of the British Linen Company (as it was first named) was Andrew Fletcher, Lord Milton. He was a lawyer landowner, had been active in the promotion of The Royal Bank of Scotland and, according to Checkland, "from 1735 to 1766 he was the most important man in the politics of Scotland." He had helped establish the Board of Trustees for Fisheries and Manufactures in Scotland and was the chairman of the board's Linen Committee. In 1727 he had been instrumental in the formation of the Edinburgh Linen Co-Partnery and in the early 1740s Milton wanted to expand it, make it national and capable of marketing in England. The men who were to see this concept to fruition were "two young and enterprising Edinburgh linen manufacturers", Ebenezer McCulloch and William Tod. They became the managers of the new enterprise (and substantial shareholders), Milton himself later becoming deputy manager. Their scheme was for "a company on a much bigger scale than hitherto seen in Scotland" and at the height of its operations in the 1750s "it was probably not just the largest single firm in the Scottish linen industry but in the Scottish economy as a whole". It handled every stage in the manufacture of linen cloth and employed thousands of spinners and weavers. In 1745 a prospectus was duly issued for "The Company for Improving the Linen Manufactury in Scotland". However, the lack of limited liability proved an obstacle to fundraising, and the alternative route of a Royal Charter was sought. Progress of the petition was slow due to the Jacobite rebellion and it made no mention of Scotland: “the Scots were looked on with open suspicion as open supporters of the exiled House of Stewart.” The Charter was eventually granted in 1746 in the name of the British Linen Company
A Scarce WW1 Aerial Dart 'Flechette' Although originally made in large numbers the surviving examples are now pretty rare. Flechettes, or aerial darts, are essentially short steel rods with a sharp point at one end, and fins at the other. Originally invented by the Italians in 1911-1912, during the First World War they were first said to have been used by the French in 1914, although they were also later used by the British and Germans. The Germans took the opportunity to make a point about the development of the use of flechettes by stamping some of their flechettes (that were the same in style to the French ones), 'INVENTION FRANCAIS, FABRICATION ALLEMANDE' [French invention, German made] in French for their enemy to read. Flechettes were dropped from aeroplanes or airships in great numbers, each canister holding between twenty and 250 darts. One French airman in March 1915 dropped 18,000 in a single day over the German lines. The idea was that by dropping them at great heights they would acquire sufficient momentum (like a bullet) to allow them to pierce the heads, or bodies of enemy soldiers or civilians. The canisters were attached under the fuselage. A wire was pulled to open the bottom of the canister, which released the flechettes. They were also used by the British to try and down German airships by dropping them from aircraft flying above. This failed to work, much in the same way firing normal ammunition at airships failed to work - they may have been able to penetrate the envelope of the airship, but did not cause much damage. Incendiary weapons were generally more successful. Against troops and civilians their success was variable. There are accounts of men being killed by flechettes, which were recorded as making thin, but deep wounds. Flechettes were primarily used early in the war, although some were still being used in January 1917.
A Scarce WW1 Scot's Guardsman's Tunic Tunic in traditional red with brass buttons. The centre regiment of the five Guards Regiments of the Household Div. The Scots Guards have over three hundred and sixty years of unbroken service to the crown. They can trace their origins back to an army that was raised by Archibald 1st Marquess of Argyll, 16 March 1642. Since this date the Regiment has served in nearly every campaign in which the British Army has been involved in. In 1686 they were brought onto the establishment of the English Army for the first time. Eight years later they took precedence within the Foot Guards, despite their seniority by length of service. The Battle Honours of the Regiment are; Namur 1695, Dettingen, Lincelles, [Egypt]1, Talavera, Barrosa, Fuentes d’Onor, Salamanca, Nive, Peninsula, Waterloo, Alma, Inkerman, Sevastopol, Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt 1882, Suakin 1885, Modder River, South Africa 1899-1902 First World War: Retreat from Mons, Marne 1914, Aisne 1914, Ypres 1914 ‘17, Langemarck 1914, Gheluvelt, Nonne Bosschen, Givenchy 1914, Neuve Chapelle, Aubers, Festubert 1915, Loos, Somme 1916 ‘18, Flers-Courcelette, Morval, Pilckem, Poelcappelle, Passchendaele, Cambrai 1917 ‘18, St. Quentin, Albert 1918, Bapaume 1918, Arras 1918, Drocourt-Quéant, Hindenburg Line, Havrincourt, Canal du Nord, Selle, Sambre, France and Flanders 1914-18 Second World War: Stien, Norway 1940, Mont Pincon, Quarry Hill, Estry, Venlo Pocket, Rhineland, Reichswald, Cleve, Moyland, Hochwald, Rhine, Lingen, Uelzen, North-West Europe 1944-45, Halfaya 1941, Sidi Suleiman, Tobruk 1941, Gazala, Knightsbridge, Defence of Alamein Line, Medenine, Tadjera Khir, Medjez Plain, Grich el Oued, Dejbel Bou Aoukaz 1943 I, North Africa 1941-43, Salerno, Battipaglia, Volturno Crossing, Roccheta e Croce, Monte Camino, Anzio, Campoleone, Carroceto, Trasimene Line, Advance to Florence, Monte San Michele, Catarelto Ridge, Argenta Gap, Italy 1943-45 Honours since the Second World War; Tumbledown Mountain, Falkland Islands 1982, Gulf 1991
A Scarce WW2 British Kings Royal Rifle Corps Plastic Cap Badge In very good condition with two folding mounting pins to rear. A rare and early British Army issue plastic cap badge of WW2. Small plastic discolouration by the flag.
A Scarce WW2 German Army Anti-Aircraft Flak Badge Award The Army Anti-Aircraft Badge or Army Flak Badge (German: Heeres-Flak Abzeichen was a German military decoration awarded to German Army personnel for service in an anti-aircraft battery during World War II. Designed by Wilhelm Ernst Peekhaus, it was of single piece construction. The pin back and clasp badge was grey metal in colour. The badge was made in one grade; it had the national eagle at the top and an oak leaf wreath around the outside rim. In the middle was an 88 mm flak gun with the barrel facing upwards to the rightAuthorised on the 18th July 1941, the Flak Badge was awarded to army flak gunners for shooting down 5 enemy aircraft. As most flak units were under control of the Luftwaffe, this award was quite rare. Criteria for the award came from a recommendation by commanders of the rank of General der Artillerie or above. It was awarded after the accumulation of 16 points or could also be awarded outside of the points system for an act of merit or bravery in the performance of anti-aircraft duties. If the candidates' battery brought down an enemy aircraft then the crew members were awarded four points. If two batteries were involved then each battery received two points. Both officers and crews were eligible for the badge. The commanding officer for an anti-aircraft unit was eligible for the badge once half of his men also qualified for the badge.Unlike the similar German Air Force Anti-Aircraft Flak Battle Badge (Flak-Kampfabzeichen der Luftwaffe), points were only awarded for the downing of aircraft and not ground targets. The award was also available to searchlight crews and sound-locator crews. German Army searchlight crews and sound-locator crews which assisted in the action by detection of aircraft could be awarded one point each
A Scarce WW2 German Army Anti-Aircraft Flak Badge Award Much rarer than the Luftwaffe equivalent badge award. Zinc version. The Army Anti-Aircraft Badge or Army Flak Badge (German: Heeres-Flak Abzeichen was a German military decoration awarded to German Army personnel for service in an anti-aircraft battery during World War II. Designed by Wilhelm Ernst Peekhaus, it was of single piece construction. The pin back and clasp badge was grey metal in colour. The badge was made in one grade; it had the national eagle at the top and an oak leaf wreath around the outside rim. In the middle was an 88 mm flak gun with the barrel facing upwards to the rightAuthorised on the 18th July 1941, the Flak Badge was awarded to army flak gunners for shooting down 5 enemy aircraft. As most flak units were under control of the Luftwaffe, this award was quite rare. Criteria for the award came from a recommendation by commanders of the rank of General der Artillerie or above. It was awarded after the accumulation of 16 points or could also be awarded outside of the points system for an act of merit or bravery in the performance of anti-aircraft duties. If the candidates' battery brought down an enemy aircraft then the crew members were awarded four points. If two batteries were involved then each battery received two points. Both officers and crews were eligible for the badge. The commanding officer for an anti-aircraft unit was eligible for the badge once half of his men also qualified for the badge.Unlike the similar German Air Force Anti-Aircraft Flak Battle Badge (Flak-Kampfabzeichen der Luftwaffe), points were only awarded for the downing of aircraft and not ground targets. The award was also available to searchlight crews and sound-locator crews. German Army searchlight crews and sound-locator crews which assisted in the action by detection of aircraft could be awarded one point each
A Scarce WW2 German Optical Gunsight Maker coded for Emil Busch AG Rathanow, and bearing the mark [blue triangle] for use in extreme temperatures up to 50 centigrade down to minus 40 centigrade. In good optical condition. This type is normally used in the binocular version but this is a monocular side filter adjustment as opposed to top filter adjustment on the binocular version.
A Scarce, Italian 1938 'Non-Folding' Folding Bayonet. With original frog mount and a lot of original blueing. In pretty much sleeper condition. A nice and pretty unusual bayonet used by the Italian Fascists in WW2 and some by the Third Reich on the imported guns from Italy.It was initially designed as a folding bayonet but the action proved to have a weakness so it was adapted and strengthened by making it non-folding knife which in fact made it more efficient and popular. As it's design was also so very neat, as compared to the K98 Mauser bayonet, with a sound blade but around the size of a British FS dagger, it proved to be an excellent close combat knife, and it was popular as such by the German Italian axis allies. Good piece, with original serial number, and most collectable.
A Sealed Pattern Zambia Armed Forces/Police Buckle With original Crown Agents label. In mint condition. The first buckle made, and the one that all others must copy.
A Set of Fine Kriegsmarine WW2 Naval Combat Visor Cap Badges Eagle in die stamped metal gilded with two pins, measuring 70 mm, In nice condition; cockade is a wartime version of the 1935 pattern, in stamped metal gilt oak leaves; with painted national tri-colour roundel; on Kriegsmarine navy coloured backer; blue/purple cloth on reverse, with three affixing pins, uniform removed; We show a photo in the gallery of Erich Topp, Uboat commander wearing his cap. Erich Topp, the third top scoring U-boat commander of World War II, is credited with sinking 34 ships totaling 193,684 tons. Born in Hanover on July 2, 1914, Topp joined the German Navy in April 1934. He served six months aboard the light cruiser Karlsruhe before transferring to the U-boat service in October 1937
A Set of Spares For A German WW2 Gun Sight With excellent lenses.
A Side Drum Of the Royal Monmouthshire Regt. Made in the 1980s a Drum of the still existing Welsh Regt. The Royal Monmouthshire.Top skin needs replacing. A most attractive piece of British Military History.
A Silver Plated Solid White Metal Figure of a British Fusileer 12cm. High set on a wooden plinth
A Silver Plated Solid White Metal Figure of a WW2 British Army R/O 11cm high set on a wooden plinth.
A Silver Plated Solid White Metal Figure of a WW2 British Commando 11cm high on a wooden plinth
A Simply Magnificent 88mm Round of The German 'King' Tiger Tank of WW2 The 'King' Tiger is one of the most famous, and certainly the rarest of the terrifying German battle panzers. A photo shown in the gallery is of the German Fuhrer, Adolf Hitler, being shown a demonstration of the 'King' Tiger and a comparison of the size of its huge shells that it fired, compared to the much smaller shells of the other German battle tanks, the regular Tigers and Panzers. Of 1500 'King' Tigers ordered by Hitler only 487 were actually constructed and place into combat service, and this quantity was a tiny amount of tanks produced by Germany in WW2 compared to the numbers of the other standard and various Tiger and Panzer tanks produced. Photo 3 in the gallery is the bottom of the shell head. Photo 9 is of the stamping of designated gun the PAK43, and KWK43 stamped on the shell case, the designated cannon used on the 'King' Tiger II. The first use of the Tiger II in combat was in Normandy on 18 July 1944 with the 503rd Heavy Panzer Battalion (schwere Panzerabteilung 503). It was first used on the Eastern Front on 12 August 1944 with schwere PzAbt 501 in the fighting at the Soviets' Baranov bridgehead over the Vistula River. In this action, a single Soviet T-34-85 under the command of Guards Lieutenant Os'kin from the 53rd Guards Tank Brigade knocked out three Tiger Iis by firing at their sides from an ambush position. Later the Tiger II was present at, among others, the Ardennes Offensive, the Soviet offensive into Poland and East Prussia in January 1945, the German offensives in Hungary in 1945, fighting to the east of Berlin at the Seelow Heights in April 1945 and finally within the city of Berlin itself at the very end of the war. The Sherman-equipped 4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards claim they were the first British regiment to knock out a King Tiger, on 8 August 1944, in France. The upgraded 88mm armament used a simply huge shell, much larger than the standard Tiger's 88, and one of the most impressive and rarest of all the shells ever to be seen. The very last of a pair we have been very fortunate to acquire. It is only the fourth example we have had in 45 years, and possibly the very last we may ever see. 45 inches long. With electric primer specfifically used in tanks [not to be mistaken with percussion primers used in artillery pieces] Deact inert and safe, not for export and not for sale to under 18s.
A Simply Superb Master Conductor/Composer's Solid Silver Presentation Baton For those with an interest in presentation pieces in the realm of musical memorabilia. Engraved 'Geisha', O.M. [Order of Merit] 25th April 1925. C.A.O.S. [Choral & Orchestra Society]. In mallacca and mounted in hallmarked solid silver. Presentation gifted to a composer/conductor who would have been a contemporary of Sir Edward Elgar O.M. Sadly, we know not to whom it may have been presented. However research in the right quarter may well bear fruit. Unscrews at the midsection into two pieces. Superb quality as one might expect.
A Small Stag Hilt Flamboyant Bladed Stiletto Knife, Maker Marked Inox Probably a Solingen knife, circa 1930's, used as a boot knife, somewhat similar to the later British WW2 FS knife. Leather boot scabbard, aluminium alloy crossgaurd and pommel, plated steel blade, staghorn grip with four hand carved cuts therein.
A Solid Bronze Desk Cannon In fine deluxe gilt finish, a modern representation of a an early Lantaka Cannon and Carriage, bearing the Royal Crest of the Sultan of Brunei. Especially commisioned for the Independence of Brunei in January 1984. 28cm long.
A Spanish Civil War, Circa 1936, Requete [Red Beret] Beret Badge The Requeté (whose members were called requetés or red berets) was a paramilitary organization Carlist created in the early twentieth century which participated in the Spanish Civil War, reaching more than 60,000 volunteer fighters who fought for the Nationalist side, with the aim of defending the Catholic religion and oppose Marxism. The name of the organization came from the employee by some battalions Carlist during the First Carlist War . The Carlist Requetés had been receiving military training during the Second Spanish Republic. During the early and middle periods of the Spanish Civil War the Requeté units were well known as highly motivated and (comparatively) well trained assault troops for the nationalists. Carlist units were instrumental in several nationalist victories, notably during the tough fighting in and around the two northern provinces of the Basque Country, Biscay and Gipuzkoa, during the Northern Campaign in 1937. The negotiations with the conspiring generals were tough. A photo in the gallery shows the badge worn on it's beret [not included]
A Spare Set of German WW2 Gas Mask Lenses In original paper packet.
A Special Operations Australian Bolo Machete, Used By Australian Commando In issue leather scabbard, marked [in crude hand paint] 'Z' and maker stamped and dated 1940. Used in Borneo and New Guinea. Bears the blade maker mark of Martindale Birmingham England and Crocodile logo, and in it's original leather riveted form fitted scabbard. Martindale is one of the best makers of such weapons. The knife is made of high carbon steel and it is razor sharp to the tip. It measures 20 inches long [out of scabbard] with 14.8 inch blade (tip to grip along the spine). The handle is secured with five large rivets. This is a most practical knife not excessively heavy and well balanced. The condition is used, otherwise near excellent throughout. This is a very nice example of an Australian WW2 use Special Operations jungle knife, that no doubt saw a lot of distinguished service by a brave Aussie that very fortunately survived the dreadful privations and conditions fighting the Japanese in the jungles and islands of the Pacific theatre.
A Spectacular 1920's, 'Zeppelin' Airship Cocktail Shaker & Travelling Bar Only the second we have had in the past 10 years. Stunning, original Art Deco piece, Possibly by JA Henkels of Solingen [although unnamed]. DRGM marked and marked, Made in Germany. There are 13 pieces, including; gondola, three stacking cups, a corkscrew and cover, a gin tankard flask, a full shaker, with lid, and condiment container. All pieces are plated on their interior in 24k gold. It's brilliantly engineered and constructed, the pieces fitting together to form a Zeppilin Airship model, with hand-in-glove precision. Overall length, 12 inches. This example is in superb original condition. The nickel finish is original but worn. "The Zeppelin Airship cocktail shaker and traveling bar" Circa. 1928 silver-plated brass 4 inches wide x 12 inches high. A near identical example, by the same maker, made in the the same year, was sold at auction. It was an identical, but a complete eighteen-piece set including four nesting spoons, four nesting cups, removable flask, and with an original, leather case. Signed the same with the impressed manufacturer mark to underside: [Germany D.R.G.M.]. Signed with impressed [Germany]. Estimated 7,000 to 9,000 dollars, Sold for $23,750 dollars US. In Wrights Modern And Contemporary Design Auction, in Illinois October 2012 Provenance: Private collection, Los Angeles Literature: Modernism: Modernist Design 1880-1940, Duncan, pg. 187. Link to the $23,000 auction example; [copy and paste] http://www.wright20.com/auctions/view/OMXD/OMXE/285/lotno_asc/none/OOJE/
A Stunning British Welsh Guards Officers Dress Tunic In superb condition for age, bespoke tailored ERII vintage with gold bullion. Large size. Photographed with associated British officers full dress scarlet and silver bullion belt, not included with tunic, sold seperately. The Welsh Guards came into existence on February 26, 1915 by Royal Warrant of His Majesty King George V in order to include Wales in the national component to the Foot Guards, "..though the order to raise the regiment had been given by the King to Earl Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, on February 6 1915." They were the last of the Guards to be created, with the Irish Guards coming into being in 1900. Just two days later, the 1st Battalion Welsh Guards mounted its first King's Guard at Buckingham Palace on 1 March, 1915 - St David's Day.One way to distinguish between the regiments of Foot Guards is the spacing of buttons on the tunic. The Welsh Guards have buttons arranged in groups of five. On March 17, 1915 the 1st Battalion sailed for France to join the Guards Division to commence its participation in the First World War. Its first battle was some months after its initial arrival, at Loos on September 27, 1915. The regiment's first Victoria Cross came two years later in July 1917 awarded to Sergeant Robert Bye.The regiment was increased to three Battalions during the Second World War. The 1st Battalion fought valiantly in all the campaigns of the North-West European Theatre. The 2nd Battalion fought in Boulogne in 1940 whilst the 1st fought in Belgium as part of the British Expeditionary Force. In May 1940 at the Battle of Arras, the Welsh Guards gained their second Victoria Cross by Lieutenant The Hon. Christopher Furness who was killed in the action. The Welsh Guards were subsequently part of the legendary Evacuation of Dunkirk that saw over 340,000 British and French troops return to the UK against all odds. In 1943 the 3rd Battalion fought throughout the arduous Tunisian North African Campaign and Italian Campaigns. Welsh Guards in action near Cagny 19 July 1944 While they battled on in those theatres the 1st and 2nd joined the Guards Armoured Division, with the 1st Battalion being infantry and the 2nd armoured. The two battalions worked closely, being the first troops to re-enter Brussels on September 3, 1944 after an advance of 100 miles in one day in what was described as 'an armoured lash unequalled for speed in this or any other war'. Very good condition.
A Stunning Italian 'Order of the Crown of Italy' in Gold; Knight's Cross In Gold and enamels, 37 x 39mm, enamels superbly intact without chipping, original ribbon, extremely fine condition. Gold-edged white enamel cross pattée alisée with gold knots between the arms, on laterally-pierced ball suspension; the face with a circular central deep blue transluscent enamel medallion bearing the gilt crown of Savoy with red, with white and green jewels, encircled by a gold ring; the reverse with a gold circular central medallion bearing a crowned black enamel eagle, an oval red enamel shield with a white enamel cross on its breast; The Order of the Crown of Italy was founded as a national order in 1868 by King Vittorio Emanuele II, to commemorate the unification of Italy in 1861. It was awarded in five degrees for civilian and military merit. Compared with the older Order of Saints Maurice and Lazarus (1572), the Order of the Crown of Italy was awarded more liberally and could be conferred on non-Catholics as well; eventually, it became a requirement for a person to have already received the Order of the Crown of Italy in at least the same degree before receiving the Order of Saints Maurice and Lazarus. The order has been suppressed by law since the foundation of the Republic in 1946. However, Umberto II did not abdicate his position as fons honorum and it remained under his Grand Mastership as a dynastic order. While the continued use of those decorations conferred prior to 1951 is permitted in Italy, the crowns on the ribbons issued before 1946 must be substituted for as many five pointed stars on military uniforms. Following the demise of the last reigning monarch in 1983, the order, founded by the first, is no longer bestowed. Notable recipients of the order were; Major General Robert A. McClure, father of U.S. Army Special Operations, Director of Information and Media Control at Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (SHAEF) during World War II Brigadier General Billy Mitchell, United States Army air power advocate. Charles Poletti, Governor of New York, and Colonel in the United States Army; served in Italy during World War II. Painting in the gallery by Karel Žádník (1847-1929), painted in Bilowitz in 1912 of Count Hugo II Logothetti who is wearing his Itlain Order of the Crown of Italy around his neck. Silk ribbon with small old staining.
A Stunning Prussian, 25 Year Gold Medal In Gilt Bronze With original silk ribbon. In superb pristine coindition awarded in WW1.
A Stunning Russian Cold War Era Poster Original poster with interesting subject matter of medal of a Hero of the Soviet Union. This is one of a collection of Russian USSR posters we have acquired from the estate of an ex British Glider Pilot of WW2. This poster is folded and in condition as seen in the photos. Dated 1968 38 inches x 22 inches. This poster is a real and used item, not just for show, would look super nicely framed
A Stunning Scots Guards Pipe Major's Bonnet Badge In silver and gilt. Wonderful quality and excellent condition. Worn on the feather bonnet and glengarry. The Scots Guards, part of the Guards Division, is one of the Foot Guards regiments of the British Army. Their origins lie in the personal bodyguard of King Charles I of England and Scotland. Its lineage can be traced back to 1642, although it was only placed on the English Establishment (thus becoming part of what is now the British Army) in 1686. In April 1940, the 1st Battalion, as part of the 24th Guards Brigade, took part in its first campaign of the war, during the expedition to Norway. In North Africa, as part of the 22nd Guards Brigade, the 2nd Battalion took part in fighting against the Italians in Egypt followed by tough fighting in Libya, then also controlled by Italy. In North Africa, in March 1943, the 2nd Battalion took part in the defensive Battle of Medenine, after the Germans had counter-attacked the Allies. In September 1943, the 2nd Battalion, as part of the 201st Guards Brigade of the 56th (London) Division, took part in the Landing at Salerno. In December 1943, the 1st Battalion, as part of 24th Guards Brigade, arrived in the Italian Theatre. At the Battle of Monte Cassino in early 1944, the 2nd Battalion suffered heavy casualties in tough fighting. The 1st Battalion, as part of its brigade, joined the 6th South African Armoured Division in May 1944. The regiment took part in many fierce engagements throughout 1944, including those against the Gothic Line, a formidable defensive line
A Stunning WW1 1914 Saxe Meinigen Silver Merit Medal Group Four medals in superb order with original silk ribbon suspension on a single bar.Circular silver medal with original loop for ribbon suspension, the face with the head of Grand Duke Wilhelm Ernst in relief facing left, circumscribed ‘Wilhelm Ernst Grossherzog Von Sachsen’; the reverse inscribed ‘Dem Verdienste 1914’ (for Merit 1914) Only a few thousand awards of the decoration were made in total and it is comparatively rare, especially in silver. The Prussian 1897 Centenary Medal (Zentenarmedaille) was officially titled the Medaille zur Erinnerung an des Hochseligen Kaisers und Königs Wilhelm I., des Großen, Majestät to honor the 100th Birthday of Kaiser Wilhelm I. It was established by Kaiser Wilhelm II (Kaiser Wilhelm I's grandson) through a Royal Order effective 22 March 1897 and was given to all active duty Imperial German military personnel and veterans of the wars of 1848, 1864, 1866, and 1870-1871. . Circular gilt bronze medal with loop for ribbon suspension; the face with the royal crown centrally, circumscribed ‘Treue Dienste Reserve Landwehr’ (Faithful Service Reserve and Territorial Army); the reverse inscribed ‘Landwehr Dienstaus-zeichnung II. Klasse’ (Reserve and Territorial Army Service Award, II class); Prussian Order of the Crown Medal. Founded in 1861 instituted in 1888 an order mainly for members of the Kaisers royal household.
A Super British Military Surgeon's Set, In Nickle Plated Campaign Cylinder With numerous tools, scissors clamps etc., and cases for needles and blades. One instrument lacking. Superbly engineered. Maker marked.
A Super Machine Gun Corps Pair [POW] With Photo's And Letter From The King A lovely pair of medals from one of the great services of WW1. Would look spectacular fully framed! With two photos of the recipient and a letter of thanks from King George Vth sent to liberated Prisoners of War. Medals in near mint condition small photo a little worn the original period blow up photo [10 x 12 inches] is very good indeed but with smalll scratches. On 2 September 1915 a definite proposal was made to the War Office for the formation of a single specialist Machine Gun Company per infantry brigade, by withdrawing the guns and gun teams from the battalions. They would be replaced at battalion level by the light Lewis machine guns and thus the firepower of each brigade would be substantially increased. The Machine Gun Corps was created by Royal Warrant on October 14 followed by an Army Order on 22 October 1915. The companies formed in each brigade would transfer to the new Corps. The MGC would eventually consist of infantry Machine Gun Companies, cavalry Machine Gun Squadrons and Motor Machine Gun Batteries. The pace of reorganisation depended largely on the rate of supply of the Lewis guns but it was completed before the Battle of the Somme in 1916. A Base Depot for the Corps was established at Camiers.There are many instances where a single well-placed and protected machine gun cut great swathes in attacking infantry. Nowhere was this demonstrated with more devastating effect than against the British army's attack on the Somme on 1 July 1916 and against the German attack at Arras on 28 March 1918. It followed that multiple machine guns, with interlocking fields of fire, were an incredibly destructive defensive weapon. The German army developed their Hindenburg Line, to which they withdrew in spring 1917, and relied greatly on machine guns for defence. The British copied this. In addition, both offensively and defensively, the MGC began to fire in co-ordinated barrages. The guns of the 2nd and 47th (London) Divisions fired an indirect barrage over the heads of their advancing infantry, and behind the German trenches (in other words, this was an interdiction barrage, to stop enemy attempts to reinforce or re-supply their front), during the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. This was possibly the first time an indirect fire tactic was borrowed from the artillery. Later, and certainly by the Battle of Messines in June 1917, machine gunners were also employing creeping barrages, with fire falling ahead of the artillery barrage to catch enemy troops moving to the rear. They would concentrate fire on specific targets, or sweep the enemy ground behind his front and support positions. Machine guns for these tasks were generally placed about 1000 yards behind the advancing infantry and were moved up as soon as the enemy positions were captured. Machinegun tactics had in fact, become more like those of the artillery than of the infantry. Photo of a Machine Gun crew near the Somme in 1916 wearing gas attack masks, and a Lewis gunner using it in it's anti aircraft capacity, and the London memorial for the Machine Gun Corps. Photos for information only not included. The letter text is as follows; Buckingham Palace 1918 The Queen joins me in welcoming you on your release from the miseries and hardships, which you have endured with so much patience and courage. During these many months of trail, the early rescue of our gallant officers and men from the cruelties of their captivity has been uppermost in our thoughts. We are thankful that this longed for day has arrived, and that back in the old Country, you will be able one more to enjoy the happiness of a home and to see good days among those who ansciously look for your return. [signed] GeorgeRI Written in blue pen on embossed paper, it is considered the first mass communication from a British monarch after it was reproduced and distributed using lithography. The photos of the soldiers in the trenches and the memorial are not included [for information only].
A Super, Commando WW2 'Heroism, MID' Medal Group, with Original Bar Ribbon. 5 Medal group with bar and Mentioned In Despatches oakleaf. Mentioned in Despatches (MID) is a military award for gallantry. This in an interesting group but with one strange anomaly. 39/45 Star, Atlantic Star* with France and Germany Bar, Africa Star, Italy Star, War Medal with MID. However it's original court mounting has not the Atlantic Star, but a Burma Star fitted, with the Atlantic ribbon and Bar, and we can't really explain why. Was the Burma Star sent by the MOD in error? we have simply no idea, but it has been worn this way since issued, and is none the less a very interesting heroism group indeed. The 5 medal ribbon bar also has two rosettes [one on the Atlantic ribbon and another on the Africa ribbon]. Medal recipient not to be named.
A Superb 1970's Royal Irish Rangers Cross belt Plate Very high quality metal badge in frosted silver and gilt. The Royal Irish Rangers came into being on 1 July 1968 through the amalgamation of the three regiments of the North Irish Brigade: the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, the Royal Ulster Rifles and the Royal Irish Fusiliers. The date was initially known as "Vesting Day" (and then "Rangers Day"), emphasising that the traditions of the old regiments were "vested" in the new large regiment. Soon after creation in December 1968, and as part of a general reduction in the Army, the 3rd Battalion (former Royal Irish Fusiliers) was disbanded. The three regiments had old and differing traditions (Rifle and Fusilier) and to avoid favouring one above another, the unique designation "Rangers" was adopted. The title had not existed in the British Army since 1922. With the creation of the "Divisions of Infantry", the Royal Irish Rangers became part of the King's Division, along with regiments from the north of England. Four screw thread mounting posts, 1 nut lacking. 3.25 inches x 2.25 inches
A Superb and Original British WW2 Propaganda Poster For the Royal Navy A rare and amazing artefact of WW2. Printed for H.M Stationary Office by Fosh & Cross Ltd. A propaganda information and recruitment poster. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale. Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return. When the U-boat commander Günther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss. The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring. Good condition with central folding creases. 20 inches x 30 inches.
A Superb and Very Rare Imperial German Naval Issue Straw Hat SMS Emden Bearing the wide, imperial black silk straw cap band with the embroidered badge of [SMS] Emden, with a crown over the imperial battle flag, and from family history it was used, during it's service life, on the SMS Emden's barge to transport the Kaiser to his ship before WW1. The Emden and her crew has a most significant status within German Naval history for in only three months service it sank or captured 23 ships. It fought with such valiant heroism before it was finally destroyed by the Royal Australian Navy, in November 1914, that all the surviving crew were given the singular and unique honour of having the ship's name, Emden, added as a suffix to their family surname in purpetuity. The SMS Emden was a Dresden class light cruiser launched in 1908 and posted to the East Asia squadron based at Tsingtao in 1910. She took part in the suppression of the Sokehs Rebellion on Ponape in 1910-11 and in 1913 (along with British and Japanese ships) shelled a rebel Chinese fort on the Yangtze. When the First World War broke out the Emden, under the command of Korvettenkapitän Karl von Müller, set sail from Tsingtao to cause mayhem amongst allied shipping in the Indian Ocean and bombard enemy ports (including Madras in British India). The allies put vast efforts into catching the SMS Emden (at one point having over 60 warships involved in the search) but she eluded them, capturing and sinking thousands of tons of Entente shipping along the way. In November 1914 she was finally cornered off the Cocos Islands and sunk by the Australian light cruiser HMAS Sydney. The surviving crew of the SMS Emden were uniquely honoured for their bravery by being allowed to add the suffix '-Emden' to their surnames. To this day some of their descendants still carry this additional name. She sank eighteen merchantman, converted another to an armed merchant cruiser and captured and used three colliers. She had also raided two allied ports and sank a cruiser and a destroyer as well as causing major disruption to shipping and tying down a large number of enemy warships. Throughout the voyage she had maintained an excellent reputation for "gentlemanly" behaviour, not a single person from the merchant ships she sank was killed, prisoners were well treated and released at the earliest opportunity, enemy wounded were treated as best they could and neutral ships were treated as such.SMS Emden ("His Majesty's Ship Emden")[a] was the second and final member of the Dresden class of light cruisers built for the Imperial German Navy (Kaiserliche Marine). Named for the town of Emden, she was laid down at the Kaiserliche Werft (Imperial Dockyard) in Danzig in 1906. Her hull was launched in May 1908, and completed in July 1909. She had one sister ship, Dresden. Like the preceding Königsberg-class cruisers, Emden was armed with ten 10.5 cm (4.1 in) guns and two torpedo tubes. Emden spent the majority of her career overseas in the German East Asia Squadron, based in Tsingtao, in the Kiautschou Bay concession in China. In 1913, she came under the command of Karl von Müller, who would captain the ship during World War I. At the outbreak of hostilities, Emden captured a Russian steamer and converted her into the commerce raider Cormoran. Emden rejoined the East Asia Squadron, after which she was detached for independent raiding in the Indian Ocean. The cruiser spent nearly two months operating in the region, and captured nearly two dozen ships. In late October 1914, Emden launched a surprise attack on Penang; in the resulting Battle of Penang, she sank the Russian cruiser Zhemchug and the French destroyer Mousquet.Müller then took Emden to raid the Cocos Islands, where he landed a contingent of sailors to destroy British facilities. Emden then set of to raid the important wireless/cable station at the Cocos Islands, arriving at 0600 on November 9. A forty man landing party was put ashore unopposed and the Buresk was signalled to join Emden. Buresk did not reply but the the island started to transmit "S.O.S. Emden is here" both by wireless and cable. Only fifty miles to the north east the was the Anzac convoy which intercepted the transmission. HMAS Sydney (Captain Glossop) was detached from the convoy. Sydney was a modern light cruiser, her 6 inch main guns outgunning the 4.1 inch armed Emden. She left the convoy at 0700 and by exceeding her designed speed arrived at the Cocos after 0900. At first Emden's lookouts thought Sydney was Buresk but when she was identified as a cruiser the landing party was recalled but were too slow and so at 0930 Emden pulled out of the lagoon without them. Ten minutes alter Emden opened fire with her starboard guns at 10,000 yards, hitting with her third salvo, knocking out Sydney's range finder. Emden continued to score hits, knocking out a gun and starting a fire but by 1000 Sydney had found Emden's range. By 1020 Emden had lost her wireless station, a forward gun, her electrics and steering. She then received damage to her shell hoists and her firing became ragged. Sydney was a faster ship than Emden and throughout the action maintained a range best suited to her heavier guns. Emden's forward funnel fell across deck causing her to be shrouded in smoke and to reduce speed below twenty knots. For the next half an hour Emden was hit repeatedly, over 100 times during the entire action, and Captain Muller decided to beach her before she sank. At 1115 she was beached, Sydney ceasing fire five minutes later and setting off after Buresk which had just arrived. Buresk scuttled herself to prevent capture and Sydney returned to the Emden. She signalled Emden to ask for surrender but received no reply and as Emden was still flying her battle flag she opened fire again. Emden hauled down her battle flag and raised a white flag, ending the battle. Sydney dropped off medical supplies then headed back to the main island to capture the landing party but when she arrived they had left in the commandeered schooner Ayesha. They eventually made it to Turkey in May 1915. Emden lost 131 killed and sixty five wounded whilst Sydney suffered three killed and eight wounded. Karl von Muller was the last to leave Emden and spent the remainder of the war as a P.O.W.. Over a raiding career spanning three months and 30,000 nautical miles, Emden had destroyed two Entente warships and sank or captured sixteen British steamers and one Russian merchant ship, totaling 70,825 gross register tons. Another four British ships were captured and released. Another very rare surviving Imperial German Navy straw hat, from the Kaisers Yacht [the SMY Hohenzollern] but with it's Kaisersciffe title SMS Hohenzollern, we show it in our photograph gallery just as it is now exhibited in the The International Maritime Museum Collection, Hamburg
A Superb Badge of the Devon and Dorset Regt 1970's Officers Badge Very fine quality officers badge in mint condition. Frosted silver and gilt. 3 piece construction. The Devonshire and Dorset Regiment, usually just known as the Devon and Dorsets, was an infantry regiment of the British Army formed in 1958 by the amalgamation of two county regiments. As part of the 1957 Defence Review, it was announced that there would be a reduction in the number of infantry battalions in the British Army. The reduction was to be effected by the merging of a number of pairs of regiments. Among the mergers to be carried out were those of the regiments of the two neighbouring counties of Devon and Dorset. The Devonshire Regiment (the former 11th Regiment of Foot, originally raised in 1685) The Dorset Regiment (the successor to the 39th Foot, raised in 1702; and the 54th Foot, dating from 1755) The amalgamation took place in Minden, Germany, on 17 May 1958. The new 1st Battalion, Devonshire and Dorset Regiment was commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Guy Young, formerly commanding officer of the 1st Devonshires, while the colonel of the regiment was Major-General George Neville Wood, formerly of the Dorsets. In November 1958 the 1st Battalion moved to Cyprus, where they carried out anti-insurgency activities against the paramilitary EOKA organisation. A ceasefire was called in December 1959, and the island achieved independence from Britain in August 1960. Following the ending of the conflict the battalion carried out exercises in Libya before returning to the United Kingdom in 1961. From 1961 to 1963 the battalion was based in Plymouth, taking part in exercises on Salisbury Plain and in recruitment activities following the ending of National Service. In May 1962 the regiment was given the freedom of the City of Exeter, and were presented with a stand of colours by the Colonel-in-Chief, Princess Marina, Duchess of Kent. From July 1963 the battalion was based in Holywood, County Down. Placed on twenty four hours travel notice, in May 1964 they moved to British Guiana where there was political and civil unrest. Elections were held in December of that year, a first step in the independence of the colony.
A Superb British WW1 Tank Drivers Mask [Authentic Museum Grade Replica] This is not an original WW1 made British tank mask, it was made as an authentic replica some while ago for a docu-drama, as, apparently the Imperial War Museum wouldn't lend theirs [not unsurprisingly]. If you see the masks at Bovington Tank Museum they are close to identical to this example as you could imagine, it would likely fool 95% of those that see it. However originals can now fetch not far short of £2,000, but this incredibly faithful replica we are seeking only £380. We never usually sell copies of any kind, but this is an exceptional authentic replication piece and the price reflects that accordingly. It looks more suited to the battlefield of Crecy to protect against the volleys of French arrows, or from a scene from a Hollywood horror film. But this medieval-style chain mail mask was actually designed for the Western Front of the First World War. The originals were worn by the pioneering British tank drivers at the Battle of Cambrai in 1917. The vehicles, which were still in their infancy as machines of war, were piloted from fume-filled cabins. And the drivers were often at risk of taking red hot shards of metal in the face as enemy machine gun fire and shells smashed into the exterior. And so these masks were designed to protect the drivers faces and eyes in the heat of battle. However, very few originals survived the war. Cambrai was the first time the new British battle tank were used in significant force, with a battle plan especially designed to utilise the new capability Those deployed by the British at Cambrai were Mark IV tanks and despite initial success, German artillery and infantry defences exposed the frailties of their armour and the vehicles became mostly ineffective after the first day. Tank design gradually improved in the inter-war period and during the Second World War, where they had once been used to support infantry, the concept of Blitzkrieg made tanks a formidable branch of the army in their own right. Before the end of the war, tanks had surpassed infantry as the most important force on the battlefield.
A Superb Early 20th Century Airship Enamel and Silver Gilt Demitasse Spoon Decorated with an airship in the bowl, and Graf Von Zeppelin on the handle. In polychrome enamel excellent condition. Hallmarked 800.
A Superb Early Brass Cased German 88mm Cannon Shell A Rare German WW2 88mm Shell Used by the German 88 mm Cannon during WW2. A simply superb example, rare zinc fuze dated 1940, with a 1939 shell case. Part of a small collection of rare shells we were thrilled to acquire, The world famous 88's were the bane of the Allies in WW2. The 88 millimetre Artillery Guns and the Tiger Tank 88 cannons fired these huge shells. Superb maker codes stamps etc. with full Waffenamt Nazi Eagle markings. To get an impression of the difference between the size and power of Allied shells against the German equivalent, in 1942 an Allied Tank Round was approximately the size of a small Coca Cola bottle, the German Tank Shell was the size of a small child! Photos in the gallery show 88mm shells being loaded into a Tiger Tank. The 88 performed well in its original role of an anti-aircraft gun, and it proved to be a superb anti-tank gun as well. Its success was due to its versatility: the standard anti-aircraft platform allowed gunners to depress the muzzle below the horizontal, unlike most of its contemporaries. During the initial stages of the war, as it was becoming increasingly clear that existing anti-tank weapons were unable to pierce the armour of heavier enemy tanks, gunners were more likely to put the weapon to use against enemy tanks, a situation that was aided by the prevalence of the 88 among German forces. Similarly to the anti-aircraft role, as an anti-tank weapon the 88 was tactically arranged into batteries, usually four guns to each. The higher-level tactical unit was, most commonly, a mixed anti-aircraft battalion (Flak-Abteilung, gemischte). It totalled 12 such guns on average, supplanted by light cannons. The German Condor Legion made extensive use of the 88 in the Spanish Civil War, where its usefulness as an anti-tank weapon and a general artillery piece exceeded its role as an anti-aircraft gun.The success of the 88 caused the Allies to take steps to defend against it in new tank designs. On July 18 and 19 1944 a Luftwaffe 8.8 cm anti-aircraft battery was re-purposed by then Major Hans von Luck to attack British tanks near Cagny taking part in Operation Goodwood. 20 tanks were killed by these guns within the first few seconds and at least 40 tanks were knocked out by 88's during the engagement. By February 1945, there were 327 heavy anti-aircraft batteries delegated against the Soviet land armies, which was 21% of those dedicated solely to the anti-aircraft defense of the country Not suitable to export, for sale to over 18s only, safe inert and empty 37 inches high
A Superb ERII British Army Chaplain's Rabbi Officer's Cap Badge In silvered gilt and blue enamel. A simply stunning example. The Department is unique in that it has two cap badges, one for it’s Christian officers and one for it’s Jewish officers, this one is for Jewish Officers. All of the chaplains are commissioned officers and do not carry arms. 1796. The Army Chaplains’ Department formed under the first Chaplain General, the Reverend John Gamble though with very few applicants. 1854. The Crimean War. 26000 troops, one deployable Chaplain, the Reverend Henry Press Wright. However the reports of William Russell to the Times caused the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel to finance more Chaplains. Eventually sixty deploy and twelve die. 1879. The Reverend James Williams Adams was the first clergyman to be awarded the Victoria Cross as he served with the 9th Lancers at Killa Kazi. 1836 Roman Catholic clergy joined the Department, followed by the Presbyterians in 1858, Wesleyans in 1881 and Jewish Rabbis in 1892. 1914-18. The Great War. Names such as Woodbine Willy and Tubby Clayton became synonymous with the bringing of comfort, care and compassion to those caught up in the bloodiness of war. The Reverends Theodore Bayley DSO, MC, VC, Noel Mellish VC, MC and WRF Addison VC stood as marks of the commitment of the Chaplains to serve wherever the British soldier was to be found, and at whatever the personal cost. 179 Chaplains die during the war. In recognition of their devoted work since 1914 King George V conferred the prefix ’Royal’ on the Army Chaplains’ Department. 1939-45. The Second World War. New formations such as Airborne Forces had Chaplains learning new skills such as parachuting. The fortitude of devoted Chaplains such as The Reverends Happy Harry Thorpe and HLO Davies in the prison camps of the far East sustain the captives during the horrors of life and death on the Burma-Siam Railway and of the notorious Shamshuipo Camp. 96 British and 38 Commonwealth Army Chaplains die during the war. 1945-present. Chaplains have continued to serve wherever British soldiers have been sent. Korea, Suez, Aden, Northern Ireland, The Falklands, Iraq, Sierra Leone, the former Yugoslavia and Afghanistan. The conflicts may change but the call, care, compassion and prayer remains constant.
A Superb ERII Painted Tenor Drum of the 1st Bn The Royal Welch Fusiliers. The Royal Welch Fusiliers was a line infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Prince of Wales' Division. It was founded in 1689 to oppose James II and to take part in the imminent war with France. The regiment was numbered as the 23rd Regiment of Foot, though it was one of the first regiments to be granted the honour of a fusilier title and so was known as The Welch Regiment of Fusiliers from 1702. The "Royal" accolade was earned fighting in the War of the Spanish Succession in 1713. It was one of the oldest infantry regiments in the British Army, hence the archaic spelling of the word Welch instead of Welsh. In the Boer War and throughout the First World War, the army officially called the regiment "The Royal Welsh Fusiliers", but the archaic "Welch" was officially restored to the regiment's title in 1920 under Army Order No.56. During those decades, the regiment itself unofficially used the "Welch" form. During the Second World War, the 1st Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers was a Regular Army unit and part of the 6th Infantry Brigade, assigned to the 2nd Infantry Division. It served in France in 1940 with the British Expeditionary Force. The battalion fought in the short but fierce battles of France and Belgium and was forced to retreat and be evacuated during the Dunkirk evacuation. After two years spent in the United Kingdom, waiting and preparing for the invasion that never came (Operation Sea Lion), the 1st RWF and the rest of 2nd Division were sent to British India to fight the Imperial Japanese Army after a string of defeats inflicted upon the British and Indian troops. The battalion was involved in the Burma Campaign, particularly the Battle of Kohima, nicknamed Stalingrad of the East due to the ferocity of fighting on both sides, that helped to turn the tide of the campaign in the South East Asian theatre. 14.25 inches high X 17 inches approx
A Superb French Fusilier-Marins Cap. As the crews of the ships lacked personnel trained for fighting on land, the imperial decree of 5 June 1856 created the specialisation of marin fusilier. The Fusiliers-Marins was initially composed of sailors and naval officers who were sent for special infantry training in Lorient in order to form the marine detachments aboard ships and conduct small scale landings. This was not the first time that the French had tried this approach. Before the First Republic, the Corps royal de l'infanterie de la marine had been superseded by the Corps royal de canonniers-matelots on 1 January 1786. These troops were notably engaged during the war of 1870 and the defence of Paris. Two battalions of Fusiliers-Marins, under the respective commands of capitaines de frégate Laguerre and de Beaumont, took part in the Tonkin campaign as part of the Tonkin Expeditionary Corps, distinguishing themselves at Son Tay and Bac Ninh. In 1900 they participated in the fighting during the Boxer Rebellion and it was on the same year that the fusiliers were finally confirmed as part of the naval service as their counterparts in the troupes de marine (troupes coloniales) moved on to the Army via the War Ministry. In World War I, their famous defense in 1914 of Diksmude in the Battle of the Yser stands out. They also served at the Dardanelles and in Macedonia. The fusiliers-marins were busy studying amphibious warfare, testing experimental landing craft and taking part in exercices combinés from the late 1920s until the mid-1930s. In World War II, their most famous battles were Bir Hakeim and Normandy. World War II Fusiliers-Marins units included the 1er Regiment de Fusiliers-Marins de Reconnaissance which served in the 1st Free French Division (1er DFL), the Régiment Blindé de Fusiliers Marins (RBFM) of the 2nd Armoured Division and the 1er Bataillon de Fusiliers Marins Commandos (1er BFMC) who served in 10 (Inter-Allied) Commando. Today's Commandos Marine are drawn exclusively from the ranks of the Fusiliers-Marins after passing rigorous selection. In Indochina after World War II, the French Navy and Fusiliers-Marins created the famous riverine warfare units called divisions navales d'assaut (naval assault divisions), commonly referred to as dinassauts. The Demi-Brigade de Fusiliers-Marins (DBFM) which included the Bataillon d'Intervention de Fusiliers-Marins (BIFM) served in Algeria.
A Superb German Iron Cross Medal Group, WW1 Issue and WW2 Wear. WW1 awards and taken as a war souvenir in WW2 and formerly worn by a senior rank officer who served in both conflicts. The Iron Cross, The Honour Cross of the World War 1914/1918, The Austria 1914-18 Veteran’s Medal, Austro Hungary WW1 Pro Deo et Patria Military Medal, the Bulgarian royal "WWI Veteran Medal". The Iron Cross was awarded for bravery in battle as well as other conspicuous military contributions in a battlefield environment. The Iron Cross 2nd Class came with a ribbon and was worn in one of two different methods: When in formal dress, the entire cross was worn mounted alone or as part of a medal bar. The Iron Cross which existed in the Kingdom of Prussia, and later in the German Empire and Third Reich, was established by King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia, as a bravery and gallantry award and first awarded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau, during the Napoleonic Wars. The recommissioned Iron Cross was also awarded during the Franco-Prussian War, the First World War, and the Second World War. The Honour Cross of the World War 1914/1918, commonly, but incorrectly, known as the Hindenburg Cross, was established by Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg, President of the German Republic, on 13 July 1934, to commemorate the distinguished deeds of the German soldiers during the First World War. This was Germany's first official service medal for soldiers of Imperial Germany who had taken part in the war, and where they had since died it was also awarded to their surviving next-of-kin. Shortly after its issuance, the government of Nazi Germany declared the award as the only official service decoration of the First World War and further forbid the continued wearing of German Free Corps awards on any military or paramilitary uniform of a state or Nazi Party organization. The Honour Cross is worn suspended from a ribbon with black edges, two white stripes, and a red stripe between them.
A Superb German Nazi Schutzpolizei Tschako Helmet Dated 1941 Superb condition overall, and handwritten named to the owner. A now very scarcely seen original helmet of the Third Reich. Made by C. Pose, Wehrausrustungen of Berlin and bearing a very good maker marking and overall in super condition. This sturdy-framed shako has a green wool mid section, with a polished fiber circular top, straight front and domed back with protruding neck guard, in the traditional police helmet style, that was established in 1920s and lasted until 1945. The front is adorned with a gilt aluminum Third Reich Berlin City Police shako plate, illustrating a spread-winged eagle sitting upon an oak leaf clustered wreath centred by a swastika insignia. Immediately above the shako plate is an oval aluminum cockade, with a painted red centre surrounded by rows of silver gilt and black paint, attached to the helmet via a u-shaped prong on the back of the cockade and slid through a slot behind the shako plate. Interior with yellow leather sweatband and Berlin maker mark. A very good example of a German police helmet Typical pre-war pattern. The Ordnungspolizei was separate from the SS and maintained a system of insignia and Orpo ranks. It was possible for policemen to be members of the SS but without active duties. Police generals who were members of the SS were referred to simultaneously by both rank titles during the war. For instance, a Generalleutnant in the Police who was also an SS member would be referred to as SS Gruppenführer und Generalleutnant der Polizei. In addition, those Orpo police generals that undertook the duties of both Senior SS and Police Leader (Höhere SS und Polizeiführer) gained equivalent Waffen-SS ranks in August 1944 when Himmler was appointed Chef der Ersatzheeres (Chief of Home Army), because they had authority over the prisoner-of-war camps in their area. Heinrich Himmler's ultimate aim was to replace the regular police forces of Germany with a combined racial/state protection corps (Staatsschutzkorps) of pure SS units. Local law enforcement would be undertaken by the Allgemeine-SS with the Waffen-SS providing homeland-security and political-police functions. Historical analysis of the Third Reich has revealed that senior Orpo personnel knew of Himmler's plan and were opposed to it.
A Superb Group of WW2 Campaign Medals A 5 medal Royal Naval group including Africa Star, Burma Star, Atlantic Star, 1939/45 Star and war medal.
A Superb Imperial German WW1 Military Issue Bi-Colour Metal Buckle and Belt WW1 complete German waffen combat belt and two piece bi-colour buckle in excellent condition overall. Belt leather maker stamped with location city of Plauen in Saxony. Size stamped 100 for 1 metre in length. Gott mit uns ("God with us") is a phrase commonly used in heraldry in Prussia (from 1701) and later by the German military from the period spanning the German Empire (1871 to 1918) to the end of the Third Reich in 1945. The Prussian Order of the Crown was Prussia's lowest ranking order of chivalry, and was instituted in 1861. The obverse gilt central disc bore the crown of Prussia, surrounded by a blue enamel ring bearing the motto of the German Empire Gott Mit Uns. At the time of the completion of German unification in 1871, the imperial standard bore the motto Gott mit uns on the arms of an Iron Cross. Imperial German 3 and 5 mark silver and 20 mark gold coins had Gott mit uns inscribed on their edge. German soldiers had Gott mit uns inscribed on their helmets in the First World War. To the Germans it was a rallying cry, "a Protestant as well as an Imperial motto, the expression of German religious, political and ethnic single-mindedness, or the numerous unity of altar, throne and Volk". The slogan entered the mindset on both sides; in 1916 a cartoon was printed in the New York Tribune captioned "Gott Mit Uns!", showing "a German officer in spiked helmet holding a smoking revolver as he stood over the bleeding form of a nurse. It symbolized the rising popular demand that the United States shed its neutrality".
A Superb Large, Zeppelin Co.Bronze Table Medal In Original Case Large bronze medal for service to the Eckner Spende, bearing the Zeppelin. size 5.25 inches overall across. Eckner Spende ZEPPELIN medal. Hugo Eckner (1868-1954) was an important part of the Zeppelin Company, which he joined in 1908. He had been an early critic of the zeppelins that were produced at that time. During WW I, he was the Chief Instructor for all zeppelins used by the army and navy. After the war ended, he assumed management of the company. The Treaty of Versailles prevented the Germans from building airships of the size that Eckner felt were necessary for commercial success. He lobbied the allied authorities, and finally was allowed to build the LZ-126. It was allowed with the proviso that the airship be turned over to the USA. In a much-publicized flight (Eckner was also a skilled PR man, which had been his first role when he joined in 1908). After a daunting flight, the LZ-126 was turned over to American authorities. It was renamed the U.S.S. Los Angeles, and was operated by the U.S. Navy until she was scrapped in 1939. From this base, Eckner continued his efforts to build commercial zeppelins. Taking a page from former employer Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin’s book, Eckner appealed to the German people for money to build his gentle giants. It was through the "Zeppelin Eckner Spende" effort that the Graf Zeppelin and the Hindenburg airships were built and sailed around the world. [In fact, Eckner himself was the captain on the longer, record-breaking flights]. The Nazis, who saw these zeppelins as a means for propaganda and displaying Germany’s might around the world. Eckner wanted no part of such propaganda, and was replaced in the company by those willing to serve the Nazi Party’s desires. This is a stunning piece.
A Superb Mecklenburg-Schwerin Military Merit Cross, First Class. In Gold Obverse: A convex cross pattee with a raised serrated edge line. 'FF' in the centre, a crown on the top arm and '1914' on the lower arm. Grand Duke Friedrich Franz II established the Military Merit Cross on 5 August 1848. It was clearly patterned on the Prussian Iron Cross. The Cross was issued in two classes, with receipt of the 2nd Class, worn from a ribbon, being a prerequisite to receipt of the 1st Class, which was a pinback cross or a deluxe screw back. It was awarded without regard to rank for bravery or military merit in wartime, and was renewed for particular conflicts, rather than being used as a general military decoration in peacetime. The 1914 version was authorized on 28 February 1915, with awards retroactive to the beginning of the war. During the First World War the Military Merit Cross could also be awarded to non-combatants, including those supporting the war effort on the home front. In these cases, the second class was awarded on a reverse coloured ribbon of red with yellow and blue edges. The Cross in both classes was reduced to 33 mm when awarded to women. . A picture in the gallery of Freiderich Franz IV wearing his 1st Class Cross [for information only]. As usual and traditional with all medals, those termed gold are not solid gold but plated.
A Superb Original Antique Leather Machine Gun Company Munition Case WW1 issue. Bearing the royal crest of King George Vth and British Army stamped for the 6th, 261 Machine Gun Company [6 261 MGC]. Substantially strong and robust hardened buffalo hide. This is a particularly rare type is of heavy grade solid leather, that is top, bottom and side, brass seam riveted, and with a wide leather carrying strap at the rear. The more common version used by the British army was a cordite carrier type, that are plain, lightweight and have no rivets, cork lined and are wide rim banded top and bottom. At the outbreak of the First World War in August 1914, the tactical potential of machine guns was not appreciated by the British armed forces. The prevalent attitude of senior ranks at the outbreak of the Great War can be summed up by the opinion of an officer (albeit expressed a decade earlier) that a single battery of machine guns per army corps was a sufficient level of issue. Despite the evidence of fighting in Manchuria (1905 onwards) the Army therefore went to war with each infantry battalion and cavalry regiment containing a machine gun section of just two guns. These organic (embedded) units were supplemented in November 1914 by the formation of the Motor Machine Gun Service (MMGS) administered by the Royal Artillery, consisting of motor-cycle mounted machine gun batteries. A machine gun school was also opened in France. After a year of warfare on the Western Front it was self-evident that to be fully effective - in the opinion of former sceptics - that machine guns must be used in larger units and some commanders advocated crewing them with specially trained men who not only thoroughly conversant with their weapons but who understood how they should be best deployed for maximum effect. To achieve this, the Machine Gun Corps was formed in October 1915 with Infantry, Cavalry, and Motor branches, followed in 1916 by the Heavy Branch. A depot and training centre was established at Belton Park in Grantham, Lincolnshire, and a base depôt at Camiers in France. The Infantry Branch was by far the largest and was formed by the transfer of battalion machine gun sections to the MGC. These sections were grouped into Brigade Machine Gun Companies, three per division. New companies were raised at Grantham. In 1917, a fourth company was added to each division. In February and March 1918, the four companies in each division were formed into a Machine Gun Battalion. The Guards Division formed its own machine gun support unit, the Guards Machine Gun Regiment. The Cavalry Branch consisted of Machine Gun Squadrons, one per cavalry brigade. The Motor Branch was formed by absorbing the MMGS and the armoured car squadrons of the recently disbanded Royal Naval Armoured Car Service. It formed several types of units: motor cycle batteries, light armoured motor batteries (LAMB) and light car patrols. As well as motor cycles, other vehicles used included Rolls-Royce and Ford Model T cars. The Heavy Section was formed in March 1916, becoming the Heavy Branch in November of that year. Men of this branch crewed the first tanks in action at Flers, during the Battle of the Somme in September 1916. In July 1917, the Heavy Branch separated from the MGC to become the Tank Corps, later called the Royal Tank Regiment. The MGC saw action in all the main theatres of war, including France, Belgium, Palestine, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Salonika, East Africa and Italy. In its short history, the MGC gained an enviable record for heroism as a front line fighting force. Indeed, in the latter part of the war, as tactics changed to defence in depth, it commonly served well in advance of the front line. It had a less enviable record for its casualty rate, with 62,049 becoming casualties, including 12,498 killed, earning it the nickname 'the Suicide Club'. A fabulous and beautiful artifact of WW1 Machine Gun Corps history, that is now perfectly useable as a stunning display piece, or stick stand or waste paper basket. Top section of rear leather strap handle is now detached, but it should be easily repairable. 14 inches high x 7.5 inches across
A Superb Original Pastel Painting Of U Boat Sinking Ship. By Paul Stead A modern artist of great potential. An original work of art, beautifully painted, signed, and framed in oak. Frame 23 inches x 18 inches, painting 15.5 inches x 10.75 inches
A Superb Original USAAF, WW2 Pilot's, Bomber Flying Jacket Winter Type B-3 Contract No. 42-22899. Named to the pilot on the back 'Ralph' with USAAF Wings symbol. With it's original maker label with contract number. This has been a well loved jacket that has seen several old tears, patches and repairs, but what a jacket, and what piece of history!. If I was still young or fit enough to ride the Vincent I would sooner sell my soul than this little cracker. Made and issued for the Army Air Forces, from 1933 till 1943. Original examples of these super WW2 Aeronautical gems are so very scarce indeed, and the beauty of them is, they are still superbly wearable, in fact the more aged the better!. Probably not the original zipper. US legend General George Patton wore his favourite B3 during the entire Battle of Bulge campaign and we show a photo of him wearing it, plus Steve McQueen and Bob Wagner in theirs. A faithful modern copy will cost well over a thousand dollars, how much more can you value an early war original, with the original owner's name and the USAAF wings motif emblazoned on the back!
A Superb Pre WW2 Nazi SS Fire Protection Police Sidearm & Original Frog In fair to excellent condition overall, manufactured circa 1933. Used by the Fire Protection Police [under the control of the SS]. With original leather frog. Plated blade, plated hilt with checquered celluloid grip. Double 'S' quillon guard. In overall nice condition. An organization that was an auxiliary to the Ordnungspolizei, and during the war was absorbed into the SS. Feuerschutzpolizei. By 1938, all of Germany's local fire brigades were part of the ORPO. Orpo Hauptamt had control of all civilian fire brigades. ORPO's chief was SS-Oberstgruppenführer Kurt Daluege who was responsible to Himmler alone until 1943 when Daluege had a massive heart attack. From 1943, Daluege was replaced by Obergruppenführer Alfred Wünnenberg until May 1945. ORPO was structurally reorganised by 1941. It had been divided into the numerous offices covering every aspect of German law enforcement in accordance with Himmler's desire for public control of all things. Small lateral crack in quillon.
A Superb Quality Post 1953 Royal Hampshire Regt. Officers Badge. In pristine near mint condition. Cut silver star mounted with gilt crowned pierce Garter on a rich blue translucent enamel ground; to the centre, a red enamelled rose with green sepals; cap of the crown in crimson velvet
A Superb Quality Royal Naval Officers Sword of WW1, Battle of Jutland Used by an an officer on battle cruiser HMS Lion. The exterior has near mint gilding and stunning. This is such a good antique sword it could go back into current service. The blade is fully etched in superb order with most of it's original frost etching and mirror polish intact. A historical vintage sword used in WW1 by an officer who served at one of the great naval engagements of the 20th century. The Battle of Jutland (German: Skagerrakschlacht) was a naval battle by the British Royal Navy's Grand Fleet (which also included ships and individual personnel from the Royal Australian Navy and Royal Canadian Navy) against the Imperial German Navy's High Seas Fleet during the First World War. The battle was fought on 31 May and 1 June 1916 in the North Sea near Jutland, Denmark. It was the largest naval battle and the only full-scale clash of battleships in the war. It was only the third-ever fleet action between steel battleships, following the smaller but more decisive battles of the Yellow Sea (1904) and Tsushima (1905) during the Russo-Japanese War. The High Seas Fleet was commanded by Vice-Admiral Reinhard Scheer, and the Grand Fleet by Admiral Sir John Jellicoe. The German fleet's intention was to lure out, trap, and destroy a portion of the Grand Fleet, as the German naval force was insufficient to successfully engage the entire British fleet. This formed part of a larger strategy to break the British blockade of Germany and to allow German mercantile shipping to operate. Meanwhile, the Royal Navy pursued a strategy to engage and destroy the High Seas Fleet, or keep the German force contained and away from Britain's own shipping lanes. Fourteen British and eleven German ships were sunk, with great loss of life. After sunset, and throughout the night, Jellicoe maneuvered to cut the Germans off from their base, in hopes of continuing the battle next morning, but under the cover of darkness Scheer broke through the British light forces forming the rearguard of the Grand Fleet and returned to port. Both sides claimed victory. The British lost more ships and twice as many sailors, and the British press criticised the Grand Fleet's failure to force a decisive outcome, but Scheer's plan of destroying a substantial portion of the British fleet also failed. The Germans' 'fleet in being' continued to pose a threat, requiring the British to keep their battleships concentrated in the North Sea, but the battle confirmed the German policy of avoiding all fleet-to-fleet contact. A few months later, after further unsuccessful attempts to reduce the Royal Navy's numerical advantage, the German Navy turned its efforts and resources to unrestricted submarine warfare and the destruction of Allied and neutral shipping. No scabbard
A Superb Silver Australian 5th Light Horse Mobile Infantry Badge Excellent rare and original example [Wide Bay and Burnett Light Horse] Queensland Mobile Infantry. The history of the 5th Light Horse is distinguished and goes thus; The 5th Light Horse Regiment was raised in Brisbane in September 1914, entirely from men who had enlisted in Queensland, and became part of the 2nd Light Horse Brigade. Sailing from Sydney on 21 December 1914, the regiment disembarked in Egypt on 1 February 1915. The light horse were considered unsuitable for the initial operations at Gallipoli, but were subsequently deployed without their horses to reinforce the infantry. The 2nd Light Horse Brigade landed in late May 1915 and was attached to the 1st Australian Division. The 5th Light Horse played a defensive role for most of the campaign but was involved in several minor attacks. It left the peninsula on 20 December 1915. Back in Egypt, the 2nd Light Horse Brigade became part of the ANZAC Mounted Division and in February 1916 joined the forces defending the Suez Canal from a Turkish advance across the Sinai Desert. The 5th Light Horse’s main activity in the Sinai was long-range patrolling, but it was involved in several small engagements during August, as the Turks retreated after their defeat at Romani. The ANZAC Mounted Division advanced into Palestine in late December 1916. The 5th’s work predominantly continued to be patrols and raids until the advance stalled before the Turkish bastion of Gaza. The regiment participated in all three battles aimed at capturing the town, most notably the first abortive attempt on 27 March 1917. On this occasion the 5th attacked Gaza from the rear and was fighting its way through streets and gardens when ordered to withdraw. With the fall of Gaza on 7 November 1917, the Turkish position in southern Palestine collapsed. The 5th was involved in the pursuit that followed, and then spent much of the first half of 1918 holding the west bank of the Jordan River. During this time it was involved in the Amman (24–27 February) and Es Salt (30 April–4 May) raids, both of which were tactical failures but helped to convince the Turks that the next offensive would be launched across the Jordan. Instead, the offensive was launched along the coast in September 1918, with the 5th taking part in a subsidiary effort east of the Jordan. It attacked at Amman on 25 September, and on 29 September 4,500 Turks surrendered to just two squadrons from the regiment at Ziza. Turkey surrendered on 31 October 1918, but the 5th Light Horse was employed one last time to assist in putting down the Egyptian revolt of early 1919. It sailed for home on 28 June 1919. Text from AWM One of the most famous men of the 5th Light Horse was sniper Trooper Sing at Gallipoli. Trooper Sing sniped from a position known as Chatham's Post, his tally stated as 150 confirmed, but a higher informal estimate puts his tally at 201. The discrepancy can be accounted for by the way such hits were recorded. On 23 October 1915, General Birdwood issued an order containing his compliments on Trooper Billy Sing's performance accounting for the 201 Turks. Private Sing was awarded the Belgian Croix de Guerre in early 1918, probably for his role in leading a patrol eliminating some German snipers at Polygon Wood in September 1917. Studio portrait in the gallery is of 1707 Lance Corporal (L Cpl) John James Marsh, 5th Light Horse Regiment from Murraria, Queensland. A 21 year old grocer prior to enlisting on 18 August 1915, he embarked for overseas with the 11th Reinforcements from Sydney on 21 October 1915 aboard HMAT Hawkes Bay. He served with the regiment in the Middle East where he was wounded in action at Gaza and died on 6 November 1917. L Cpl Marsh is buried in the Beersheba War Cemetery, Israel. Original badge, pattern1930/42, with two lug fixing in superb order and superb quality definition.
A Superb Solid Silver Royal Antediluvian Order Of Buffaloes Order Of Merit Hallmarked silver with fine mint enamelling and silk ribbon, known within the order as a jewel. The Royal Antediluvian Order of Buffaloes (RAOB) was one of the largest fraternal organisations in the United Kingdom. The order started in 1822 and is known as the Buffs to members. The RAOB organisation aids members, their families, dependents of former members and other charitable organisations. The order has a Rule Book, Manual of Instruction and Ceremony Lectures issued and revised by the Grand Lodge of England based at Harrogate in England. The 'lodge' description for branch organisation and headquarters was adopted in imitation of Freemasonry but RAOB is completely open in its objectives, activities and ritual. The RAOB was begun in the Harp Tavern (opposite the Drury Lane Theatre) by the artist Joseph Lisle and comedian William Sinnett along with other stage hands and theatre technicians in August 1822. It drew its then name of The Buffaloes from a popular song of the time We’ll chase the Buffalo. This first meeting is historically the Phoenix Lodge No.1. As members toured the country with various shows lodges were opened in other towns. The Order's motto "No Man Is At All Times Wise" (Latin: Nemo Mortalium Omnibus Horis Sapit) and has the maxim of "Justice, Truth and Philanthropy".
A Superb, Air Crew Europe Star. The Rarest WW2 British Campaign Medal The rarest and most collectable of all the British campaign medals issued for the war. Original silk ribbon, superb patina. The Air Crew Europe Star is a military campaign medal, instituted by the United Kingdom in May 1945 for award to subjects of the British Commonwealth for service in the Second World War, specifically Commonwealth air crew who participated in operational flights over Europe from bases in the United Kingdom. The strategic bombing campaign against German industrial cities, military installations and a wide variety of other targets continued throughout World War Two and made a decisive contribution to Allied victory. Although the Air Forces suffered significant losses of both men and aircraft, the campaign severely curtailed German industrial production Two clasps were instituted to be worn on the medal ribbon, the Atlantic Clasp and the France and Germany Clasp
A Superb, Impressive Bavarian German 1930's Third Reich Carved Oak Eagle A large and substantial piece of history, and a well executed carved oak sculpted wall adornment from the early Third Reich. Around 25 years ago we viewed an almost identical example that was found in a bombed out NSDAP and SS officials residence in Obersalzberg. In all the chalets and homes in the Black Forest and Bavarian Alps much of the furnishings are this highly distinctive hand carved oak often called Black Forest oak. At Hitler's Berghof, the Eagles Nest much of the décor was of this eagles construction. Within Hitler's personal office in The Brown House at Munich [see photograph] he had over the double door entrance the same form of winged eagle clasping the wreath and swastika within its claws, and around the same size as this one. Originally a small resort town near Berchtesgaden in Southern Germany, Hitler was first told about Obersalzberg by one of the participants in his 1923 Beer Hall Putsch, and upon getting out of prison travelled there to finish dictating Mein Kampf. During the ascension of the Nazi Party, the royalties from Mein Kampf paid the rent on a small chalet called Haus Wachenfeld, which he would later buy and convert into his Burghof. Obersalzberg was bought out in it's entirety by the Party, which established a security cordon manned by the Liebstandart SS Adolph Hitler, and converted the area into the NSDAP's home away from home. Much of the town was bombed by the RAF, or torched by the retreating SS, but some areas managed to survive in part and gained the attention of GI souvenir hunters. We believe this eagle may well have originated from a similar sourced location in Obersalzberg as they are so terribly similar and highly distinctive to that particular region. Weighs around 7 kilos, size 23 inches x 17,25 inches x 2.5 inches.
A Superb, Original, American Poster, Printed in 1932, of the USA in WW1 A Historical Map of the American Expeditionary Force. Shown in a temporary plasticated frame for protection [hence reflections]. Very rarely do these originals appear, reprints, however, are readily available. The United States was a formal participant in World War I from April 6, 1917 until the war's end on November 11, 1918. Before entering the war, the US had remained neutral, though the US had been an important supplier to Britain and other Allied powers. During the war, the US mobilized over 4,000,000 military personnel and suffered 110,000 deaths, including 43,000 due to the influenza pandemic. The war saw a dramatic expansion of the US government in an effort to harness the war effort and a significant increase in the size of the US military. After a slow start in mobilizing the American economy and manpower, by spring 1918 the U.S. was poised to play a decisive role in the conflict. Under the leadership of President Woodrow Wilson the war represented the climax of the Progressive Movement as it claimed to bring reform and democracy to the world. 28" x 35"
A Superb, Original, British, WW2 No.2 Commando's Regt. Badge & FS Knife with his souvenir German occupation and domestic currency, including Belgian francs, German marks and Italian lire and a British armed services folding knife. Most important part of the collection is his wonderful, original, private purchase silver sweetheart or mufti badge of the reknown and remarkably heroic WW2, Special Services force, No.2 Commando unit, plus, complete with his third, FS commando knife, made by William Rodgers, currency and service utility knife. The silver badge is a representation of their commando unit badge, a pair of SS astride an FS knife [profile] within the traditional shield shape [as used by the unit in their badge] inset in a circlet, hanging by a link from a bar, engraved; No.2 COMMANDO. The FS knife as one expects is well used, and shows signs of considerable close combat use but is nicely together and complete. The scabbard still has it's original tabs and brass chape, but it is lacking it's small elastic top band. The blade is very grey and the quillon is maker stamped by Rodgers. The No.2's Operational history; The first No 2 Commando, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Jackson, did not carry out any operations before being turned over to parachute duties. After the formation of the 11th SAS Battalion a new No. 2 Commando was formed, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Augustus Charles Newman, from a new batch of volunteers. The first action that men from No. 2 Commando were involved in was two troops supporting No. 3 Commando in the Vaagso raid in December 1941. The next action involving men of No. 2 Commando was Operation Musketoon in September 1942. This was a raid against the Glomfjord hydroelectric power plant in Norway. The raid, commanded by Captain Graeme Black, MC, landed by submarine and succeeded in blowing up pipelines, turbines and tunnels, effectively destroying the generating station; the associated aluminium plant was shut down permanently. One commando was killed in the raid; another seven were captured while trying to escape the area and were taken to Colditz Castle. From there they were taken to Sachsenhausen concentration camp and executed, the first victims of Adolf Hitler's Commando Order. The three remaining commandos managed to escape to Sweden and eventually returned to No. 2 Commando. St Nazaire raid The St Nazaire Raid (Operation Chariot) was a seaborne attack on the heavily defended docks of St. Nazaire in occupied France on the night of 28 March 1942. The raid has since been called "The greatest raid of all". This was a combined operation undertaken by Royal Navy and Commando units. The main commando force was provided by No. 2 Commando with supporting demolition parties from other commando units. The intention of the raid was to destroy the dry dock which would force any large German warship in need of repairs, such as the Tirpitz, to return to home waters rather than seek safe haven in the Atlantic coast. Of the 600 men who left the port of Falmouth, Cornwall, England, on the raid only 225 would return. The main commando force was 100 men from No.2 Commando. In addition to demolition tasks, they were to assault the harbour gun positions and provide covering fire for the demolition parties. Demolition Parties from No.2 Commando were supported by those drawn from No. 1, No. 3, No. 4, No. 5, No. 9 and No. 12 Commando. The raid was considered a success even with 25% of the force killed and most of the rest captured. Commando Commanding Officer Lieutenant Colonel Newman and his surviving troops were captured trying to escape the town into open country, when they ran out of ammunition. For his part in the raid Newman was awarded the Victoria Cross. A posthumous Victoria Cross was awarded after the war to Sergeant Thomas Durrant of No. 1 Commando for his part in the raid, upon recommendation by Newman. Mediterranean theatre With the capture of Lieutenant Colonel Newman at St Nazaire the commando unit received a new commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Jack Churchill, in April 1942. The commando was sent to the Mediterranean Theatre as part of 2nd Special Service Brigade and in July 1943 landed at Catania during the Allied invasion of Sicily. No. 2 Commando had a quiet time in the Sicily campaign and their only noteworthy action was landing in advance of the British Eighth Army at Scaletta about 15 miles (24 km) south of Messina on 15 August. Here they engaged the German rearguard and then on 16 August were involved in house to house fighting in Scaletta itself. Salerno After Sicily was secured, the Allied invasion of Italy followed, beginning 3 September 1943. No. 2 Commando landed at Vietri sul Mare at 03:30 hours, their initial target was a German gun battery. After the commandos scaled the cliffs they discovered the battery was undefended; they moved towards Vietri itself, and the town was secured two hours later. Establishing their headquarters there, they then opened Marina beach for further landings. No. 2 Commando was next ordered to capture a German observation post outside of the town of La Molina which controlled a pass leading down to the Salerno beach-head. No. 2 and No. 41 (Royal Marine) Commandos, infiltrated the town and captured the post, taking 42 prisoners including a mortar squad. On 11 September the commandos made contact with the U.S. Army Rangers who had landed to their west. On 13 September the commando defended the village of Dragone against the attacking German paratroopers and panzergrenadiers. The battle cost the commando 28 dead and 51 wounded. After a day's rest following the battle the commando moved to Mercatello, about three miles east of Salerno. Together with No. 41 (RM) Commando, they were tasked by Brigade to "sweep the area and clean out the German forces". Having completed the requested "sweep", the commando returned, bringing with them 150 captured Germans. Both commandos were then ordered back to occupy the area known as the "pimple". Over the next days the commando losses grew and included the then-Duke of Wellington. Finally relieved on 18 September they were withdrawn to Sicily. During the Salerno operations No. 2 and No. 41 (RM) Commandos had 367 killed, wounded or missing out of the 738 who had made the landing. Yugoslavia A depleted No. 2 Commando landed on the Yugoslavian island of Vis 16 January 1944; almost half the commando, consisting of replacements and training staff, remained in Italy. They would remain in the area for the next six months and carried out a number of operations including raids on German garrisons, attacking shipping, making assaults on fixed positions and even helping in the construction of an airfield. Between 26 January and 4 February the commando attacked the German garrison near Milna on the island of Hvar four times. On 19 March the 110 men from No. 2 Commando attacked the village of Grohote killing six and capturing 102 Germans with the loss of one man. By May 1944 No. 2 Commando had been joined on the island of Vis by No. 40 (Royal Marine) Commando, No. 43 (Royal Marine) Commando, some men from the Highland Light Infantry and a Royal Artillery detachment. On 2 June Lieutenant Colonel Jack Churchill, in command of both Royal Marine commandos and a group of Yugoslav Partisans in an assault on German fortifications, was captured after having been knocked unconscious. He was replaced as commanding officer by Lieutenant Colonel Francis West Fynn. After the commando marched past Marshal Josip Broz Tito at an airfield they had helped construct on 23 June they returned to Italy. Albania On their return from Yugoslavia the commando were based near Molopoli in Italy; they recruited new men and carried out parachute training. On the night 28/29 July 250 men from No. 2 Commando landed at Spilje in Albania; their objective was a German position near the village of Himare. After withdrawing they estimated that 100 Germans had been killed; the commando lost 29 dead and 61 wounded. On 22 September No. 2 Commando raided Albania again; their objective this time was to capture the port town of Sarande. The Commando landed on a beach 6 miles (9.7 km) north of Sarande and soon came under artillery fire. Believing the German garrison to consist of 200 men they discovered that the true German strength was 2000 men. Requested reinforcements from No. 40 (Royal Marine) Commando arrived 24 September. Sarande was captured by the combined force on 9 October. With the capture of the town, the German garrison on Corfu was cut off and surrendered to the commandos in November. On their return to Italy No. 2 Commando and the rest of 2 Commando Brigade was gathered together for Operation Roast the battle at Comacchio lagoon. Their task was to capture a spit of land which extended from Lake Comacchio to the Adriatic Sea, with possible further exploitation northwards. No. 2 Commando started the attack at 19:00 hours 1 April 1945 by boat across Comacchio lagoon; they reached the opposite shore at 05:00 hours 2 April and approached the Germans from the rear and started their attack. All the Brigade objectives were achieved, with all the German forces south of Porto Garibaldi captured or destroyed. Fighting continued until mid April when No. 2 Commando were withdrawn having lost 23 men in the operation. The German forces in Italy surrendered on 2 May 1945. As a point of interest, the No 2 commando serviceman was first issued with his 1st pattern FS knife, and in late '42 early '43 it was replaced with a 3rd pattern after his 1st pat. Then his other 3rd pattern, his last FS knife he used. We have agreed for family discretion not to pass on the name of the commando combatant, who served with distinction for almost 30 years in the British forces special services. The regular No.2 SS cap badges were often handmade and were fashioned out of spare materials like canteen / mess cutlery. The last time we saw an original ordinary No. 2 Commando SS cap badge sold it went for £650 in 2015, such is the desirability of the earliest commando servicemen's personal items.
A Superb, Original, WW1 'Arts and Crafts' Royal Engineers Picture Frame. A stylised hammered and formed copper frame with dome head copper rivets [can be known as 'Liberty' style after the world reknown, and elite, Liberty department store]. The bottom section has an original Great War period Royal Engineers badge with King George Vth Cypher. Arts and Crafts was a reformist movement that influenced British, Canadian, and American architecture, decorative arts, cabinet making, crafts, and even the "cottage" garden designs of William Robinson or Gertrude Jekyll. Its best-known practitioners were William Morris, Charles Robert Ashbee, T. J. Cobden Sanderson, Elbert Hubbard, Walter Crane, Nelson Dawson, Phoebe Anna Traquair, Herbert Tudor Buckland, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Christopher Dresser, Edwin Lutyens, William De Morgan, Ernest Gimson, William Lethaby, Edward Schroeder Prior, Frank Lloyd Wright, Gustav Stickley, Greene & Greene, Charles Voysey, Christopher Whall and artists in the Pre-Raphaelite movement. The Arts and Crafts movement came into being in the end of the 19th century and was at it's peak at around 1910. It style attained great iconic fashion status and this is an near perfect example of everything it represented. Widely exhibited in Europe, the Arts and Crafts movement's qualities of simplicity and honest use of materials negating historicism inspired designers like Henry van de Velde and movements such as Art Nouveau, the Dutch De Stijl group, Vienna Secession, and eventually the Bauhaus. The movement can be assessed as a prelude to Modernism, where pure forms, stripped of historical associations, would be once again applied to industrial production. Oak mount. 9.5 inches x 6.5 inches size overall, picture aperture 6.5inches x 4.5inches. Basic, original easel type stand. With few small bruises to the copper edge. This is a super, original and historical example of an iconic style that is now very collectable indeed, with the added compliment of the contemporary Royal Engineers connection from WW1. Period picture of WW1 Royal Engineer [not an original photo] included.
A Superior WW2 German Heer Officer's Dagger and Hanging Straps Made by Ernst Packe & Sohne of Solingen, Siegfried Waffen logo mark. From a Heer officer Heer officer's, of the 6th Co. II Infantry Regt 63, Ingolstadt. The photograph in the gallery being worn by an officer owner. We had from this regiment a set of original WW2 German army souvenirs, [collected by a British soldier] another dagger, a photo of the officer wearing it, an officer's portopee and a photo album of the regiment. All those other pieces were sold in a just few days this week. Just one of this Infantry regiments heroes was Johannes "Johann" Lutz who was a highly decorated Leutnant in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also known as the Panzerknacker of Battle of Hürtgen Forest and recipient of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Lutz was captured by US forces in April 1945 and was held until November 1945. on November the 17th 1938 he entered the service of the 'Wehrmacht' at the Infantry-Regiment 63 in Ingolstadt. There he was trained as a machine gunner. From the on-set of the war he participated in the Invasion of Poland as a MG-1 gunner. During the Battle of France he acted as a group leader. On 11 October 1940 the second battalion was incorporated into the 'Kradschützenbataillon'. At the beginning of the campaign in the Soviet Union, Lutz was the leader of the 3rd infantry group to the 'Kradschützenbatallion 17'. As early as the 2 July 1941 he was awarded the Iron Cross 2nd Class. Later on Lutz was transferred to the 6th 'Panzergrenadier-Regiment 63', where he served as the leader of a company. At Orel Lutz was awarded the Iron Cross 1st Class, on the 28 August 1942. In 1943 Lutz was trained as an officer at the gun-school in Ohrdruf in Thuringia and in Groß Glienicke near Berlin. In 1944 he participated in a master course for technical tank officers at the Panzertruppenschule Krampnitz. After the beginning of the Invasion of Normandy in 1944 Lutz was assigned as a troop leader for the first troop of the 'Divisionsbegleitkompanie' of the 116th Panzer Division. With the division he fought at Arnheim and later in the bloody battles in the Eifel. In the combat zone of Aachen he was awarded with the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross on 9 December 1944 for the occupation and protection of Vossenack. During this fight in Hürtgenwald he destroyed 5 US Tanks within one day. Following this the first troop of the 'Divisionsbegleitkompanie' was signed into the 'Ehrenblatt' of the 116 tank division. After this Lutz became company leader and first lieutenant and fought in the Ruhr Pocket. On 20 April 1945 Lutz became an American prisoner of war, at this point he served as adjutant to the combat commander in the Harz mountains. One very small dent to the scabbrd mid section
A Two Colour Enamel and Silver Plate SAS Lapel Badge.
A Unique 'Sealed Pattern' Leeward Islands Police Buckle In excellent condition. With Crown Agents 'sealed pattern' label. The sealed pattern buckle was the very first dgovernment approved buckle of it's type, and the example by which every other one must follow.
A USS Los Angeles, Lakehurst New Jersey Felt Cloth Pennant Plus felt tails. "Lakehurst N.J." designation. Nice art image at left of dirigible along with name. 28.5 inches long. Los Angeles was built for the United States Navy as a replacement for the Zeppelins that had been assigned to the United States as war reparations following World War I which had been sabotaged by their crews in 1919. Under the terms of the treaty of Versailles Luftschiffbau Zeppelin were not permitted to build military airships. In consequence Los Angeles, which had the Zeppelin works number LZ 126, was built as a passenger airship, although the Treaty limitation on the permissible volume was waived, it being agreed that a craft of a size equal to the largest Zeppelin constructed during World War One was permissible. The airship's hull had 24-sided transverse ring frames for most of its length, changing to an octagonal section at the tail surfaces, and the hull had an internal keel which provided an internal walkway and also contained the ccommodation for the crew when off duty. For most of the ships length the main frames were 32 ft 10 in (10 m) apart, with two secondary frames in each bay. Following the precedent set by LZ 120 Bodensee, crew and passenger accommodation was in a compartment near the front of the airship that was integrated into the hull structure. Each of the five Maybach V12 engines occupied a separate engine car, arranged as four wing cars with the fifth aft on the centerline of the ship. All drove two-bladed pusher propellers and were capable of running in reverse. Auxiliary power was provided by wind-driven dynamos
A USSR Red Army Uniform Identification Poster. In good condition sold unframed.
A USSR Russian Naval Service Belt From A WW2 Veteran Just acquired from it's original owner who served in WW2 and in the early Cold War Era. This was his comrade's Red Star Navy service belt that he wore, and another belt we acquired was his own, worn in his service in the Red Army WW2 & Cold War. With it's original leather belt. A most scarce original example straight from it's original owner. Photos in the gallery originally taken in 1945 to '47 of naval personnel all wearing this pattern of belt. The Red Workers' and Peasants' Army was the name given to the army and the air force of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic and from 1922 the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. It was established in the immediate period after the 1917 October Revolution (Red October or Bolshevik Revolution), when the Bolsheviks constituted an army during the Russian Civil War opposite the military confederations (especially the combined groups summarized under the preamble White Army) of their adversaries. From February 1939, the Red Army, who together with the Soviet Navy, embodied the main component of the Soviet Armed Forces, took the official name "Soviet Army" until its dissolution in December 1991.
A Very Attractive Imperial German Bullion and Gilt Officers Brocade Belt With royal crown and crest of Kaiser Willhelm II. Superb gilded buckle with silver bullion belt bears two horizontal stripes. Some of the cloth inner lining to belt has worn away
A Very Fine & Stunning German WW2 Officers Sabre By Pack Deluxe quality example by the firm of Ernst Pack Solingen, Ernst Pack Sohne, M.B.H, Siegfried Waffen makers logo for the deluxe products. Suppliers to officers of the Third Reich from the early 1930's and into WW2. Very finely chiselled cast hilt depicting the spread winged German eagle holding the wreathed swastika within its claws. The German Army (German: Heer, was the land forces component of the Wehrmacht, the German armed forces, from 1935 to 1945. The Wehrmacht also included the Kriegsmarine (Navy) and the Luftwaffe (Air Force). During World War II, a total of about 15 million soldiers served in the German Army, of whom about seven million became casualties. Separate from the army, the Waffen-SS (Armed SS) was a multi-ethnic and multi-national military force of the Third Reich. Growing from three regiments to over 38 divisions during World War II, it served alongside the army but was never formally part of it. Only 17 months after Hitler announced publicly the rearmament program, the Army reached its projected goal of 36 divisions. During the autumn of 1937, two more corps were formed. In 1938, four additional corps were formed with the inclusion of the five divisions of the Austrian Army after the Anschluss in March. During the period of its expansion by Adolf Hitler, the German Army continued to develop concepts pioneered during World War I, combining ground (Heer) and air (Luftwaffe) assets into combined arms teams. Coupled with operational and tactical methods such as encirclements and the "battle of annihilation", the German military managed quick victories in the two initial years of World War II, prompting the use of the word Blitzkrieg (literally lightning war, meaning lightning-fast war) for the techniques used. The German Army entered the war with a majority of its infantry formations relying on the horse for transportation. The infantry remained foot soldiers throughout the war; artillery also remained primarily horse-drawn. The motorized formations received much attention in the world press in the opening years of the war, and were cited as the main reason for the success of the German invasions of Poland (September 1939), Norway and Denmark (April 1940), Belgium, France and Netherlands (May 1940), Yugoslavia (April 1941) and the early campaigns in the Soviet Union (June 1941). However their motorized and tank formations accounted for only 20% of the Heer's capacity at their peak strength.
A Very Fine Near Mint German War Merit Cross With Swords First Class The War Merit Cross (Kriegsverdienstkreuz) was a decoration of Nazi Germany during the Second World War, which could be awarded to civilians as well as military personnel. This award was created by Adolf Hitler in 1939 as a successor to the non-combatant Iron Cross which was used in earlier wars. The award was graded the same as the Iron Cross: War Merit Cross Second Class, War Merit Cross First Class, and Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross. The award had two variants: with swords given to soldiers for exceptional service in battle above and beyond the call of duty (but not worthy of an Iron Cross which was more a bravery award), and without swords for meritorious service behind the lines which could also be awarded to civilians. Recipients had to have the lower grade of the award before getting the next level. There was also another version below the 2nd class simply called the War Merit Medal (German: Kriegsverdienstmedaille), set up in 1940 for civilians in order to offset the large number of 2nd class without swords being awarded. It was usually given to those workers in factories who significantly exceeded work quotas.
A Very Fine Pair of Cased WW1 Great War Imperial German Epaulettes For the Imperial German 40th Infantry. Out of interest it was the 40th that relieved Adolf Hitler's company in the trenches when he was fighting in combat in WW1. In their original storage case in mint condition overall. Mid blue cloth background with gilt crescent and Infantry number 40. Red back cloth.
A Very Fine Princess Mary Box Christmas 1914 & Original Contents Handwritten by the recipient at Christmas 1914. "Presented to 302 Rifleman G. Gladstone The 1st Battalion the Rifle Brigade". Records show him as George Gladstone, 1st Rifle Brigade 5/302 Private. Original brass embossed gift box, with original gilt lacquer, a packet that once held cigarettes, a packet that once held tobacco, a Christmas card from King and Queen and a photo card of Princess Mary. Very rare with original contents but exceptionally rare to know the name and regt. Of the recipient written in person. Paperwork has some old tape markings. They were sent to the British troops in the frontline trenches in WW1 at Christmas 1914. In original condition, that once would have contained tobacco or chocolate etc. During World War One King George V and Queen Mary got very involved in active war work. The King mainly visited battlefields (as recorded on the ‘King at the Front’ postcards) while the queen organised clothing drives, visited hospitals and other welfare organisations. Princess Mary, then 18, often accompanied the Queen and according to the book ”Princess Mary, Viscount Lascelless“ became intensely concerned, with Christmas looming, about the well-being of the soldiers and sailors serving far from home. With her parents consent the following letter of appeal was published in November 1914. ” For many weeks we have all been greatly concerned for the welfare of the soldiers and sailors who are so valiantly fighting our battles by land and sea. Our first consideration has been to meet their more pressing needs and I have delayed making known a wish that has long been in my heart, for fear of encroaching on other funds, the claim of which have been more urgent. I want you all to help me send a Christmas present from the whole nation to every sailor afloat and every soldier at the Front. On Christmas Eve, when, like the shepherds of old, they were wont to hang out their stockings, wondered what the morrow had in store. I’m sure that we should all be happier to feel that we had helped to send our little token of love and sympathy on Christmas morning something that would be of useful and permanent value, and the making of which may be the means of providing employment for trades adversely affected by the war. Could there be anything more likely to hearten them in their struggle than a present received straight from home on Christmas Day? Please will you help me Mary“. In support of this appeal many periodicals of the day published or referred to her letter. The following example appeared in the Illustrated War News of 4 November 1914 ”Princess Mary is appealing for help to send a Christmas present, from the Nation, to ”every Sailor afloat and every Soldier at the front“. Remittance should be addressed to H.R.H. the Princess Mary, Buckingham Palace, S.W., the envelopes marked ”Sailors and Soldiers Christmas Fund“. The appeal was very successful for it had reached 131,000 Pound by 16 December .It was initially decided that the ”Gift“ would be received by every sailor afloat and every soldier at the Front wearing the King’s uniform on Christmas Day 1914. The difficulty for the committee was deciding how many to get manufactured. They calculated that 145,000 sailors including Royal Marines and 350,000 soldiers including the Indian Contingent qualified. It was therefore calculated that between 55 and 60,000 pounds would be needed to cover the cost of nearly 500,000 gifts. The final Fund total was reported by the Committee on 30 June 1919 as 193,667 pounds 4s and 10d. Monies from the fund is also reported as having been used, to buy War Bonds and, in War Loans. The funds that remained at the end were apparently transferred to Queen Mary’s Maternity Home founded for the benefit of the wives and children of sailors, soldiers and airmen of the newly formed Royal Air Force. Abridged from an original article by Grahame Barber. 2nd Lieutenant R C Leach of the 1st Battalion, King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment wrote to his mother describing Christmas 1914: “I think we must have had a decidedly more cheerful Christmas than you at home. For a start on getting into billet I found 15 parcels waiting for me. They had a special Post Office bag for them. Well on Christmas morn I spent till about 1.30 issuing presents to the men; both yours which were very welcome and those sent in bulk to be divided amongst the troops, each regiment getting a certain share. There were also Princess Mary’s presents which consisted of a packet of cigarettes, a pipe, a packet of tobacco and a Christmas card from King and Queen.” Also in the gallery a photo [for information only] of a soldier opening his Princess Mary Gift Tin, Christmas 1914.
A Very Fine Quality Meissen Porcelain Round the World Medal 1926 A rare and most desireable medal a most fine collectors piece 1929 Graf Zeppelin World Flight Medal. White bisque porcelain, and gilt 48mm. Obv. Airship over Eastern Hemisphere globe, GRAF ZEPPELIN WELT RUNDFLUG . Rev. Airship over Western Hemisphere globe, FRIEDRICHSHAFEN. TOKIO. LOS ANGELES. LAKEHURST . A classic Zeppelin issue made by the State Porcelain Factory of Meissen, mintmark crossed swords. The tour began in Friedrichshafen, Germany, where the Graf Zeppelin was built, and continued on to Tokyo, Los Angeles, and Lakehurst, NJ (where her sister ship, the Hindenburg, exploded in May 1937) before returning to Germany.
A Very Good 1897 Pattern Infantry Officers King George Vth Period Used in WW1 and WW2 and perfectly suitable for current service use in the army today. Now near pristine hilt, traditional wire bound sharkskin grip, plain bright blade also now pristine and superb leather over wood field service scabbard. Traditional pierced half basket hilt with the cypher of King George Vth. Just returned from our conservation artisan and after many, many hours of expert attention it now once more to parade ground condition almost as it was when it was made in WW1. The 1897 pattern Infantry officer's sword has remained unchanged to the present day. By the time of its introduction, the sword was of limited use on the battlefield against rapid-firing rifles, machine guns and long-range artillery. However, the new sword was regarded, when needed, as a very effective fighting weapon. Reports from the Sudan, where it was used in close-quarters fighting during the Reconquest of the Sudan 1896-99, were positive. Field Marshal Montgomery advanced with his 1897 Pattern drawn during a counter offensive in the First World War. The actual sword he carried is exhibited in the Imperial War Museum, London. The blade is straight and symmetrical in shape about both its longitudinal axes. The thick blade has a deep central fuller on each side and is rounded on both its edge and back towards the hilt, giving a “dumbbell” or “girder” cross section. Through a gradual transition, the blade becomes double edged towards the tip, and the last 17 inches (430 mm) were sharpened when on active service. The blade ends in a sharp spear point. The guard is a three-quarter basket of pressed, plated steel. It is decorated with a pierced scroll-work pattern and had the royal cypher of the reigning monarch set over the lower knuckle bow.
A Very Good 1910 General Staff Officer's WW1 Austrian Kepi In superb condition. With leather peak and bullion cockade and bullion trim. Maker label marked. It was the assassination of Arch Duke Franz Ferdinand in Serbia that was the cause for the greatest conflict known to man, The Great War or WW1 as it is known today. Franz Ferdinand (18 December 1863 – 28 June 1914) was an Archduke of Austria-Este, Austro-Hungarian and Royal Prince of Hungary and of Bohemia, and from 1896 until his death, heir presumptive to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia. This caused the Central Powers (including Germany and Austria-Hungary) and the Allies of World War I (countries allied with Serbia or Serbia's allies) to declare war on each other, starting World War I. After the death of Crown Prince Rudolf, Franz Joseph's nephew, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, became heir to the throne. On 28 June 1914, Franz Ferdinand and his morganatic wife, Countess Sophie Chotek, were assassinated on a visit to Sarajevo. When he heard the news of the assassination, Franz Joseph said that "one has not to defy the Almighty. In this manner a superior power has restored that order which I unfortunately was unable to maintain." While the emperor was shaken, and interrupted his vacation in order to return to Vienna, he soon resumed his vacation to his imperial villa at Bad Ischl. With the emperor five hours away from the capital, most of the decision-making during the "July Crisis" fell to Count Leopold Berchtold, the Austrian foreign minister, Count Franz Conrad von Hötzendorf, the chief of staff for the Austrian army, and the rest of the ministers. On 21 July, Franz Joseph was apparently surprised by the severity of the ultimatum that was to be sent to the Serbs, and expressed his concerns that Russia would be unwilling to stand idly by, yet he nevertheless chose to not question Berchtold's judgment. A week after the ultimatum, on 28 July, Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia, and two days later, the Austro-Hungarians and the Russians went to war. Within weeks, the French and British entered the fray. Because of his age, Franz Joseph was unable to take as much as an active part in the war in comparison to past conflicts. On 28 July, the Austro-Hungarians fired the first shots in preparation for the invasion of Serbia.[12][13] As Russia mobilised, Germany invaded neutral Belgium and Luxembourg before moving towards France, leading Britain to declare war on Germany. After the German march on Paris was halted, what became known as the Western Front settled into a battle of attrition, with a trench line that would change little until 1917. Meanwhile, on the Eastern Front, the Russian army was successful against the Austro-Hungarians, but was stopped in its invasion of East Prussia by the Germans. In November 1914, the Ottoman Empire joined the war, opening fronts in the Caucasus, Mesopotamia and the Sinai. Italy and Bulgaria went to war in 1915, Romania in 1916, and the United States in 1917. The war approached a resolution after the Russian government collapsed in March 1917, and a subsequent revolution in November brought the Russians to terms with the Central Powers. On 4 November 1918, the Austro-Hungarian empire agreed to an armistice. After a 1918 German offensive along the western front, the Allies drove back the Germans in a series of successful offensives and began entering the trenches. Germany, which had its own trouble with revolutionaries, agreed to an armistice on 11 November 1918, ending the war in victory for the Allies. A group photo in the gallery of men wearing similar helmets probably belong to the k.u.k. Husarenregiment Graf von Hadik Nr. 3, which was founded in 1703. The men of this unit came from Hungary, Romania, Serbia and Croatia. This unit was based in Sopron (today in Hungary), where this picture was taken. Another very similar helmet is worn by Frédéric de Teschen, Arch Duke of Austria, Duc de Teschen.
A Very Good 2nd Pattern FS Commando Knife of WW2 A scarce 2nd pattern Fairbairn-sykes fighting knife, in excellent condition, circa 1942, blued, hand ground blade in lovely condition. Leather scabbard in very nice condition, leather good. A 2nd pattern, the so called 'Officers' type. The type that was made [after the 1st pattern was discontinued] from the 12th August 1942 until 1943. The story about the Fairbairn Sykes Fighting knife starts in England in 1940. In 1940 the British formed special commandos to carry out raids. The initiative came from Winston Churchill in 1940 for a force that could carry out raids against German occupied Europe.. On the 8 June 1940, Section M09 of the War Office was brought into being. The name commando was taken from small effective mobile Boer units during the war in South Africa 1899-1902. Initially drawn from within the British Army from soldiers who volunteered for special service, the Commandos' ranks would eventually be filled by members of all branches of the United Kingdom's armed forces and a number of foreign volunteers from German-occupied countries. Reaching a wartime strength of over 30 individual units and four assault brigades, the Commandos served in all theatres of war from the Arctic circle to Europe and from the Middle East to South-East Asia. Their operations ranged from small groups of men landing from the sea or by parachute to a brigade of assault troops spearheading the Allied invasions of Europe and Asia. Two of the first instructors were Captain William Ewart Fairbairn (b. 28 February 1885, d. 20 June 1960) and Captain Eric Anthony Sykes (b. 5 February 1883, d. 12 May 1945). These middle aged gentlemen trained the young soldiers in a new and difficult mode of close-combat fighting at the Commando Basic Training Centre, Achnacarry, Scotland. Churchill described the commandos as 'a steel hand from the sea' The need for a proper fighting knife, for these commandos, was apparent from the first few weeks of training specialized personnel. As Fairbairn later wrote, "…the authorities did not recognize a fighting knife as part of the equipment of the fighting services. In fact, such a thing as a fighting knife could not be purchased anywhere in Great Britain." Until now, there had never been an official knife for the British armed services, although many types of knife had been authorised for use in the past. Bowie style knives were carried by some of the Imperial Yeomantry during the South African War of 1900-1901, and in World War I cut-down bayonets, privately purchased hunting knives, or captured German issue folding knives were extensively utilised. In November 1940 there was a meeting between W. E. Fairbairn, E. A. Sykes and Robert Wilkinson Latham at Wilkinson Sword Company. Fairbairn and Sykes described the type of knife they envisioned and the purpose for which it was intended. As discussion continued, preliminary sketches were drawn up and modified time and time again. As Robert Wilkinson Latham tells it: 'In order to explain exactly their point, the two men rose to their feet and one, it was Fairbairn my grandfather mentioned, grabbed the wood ruler from his desk and the two men danced around the office in mock combat'. W. E. Fairbairn had also brought with him an example of a suitable fighting knife. The system they devised utilised techniques drawn from Jiu Jitsu, Gatka, Kung Fu and 'Gutter Fighting'. It proved extremely effective. They were natural choices for the job. Both had served in the Shanghai Municipal Police Force, facing death daily in the dark, narrow streets and alleys of the city against armed thugs and organised gangs. In Shanghai they had made some fighting knives out of bayonets. The meeting resulted in the Fairbairn Sykes Fighting Knife, that was manufactured, firstly, into the 1st pattern FS Knife, it was to then evolve, briefly, into the 2nd pattern FS Knife [in August 1942] and eventually into the 3rd pattern, in around October 1943. The 3rd pattern is still in use today. This is very good example of these highly sought after early and rare 2nd types, complete with it's original scabbard and most of it's original blade blueing
A Very Good and Sound WW2 American Jungle Machete Dated 1940 Made by H Collins and Co. Ltd. Trade marked Legitimus. A Merills Marauder bring back. Merrill’s Marauders (named after Frank Merrill) or Unit Galahad, officially named the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional), was a United States Army long range penetration special operations jungle warfare unit, which fought in the South-East Asian theatre of World War II, or China-Burma-India Theatre . The unit became famous for its deep-penetration missions behind Japanese lines, often engaging Japanese forces superior in number.
A Very Good Australian WW2 Combat Knife For American and Australian Forces Supplied for combat forces fighting in the Pacific Theatre. Bowie blade with three rivet wooden handle and original scabbard. Both the knife and scabbard bear their matching serial numbers. Scabbard has mid-section partial separation. A most scarce special forces knife especially rarely seen in the UK.
A Very Good British Special Constabulary Medal King George VIth The Special Constabulary Long Service Medal is long service medal awarded in the United Kingdom to members of the Special Constabulary who have completed a specified period of service. Established in 1919 by King George V, the medal was initially created to reward members of the Special Constabulary for their service during World War I. The medal may be awarded to Special Constables who are recommended by the Chief Officer of Police of the department in which they serve so long as they have served for at least nine years, and willingly and competently discharged their duty as a Special Constable. Years of service during World War I from 1914 to 1918 and service during World War II from 3 September 1939 to 31 December 1945 are counted as triple. Named to the recipient
A Very Good British WW1 Army Tanks Corps Sweetheart Badge Gilt and Enamel This is a beautiful, most rare type of 'Tanks' badge, a large size, and an absolute corker, with all it's original gilt and blue enamel remaining. Worn by the girls and ladies, the 'sweethearts', of the bravest of men that served in the British and Commonwealth Armies Tank Corps. In the autumn of 1914, Lieutenant-Colonel E.D. Swinton suggested the idea of an armoured vehicle to the military authorities at home. It was not until January 1915 when Winston Churchill, then the First Lord of the Admiralty, interested himself in Col. Swinton's suggestion and the idea of a "land battleship" began to take official form. The first experimental machine was completed in December 1915 and in March 1916 the headquarters of what was to be known as the Heavy Section Machine Gun Corps was established at Bisley under the command of Col. Swinton. Later this section was moved to Elveden Camp, where six companies of tanks were raised. On 13 August 1916 four of these companies began to embark for France, but the Headquarters of the Heavy Section and its commander remained in England. The supply of machines was the responsibility of the "Mechanical Warfare Supply Department" of the Ministry of Munitions, which was controlled by Lieutenant-Colonel Albert Stern. Tanks were used for the first time in action on the battlefield of the Somme on 15 September 1916. 36 Mark 1 tanks of C and D Companies arrived on the start line for the renewal of the Somme offensive: this action was later designated as the Battle of Flers-Courcelette. Arguments continue as to whether it would have been better to wait until much larger numbers of tanks were available before they were used in battle. The Heavy Section MGC was redesignated as the Heavy Branch MGC in November 1916. At best, the early tanks could achieve a top speed of 4 miles per hour. On the battlefield this was rarely realised and in many cases infantry moved far faster. The machines were crewed by a Subaltern, 3 Drivers and 4 Gunners, of which one was an NCO. Interior conditions were truly appalling, being a combination of intense heat, noise and exhaust from the engine, violent movement as the tank crossed the ground and molten metal splash as bullets struck the plating. Men would often be violently sick or badly incapacitated by the conditions and were often in no fit state to continue after quite short journeys. It was difficult to communicate within the tank and with men and other tanks outside. The tank officer often had to get out and walk, to reconnoiter his path or to work with the infantry. The tanks also proved to be mechanically unreliable and vulnerable to shellfire. Some tanks carried a wire frame on the roof, designed to deflect grenades. Nonetheless, the first appearance of the tanks caused considerable alarm to the Germans … until they realised their shortcomings and began to organise tactics and armament to defend against them.
A Very Good Cold War Period West Berlin Schutzpolizei Shako Made of vulcanfiber with original leather chin strap, city polizei helmet plate. No cockade. Excellent condition overall size 57. In 1936, during the Nazi regime it was dissolved like all other German police forces, and replaced by the Ordnungspolizei or Orpo. The Orpo was established as a centralized organisation uniting the municipal, city, and rural uniformed forces that had been organised on a state-by-state basis. Eventually the Orpo embraced virtually all of the Third Reich's law-enforcement and emergency response organizations, including fire brigades, coast guard, civil defense, and even night watchmen. It was under the overall command of Heinrich Himmler. The existence of West Berlin, a conspicuously capitalist city deep within communist East Germany, “stuck like a bone in the Soviet throat,” as Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev put it. The Russians began maneuvering to drive the United States, Britain and France out of the city for good. In 1948, a Soviet blockade of West Berlin aimed to starve the western Allies out of the city. Instead of retreating, however, the United States and its allies supplied their sectors of the city from the air. This effort, known as the Berlin Airlift, lasted for more than a year and delivered more than 2.3 million tons of food, fuel and other goods to West Berlin. The Soviets called off the blockade in 1949. After a decade of relative calm, tensions flared again in 1958. For the next three years, the Soviets–emboldened by the successful launch of the Sputnik satellite the year before and embarrassed by the seemingly endless flow of refugees from east to west (nearly 3 million since the end of the blockade, many of them young skilled workers such as doctors, teachers and engineers)–blustered and made threats, while the Allies resisted. Summits, conferences and other negotiations came and went without resolution. Meanwhile, the flood of refugees continued. In June 1961, some 19,000 people left the GDR through Berlin. The following month, 30,000 fled. In the first 11 days of August, 16,000 East Germans crossed the border into West Berlin, and on August 12 some 2,400 followed—the largest number of defectors ever to leave East Germany in a single day. The construction of the Berlin Wall did stop the flood of refugees from East to West, and it did defuse the crisis over Berlin. (Though he was not happy about it, President Kennedy conceded that “a wall is a hell of a lot better than a war.”) Over time, East German officials replaced the makeshift wall with one that was sturdier and more difficult to scale. A 12-foot-tall, 4-foot-wide mass of reinforced concrete was topped with an enormous pipe that made climbing over nearly impossible. Behind the wall on the East German side was a so-called “Death Strip”: a gauntlet of soft sand (to show footprints), floodlights, vicious dogs, trip-wire machine guns and patrolling soldiers with orders to shoot escapees on sight. In all, at least 171 people were killed trying to get over, under or around the Berlin Wall. Escape from East Germany was not impossible, however: From 1961 until the wall came down in 1989, more than 5,000 East Germans (including some 600 border guards) managed to cross the border by jumping out of windows adjacent to the wall, climbing over the barbed wire, flying in hot air balloons, crawling through the sewers and driving through unfortified parts of the wall at high speeds.
A Very Good Early WW2 RAF Fighter Bomber Pilot 4 Medal Group With a very fine Air Crew Europe Star, 1935-45 Star, 1939 45 War Medal and Defence Medal. Of 142 squadron, battle of France veteran but with no paperwork verification. But all original medals in original box of issue and in excellent condition. The Air Crew Europe Star was a campaign medal of the British Commonwealth, awarded for service in World War II. Specifically, the medal was awarded to Commonwealth aircrew who participated in operational flights over Europe, from UK bases. POW but no verification. The 12 and 142 Squadron Fairey Battle crews of the Advanced Air Striking Force (AASF) who along with their fellow RAF daylight bomber squadrons fought valiantly and heroically to try and stem the onslaught of the wehrmacht and luftwaffe invasion of France, Belgium and Holland 10 - 14 May 1940. In the early months of the Second World War it served with the Advanced Air Striking Force in France and on 10th May 1940, the day the Germans invaded the Low Countries, it gained the distinction of being the first AASF unit to bomb the advancing enemy. Later that month No. 142 was one of the Fairey Battle squadrons which attacked the Meuse bridges in a further attempt to stem the German advance. The squadron was withdrawn to England in June 1940, and by the end of the year was converting to Wellingtons prior to engaging in the strategic night-bombing offensive. Two months operational flying was required between 3 September 1939 and 5 June 1944 in order to qualify. The 1939-1945 Star must have been earned before commencing qualifying service for the Air Crew Europe Star. From 6 June 1944 (D-Day), operational flying over Europe qualified aircrew for the France and Germany Star. British uniform regulations stipulated that neither the Atlantic Star nor the France and Germany Star would be awarded to a recipient of the Air Crew Europe Star. Subsequent entitlement to the Atlantic Star or the France and Germany Star was denoted by the award of the appropriate clasp to the Air Crew Europe Star.
A Very Good FN Model 1949 SLR Rifle Bayonet In excellent condition. A contract was ordered by the Belgian government starting with thirty test rifles on May 12, 1949, received on August 31, 1949, and made a second larger order for 100 test rifles delivered by December 12, 1949. The Belgians would make a contract for production of the SAFN 1949 rifle on August 24, 1950 for 6000 rifles in caliber .30-06 Springfield. The Belgians designated the rifle as the ABL SAFN-49, ABL is an acronym for the Belgian Army in both French and Flemish; "AB" for the French "Armée Belge" and "BL" for the Flemish "Belgisch Leger". SAFN stands for Semi-Automatique, Fabrique Nationale. The contracts for the SAFN 1949 rifle made by FN for Belgium totaled 87,777 rifles total, composing almost half of all SAFN 1949 rifles ever produced. This is an excellent original, FN-49 short bayonet & scabbard. It has a 9" double edged blade with phosphate finish, steel crossguard and pommel The bayonet has walnut slab grips with correct rivets. It is complete with original black painted steel scabbard with locket. The rifle worked well in the Korean War in the hands of Belgian troops. Many military reports list the FN-49 rifle as both more reliable and more accurate than the US made M1 Garand rifle. A majority of the SAFN 1949 rifles were manufactured in 7.62×63mm caliber for the armies of Belgium, the Belgian Congo, Luxembourg, Indonesia, Colombia, and Brazil (rifles were ordered by Brazilian Navy, in 1954, and are marked "1954 - Marinha do Brasil").
A Very Good German 1916 Camouflage Combat Helmet 2nd Pattern Liner this fine helmet has the most desirable camouflage painted finish, and it original 1916/7 pattern, metal rim, three pad chrome leather liner, complete and in good order. A lovely scarce helmet of the Great War. Designed by Freidrich Schwerd of the Hannover Technical Institute, the M16 helmet was first issued to the 1st Assault Battalion in December 1915 for evaluation. The first combat issue, to frontline troops, was at Verdun at the end of January 1916. Camouflage paint was predominantly pioneered by the German armed forces in WW1, and some of the incredible multi coloured designs had never seen their like before. The basic helmet shell is formed from one steel disk, and went through at least nine stamping stages before it reached its final shape. The rivets at the lower side skirts fasten M1891 pickelhaube side posts, to attach M1891 pickelhaube chinstrap. The helmet liner is held in place with 3 split rivets. The liner was made of a leather or sheet metal band with three leather tabs with pads attached to it, which formed a very efficient internal sizing system. The liner was designed so that the helmet would remain 1 finger width away from the head at the sides, and two at the top. This was to prevent injuries to the head by objects striking the helmet and denting it. At the sides of the helmet are two large lugs, which served two functions. The first function was for ventilation of the helmet; and second function was to support a heavy armoured plate, called a Stirnpanzer. The plate was notched so that it could hang on the lugs, and was secured with a leather strap that fastened at the back of the helmet. Issued along with this armoured helmet plate, was a set of sectional chest Armor, called lobster Armor by collectors, which weighed 35 pounds. It was thought that this Armor would protect sentries and machine gunners who were more exposed to enemy fire than other troops. Generally the soldiers threw the Armor away at the first opportunity, as wearing the cumbersome Armor in the trenches was of dubious value, making both the helmet plate and lobster Armor quite rare today. The stahlhelm was painted field grey, until an order of the General Staff, ordered a camouflage paint scheme. The official camouflage pattern for new helmets was painted over a green or brown base coat. A coloured lozenge pattern was used, with a black finger wide stripe separating the green, yellow ocher and rust brown camouflage colours. Helmets already in the field were to be painted in camouflage colours as well as local conditions allowed. Camouflage helmets also exist where the various colours are blended together, without the black striping. Original painted camouflage helmets are now quite rare and are a most interesting collectable iconic of the Great War trench warfare.
A Very Good German 1916 Camouflage Combat Helmet Ist Pattern Liner This fine helmet has the most desirable camouflage painted finish, and it original 1916 first pattern, all leather three pad leather liner, complete and in good order. A lovely scarce helmet of the Great War. Designed by Freidrich Schwerd of the Hannover Technical Institute, the M16 helmet was first issued to the 1st Assault Battalion in December 1915 for evaluation. The first combat issue, to frontline troops, was at Verdun at the end of January 1916. Camouflage paint was predominantly pioneered by the German armed forces in WW1, and some of the incredible multi coloured designs had never seen their like before. The basic helmet shell is formed from one steel disk, and went through at least nine stamping stages before it reached its final shape. The rivets at the lower side skirts fasten M1891 pickelhaube side posts, to attach M1891 pickelhaube chinstrap. The helmet liner is held in place with 3 split rivets. The liner was made of a leather or sheet metal band with three leather tabs with pads attached to it, which formed a very efficient internal sizing system. The liner was designed so that the helmet would remain 1 finger width away from the head at the sides, and two at the top. This was to prevent injuries to the head by objects striking the helmet and denting it. At the sides of the helmet are two large lugs, which served two functions. The first function was for ventilation of the helmet; and second function was to support a heavy armoured plate, called a Stirnpanzer. The plate was notched so that it could hang on the lugs, and was secured with a leather strap that fastened at the back of the helmet. Issued along with this armoured helmet plate, was a set of sectional chest Armor, called lobster Armour by collectors, which weighed 35 pounds. It was thought that this Armor would protect sentries and machine gunners who were more exposed to enemy fire than other troops. Generally the soldiers threw the armour away at the first opportunity, as wearing the cumbersome armour in the trenches was of dubious value, making both the helmet plate and lobster armour quite rare today. The stahlhelm was painted field grey, until an order of the General Staff, ordered a camouflage paint scheme. The official camouflage pattern for new helmets was painted over a green or brown base coat. A coloured lozenge pattern was used, with a black finger wide stripe separating the green, yellow ocher and rust brown camouflage colours. Helmets already in the field were to be painted in camouflage colours as well as local conditions allowed. Camouflage helmets also exist where the various colours are blended together, without the black striping. Original painted camouflage helmets are now quite rare and are a most interesting collectable iconic of the Great War trench warfare.
A Very Good German WW2 Silver Infantry Assault Badge for Heer and SS This is a very nice example in lovely crisp condition. The Infantry Assault Badge was a German war badge awarded to Waffen SS and Wehrmacht Heer soldiers during WWII. This decoration was instituted on December 20th 1939 by the Oberstbefehlshaber des Heeres, Generalfeldmarschall von Brauchitsch. It could be awarded to members of non-motorized Infantry units and units of the Gebirgsjäger that had participated in Infantry assaults, with light Infantry weapons, on at least three days of battle in the front line as from January 1st 1940. When a counter offensive led to fighting at short distance, it could also apply. Award of the Infanterie Sturmabzeichen was authorized at regimental command level or above. The first two awards were given to an officer and a enlisted soldier on a special occasion on May 28th 1940, by von Brauchitsch himself. Photo in the gallery of SS Sturmbannfuhrer Otto Weidinger wearing , amongst his other decorations, his same Infantry Assault Badge.
A Very Good Gew 98 1905 Pattern German Mauser Bayonet Ohne Säge of WW1 Made by the Mauser war production factory in Obendorf. Dated 1916, the height of the notorious trench warfare era. With traditional 'butcher' blade, date stamped 1916. Designed to fit the Mauser Gew 98 rifle. The Seitengewehr 98/05 was introduced into the the Prussian army in late 1905, as a replacement for the 98/02 for engineers and pioneer troops, as the 98/02 was deemed to long and heavy for it's intended purpose. Initial production was in two versions, the first plain backed, and the second with 29 double teeth. The scabbard was leather with steel throat and chape mounts, later changed to all steel that was better for trench warfare combat. The bayonet as typical of German blades did not have more than a vestigial muzzle ring, relying on the length of the hilt mounting to fix the blade to its rifle. The plain back version was identified as the S98/05 or S98/05 o.S. (ohne Säge - without saw) and the saw back as the S98/05 S or m.S. (mit Säge - with saw). The overall condition is good, with wooden grips, and denting to principally one side of the scabbard. Likely defensive dents due to trench combat. Overall 20.5 inches long, blade length 14.5 inches.
A Very Good Heer Officer's Sabre WW2 Circa 1936 Gilt hilt with much original gilt remaining Swastika and Eagle langet, made by Alcoso. Alcoso of Solingen scales logo [Alexander Coppel GmbH Dove head pommel with eagle and swastika shield shaped quillon and deluxe oak leaf backstrap. Overall in fabulous condition. The German Army (German: Heer, was the land forces component of the Wehrmacht, the German armed forces, from 1935 to 1945. The Wehrmacht also included the Kriegsmarine (Navy) and the Luftwaffe (Air Force). During World War II, a total of about 15 million soldiers served in the German Army, of whom about seven million became casualties. Separate from the army, the Waffen-SS (Armed SS) was a multi-ethnic and multi-national military force of the Third Reich. Growing from three regiments to over 38 divisions during World War II, it served alongside the army but was never formally part of it. Only 17 months after Hitler announced publicly the rearmament program, the Army reached its projected goal of 36 divisions. During the autumn of 1937, two more corps were formed. In 1938, four additional corps were formed with the inclusion of the five divisions of the Austrian Army after the Anschluss in March. During the period of its expansion by Adolf Hitler, the German Army continued to develop concepts pioneered during World War I, combining ground (Heer) and air (Luftwaffe) assets into combined arms teams. Coupled with operational and tactical methods such as encirclements and the "battle of annihilation", the German military managed quick victories in the two initial years of World War II, prompting the use of the word Blitzkrieg (literally lightning war, meaning lightning-fast war) for the techniques used. The German Army entered the war with a majority of its infantry formations relying on the horse for transportation. The infantry remained foot soldiers throughout the war; artillery also remained primarily horse-drawn. The motorized formations received much attention in the world press in the opening years of the war, and were cited as the main reason for the success of the German invasions of Poland (September 1939), Norway and Denmark (April 1940), Belgium, France and Netherlands (May 1940), Yugoslavia (April 1941) and the early campaigns in the Soviet Union (June 1941). However their motorized and tank formations accounted for only 20% of the Heer's capacity at their peak strength. The maker of this fine sword had a most interesting history and somewhat reflective of the whole fate of Germany and it persecuted people during this era. Alexander Coppel was the youngest son of Solingen entrepreneur Gustav Coppel . After finishing his studies, he graduated and joined the family business Alexander Coppel, producing steel products and edged weapons, and in a Hildener produced steel pipes. Like his parents Coppel was active in his community and social aspects of Solingen, and curator of the "Coppelstifts", a foundation with infant home and recreation centre for adults, which was launched in 1912 by his family. On the occasion of the 100th anniversary of its founding, the company donated, from Alexander Coppel in 1921, two million marks for social purposes. However tragically, after the German transfer of power to the Nazis in 1933, the Jewish family Coppel was harassed and persecuted by the Nazis. Alexander Coppels sister in law, Sophie (1875-1951) emigrated in 1934, with her son Heinz and his family, to Switzerland. In 1936 the company was assimilated by Nazi control. On March 1, the Hildener works, was merged with another company, and the Solingen branch was acquired by "Aryan" shareholders in April. Alexander's eldest brother Carl Gustav (born 1857), who had lived in Dusseldorf since 1920, took his own life on 25 September 1941, and his daughter Anna died in 1942 in the Ravensbrück concentration camp , the fate of her sister Martha is unclear. Alexander Coppel had from November 1938 held the new name "Gideon"; and in 1941 was "a representative" of the Jewish community under instructions from the supervision of the Gestapo standing district branch of the " Reich Association of Jews in Germany ". On the 21st July 1942 he was, together with other Jewish residents from Solingen, deported to the Theresienstadt ghetto, where he died three weeks later.
A Very Good Long Service Good Conduct Silver Naval Medal Excellent condition, but not cleaned in 60 plus years so very grey indeed. Will polish beautifully. King George Vth. The Royal Navy Long Service & Good Conduct Medal was introduced on 24 August 1831. It is silver and circular in shape. The medal of 1831 had on its obverse side an anchor surmounted by a crown and enclosed in an oak wreath. The medal's reverse side was engraved with the recipient's details. The silver medal has changed dimensions and ribbon colour twice during its period of issue. The original medal of 1831 was 34mm in diameter and was suspended from a ring by a dark blue ribbon. In 1848 the medal became 36mm in diameter with a dark blue ribbon with white edges. A narrow suspender was introduced in 1874. Today, the Long Service & Good Conduct Medal (Navy) is based on the pattern of 1848. The obverse of the medal shows the effigy of the reigning monarch, while the reverse shows the image of a three-masted man-of-war surrounded by a rope tied at the foot with a reef knot with the words 'For Long service and Good Conduct' around the circumference. An Other Rank who completes 15 years of reckonable service from the date of attestation or age 17½, whichever is later, and who holds all three good conduct badges, shall be eligible to receive the medal. However, there are a number of offences which would normally preclude award of the LS&GCM. Awards are only made after a thorough check of a sailor's record of service. A Clasp to the medal was introduced during the reign of King George V and can be awarded for an additional fifteen year's service. The Clasp bears a laurel leaf design. When the ribbon alone is worn, a silver rosette denotes award of the Clasp. The medals' ribbon is dark blue flanked at the edges by narrow stripes of white. Awarded to sailor serving on HM Pembroke
A Very Good Officer's Silver and Gilt Cap Badge of the Loyal Regt. 1950's. Original early ERII. With red rose centre and gilt regimental banner. Silver crowned lion. 2 part construction. At the outbreak of World War II, the 1st Battalion Loyals were part of the 2nd Infantry Brigade, attached to the 1st Infantry Division. In September 1939 they were sent to France as part of the British Expeditionary Force and remained there alongside the French Army until May 1940. The 1st Loyals would participate in the fighting in France and Belgium in 1940, including acting as part of the rearguard for the Dunkirk evacuation. Eventually, the 1st Loyals would see action in Tunisia in early 1943, and Italy and at the Battle of Anzio where the 1st Division saw some of the fiercest fighting of the war. The battalion along with the rest of 1st Division were sent to Palestine in 1945. During the fighting in the Tunisian campaign, in April 1943, Lieutenant Willward Alexander Sandys-Clarke was posthumously awarded the regiment's only Victoria Cross of the war for his extreme heroism. Upon the commencement of hostilities in 1939, the 2nd Battalion, Loyal Regiment found themselves stationed in the Far East as part of Singapore Fortress's 1st Malaya Infantry Brigade. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the 2nd Loyals fought in Malaya as part of the delaying action during the Battle of Malaya. Eventually, the 2nd Battalion surrendered along with the rest of the Singapore garrison on 15 February 1942. The survivors spent the rest of the war as prisoners of the Imperial Japanese Army. Following the destruction of the 2nd Loyals with its surrender at Singapore, the battalion was reformed in Britain. The 10th Battalion, a hostilities-only battalion raised in 1940, was re-designated as the new 2nd Battalion on 28 May 1942. Eventually the battalion was deployed as part of 20th Indian Infantry Brigade of the 10th Indian Infantry Division in Italy during the closing phases of the Italian Campaign
A Very Good Original German WW2 West Wall Medal and Packet of Issue The West Wall Medal (German: Deutsches Schutzwall-Ehrenzeichen) was a military decoration of Nazi Germany. It was instituted on 2 August 1939 and was given to those who designed and built the fortifications on Germany's western borders, known as the West Wall or, in English, the Siegfried Line, and to the troops who served there prior to May 1940. In 1944, as Germany was expecting the arrival of the allied invasion, it was again awarded to those who took part in the fortification of the western borders.The medal was struck in bronzed brass. Its oval shape featured on the obverse (from bottom to top) a bunker, a crossed sword and shovel, and the German Eagle. On the reverse it bore the inscription "Für Arbeit zum Schutze Deutschlands" (For Work for the Protection of Defense of Germany).The medal was designed by Professor Richard Klein, of Munich. Excellent plus condition
A Very Good Pair Of German WW2 E. Leitz of Wetzel Binoculars In leather carrying case. Individual focusing eyepieces. Alloy frame with original black paint. Leather covered body. Original neck strap. Maker marked by Leitz, magnification 6 x L25, 150 - 8,5 degrees. Some service wear paint losses to frame. A pattern as used by all the major services, SS division personnel, Panzer officer's etc. Each eye piece focuses individually. The lenses provide a super sharp, bright, clear view. A photo of SS-Untersturmführer Franz-Josef Kneipp in the gallery wearing his service binoculars of the same type. They work very well will nice clear optics and focusing.
A Very Good Pair of German WW2 Zeiss Service Binoculars 6 x 30. Alloy frame with original black paint. Leather covered body. Original neck strap. Maker marked Carl Zeiss, Jena. Dienstglas 6 x 30 H/6400. The pattern as used by all the major services SS division personnel, Panzer officer's etc. Each eye piece focuses individually. Porro Prism Grid Scale Designation = H/6400 .The lenses provide a sharp, bright, clear view. A photo of SS-Untersturmführer Franz-Josef Kneipp in the gallery wearing his service binoculars of the same type. Small chip the right eye bakelite cover
A Very Good Pair of WW2 RAF Pilot's Wings King George VIth issue for WW2. RAF wings with RAF under King's crown with wings. The original Royal Flying Corps (RFC) Pilot's brevet or Pilot's Wings was designed by senior officers General Sir Frederick Sykes and General Sir David Henderson. It consisted of the wings of a swift in white silk embroidery with the monogram of RFC encircled by a laurel wreath of brown silk. The monogram was surmounted by a crown. The Wings were given Royal approval by King George V in February 1913 under Army Order 40/13. The Wings became the symbol of qualification worn by trained pilots. When the Royal Air Force (RAF) was formed in 1918 the design was changed slightly. The wing shape took the form of an eagle and the monogram became RAF. The design of the flying badge was the first of its kind in the world. It has been used as the basis of pilot's badges for the air forces of many countries.
A Very Good Pre WW1 Royal Engineer's Dress Uniform for Lance Corporal Tunic and trousers. In excellent condition for age. Fine red cloth with single bullion corporal stripe . Fine original Royal Engineer buttons. Austrian knots and cuffs. British other ranks and NCO's uniforms made prior to WW1 are very sought after and so few survive today as to make them most scarce and very interesting. Makers label inside with date.
A Very Good Pre-War German Officers Sword Used In WW2 Photograph in the gallery of Field Marshal von Kliest with his identical sword. It has spent two whole days in the workshop having the hilt specialist hand cleaned to conserve the gilt finish. Pristine gilt remaining to the hilt, synthetic ruby stone eyes oak leaf backstrap. Super deluxe double etched blade. Made by Weyersberg of Solingen. Overall in fabulous condition. Paul Ludwig Ewald von Kleist (8 August 1881 – 13 November 1954) was a leading German field marshal during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern). The Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. The German Army (German: Heer, was the land forces component of the Wehrmacht, the German armed forces, from 1935 to 1945. The Wehrmacht also included the Kriegsmarine (Navy) and the Luftwaffe (Air Force). During World War II, a total of about 15 million soldiers served in the German Army, of whom about seven million became casualties. Separate from the army, the Waffen-SS (Armed SS) was a multi-ethnic and multi-national military force of the Third Reich. Growing from three regiments to over 38 divisions during World War II, it served alongside the army but was never formally part of it. Only 17 months after Hitler announced publicly the rearmament program, the Army reached its projected goal of 36 divisions. During the autumn of 1937, two more corps were formed. In 1938, four additional corps were formed with the inclusion of the five divisions of the Austrian Army after the Anschluss in March. During the period of its expansion by Adolf Hitler, the German Army continued to develop concepts pioneered during World War I, combining ground (Heer) and air (Luftwaffe) assets into combined arms teams. Coupled with operational and tactical methods such as encirclements and the "battle of annihilation", the German military managed quick victories in the two initial years of World War II, prompting the use of the word Blitzkrieg (literally lightning war, meaning lightning-fast war) for the techniques used. The German Army entered the war with a majority of its infantry formations relying on the horse for transportation. The infantry remained foot soldiers throughout the war; artillery also remained primarily horse-drawn. The motorized formations received much attention in the world press in the opening years of the war, and were cited as the main reason for the success of the German invasions of Poland (September 1939), Norway and Denmark (April 1940), Belgium, France and Netherlands (May 1940), Yugoslavia (April 1941) and the early campaigns in the Soviet Union (June 1941). However their motorized and tank formations accounted for only 20% of the Heer's capacity at their peak strength.
A Very Good Regimental German Sword of the 121st. With copper bronze hilt and wire bound grip. Regimentally marked for the 121st Infantry Regt. With matching regimentally marked scabbard [with leather scabbard broken at middle]. A heavy grade combat weight sword. The 3rd Wurttemburg regiment was known as the 121st imperial German regiment. Their WW1 history; On mobilization in August 1914 at the beginning of World War I, most divisional cavalry, including brigade headquarters, was withdrawn to form cavalry divisions or split up among divisions as reconnaissance units. Divisions received engineer companies and other support units from their higher headquarters. The 26th Division was renamed the 26th Infantry Division. Its initial wartime organization was as follows: 51. Infanterie-Brigade Grenadier-Regiment Königin Olga (1. Württembergisches) Nr. 119 Infanterie-Regiment Kaiser Friedrich, König von Preußen (7. Württembergisches) Nr. 125 52. Infanterie-Brigade Infanterie-Regiment Alt-Württemberg (3. Württembergisches) Nr. 121 Füsilier-Regiment Kaiser Franz Josef von Österreich, König von Ungarn (4. Württembergisches) Nr. 122 Ulanen-Regiment König Wilhelm I (2. Württembergisches) Nr. 20 26. Feldartillerie-Brigade 2. Württembergisches Feldartillerie-Regiment Nr. 29 Prinz-Regent Luitpold von Bayern 4. Württembergisches Feldartillerie-Regiment Nr. 65 1.Kompanie/Württembergisches Pionier-Bataillon Nr. 13
A Very Good Silver WW2 German General Assault Badge In good condition, pin fastener complete. Silver plated metal. The standard issue General Assault badge was introduced on 1st June 1940, by Generaloberst Walther von Brauchitsch, as a combat award to SS and Heer armed support personnel who were ineligible for the Infantry or Panzer Assault badges. Criteria for award of the badge was basically the same as the criteria for award of the Infantry and Panzer Assault badges, with the main qualification being participation in three separate assaults in a supporting role. On its introduction it was titled the Engineers Assault Badge [Pionier-Sturmabzeichen} as it was only intended for award to combat engineers, but quite soon after its introduction it’s issue was extended to other personnel anti-tank and anti-aircraft, artillery and assault gun personnel, personnel and medical personnel. Personnel who had single handedly destroyed an enemy tank were awarded the standard General Assault badge, but by 1943 it was decided that the General Assault Badge was insufficient in recognising the number of assaults that the support personnel participated in, which resulted in upgrades to the award, and the introduction of four Special Grade of the General Assault badges in June 1943. The Special Grade badges followed the same design of their predecessor but were larger, two piece construction awards, with a rectangular numbered panel to the bottom of the wreath.
A Very Good Third Reich German WW2 Sword. Nickle Plated and Black Grip The black celluloid gripped sword was, due to it's silver and black colour combination, that perfectly complimented the black and silver livery of the SS, the pattern of German sword adopted by early SS officers, before they were granted their dedicated pattern of sword in 1936. There are numerous surviving original photographs of SS officer's wearing the very same pattern of sword.
A Very Good U.S.M4 Fighting Knife Bayonet, U.S.M8 A1 Scabbard For the US Army M1 Carbine, and a superb original example. The first contract was to the Turner Manufacturing Company of Statesville, North Carolina for M4 bayonets in 1954. They are marked U.S. M4 / TMN on the blade side of the lower guard. These have the post-1951 wider guard. Several characteristics of the US military M4 are seen here. They include the two long slots in the tang (presumably to reduce weight), the bar bent through a hole in the tang to hold the guard against the blade, and the nearly 90 degree angle where the grinding of the true edge ends (called the backcut). The grips are checkered black moulded plastic. In the case of the Turner production, the grips are unmarked inside other than one or two digit numbers, in this case number 3 which are apparently mould numbers. The pommel is secured by a sunburst peen, and the latch retaining pins are solid and peened in place. Pommels are unmarked except for a "dimple" at the six o'clock position, likely a hardness test. On most of the Turner production, all of the metal is Parkerized with a medium dark gray fairly smooth finish as is this one. Regular U.S.M8 A1 scabbard marked TWB representing assembled by Pennsylvania Working Home for the Blind, in Philadelphia, PA. The main body painted green. The throat piece is enforced with a metal fitting. It is here that most of the markings are found. A canvis attachment is secured near the throat piece. This device provided the means by which the knife could be secured to a utility belt or another surface. A black metal hook is secured at the end of the canvas strap. The tip of the scabbard has a hole where the leg tie would pass through. Some of the scabbards had a metal gromet in the hole. Others did not. During a short period a metal fitting was applied to the tip.
A Very Good WW1 1908 Pattern British Cavalry Trooper's Sword Darkened lacquer war finish with very good blade in clean polish. Regimentally marked hilt and scabbard and overall a great sword. An original sword as can be seen used to incredible effect in the magnificent epic, by Steven Spielberg, 'Warhorse'. A vintage trooper's sword with full ordnance markings, used in the frontline British cavalry regiments during WW1. The current Cavalry pattern used by all forms of the current British Cavalry. Considered to be the best designed cavalry sword ever made. In exceptionally good condition for age, a superb collector's item from the finest cavalry in the world. Early in WW1, cavalry skirmishes occurred on several fronts, and horse-mounted troops were widely used for reconnaissance. Britain's cavalry were trained to fight both on foot and mounted, but most other European cavalry still relied on the shock tactic of mounted charges. There were isolated instances of successful shock combat on the Western Front, where cavalry divisions also provided important mobile fire-power. Beginning in 1917, cavalry was deployed alongside tanks and aircraft, notably at the Battle of Cambrai, where cavalry was expected to exploit breakthroughs in the lines that the slower tanks could not. At Cambrai, troops from Great Britain, Canada, India and Germany participated in mounted actions. Cavalry was still deployed late in the war, with Allied cavalry troops harassing retreating German forces in 1918 during the Hundred Days Offensive, when horses and tanks continued to be used in the same battles. In comparison to their limited usefulness on the Western Front, "cavalry was literally indispensable" on the Eastern front and in the Middle East.
A Very Good WW1 American Officer's Cap Maker Marked Maker's address of Broadway & 9th St. New York. In very good overall condition, but with some stitching apart at the lining band. The first we have had in over 20 years.
A Very Good WW1 French Lebel Bayonet & Frog In excellent condition with regulation removed quillon. The Lebel Model 1886 rifle is also known as the "Fusil Mle 1886 M93", after a bolt modification was added in 1893. It is an 8 mm bolt action infantry rifle that entered service in the French Army in 1887. It is a repeating rifle that can hold eight rounds in its forestock tube magazine, one round in the transporter plus one round in the chamber. The Lebel rifle has the distinction of being the first military firearm to use smokeless powder ammunition. The new gunpowder, "Poudre B," was nitrocellulose-based and had been invented in 1884 by French chemist Paul Vieille. Lieutenant Colonel Nicolas Lebel contributed a flat nosed 8 mm full metal jacket bullet. Twelve years later, in 1898, a solid brass pointed (spitzer) and boat-tail bullet called "Balle D" was retained for all 8mm Lebel ammunition. Each case was protected against accidental percussion inside the tube magazine by a primer cover and by a circular groove around the primer cup which caught the tip of the following pointed bullet. Featuring an oversized bolt with front locking lugs and a massive receiver, the Lebel rifle was a durable design capable of long range performance. In spite of early obsolete features, such as its tube magazine and the shape of 8mm Lebel rimmed ammunition, the Lebel rifle remained the basic weapon of French line infantry during World War I (1914–1918). Altogether, 3.45 million Lebel rifles were produced by the three French state factories between 1887 and 1916. 26 inches long overall, 20.5 inch blade.
A Very Good WW1 German Wound Badge The German Wound Badge was a German military award for wounded or frost-bitten soldiers of Imperial German Army in World War I, the Reichswehr between the wars, and the Wehrmacht, SS and the auxiliary service organizations during the Second World War. This form of award was in fact one of only two decorations awarded to Hitler in WW1 when he was wounded fighting in the trenches. After March 1943, due to the increasing number of Allied bombings, it was also awarded to injured civilians. It was ultimately one of the most highly prized, since it had to be "bought with blood". The badge had three classes: black (3rd class, representing Iron), for those wounded once or twice by hostile action (including air raids), or frost-bitten in the line of duty; silver (2nd class) for being wounded three or four times, or suffering loss of a hand, foot or eye from hostile action (also partial loss of hearing), facial disfigurement or brain damage via hostile action; and in gold (1st class, which could be awarded posthumously) for five or more times wounded, total blindness, "loss of manhood", or severe brain damage via hostile action. Badges exist in pressed steel, brass and zinc, as well as some base metal privately commissioned versions. Those of the First World War were also produced in a cutout pattern. All versions of the Wound Badge were worn on the lower left breast of the uniform or tunic. The badge was worn below all other awards on the left. We have the paras medal as well.
A Very Good WW1 Gloucester Regt. Sterling Silver Military Sweetheart Brooch The Gloucestershire Regiment was an infantry regiment of the British Army. Nicknamed "The Glorious Glosters", the regiment carried more battle honours on their regimental colours than any other British Army line regiment. During the course of the war, the regiment raised 25 battalions, seeing service on the Western Front, Gallipoli, Macedonia, Mesopotamia, Persia and Italy. Battle Honours gained in WW1; The Great War (25 battalions): Mons, Retreat from Mons, Marne 1914, Aisne 1914 '18, Ypres 1914 '15 '17, Langemarck 1914 '17, Gheluvelt, Nonne Bosschen, Givenchy 1914, Gravenstafel, St Julien, Frezenberg, Bellewaarde, Aubers, Loos, Somme 1916 '18, Albert 1916, '18, Bazentin, Delville Wood, Pozières, Guillemont, Flers-Courcelette, Morval, Ancre Heights, Ancre 1916, Arras 1917 '18, Vimy 1917, Scarpe 1917, Messines 1917 '18, Pilckem, Menin Road, Polygon Wood, Broodseinde, Poelcappelle, Passchendaele, Cambrai 1917 '18, St Quentin, Bapaume 1918, Rosières, Avre, Lys, Estaires, Hazebrouck, Bailleul, Kemmel, Béthune, Drocourt-Quéant, Hindenburg Line, Épéhy, Canal du Nord, St Quentin Canal, Beaurevoir, Selle, Valenciennes, Sambre, France and Flanders 1914–18, Piave, Vittorio Veneto, Italy 1917–18, Struma, Doiran 1917, Macedonia 1915–18, Suvla, Sari Bair, Scimitar Hill, Gallipoli 1915–16, Egypt 1916, Tigris 1916, Kut al Amara 1917, Baghdad, Mesopotamia 1916–18, Persia 1918
A Very Good WW2 German NSKK Sleeve Eagle The NSKK were the motorized section of the Political SA [Sturm Abeitlung, or Storm troopers] they were all part of the political section of the uniformed Nazis under the control of Himmler's SS. They were instrumental in training dedicated men for service in armoured vehicles and even tanks and many NSKK members were subsequently transferred or volunteered to the Waffen SS Panzer Divisions at the outbreak of war. By 1943, almost all of the NSKK was on active service with either the Army or the Waffen SS.
A Very Good WW2 K98 Bayonet in Scabbard Dated 1938 Celluloid ribbed grip and overall in very nice condition. Probably by Ernst Pack & Son [name obscured]. Blade dated on back strap 38. Made before the war, this interesting piece would have been used throughout the entire war period from 1939, right from the eras of the invasion of Poland and it's surrender, then France and its surrender, Holland and its surrender, Belgium and its surrender. Then during the period when only Britain and the Commonwealth forces fought against Germany on their own, until the end of 1941, when Germany declared war on America, followed by the war in Africa with the Afrika Korps under the command of Rommel, and also during Operation Barbarossa, the invasion of the Soviet Union. Then during the allies liberation of France, and subsequently the liberation by the British, Canadians and Americans of the whole of the enslaved Western Europe, combined with the liberation of Eastern Europe and the capture of Berlin by the Red Army. Exactly where it was used, in it's eight year working service life, is impossible to say, but the possibilities are certainly most intriguing
A Very Good WW2 United States Army Fire Department Helmet Formed hard leather helmet with USA [US Army badge] FD from WW2. During the 1930s most fire equipment used at Army installations was constructed at the Quartermaster Corps Motor Transport Shop at Camp Holabird, in Baltimore, Maryland. Scores of pumpers and crash trucks were produced there and shipped to camps stateside and overseas. The Quartermasters Corps had been responsible for all Army fire protection since the 1800s. With war on the horizon, in 1939, the QMC started to plan for the Army's wartime firefighting needs. New camps and post would be constructed and exsisting installations would be rebuilt and enlarged. New arsenals, airfields, and related compunds would all require hugh numbers of new fire apparatus. This demand for fire trucks far surpassed what the QM Depot at Camp Holabird could produce. The Army turned to the nations fire apparatus manufacturers to supply this much needed equipment. On 4 December 1941 the responsibility for Fire Protection within the Army passed from the Quartermaster Corps to the Corps of Engineers. (COE) On 7 December Pearl Harbor was attacked and the United States found itself at war. One of the many problems now facing the COE was the need to provide fire protection in overseas theaters of operations. After 6 months of planning, 1 July 1943 saw the formation of the Engineer Fire Fighting Detachments 1 thru 10 at Camp Clairborne, near Alexandria, Louisiana. The initial staffing for the detachments brought men from other Army units, some with a background in firefighting who would become the cadre for the new units. The Commanding Officer (CO) of each detachment held the rank of Lieutenant and most were recent graduates of the COE Officer Candidate School at Fort Belvoir, Virginia, and would become the Fire Marshall for each detachment. The Cos attended a week course in the “Methods of Fire Fighting” held at the Central Fire Station in Alexandria, Louisiana. The school was sponsored by the Division of Trade and Industrial Education of the Louisiana State Department of Education. A senior Non-Commissioned Officer (NCO) from each detachment was designated Fire Chief and attended a special two week school in firefighting held at the District of Columbia Fire Training Center in Washington, DC. Colonel R. Lewis, COE Fire Protection Specialist was Commandant of the school which lasted from the 14th thru 26th September 1942. Providing fire protection at the many airfields in England could also prove dangerous. On the evening of 4 June 1944, a B-24 Liberator bomber of the 856th Bomb Group piloted by Second Lieutenant Raymond J. Sachtleben crashed into an unoccupied house at approximately 17:30 at Hardingham, near Garveston, Norfolk, killing all ten men in the crew. Private Ted Bunalski and Sergeant Monroe A. Atchley, members of the 2033rd EAFFP, were eating dinner when they heard a man yelling that a plane had crashed. They left their meals, ran out to the road, and jumped on the first fire truck going to the fire. Joined by other members of the platoon, led by Staff Sergeant Charles Provenzano, upon arrival at the crash site they immediately went to the burning plane and proceeded to extinguish the flames, disregarding the danger of bombs and a gas tank which was burning and full of gasoline. The plane was loaded with Model 201b fragmentation bombs, and while the fire was being combated, a bomb exploded. Sergeant Atchley was killed instantly. Private Bunalski received multiple shrapnel wounds, and a severe wound to the left side of his neck, which caused him to bleed to death. The other members of the platoon continued to attempt to fight the fire until ordered away from the crash. Private Bunalski and Sgt. Atchley were posthumously awarded the Soldiers Medal for heroism. Staff Sergeant Provenzano was awarded the Bronze Star along with four other members of the 2033rd EAFFP, Sergeant Antonio M. Suplrizio, Private First Class Anton Bauo, Michael Lararowica, and John J. Schrack. The strap is only partial. The helmet surface has old surface use markings etc.
A Very Pleasing Rare Italian Fascist Leader's Dagger Of the 1930's and 40's In it's original scabbard leather belt frog mount and belt buckle clip. The Italian Fascist leader's dagger was the dagger worn by senior leaders of the fascists, when in uniform, and Mussolini always wore his ivory gripped version very proudly, and presented Hitler with a matching example. See photos in the gallery of both Mussolini and Hitler wearing their Italian Fascist leader's dagger. Beatiful alloy eagle head grip, with black grip panels embellished with the ancient Roman symbol of the stick and fasces, blued steel scabbard and rare original leather strap and belt buckle mount
A Very Rare German 1939 WW2 75mm Shell Made For The Government of Kabul Made by a company whose main shareholder was Reichmarshal Herman Goering. It is exceptionally rare to get a former armament shell made by the Third Reich, that survived the entire war without being used. Even more rare, are the munitions that were made for foreign powers, who would eventually be fighting against their adversaries [the Allied Forces]. This shell was made, produced [and decorated in their colours] for the Kabul Government, but never delivered and more amazingly never used. It has the German amament company's logo of Rheinmetall, and the Afghan script as well. It was made by Rheinmetall-Borsig, as with many other industrial enterprises at the time, they developed and produced weapons and munitions in response to orders from the Reich War Ministry. Production included machine guns, tank guns, mortars and field artillery, anti-aircraft guns, and railroad guns. Becoming involved in the production of artillery during the First World War, Rheinmetall allied with Solothurn AG. In 1933 the takeover of locomotive manufacturer August Borsig GmbH was made as a future arms production plant in Berlin. Continued expansion led to an amalgamation with Borsig AG in 1936, the resulting Rheinmetall-Borsig Aktiengesellschaft combine. The company's affiliation to Goering's complex was strengthened even further in June 1938, when Reichswerke Hermann Goering purchased the majority holding in Rheinmetall-Borsig from Vereinigte Industrieunternehmungen AG (VIAG). The merger with Borsig-Werk in Berlin in 1936 nearly doubled the number of Rheinmetall employees compared to 1935. By 1938, with a workforce of 45,438 - the figure cited in that year's annual report - the much-enlarged company had clearly joined the ranks of Germany's corporate giants. Apart from plants in Berlin-Tegel, Düsseldorf, Sömmerda and Unterlüß, "Rheibo" (as it was unofficially known) had major subsidiaries and trade investments, especially in Berlin; but the company maintained large-scale production facilities in Switzerland and the Netherlands as well. To this extent, Rheinmetall-Borsig in 1938 was even bigger than Röchling, Rheinmetall's later majority shareholder. With the outbreak of World War II in September of 1939, Rheinmetall-Borsig restructured itself into a Regular Works and an Affiliated Works. Regular Works comprised the facilities in Düsseldorf, Sömmerda, Unterlü, and the Borsig plant in Berlin-Tegel, along with separate divisions in Derendorf, Rath, Grafenberg, Halver, Gruiten, and Oberkassel. Affiliated Works consisted of eight facilities that since 1936 had been used as production plants for weapons and munitions. The factories were located in Berlin, Guben and Fürstenberg (Mark Bradenburg), Breslau, and Apolda in Thüringen. By the first year of the war, all ordinance factories came under the control of institutions of the German armed forces. In March of 1940 the newly created Ministry of Armaments and Munitions began to coordinate the arms efforts. The company was Hitler's second biggest arms supplier. At its scattered plants Rheinmetall made nearly every important kind of gun the German Army used.
A Vintage 'Silver' Badge of Clan Grant A 'Silver' Clan badge of a garter with the motto 'Stand Fast' , centred with a burning hill. The Grants are one of the oldest and certainly one of noblest of Scottish history. Not hallmarked. Good condition heavt grade 2 inches max width.Silver coloured metal, not hallmarked English silver.
A Vintage Royal Naval Issue Deck Knife By Nowill & Son Ordnance Stamped Very similar to to the American EK Commando knife. In scabbard and with naval roping.
A WW1 455 Cal Revolver Holster With WW2 Quick Draw Adaption Acquired as part of a single officer's WW2 special forces kit. Of Capt. Devos. He served in the war in France and Germany [possibly elsewhere] and was promoted through to Lt. In 1944, and Capt. in early 1945. His officer's tunic denotes he was in the Gloucestershire Regt. His tunic is named, as are all his special forces, secret intelligence, and weapons training manual etc. plus his other kit and FS commando knife. Also it came with an early war Brodie helmet with Div. Flash [tricolour of red whit and blue]. His tunic is superb with all his wartime patches etc. We also have his Sam Browne with a .45 cal holster that has been cut and customised for quicker draw. Plus his '42 dated canvas belt and '43 dated holster. Compass pouch dated '42. We are selling as separate lots as not all collectors collect all things.
A WW1 Habsburg Empire Officer's Sword of Austro Hungary. WW1 period sword for an officer. Typical Austrian B shaped guard and wirebound fishskin grip. In original steel scabbard. Very good condition overall. In 1914, his latest addition to the Austro-Hungarian Empire was Bosnia-Herzegovina. Bosnian Serbs resented Austrian rule and sought the protection of independent Serbia. It was one of these Bosnian Serb groups, the Black Hand, that assassinated the Crown Prince, Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo. By the end of the year, her association with Germany would see her at war with France, Britain and Japan, while her attack on Serbia also drew in Montenegro. The Austro-Hungarian empire encompassed many peoples, and so did its army. Poles, Czechs, Slovaks, Croats, Slovenes, Bosnians, Italians, Ruthenes and Jews fought in the army alongside the Austrians and Hungarians, and under Austrian and Hungarian officers. In all, 1,495,200 Austro-Hungarian soldiers died during the Great War, including 480,000 that died as prisoners of war. Austria, apparently egged on by her German allies, quickly sent Serbia an ultimatum and declared war on the 28th July 1914. A few days later, on August 1st, Germany declared war on Russia - seen as the champion of the Slav cause by Serbs, Russians and Germans alike. Austria declared War on Russia a few days later, followed by a declaration of war on Belgium on 7th August.
A WW1 Royal Naval Officer's Belt Gilt bronze buckle with patent leather belt, however the belt is pretty worn and very small size.
A WW1 to WW2 German Hilted Trench Fighting Knife, & Scabbard. With a deer's foot hilt and Solingen blade. Some wear losses to the deer's foot. The blade was also replaced post war as the Edge Brand mark was not used until after this date apparently. This knife came from an an allied soldier veteran's war souvenirs from German soldiers, he used it after replacing the blade and scabbard until his demise in the 1990's. We acquired his complete collection of souvenir's, including German mortars and his medals. A Later Replaced Blade & Scabbard
A WW1 Trench Made Trench Periscope Trench Periscope, manufactured in the trenches, comprising: a rolled metal cylinder with timber inserts to mount 2 mirrors [top round, was oval] and wooden "rolling pin" type handle. Unmarked unofficial pattern circa 1915 -18.
A WW2 Bowie Fighting Knife With Pressed Leather Grip A most similar Bowie is illustrated in Gordon Hughes seminal work of fighting knive a Primer on Military Knives Part Two, illustration 121. Described as a private purchase knife used by a WW2 Commando before and during the issue of the standard Commando FS knife. Good robust quality, large width size blade, with good rivetted leather scabbard. Very popular both with British, Commonwealth and American forces. Overall 12 inches blade 5.5 inches.
A WW2 C Type RAF Flying Helmet and Goggles. In the summer and autumn of 1940, a battle for national survival was waged in the skies over Britain. Not only would this struggle, the first to be fought primarily in the air, decide the fate of the United Kingdom, but on it also rested the freedom of Europe and the outcome of the Second World War. By the end of June, 1940, the United Kingdom stood alone. The forces of Nazi Germany and her allies had conquered or dominated the rest of Europe from Norway to Sicily and the British Expeditionary Force and its allies had undergone a humiliating retreat back across the Channel under Operation Dynamo. In early July the German leader, Adolf Hitler, turned his attention to the British Isles, the last bastion of European democracy. His intention was to force the surrender of Britain through blockade, bombing, or, as a last resort, invasion. To achieve this end, Hitler knew that the Germans would need superiority in the air. Only if they controlled the skies could a heavy enough bombing campaign be mounted, or an invasion force cross the English Channel. While the Royal Navy would still pose a severe threat to an invasion force, they could not prevent aerial attacks on Britain’s ports, industries or people, and were vulnerable to German air attack. The Battle of Britain is the name given to the Second World War air campaign waged by the German Air Force (Luftwaffe) against the United Kingdom during the summer and autumn of 1940. The Battle of Britain was the first major campaign to be fought entirely by air forces, and was also the largest and most sustained aerial bombing campaign to that date. The German objective was to gain air superiority over the Royal Air Force (RAF), especially Fighter Command. From July 1940, coastal shipping convoys and shipping centres, such as Portsmouth, were the main targets; one month later, the Luftwaffe shifted its attacks to RAF airfields and infrastructure. As the battle progressed, the Luftwaffe also targeted aircraft factories and ground infrastructure. Eventually the Luftwaffe resorted to attacking areas of political significance and using terror bombing strategy. By preventing Germany from gaining air superiority, the British forced Hitler to postpone and eventually cancel Operation Sea Lion, a planned amphibious and airborne invasion of Britain. However, Germany continued bombing operations on Britain, known as The Blitz. The failure of Germany to achieve its objectives of destroying Britain's air defences, or forcing Britain to negotiate an armistice or even an outright surrender, is considered its first major defeat and a crucial turning point in the Second World War. The Battle of Britain has an unusual distinction in that it gained its name prior to being fought. The name is derived from a famous speech delivered by Prime Minister Winston Churchill in the House of Commons more than three weeks prior to the generally accepted date for the start of the battle:
A WW2 Close Combat Knife Double Edged Blade Staghorn Grip Original leather belt military type 7 rivet scabbard, with press stud hilt strap, and remains of a leg tying cord. The blade is incredibly similar to the FS commando knife blade so we are thinking it is a early war piece, circa 1939, made before the FS knife was first issued in 1941.
A WW2 Dental Instruments Medics Kit Roll Very nice quality instruments that could likely work well today [after polishing and sterilising.
A WW2 French Tank Division Badge. Second DB [Division Blindee] The design based on the track and bogies of the US Sherman tank. The troops of the 2ème Division Blindée, or French 2nd Armoured Division, first saw combat in the disastrous 1940 Norwegian Campaign as a part of the independent 501ème Régiment de Chars de Combat (501st Tank Regiment). After the fall of France, the unit retreated to the United Kingdom where it formed the core of the free French forces under Charles De Gaulle. The 2ème Division Blindée landed on Utah Beach on the night of the 31st July – 1st August, and formed up near La Haye-du-Puit. They joined the XV Corps of the US Third Army and were readied for their role in Operation Cobra. They were ordered to attack through the Avranches Corridor towards Le Mans. After several days of hard fighting through the countryside, Le Mans was liberated on 9 August. This was the first fo many major French cities that Leclerc and his 2éme Division Blindée would liberate in the next year of the war. From Le Mans, the XV Corps turned their attentions northwards to the city of Alençon. The city was liberated by the 2ème Division Blindée on 12 August. The following attack then drove through the German defences in Ecovre. As they drove inland with the rest of the Third Army, the French division ran into many prepared anti-tank defences deployed by the 9th Panzer Division. They overcame the initial shock of the violent ambushes and fought valiantly through the German positions, clearing the Germans out of the forest of Ecuvres. Initially, SHAEF was not prepared to spend valuable resources on liberating the Capital city. They were worried that an assault would trigger a brutal street-to-street fight. Obviously De Gaulle objected. He threatened that he would order the city to be liberated using the 2ème Division Blindée with or without Allied assistance. Finally they approved, and it was agreed that the Free French forces would lead the way. Leclerc threw the 2éme Division Blindée into a headlong rush towards Paris.
A WW2 German Heer Marksmanship Lanyard In silver bullion cord. The sharpshooters badge and aiguillette was awarded to the best shot in the regiments, and these men often were the first to become snipers. This is a nice piece and in superb condition.
A WW2 German Heer Officers Cap Eagle, Wreath and Cockade he German Army { Heer } was the land forces component of the Wehrmacht, the German armed forces, from 1935 to 1945. During World War II, a total of about 15 million soldiers served in the German Army, of whom about seven million became casualties. Separate from the army, the Waffen-SS (Armed SS) was a multi-ethnic and multi-national military force of the Third Reich. Growing from three regiments to over 38 divisions during World War II, it served alongside the army but was never formally part of it. Only 17 months after Hitler announced publicly the rearmament program, the Army reached its projected goal of 36 divisions. During the autumn of 1937, two more corps were formed. In 1938, four additional corps were formed with the inclusion of the five divisions of the Austrian Army after the Anschluss in March. During the period of its expansion by Adolf Hitler, the German Army continued to develop concepts pioneered during World War I, combining ground (Heer) and air (Luftwaffe) assets into combined arms teams. Coupled with operational and tactical methods such as encirclements and the "battle of annihilation", the German military managed quick victories in the two initial years of World War II, prompting the use of the word Blitzkrieg (literally lightning war, meaning lightning-fast war) for the techniques used. The German Army entered the war with a majority of its infantry formations relying on the horse for transportation. The infantry remained foot soldiers throughout the war; artillery also remained primarily horse-drawn. The motorized formations received much attention in the world press in the opening years of the war, and were cited as the main reason for the success of the German invasions of Poland (September 1939), Norway and Denmark (April 1940), Belgium, France and Netherlands (May 1940), Yugoslavia (April 1941) and the early campaigns in the Soviet Union (June 1941). However their motorized and tank formations accounted for only 20% of the Heer's capacity at their peak strength.
A WW2 German Heer Officers Dagger By Eikhorn Of Solingen A fine example with highly desireable yellow twist grip and silver plated mounts. Oak leaf ornamented pommel, crossguard and langet bearing an eagle and swastika; blade with much remaining original crossgraining. Housed in original plated undented scabbard with two suspension rings. Overall excellent plus condition, grip bears one small chip to the grip. The Third Reich Army (Heer) Officer`s dagger was designed by Paul Casburg in 1935.
A WW2 German Luftwaffe Service Belt Buckle Maker Marked and Dated 1940 Made by H Aurich, Dresden.
A WW2 German M40 Kriegsmarine Combat Helmet With original liner marked for Kriegsmarine, strap dated 1944 [broken] and good WW2 combat kriegsmarine paint. The Kriegsmarine was the navy of Nazi Germany from 1935 to 1945. It superseded the Imperial German Navy of World War I and the inter-war Reichsmarine. The Kriegsmarine was one of three official branches of the Wehrmacht, the armed forces of Nazi Germany. The Kriegsmarine grew rapidly during German naval rearmament in the 1930s (the Treaty of Versailles had limited the size of the German navy previously). Kriegsmarine ships were deployed to the waters around Spain during the Spanish Civil War, under the guise of enforcing non-intervention, but in reality supporting the Franco side of the war. In January 1939 Plan Z was ordered, calling for naval parity with the Royal Navy by 1944. However, when World War II broke out in September 1939, Plan Z was shelved in favour of building submarines (U-boats) and prioritizing land and air forces. The Commander-in-Chief of the Kriegsmarine (as for all branches of armed forces during the period of absolute Nazi power) was Adolf Hitler, who exercised his authority through the Oberkommando der Marine. The Kriegsmarine ships were the U-boats, most of which were constructed after Plan Z was abandoned at the beginning of World War II. Wolfpacks were rapidly assembled groups of submarines which attacked British convoys during the first half of the Battle of the Atlantic but this tactic was largely abandoned in the second half of the war. Along with the U-boats, surface commerce raiders (including auxiliary cruisers) were used to disrupt Allied shipping in the early years of the war, the most famous of these being the heavy cruisers Admiral Graf Spee and Admiral Scheer and the battleship Bismarck. However, the adoption of convoy escorts, especially in the Atlantic, greatly reduced the effectiveness of commerce raiders against convoys. After the Second World War, the Kriegsmarine's remaining ships were divided up amongst the Allied powers and were used for various purposes including minesweeping.
A WW2 German Minesweepers, Sub Chasers and Escort Vessels War Badge Made by Otto Placzek Berlin. Ausf Schwerin Berlin. In WWII underwater operations played a key role in ocean battles. Submarines were very effective at destroying cargo and combat ships using torpedo's. Another weapon that created havoc among the nation's ports was the mine. This device consisted of an explosive charge that was anchored to the ocean floor and floated just at the right height to hit the body of the ships. The German Navy developed a ship specifically designed for dealing with mines. It had the capability of detecting the threat and disabling it. Some of the other functions it had was to lay mine fields and chase enemy submarines. The War Badge for Mine Sweepers, Sub Chasers and Escort Ships was created on August 31, 1940. The purpose was to recognize valuable service provided by crew members of vessels. The badge was instituted by the Commander- in -Chief of the Navy Grand Admiral Raeder on the 31st August 1940, and was designed by the well known sculpture/artist Otto Placzek of Berlin. Vertical oval shaped, die-cast alloy metal badge, depicting a column of water exploding from the sea in a silver and grey finish, surrounded by a gold finished oak leaf wreath. At the top of the wreath is an eagle, with wings outstretched and a swastika in it's talons. On the reverse is a vertical hinged pin with retaining hook and the inscription The award criteria is To have taken part in three operational sorties. To have been wounded whilst on an operational sortie. Killed In Action whilst on an operational sortie. Sunk (and survived) whilst on an operational sortie. The badge could also be awarded after 6 months of service if none of the above criteria was met. The Imperial War Museum have a near identical example, by the same maker. The IWN collection exhibit number for their example is INS 21263
A WW2 German Third Reich Fire/Police Helmet Plain black paint overall, some surface paint losses. Original strap and liner.
A WW2 Iron Plaque For The German Pioneer Lehr Battalion A most intriguing piece that shows a pair of crossed hammers and a tunnel entrance below a winged eagle bearing a swastika in a wreath. The military force, alongside the TODT, that oversaw and instructed the slave labour that created incredible structures, tunnels, and installations, such as the underground bases at Peenemunde. Slave labourers, concentration camp inmates and prisoners of war provided the work that enabled the construction of the test sites and the later serial production of the rockets, which the Nazi propaganda referred to as "Vergeltungswaffe 2" (or "Vengeance Weapon 2"), in so short a period of time. Both the inhumane labour conditions and the attacks on Belgian, British and French cities using the supposed "wonder weapon" claimed thousands of lives. The ambivalent nature of technological progress is uniquely reflected in the story of Peenemünde. 4.75 inches across
A WW2 Officer's Balmoral Cap Royal Warwickshire Regt, Monty's Ironsides An absolute gem of a British Army D-Day Landing collector's piece. An original officer's Balmoral, used from the Normandy D-Day landings onwards right into VE Day by an officer of the Royal Warwicks. A fine and rarely seen original cap with its original bronzed officer's bonnet badge of highest quality [showing a separate wire rope within the design]. The 2nd Battalion Royal Warwicks in World War 2 were part of 185 Brigade 3rd Div. known as Monty's Ironsides. On 6 June 1944, Major-General Bernard Montgomery chose his 'Iron Sides', the famous British 3rd Division, to spearhead the Allied attack on the Normandy beaches on D-Day. As the only division in the British Liberation Army to participate in the savage fighting from D-Day all the way through to VE-Day, the Iron Sides' contribution to victory in Europe was immense. Their courageous efforts won them two Victoria Crosses, but the price in lives was high; the division suffered 15,000 casualties including 2,586 killed in action. The 3rd was probably the most 'British' of all the divisions fighting in North-West Europe. It included the King's Own Scottish Borderers, a Highland gunner regiment, the Royal Ulster Rifles, the two roses of East Yorkshire and South Lancashire, the East Anglians (Suffolk, Norfolk, Lincolns) and the Midlands (Warwick and Shropshire), besides cockneys from the Middlesex Regiment and the Recce Regiment from Northumberland. Excellent condition, interior lining stamped WD.
A WW2 Order of the German Cross in Gold [1941] Active Service Issue Period photos of several combat officers awarded the same award, and wearing it in service uniform. [ photos not included, for historical context only]. The active duty combat and dress uniform type, in cloth, gilt metal and bullion. SS/Heer pattern green cloth ground, original black paper backing. Some edge cloth lacking on 3 points of the star.
A WW2 Portable Military and Maritime Campaign Cup Made in four collapsible sections and in it's cardboard case.
A WW2 RAF 'Battle of Britain' B Type Helmet & Original Rare D type Mask An original Battle of Britain Period RAF flying helmet and mask. The 'D' type mask is the rarest and most collectable of all the types of mask used by WW2 RAF pilots, and used in the Battle of Britain. With provenence and history. A good D type mask can now fetch up to £2,700 alone. With original earpieces and mike socket. Last used by Flying Officer Derrick, who was killed in action, with RAF 55 Squadron, flying in Baltimores, aged 26, during the invasion of Italy. He originally flew supporting the 8th Army's advance in the Eastern Desert then from Sicily into Italy. He died on the 25th July 1943 and is buried in Italy. The Battle of Britain (German: Luftschlacht um England, literally "Air battle for England") is the name given to the Second World War defence of the United Kingdom by the Royal Air Force (RAF) against an onslaught by the German Air Force (Luftwaffe) which began at the end of June 1940. In Britain, the officially recognised dates are 10 July – 31 October 1940, overlapping with the period of large-scale night attacks known as the Blitz.[18] German historians do not accept this subdivision, and regard the Luftschlacht um England as a campaign lasting from July 1940 to June 1941.[19] The Battle of Britain has been described as the first major campaign to be fought entirely by air forces. The objective of the Nazi German forces was to increase pressure on Britain to agree to a negotiated peace settlement. An air and sea blockade began in July 1940, with coastal shipping convoys, ports and shipping centres such as Portsmouth the main targets of the Luftwaffe. A direction issued on 1 August for the Luftwaffe's Adlertag campaign to achieve air superiority over the Royal Air Force (RAF) with the aim of incapacitating RAF Fighter Command, and shifted attacks to RAF airfields and infrastructure. As the battle progressed, the Luftwaffe also targeted factories involved in World War II aircraft production and ground infrastructure. Eventually the Luftwaffe resorted to attacking areas of political significance and using terror bombing strategy. By preventing Germany from gaining air superiority, the British forced Adolf Hitler to postpone and eventually cancel Operation Sea Lion, a planned amphibious and airborne invasion of Britain. However, Germany continued bombing operations on Britain, known as The Blitz. The failure of Nazi Germany to achieve its objective of destroying Britain's air defences in order to force Britain to negotiate an armistice (or even surrender outright) is considered by Steven Bungay to be its first major defeat in World War II, and a crucial turning point in the conflict. The Battle of Britain has an unusual distinction in that it gained its name prior to being fought. The name is derived from a famous speech delivered by Prime Minister Winston Churchill in the House of Commons on June 18, more than three weeks prior to the generally accepted date for the start of the battle: The Squadron took part in almost the entire desert war, operating as a day bomber squadron for most of that period (apart from a short period of rest in the summer of 1941 and a period of anti-shipping sweeps from September 1941 until March 1942. The Martin Baltimore II differed from the Mk I only in that it was delivered with two 0.30in Browning machine guns in the rear dorsal position in place of the single gun of the Mk. I. Neither installation proved satisfactory, and in most cases was replaced by a British version, using 0.303in Brownings. 100 Baltimore Mk.Iis were delivered as part of the first British order for 400 aircraft, following 50 Baltimore Is. The Baltimore II was used by five operational squadrons, four of which also used the Mk I. In July 1943, after the end of the campaign in North Africa, the Baltimore equipped squadron turned its attention to Sicily, moving onto that island in August. A move to mainland Italy followed in September 1943, and the squadron spent the rest of the war operating in support of the Allied armies as they advanced up the country.
A WW2 RAF and SOE Escape Compass. A small working compass for concealment within a matchbox, button or other suitable secreted item. Specifically made for use by Aircrew of the RAF if they were to be shot down over enemy lines, and also for SOE operatives for across country navigation.
A WW2 Regimental Silver Metal Presentation Tankard.Lt Col Royal Engineers. Heavy gauge tankard with presentation inscription. Presented to Major Cook, Pannagarh. We have a collection of his wartime militaria and sword etc.of Lt Col Cook. He signed up to Military Service with the Royal Engineers during the inter-war years and serving most of his time in India and the Far-east, when as acting-Captain, Frederick Cook was shot & wounded in action and hospitalized during 1942 with a bullet lodged in his spine. Following an X-ray, this was considered too difficult to remove, and he was subsequently discharged back into service, continuing until he left the Military. We are selling this tankard separately from the Colonel's WW2 and post war service mementos, as regimental presentation silver are collectable items attracting their own distinctly separate collectors. The tankard is marked with a typical Indian Empire silver mark, [stamped 'pure silver'] on the base. This mark does not qualify as English grade silver in any way, and naturally it bears no English assay mark.
A WW2 Senior British Officer's Campaign Chair A foldaway British Army chair that was used at a mobile British Brigade headquarters during D.DAY and Beyond. In very good order and seems to work very well.
A WWI 'Doughboy' Canvas Webbing Grenade Vest Pack Dated 1918 Made by the Troy Carriage Sunshade Co. May 1918. 11 flap pockets in excellent condition. US inspector stamped
A Zeppelin Airship Post Letter For The Brazil Flight, 27 July 1936 A South American Europe Flight During the Olympics of 1936. Superb condition. The Hindenburg made 17 round trips across the Atlantic in 1936, its first and only full year of service, with ten trips to the United States and seven to Brazil. In July 1936 it completed a record Atlantic double crossing in five days, 19 hours and 51 minutes. Among the famous passengers was German heavyweight boxing champion Max Schmeling, who returned home on the Hindenburg to a hero's welcome after knocking out Joe Louis in New York on June 19, 1936. During the 1936 season the airship flew 191,583 miles (308,323 km), carried 2,798 passengers, and transported 160 tons of freight and mail, a level of success that encouraged the Luftschiffbau Zeppelin Company to plan the expansion of its airship fleet and transatlantic service. The airship was reportedly so stable that a pen or pencil could be stood on a table without falling. Its launches were so smooth that passengers often missed them, believing that the airship was still docked to its mooring mast. The cost of one way passage between Germany and the United States was US$400, an especially considerable sum in the Depression era. Hindenburg passengers were generally affluent, including many public figures, entertainers, noted sportsmen, political figures, and leaders of industry. The Hindenburg was used again for propaganda purposes when it flew over the Olympic Stadium in Berlin on August 1 during the opening ceremonies of the 1936 Summer Olympic Games. Shortly before the arrival of Adolf Hitler to declare the Games open, the airship crossed low over the packed stadium while trailing the Olympic flag on a long weighted line suspended from its gondola. During 1936 the Hindenburg had a special Blüthner aluminium grand piano placed on board in the music salon, although the instrument was removed after the first year to save weight. Over the winter of 1936–37, several alterations were made to the airship's structures. The greater lift capacity allowed ten passenger cabins to be added, nine with two beds and one with four beds, thus increasing the total passenger capacity to 72. In addition, "gutters" were installed to collect rain for use as water ballast: taking on rainwater ballast to compensate for the weight of fuel consumed during a voyage was more economical than venting hydrogen. Another change was the installation of an experimental aircraft hook-on trapeze based on the system similar to the one used on the U.S. Navy Goodyear-Zeppelin built airships Akron and Macon. This was intended to allow customs officials to be flown out to the Hindenburg to process passengers before landing and to retrieve mail from the ship for early delivery. Experimental hook-ons and takeoffs were attempted on March 11 and April 27, 1937, but were not very successful, owing to turbulence around the area where the hook-up trapeze had been mounted. The loss of the ship ended all prospects of further testing.
A Zeppellin Carving Knife. Apparently From the Restaurant on the Hindenberg A original chef's carving knife with a model of the Zeppelin as the handle, supposedly used on the Hindenberg Zeppelin The company that ran the Graf Zeppelin and Hindenberg transatlantic airships was the Nazi propaganda based company, titled the DZR, the Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei. The DZR was created at the instigation of Air Minister Hermann Göring as a way to increase Nazi control over zeppelin operations, and can be see as part of the larger policy of Gleichschaltung, or coordination, which affected all aspects of German life in the years following Hitler’s assumption of power. Consistent with Nazi ideology, the airship was expected to be more than just a private commercial venture; it was to be a public symbol of the new German nation. In a speech marking the founding of the DZR, Göring commented: “I hope that the new ship will also fulfill its duty in furthering the cause of Germany. The airship does not have the exclusive purpose of flying across the Atlantic, but also has a responsibility to act as the nation’s representative.” In March 1935, the South Atlantic flights became the responsibility of Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei, after this company had been set up jointly by Luftschiffbau Zeppelin, the German Air Ministry and Deutsche Lufthansa. The even larger airship, the LZ 129 'Hindenburg' joined the 'Graf Zeppelin' in 1936, and, in addition to South Atlantic flights with its parter, inaugurated a service over the North Atlantic, between Frankfurt and Lakehurst in New Jersey, in the summer. Also in 1936 the South American route was extended to Rio de Janeiro. Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei ceased operations as the commercial use of airships came to an abrupt end on 6 May 1937, when the 'Hindenburg' exploded at Lakehurst.
A1930's DZR Air Ship Dinner Knife, For The Hindenberg or Graf Zeppelin The Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei (the German Zeppelin Transport Company, or DZR) was established on March 22, 1935, to operate German passenger airships. Prior to the establishment of the DZR, passenger zeppelins were built by the Luftshiffbau Zeppelin (the Zeppelin Airship Construction Company, known as the “LZ”) and operated by DELAG (Deutsche Luftschiffahrts-Aktiengesellschaft, or German Airship Transportation Corporation Ltd), which was established in 1909 as an offshoot of the LZ and dominated by Hugo Eckener. With the establishment of the DZR, airship activities were divided between the LZ, which would continue to build the airships, and the DZR, which would operate them. Consistent with Nazi ideology, the airship was expected to be more than just a private commercial venture; it was to be a public symbol of the new German nation. In a speech marking the founding of the DZR, Göring commented: “I hope that the new ship will also fulfill its duty in furthering the cause of Germany… The airship does not have the exclusive purpose of flying across the Atlantic, but also has a responsibility to act as the nation’s representative.” The establishment of the DZR may have also been partly inspired by the bureaucratic rivalry between Air Minister Göring and Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels, and Goering’s commitment of 9 million marks to the zeppelin project, on condition of the creation of the DZR, came shortly after Goebbels offered the Zeppelin Company 2 million marks toward the completion of LZ-129 in the summer of 1934.
American WW1 Rifle Bayonet, Re-Issued to British Home Guard WW2. Pattern 1913/17. In excellent order with frog mount. Made by Remington. The pattern of bayonet that was continually used in WW2 by the British Home Guard. With twin cuts in the wood grip added to differentiate for British forces that it was the American bayonet and not a British Wilkinson. Dated both 1913 and 1917. Struck out US service marks.
An Airship Zeppelin Sample Card For Picture Frame Mounts Circa 1915 Pressed gilt and silvered metal airship models that were sold to affix to picture frames of the photos of loved ones that served in the Zeppelins in WW1.
An American, Goodyear Co. Ashtray Made From Duralumin From Airship Akron A 1931 souveninir of USS Akron (ZRS-4). Striking and very rare. It was a helium-filled rigid airship of the U.S. Navy which operated between September 1931 and April 1933. She was the world's first purpose-built flying aircraft carrier, carrying F9C Sparrowhawk fighter planes which could be launched and recovered while she was in flight. With an overall length of 785 ft (239 m), the Akron and her sister ship the Macon were among the largest flying objects ever built. Although the LZ129 Hindenburg and the LZ130 Graf Zeppelin II were some 18 ft (5.5 m) longer and slightly more voluminous, the two German airships were filled with hydrogen, so the US Navy craft still holds the world record for helium-filled airships. The Akron was destroyed in a thunderstorm off the coast of New Jersey on the morning of 4 April 1933, killing 73 of the 76 crewmen and passengers. This accident involved the greatest loss of life in any airship crash. The airship's skeleton was built of the new lightweight alloy duralumin 17-SRT. The frame introduced several novel features compared with traditional Zeppelin designs. Rather than being single-girder diamond trusses with radial wire bracing, the main rings of the Akron were self-supporting deep frames: triangular Warren trusses 'curled' round to form a ring. Though much heavier than conventional rings, the deep rings promised to be much stronger, a significant attraction to the navy after the in-flight break up of the earlier conventional airships R38/ZR-2 and ZR-1 Shenandoah. The inherent strength of these frames allowed Chief Designer, Dr Karl Arnstein, to dispense with the internal cruciform structure used by Zeppelin to support the fins of their ships. Instead, the fins of the Akron were cantilevered: mounted entirely externally to the main structure. Zeppelin and other rigid designs used a single keel at the lowest point of the hull circumference but Arnstein gave the Akron three keels, one running along the top of the hull and one each side, 45 degrees up from the lower centreline. Each keel provided a walkway running almost the entire length of the ship. The strength of the main rings, the lower keels, and the fact that helium, instead of flammable hydrogen, was to be used, also allowed the designer to mount the engines inside the hull, improving streamlining.
An April 13th 1945 Daily Mirror Roosevelt Dies Headline Newspaper and "End in a Few Days", US Told; A likely unique opportunity to own a piece of WW2 history. It would look splendid framed. Including within its pages is a story of a 20 year old WW2 widow, photographed working as a cinema ticket booth operator, who was told her Killed in Action husband has been posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross, the rarest and most valorous medal in the world. It details that he stood in open ground on a battlefield in Burma and held back a force of 300 Japanese on his own, from a distance of only 10 yards. When they returned for another assault he used a mortar, single handed, again completely unprotected in open ground, killed 7 then was mortally wounded. These were real and most worthy heroes, not the seemingly pointless self centred media celebrities of today, that appear to be worshiped by todays masses of the 21st century. Also, an article of the 14th Army Killing 1,029 Japs, "its greatest day of Jap-Killing since the fall on Mandalay". Not a piece of Western reportage that we would ever expect to see today! Plus a most peculiar cartoon section that we need not describe in words, humour certainly has changed in 70 years, but we think the pictures say it all??
An Edwardian Colonel's Scarlet Cloth Sidecap, of 15th [The Kings] Hussars. Good condition overall. With two Lion and Crown buttons for the rank of Colonel and Brigadier .
An Edwardian West Yorkshire Regt. Helmet Plate World War I saw numerous battalions of The Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment) serving at Neuve-Chappelle, Loos, the Somme, Passchendaele, Ypres, Marne, Arras, Cambrai and Gallipoli. At its peak The West Yorkshire Regiment numbered 37 battalions, 66 Battle Honours were bestowed and four Victoria Crosses were awarded. The four TF battalions formed the West Yorkshire Brigade, which mobilised as 146 Brigade, 49th (West Riding) Infantry Division on the outbreak of World War I and served in France 1915–18. They raised duplicate battalions (2/5th, 2/6th, 2/7th, 2/8th) that constituted 185 Bde in 62nd (2nd West Riding) Division, which also served in France 1917–18. In 1915 they formed further reserve battalions (3/5th, 3/6th, 3/7th, 3/8th) Battle honours in WW1 The Great War [31 battalions]: Aisne 1914 '18, Armentières 1914, Neuve Chapelle, Aubers, Hooge 1915, Loos, Somme 1916 '18, Albert 1916 '18, Bazentin, Pozières, Flers-Courcelette, Morval, Thiepval, Le Transloy, Ancre Heights, Ancre 1916, Arras 1917 '18, Scarpe 1917 '18, Bullecourt, Hill 70, Messines 1917 '18, Ypres 1917 '18, Pilckem, Langemarck 1917, Menin Road, Polygon Wood, Poelcappelle, Passchendaele, Cambrai 1917 '18, St. Quentin, Rosières, Villers Bretonneux, Lys, Hazebrouck, Bailleul, Kemmel, Marne 1918, Tardenois, Amiens, Bapaume 1918, Drocourt-Quéant, Hindenburg Line, Havrincourt, Épéhy, Canal du Nord, Selle, Valenciennes, Sambre, France and Flanders 1914-18, Piave, Vittorio Veneto, Italy 1917-18, Suvla, Landing at Suvla, Scimitar Hill, Gallipoli 1915, Egypt 1915-16
An Enamel, Nazi Marked, 1933 Chicago World's Fair Flight Badge A Rare original example of these fascinating pieces from early Nazi propaganda. With a full relief model of a silver Zeppelin, with Swastika tail fins, over a two-tone blue sky and sea background, within a white oval. Entitled Nord-u Sudamerica Jubilaumsfahrt 1933. It was produced for the Chicago World Fair and the 1933 Graf Zeppelin flight, from Europe, to South America, Chicago and on to Europe. Graf Zeppelin LZ127, badge 1933, blue and white enamel on silver, for her Jubilee flight from Germany to North and South America, during which she visited Chicago's World Fair before returning to Germany, maker's mark to reverse Kerbach Dresen, 2 inches across. Very fine, attractive.
An Enamel, Nazi Marked, 1933 Chicago World's Fair Flight Badge A Rare original example of these fascinating pieces from early Nazi propaganda. With a full relief model of a silver Zeppelin, with Swastika tail fins, over a two-tone blue sky and sea background, within a white oval. Entitled Nord-u Sudamerica Jubilaumsfahrt 1933. It was produced for the Chicago World Fair and the 1933 Graf Zeppelin flight, from Europe, to South America, Chicago and on to Europe. Graf Zeppelin LZ127, badge 1933, blue and white enamel on silver, for her Jubilee flight from Germany to North and South America, during which she visited Chicago's World Fair before returning to Germany, maker's mark to reverse Kerbach Dresen, 2 inches across. Very fine, attractive.
An ER II Vintage Ghurka Kukri With Military Leather Frog Mount With traditional bi-knives and fine quality steel blade. Leather covered wooden scabbard, brass ovoid pommel, brass scabbard chape. Traditionally made in Nepal. The Kukri is the renown and famous weapon of the Nepalese Gurkha. Probably the most respected and feared warriors in the world, the Gurkhas of Nepal have fought in the Gurkha regiments of the British Army for around two centuries. With a degree of loyalty and dedication that is legendary, there is no greater soldier to be at one's side when in battle than the noble Gurkha. With a Kukri in his hand and the battle cry called, "Ayo Gorkhali!" ["the Gurkhas are coming!"], no foe's head was safe on his shoulders. Battle hardened German Infantry in WW1, or WW2 Japanese Shock Troops, have been known to tremble in their boots at the knowledge that they would be facing the Gurkhas in battle. Some of the most amazing feats of heroism have resulted in the most revered medal, the British Victoria Cross [ the world's greatest and most difficult to qualify for gallantry medal] being awarded to Ghurkas. The blade shape descended from the classic Greek sword of Kopis, which is about 2500 years old. Some say it originated from a form of knife first used by the Mallas who came to power in Nepal in the 13th Century. There are some Khukuris displaying on the walls of National Museum at Chhauni in Kathmandu which are 500 years old or even older, among them, one that once belonged to Drabya Shah, the founder king of the kingdom of Gorkha, in 1627 AD. But, some say that the Khukuri's history is possibly centuries older this. It is suggested that the Khukuri was first used by Kiratis who came to power in Nepal before Lichchhavi age, in about the 7th Century. In the hands of an experienced wielder Khukuri or Kukri is about as formidable a weapon as can be conceived. Like all really good weapons, Khukuri's or Kukri's efficiency depends much more upon skill than the strength of the wielder. And thus so that it happens, that a diminutive Gurkha, a mere boy in regards to his stature, could easily cut to pieces a gigantic adversary, who simply does not understand the little Gurkha's mode of attack and fearsome skill. The Gurkha generally strikes upwards with his Kukri, possibly in order to avoid wounding himself should his blow fail, and possibly because an upward cut is just the one that can be least guarded against however strong his opponent. For sale to over 18s only.
An Excellent Example of The Adolf Hitler Photo Book of 1936 This is an excellent original example of the rare Third Reich German book ADOLF HITLER - Bilder aus dem Leben des Führers (Adolf Hitler - Pictures of the Life of the Führer) as published in 1936 by Cigaretten-Bilderdienst in Altona-Bahrenfeld, Germany. Not a rare book at the time but very rare to get in such near mint condition today. Made by the German so-called cigarette card manufacturers that were popular all over the world from the 1900s until after WWII. However unlike the British versions that had a small card in every cigarette packet, the German type were much larger and had to be sent for from vouchers in the cigarettes packet. The family would purchase the empty album and send in coupons from cigarette packages for packets of photographs, which would then be mounted into the album. This is one of the most impressive made during the 1930s in Germany and consists of beautifully clear and sharp black/white and colour images showing the life of Adolf Hitler, taken by Heinrich Hoffmann, Hitler's personal photographer and Eva Braun's former employer. There are also commentaries written by some of the leaders of the new Reich. This is a very clean, bright, and immaculate example and dates from the mid 1930s. It's a great collector reference. Most of these books were destroyed within Germany at the surrender in 1945. This Nazi book has an excellent historical text and photo captions that cover the period of Hitler’s life from his birth in Braunau am Inn through his service in World War I, his excellent watercolor paintings, the battles of the early days of the NSDAP, the success of the Nazi Party in German elections and Hitler’s eventual appointment as Reichskanzler or Chancellor of Germany. The album is complete with no pages missing or with any other damage, the size is 9-1/2 x 12-1/2 inches, 135 heavy material pages with, we believe, 256 photo-like pictures (many of them full or half page size!) pasted into the text! There are no pictures missing and none of them is damaged. Some of the album's content: 1. Foreword by Dr. Joseph Goebbels 2. Adolf Hitler traveling 3. Adolf Hitler giving speeches 4. Adolf Hitler and the "Deutsche Arbeitsfront" (D.A.F.) 5. Adolf Hitler and the German Arts 6. The new building projects of Adolf and his architect Albert Speer 7. Adolf Hitler and his favourite project: the Reichsautobahn 8. Adolf Hitler and the strong new Wehrmacht 9. Adolf Hitler and the Hitler Youth (HJ or Hitlerjugend) 10. Adolf Hitler on the Obersalzberg 11. Adolf Hitler and his SS Leibstandarte 12. Adolf Hitler and the National Socialist Movement 13. Water color paintings from the early Adolf Hitler 14. etc., etc., etc…
An Excellent Royal Netherland Navy Officer's Dress Belt 1930's Used in WW2 The service dress belt of a RNN submarine commander of the Royal Netherlands Navy of WW2. Excellent condition. The Dutch Navy at the beginning of the war with Germany in May 1940, consisted of 1 coastal defence ship, 5 cruisers, 9 destroyers, 27 submarines, 4 gun boats, 6 minelayers and other smaller vessels. The Dutch Navy fought in many parts of sea like North Sea, Mediterranean and the Pacific sea where the Dutch navy had to defend the Dutch colonies from the Japanese advance. Dutch naval forces had a contribution of sinking many enemy vessels, including 2 U-boats and also Japanese and even Italian submarines. But they also suffered many losses during the war, especially their submarine arm. They lost the coastal defence ship Soerabaja, the 3 cruisers De Ruyter, Java and Sumatra, 9 destroyers, 11 submarines and other smaller vessels. According to records the Royal Dutch Navy lost 59 warships during WWII [40%] Used by a Commander of a RNN U Boat, the Free Dutch Navy Submarine of WW2 HNMS O 19 (N 54)
An Exceptional American WW1 Winchester Sword Bayonet With Army Grenade Mark Dated pattern 1917. A real corker with big Winchester W trade mark and date, plus US Army flaming grenade. Jewell made scabbard with leather frog mount combined with the double hooks. With twin cuts in the wood grip added to differentiate for British forces that it was the American bayonet and not a British Wilkinson. The M1917 bayonet was designed to be used with the US M1917 Enfield .30 calibre rifle, as well as with the seven different U.S. trench shotguns. The blade was 16 inches (40.6 cm) long. The M1917 bayonet was used first during World War I by American soldiers on the Western Front. A sword bayonet design, the M1917 bayonet design was based on the British P1907 bayonet, which incorporated a long 17-inch blade. While designed primarily for the M1917 rifle the bayonet was fitted for use on all the "trench" shotguns at the time.
An Exceptional German Officers Sword With Eagle and Swastika Hilt Gilt hilt with all original mirror gilt remaining, Swastika and Eagle langet, made by Alcoso. Alcoso of Solingen scales logo [Alexander Coppel GmbH Dove head pommel with eagle and swastika shield shaped quillon and deluxe oak leaf backstrap. Overall in fabulous condition. The German Army (German: Heer, was the land forces component of the Wehrmacht, the German armed forces, from 1935 to 1945. The Wehrmacht also included the Kriegsmarine (Navy) and the Luftwaffe (Air Force). During World War II, a total of about 15 million soldiers served in the German Army, of whom about seven million became casualties. Separate from the army, the Waffen-SS (Armed SS) was a multi-ethnic and multi-national military force of the Third Reich. Growing from three regiments to over 38 divisions during World War II, it served alongside the army but was never formally part of it. Only 17 months after Hitler announced publicly the rearmament program, the Army reached its projected goal of 36 divisions. During the autumn of 1937, two more corps were formed. In 1938, four additional corps were formed with the inclusion of the five divisions of the Austrian Army after the Anschluss in March. During the period of its expansion by Adolf Hitler, the German Army continued to develop concepts pioneered during World War I, combining ground (Heer) and air (Luftwaffe) assets into combined arms teams. Coupled with operational and tactical methods such as encirclements and the "battle of annihilation", the German military managed quick victories in the two initial years of World War II, prompting the use of the word Blitzkrieg (literally lightning war, meaning lightning-fast war) for the techniques used. The German Army entered the war with a majority of its infantry formations relying on the horse for transportation. The infantry remained foot soldiers throughout the war; artillery also remained primarily horse-drawn. The motorized formations received much attention in the world press in the opening years of the war, and were cited as the main reason for the success of the German invasions of Poland (September 1939), Norway and Denmark (April 1940), Belgium, France and Netherlands (May 1940), Yugoslavia (April 1941) and the early campaigns in the Soviet Union (June 1941). However their motorized and tank formations accounted for only 20% of the Heer's capacity at their peak strength. The maker of this fine sword had a most interesting history and somewhat reflective of the whole fate of Germany and it persecuted people during this era. Alexander Coppel was the youngest son of Solingen entrepreneur Gustav Coppel . After finishing his studies, he graduated and joined the family business Alexander Coppel, producing steel products and edged weapons, and in a Hildener produced steel pipes. Like his parents Coppel was active in his community and social aspects of Solingen, and curator of the "Coppelstifts", a foundation with infant home and recreation centre for adults, which was launched in 1912 by his family. On the occasion of the 100th anniversary of its founding, the company donated, from Alexander Coppel in 1921, two million marks for social purposes. However tragically, after the German transfer of power to the Nazis in 1933, the Jewish family Coppel was harassed and persecuted by the Nazis. Alexander Coppels sister in law, Sophie (1875-1951) emigrated in 1934, with her son Heinz and his family, to Switzerland. In 1936 the company was assimilated by Nazi control. On March 1, the Hildener works, was merged with another company, and the Solingen branch was acquired by "Aryan" shareholders in April.
An Historical Russian Revolutionary Era Poster Original poster with interesting subject matter of the early Revolutionaries. This is one of a collection of Russian USSR posters we have acquired from the estate of an ex British Glider Pilot of WW2. This poster is folded and in condition as seen in the photos. Undated 34 inches x 22.5 inches. This poster is a real and used item, not just for show, would look super nicely framed
An Honest WW1 Military Kukri With Frog Mounted Scabbard Leather covered wooden scabbard, but, the leather covering has split and seperated on both edges and has areas of small losses. Carved buffalo horn handle with two tang rivets. Ovoid brass pommel cap. A little battle weary, but an absolutely iconic piece of the weaponry from the noble Gurkhas that fought for King and Empire in WW1. The Kukri is the renown and famous weapon of the Nepalese Gurkha. Probably the most respected and feared warriors in the world, the Gurkhas of Nepal have fought in the Gurkha regiments of the British Army for around two centuries. With a degree of loyalty and dedication that is legendary, there is no greater soldier to be at one's side when in battle than the noble Gurkha. With a Kukri in his hand and the battle cry called, "Ayo Gorkhali!" ["the Gurkhas are coming!"], no foe's head was safe on his shoulders. Battle hardened German Infantry in WW1, or WW2 Japanese Shock Troops, have been known to tremble in their boots at the knowledge that they would be facing the Gurkhas in battle. Some of the most amazing feats of heroism have resulted in the most revered medal, the British Victoria Cross [ the world's greatest and most difficult to qualify for gallantry medal] being awarded to Ghurkas. The blade shape descended from the classic Greek sword of Kopis, which is about 2500 years old. Some say it originated from a form of knife first used by the Mallas who came to power in Nepal in the 13th Century. There are some Khukuris displaying on the walls of National Museum at Chhauni in Kathmandu which are 500 years old or even older, among them, one that once belonged to Drabya Shah, the founder king of the kingdom of Gorkha, in 1627 AD. But, some say that the Khukuri's history is possibly centuries older this. It is suggested that the Khukuri was first used by Kiratis who came to power in Nepal before Lichchhavi age, in about the 7th Century. In the hands of an experienced wielder Khukuri or Kukri is about as formidable a weapon as can be conceived. Like all really good weapons, Khukuri's or Kukri's efficiency depends much more upon skill than the strength of the wielder. And thus so that it happens, that a diminutive Gurkha, a mere boy in regards to his stature, could easily cut to pieces a gigantic adversary, who simply does not understand the little Gurkha's mode of attack and fearsome skill. The Gurkha generally strikes upwards with his Kukri, possibly in order to avoid wounding himself should his blow fail, and possibly because an upward cut is just the one that can be least guarded against however strong his opponent. For sale to over 18s only.
An Imperial German 'Butcher' Bayonet WW1 Dated 1915 Manufactured by Simson & Co. Suhl. With traditional 'butcher' blade, date stamped 1915. Designed to fit the Mauser Gew 98 rifle. The Seitengewehr 98/05 was introduced into the the Prussian army in late 1905, as a replacement for the 98/02 for engineers and pioneer troops, as the 98/02 was deemed to long and heavy for it's intended purpose. Initial production was in two versions, the first plain backed, and the second with 29 double teeth. The scabbard was leather with steel throat and chape mounts, later changed to all steel that was better for trench warfare combat. The bayonet as typical of German blades did not have more than a vestigial muzzle ring, relying on the length of the hilt mounting to fix the blade to its rifle. The plain back version was identified as the S98/05 or S98/05 o.S. (ohne Säge - without saw) and the saw back as the S98/05 S or m.S. (mit Säge - with saw). The overall condition is good, with wooden grips, and denting to principally one side of the scabbard. Likely defensive dents due to trench combat. Overall 20.5 inches long, blade length 14.5 inches. No scabbard
An Imperial German Print Of A German Infantryman, Landsturmann Lantz Landwehr Infantry Regt. Nr.123 Ravensburg A personal portrait photo of a German WW1 rifleman that has been onlaid onto the patented print, of three armed men, ostensibly from his regiment. Infantry in a wooded scene, with a Zeppelin in the background and his name inscribed below. They were unique patented items that were created for the family members of the soldier for posterity by a photographic studio A Wolf of Ulm. 330mm x 450mm. Sold small mounted and unframed. Would look stunning nicely reframed
An Imperial German Silver Plated Goblet Honouring Otto von Bismarck Bearing the motto "We German's Fear God, But No One Else In The World" With portrait busts of Otto von Bismarck and his last home of Friedrichsruh. Maker marked at the base F & N. M. Otto Eduard Leopold, Prince of Bismarck, Duke of Lauenburg (1 April 1815 – 30 July 1898), known as Otto von Bismarck, was a conservative Prussian statesman who dominated German and European affairs from the 1860s until 1890. In the 1860s he engineered a series of wars that unified the German states, significantly and deliberately excluding Austria, into a powerful German Empire under Prussian leadership. With that accomplished by 1871 he skillfully used balance of power diplomacy to preserve German hegemony in a Europe which, despite many disputes and war scares, remained at peace. For historian Eric Hobsbawm, it was Bismarck who "remained undisputed world champion at the game of multilateral diplomatic chess for almost twenty years after 1871, [and] devoted himself exclusively, and successfully, to maintaining peace between the powers." After the victory over France and the establishment, in 1871, of the German Empire, Otto von Bismarck received the Sachsenwald (Saxon forest) as a present from Emperor William I. Bismarck had a manor house built on the site of an inn, which Frederick Charles Augustus, sovereign count of Lippe-Biesterfeld, had originally founded as his hunting lodge in 1763, named after him Friedrichsruh (Frederick's rest). The manor house is positioned in the forest, directly beside the Hamburg-Berlin railway line, and Bismarck retained the name of Friedrichsruh. Some of his descendants still live there. 3.25 inches x 4.25 inches
An Imperial German WW1 Bavarian Pickelhaub Helmet Plate Solder repair to lugs one unsuccessful. On a point of interest this is the kind of helmet plate worn on the WW1 infantry pickelhaube of Adolf Hitler. Could this be his?, frankly it is most unlikely, but, in the realms of possibility, it is, in theory, possible. Photo in the gallery of Herr Hitler wearing his Bavarian pickelhaube with it's comouflage cover. World War One (1914-1918)--Adolf Hitler, though born an Austrian national, joined the German army upon the outbreak of war in 1914. He had moved to the southern German region of Bavaria in 1913, and joined a Bavarian military unit. Hitler served in the German Army on the Western Front in Belgium and France. He later served as a regimental runner in the 16th Bavarian Reserve Regiment, and was twice decorated for bravery. Hitler received the relatively common Iron Cross, Second Class, in 1914 and Iron Cross, First Class, in 1918. In 1916, Hitler was wounded in the groin area/ left thigh area during the Battle of the Somme, and returned to the front in March 1917. On October 15, 1918, Hitler was admitted to a field hospital, temporarily blinded by a mustard gas attack. Hitler was still in hospital when Germany surrendered to the Allies on November 11, 1918. At the beginning of World War I, the Bavarian Army had an effective strength of 87,214 men including 4,089 officers, physicians, veterinarians and officials; and 83,125 NCOs and other ranks, plus 16,918 horses. With the beginning of mobilisation on 1 August 1914, the supreme command of the Bavarian field army passed from the 4th Army Inspectorate to the German Emperor. Units in Bavaria remained under the command of the Bavarian War Ministry. The Bavarian Army — consisting of the three Bavarian Army Corps, the Bavarian Cavalry Division — was joined by some additional Prussian units and transported to the Western Front as the German 6th Army under the command of Crown Prince Rupprecht. The Bavarian army fought at the Battle of the Frontiers, the last time that it fought together as a single unit: the exclusive Bavarian command of Bavarian forces began to be diluted from the German Army reorganisations in Autumn 1914 onwards. Rupprecht held command for the duration of the war and was promoted to Field Marshal in 1916 largely on account of his outstanding ability; however, after Frontiers, the units under his command came largely from outside Bavaria. Although the German Empire fell in the German Revolution of 1918–19, and King Ludwig III was forced to abdicate, Bavaria retained its military sovereignty. However, the rise of the Bavarian Soviet Republic and the confusion surrounding its overthrow and the defeat of its "Red Army" persuaded the drafters of the Bamberg Constitution of 1919 to relinquish military sovereignty to the Weimar Republic. At any rate, the regular Bavarian troops had been demobilised after the war to the extent that most of the fighting against the Red Army was done by Freikorps units and other German troops from outside Bavaria. During World War I, around 200,000 members of the Royal Bavarian Army were killed.
An Imperial German WW1 Officer's Camo Trench Cover For A Pickelhaube. The Uberzug. The officer or private purchase type with card mounting instead of hooks. On 28 January 1897 Regimental numbers were introduced which were sewn in red onto the front of the Überzug. Initially, only infantry wore the Regimental numbers, but this was extended to all arms that wore a Pickelhaube on 15 August 1914. On 15 Aug 1914 it was directed that the colour of the letters/numbers were to be changed from red to dark green. As early as in 1844, the poet Heinrich Heine was mocking at the Pickelhaube as a reactionist symbol and, besides, an unapt headgear. He cautions that the spike could easily "draw modern lightnings down on your romantic head". The poem is part of his political satire on the contemporary monarchy, national chauvinism and militarism entitled: Germany. A Winter's Tale. The officers version such as this bore no numbers at all. Rim stamped DRP, for Deutsches Reich Patent
An Important and Scarce Silver Sudan Ordnance Corps Cap Badge WW2 A rare officer's badge used in the Libyan dessert campaign in WW2, and detachments of Sudan Ordnance Corps, were part of the Sudan Defence Force. The badge is super and shows 70 odd years of original age patina. The SDF along with SOC played an active role during the Western Desert Campaign along the Sudanese border with ASI in North Africa. The SDF was used to supply the Free French and then the Long Range Desert Group (LRDG) garrisons of the former Italian Fort Taj at the Kufra oasis in southeastern Libya. In March 1941, French and LRDG forces had wrested control of the fort from the Italians during the Battle of Kufra. SDF convoys of 3-ton trucks had to make a round trip of about 1,300 miles to keep the garrisons at Kufra supplied with petrol, food, ordnance, and other vital supplies. The overall scarcity of petrol meant that LRDG patrols could do little more than guard Kufra against attacks from the north. They were unable to raid northwards from Kufra. In February 1941, the situation was somewhat improved when twenty 10-ton trucks were added to the convoys. Ultimately the SDF took over the garrison duties at the oasis from the LRDG. The SDF provided the garrison for Jalo Oasis. British Military Intelligence in Cairo worked very closely with the SDF and used them in numerous operations during the North African campaign in World War II. In 1942 on instructions from London, British Military Intelligence, Cairo and elements of the Sudan Defence Force were involved with countering Operation Salaam, the infiltration of German Brandenburger commandos into Egypt. Together with British intelligence agents, members of the SDF were ordered to intercept and capture the German intelligence (Abwehr) commandos and their Hungarian guide, desert explorer László Almásy. Even after the Tunisian Campaign had ended in Allied victory, SDF patrols were busy thwarting German efforts to land agents behind the lines. The Germans continued attempts to make contact with Arab rebels. On 15 May 1943, a four-engine aircraft with German markings attempted to land at El Mukaram only to be engaged and shot up by a SDF patrol. The aircraft was able to take off and make good its escape, but it did so with casualties and flying on two engines. By the end of the war, the SDF was an experienced military force with about 70 Sudanese officers, almost all of them Muslim northerners. Gradually Sudanese officers were appointed to replace British officers in the years that preceded independence.
An Interesting German WW2 'Field of Combat' Made Fighting Knife Created from a regular German WW2 K98 bayonet. We show a regular K98 bayonet alongside in the photo gallery to illustrate how much it has been changed. Strangely, unlike the British Army and its FS knife, and the American and its M-3 combat knife, the German armed forces did not have a regular service issue close combat fighting knife. Some luftwaffe troops used the WW1 style boot knife, or many used their old WW1 trench knives
An Interesting Italian WW2 Close Combat Knife With German and British Parts Of a Nembo unit paratrooper attached to the Raggruppamento Motorizzato. A shortened Carcano rifle bayonet, mounted in a German WW2 bayonet frog, which has itself been mounted with a British army WW2 sharpshooters sniper's badge, of crossed .303 Enfield rifles. After the allied invasion of Sicily in 1943 the Italian former axis allies of Hitler went over to the allied cause and arrested General Mussolini. Italian troops then fought alongside the allies against the German forces in Italy. This is the origin root of this fighting knife. A mixture of Italian, German and British armed forces in one close combat knife. It offers up a most intriguing piece WW2 history. Soldiers of the Raggruppamento Motorizzato, the first Italian unit organized to fight on the side of the allies in They are armed with the Carcano carbine. The blade is maker marked as is the German frog. … The First Motorized Grouping was a combat unit of the Italian Royal Army , formed at the level of brigade to be framed in the Italian Cobelligerante Army . Created in San Pietro Vernotico in the province of Brindisi in full World War II , based on the Infantry Command of the Legnano Division on September 26, 1943 to participate in the Italian Campaign alongside the Allies , the Group was commanded by General Vincenzo Dapino , to whom the General Umberto Utili succeeded, under which he was enlarged and transformed into the Italian Liberation Corps . The First Motorized Grouping was the first great military unit of the Italian Cobblestone Army to take part in the operations of the Italian Campaign alongside allied forces following the events following the proclamation of the armistice of September 8, 1943 . The flag of war was that of the Legnano division. The symbol of the department was the beaded shield of blue. On November 29, 1943 US commanding General Geoffrey Keyes communicated to Dapino the intention to use the unit in an offensive action at Mount Lungo. On December 3, the Group was operationally aggregated to the 36th Texas Division and was initially charged with participating in the break-in of the Bernhardt Line in the Caserta sector. Here, in Montelungo , the department had the baptism of fire, with bloody losses and above all a large number of missing. Apparently the paras would have had the M39 fighting knife, but in war circumstances regulations and rules were practically non existent especially due to the shortage of arms that the allied Italians suffered.
An Interesting Italian WW2 Epaulette Shoulder Board Italian campaign souvenirs of WW2 are very scarce these days. In very good condition just small mothing to rear red cloth. Gilt bullion excellent.
An Interesting Ladies Medal & Badges of a WW2 'Special Services' Operative From family repute awarded and worn by a female SOE agent of WW2. Her defence medal, her enamel badge of the WHD [Women's Home Defence] depicting a rifle and semi auto pistol, and her membership badge of the [London] Fox Rifle Club. The scarce WW2 WHD enamel badge was issued to members of the Women’s Home Defence corps in Britain. The WHD was founded in June 1940 by Dr. Edith Clara Summerskill (1901–1980) and it’s aim was to have a role for women in armed defence alongside the Home Guard. Edith was a Labour Party MP since 1938 who lobbied both parliament and the War Office for official recognition of the WHD. The War Office refused to recognise the WHD, put forward various arguments against them and technically considered the organisation illegal. It was also seen to be socially unacceptable for women to train as combatants and was claimed that the existence of the WHD competes for scarce resources in competition with other Home Front organisations. It was considered that the official roles of women during wartime were to carry out jobs and support duties that would facilitate the release of men for active combat. However, there were occasions when women of the WHD did train and drill alongside some Home Guard units, but at the discretion of those in command. Just the same, any uniforms or insignia worn by members of the WHD and training with arms were entirely unofficial and off-the-record. Despite resistance from the authorities, by December of 1942 there were some 250 units of the WHD working in support of the Home Guard. The issue could no longer be ignored and with continued lobbying, increasing support from MP’s, gains were made. In April 1943 the War Office reluctantly recognised and granted the WHD limited responsibility within the Home Guard but in a non-combatant and supportive role. The Women’s Home Guard Auxiliaries (WHGA) as they were now called were not issued with uniforms but identified only by their badge and sometimes an armband. Now for the interesting part, although there was official reluctance for women to be expected to fight and be armed, as it would deflect arms from male combatants, many women were indeed arms trained, and indeed many with semi-auto pistol training that Home Guard men were often not given. British Rifle Clubs were the training ground for potential snipers and men with such training were recruited into the 'Auxiliaries' . Men given top secret instruction in guerrilla warfare training that were expected to go off radar, if Britain was invaded, and to become resistance operatives based in hidden underground bunkers around the English countryside. With top secret orders to destroy bridges, communication networks and the railway infrastructure in order to confound the German occupation forces. They were also trained to sniper-kill German soldiers, and English women who were fraternising with the enemy, and their very first top secret instruction, upon official confirmation of the German invasion, was to assassinate the county's Chief Constable. As he, above all others, would be able to give his German interrogators more secret information than any other, and he would likely be the very first to be arrested by the German occupiers due to the mass of secret information he would be party to. Needless to say the Chief Constables were never actually informed of this likely fate if the invasion occurred. Given such forewarning may well have influenced acceptance of the post due to offered or earned promotion. Due to the request of the family we do not have any information, regarding the medal and badges, as to the ladies family name, or any of her specific service history that we are able to pass on to the new owner. In the gallery we show a photograph of a dear friend of the partners, [Mark and David's] late mother, Anita Vulliamy, daughter in law of Major-General C.H.H. Vulliamy. She was a simply a remarkable lady, who, during the war, was captured by the Gestapo, horrifyingly tortured, but managed to survive captivity. During her months in the Gestapo prison she crocheted a holy cross, made of prison cell straw bedding. After the war, her cross was exhibited alongside a similar piece, a straw doll, made by British SOE heroine Odette Churchill at a Charity event in London in 1956 and they raised £875 for the Polio Fund in one week. A huge sum in those days.
An Interesting Military Leather Trench Coat WW2 In good brown hide, with typical military blanket cloth liner. Double breasted. This is fairly unknown territory to us, so we know not if it is German or British etc. Zig zag stitched collar reinforcement with detachable collar strap. Single front pocket. No interior labels or markings. Good WW2 leather military or maritime coats are now most collectable be they either Allied or Axis.
An Interesting Russian Cold War Era Poster Original poster with interesting subject matter of things not to do??. This is one of a collection of Russian USSR posters we have acquired from the estate of an ex British Glider Pilot of WW2. This poster is folded and in condition as seen in the photos.Dated 1987 37.5 inches x 25 inches. This poster is a real and used item, not just for show, would look super nicely framed
An Intriguing Original Print of an Imperial German Rifleman in WW1 A personal portrait photo of a German WW1 rifleman that has been onlaid onto the patented print, of three armed men, ostensibly from his regiment, the 2nd Jager Battalion Aschaffenberg, Jager [rifleman] Hauck of the Bavarian Infantry in a wooded scene, and his name inscribed below. They were unique patented items that were created for the family members of the soldier for posterity. Photographic studio, A.Wolf of Ulm. 420mm x 525mm. Mounted and unframed. Would look stunning nicely reframed
An NSFK German Flight of 1938 Souvenir Ashtray Of Aeronautical Alloy The Deutschlandflug 1938 [German Flight] was the largest international aerospace event in the world. The German flight in 1937 was the first large-scale aviation event after the armament of the Wehrmacht and was organized by the National Socialist Air Corps (NSFK). The airmen did not participate individually, but in triple associations, of which 62 were at the start; 61 of these also reached the goal. The associations did not collectively share a previously defined route, but were able to choose their flight route themselves to fly more than 70 established destinations. On four days of the contest, the three groups broke up and the planes flew individually. [8th] The German Sportflieger stated: "No human life in this competition is to be deplored, which put the highest demands on machines and crew, which also had still Orter tasks and skill tests (target dropping and obstacle landings) after six exhausting flight days" ] On the German flights of 1934, 1935, and 1937, only three- to seven-aircraft units participated. In 1937, private pilots also launched their own aircraft. The 1938 German Flight was the largest international aerospace event in the world, with some 400 aircraft taking off and spending a total of around 2,500,000 kilometers on eight competitions. In this competition, both the route and the airfields were selected. Due to the inexperience of many pilots as well as bad weather, several serious accidents occurred. The German flight planned for 1939 no longer came to the rescue. The German flight is a competition for aircraft pilots , which was carried out for the first time from 11 June to 10 July 1911. On the following flights to Germany, pilots took part, whose names should be included in the history of aviation. Names such as Ernst Udet or Elly Beinhorn are featured on the lists. In the time of National Socialism the flights became gigantic performance with up to 400 participating aircraft. The N.S.F.K. (National Socialist Flying Corps) was created in January of 1932, to promote interest in aviation throughout Germany. It was a male dominated association, although females were not discouraged from participating in events. The NSFK was very closely associated with the Hitler Youth (HJ) organization.
An Officer's Cap Badge of the Northhamptonshire Regt.Probably WW2 In silver metal and gilt. With battle honour scrolls of Gibralter and Talavera. Silver coloured metal, not hallmarked English silver.
An Old WW1 Grenadier Guards Belt Buckle. Heavily polished and worn for over 100 years. The Grenadier Guards is an infantry regiment of the British Army. It is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. It is not, however, the most senior regiment of the Army, this position being attributed to The Life Guards. Although The Coldstream Guards were formed before The Grenadier Guards, the regiment is ranked after the Grenadiers in seniority as, having been a regiment of the New Model Army, the Coldstream served the Crown for four fewer years than the Grenadiers (the Grenadiers having formed as a Royalist regiment in exile in 1656 and the Coldstream having sworn allegiance to the Crown upon the Restoration in 1660). The grouping of buttons on the tunic is a common way to distinguish among the regiments of Foot Guards. Grenadier Guards' buttons are equally spaced and embossed with the Royal Cypher reversed and interlaced surrounded by the Royal Garter bearing the royal motto Honi soit qui mal y pense (Evil be to him who evil thinks). Their "Buff Belt" brass clasps also carry the Royal Cypher. Modern Grenadier Guardsmen wear a cap badge of a "grenade fired proper" with seventeen flames. This cap badge has to be cleaned twice a day – once in the morning, and once in the afternoon. A tarnished grenade is severely frowned upon.
An Old, Brass, South African Police Buckle With South African crest and name of force in English and Afrikaans.
An Original Autograph of Admiral of the Fleet Earl Mountbatten of Burma Admiral of the Fleet Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, KG, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCIE, GCVO, DSO, PC, FRS (born Prince Louis of Battenberg; 25 June 1900 – 27 August 1979) Last Viceroy of India. He was a British naval officer and statesman, an uncle of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, and second cousin once removed of Elizabeth II. During the Second World War, he was Supreme Allied Commander, South East Asia Command (1943–46). He was the last Viceroy of India (1947) and the first Governor-General of independent India (1947–48). From 1954 until 1959 he was First Sea Lord, a position that had been held by his father, Prince Louis of Battenberg, some forty years earlier. Thereafter he served as Chief of the Defence Staff until 1965, making him the longest serving professional head of the British Armed Forces to date. During this period Mountbatten also served as Chairman of the NATO Military Committee for a year. In 1979, Mountbatten, his young grandson Nicholas aged 14, 83-year-old 'Dodo', the Dowager Lady Brabourne and a young family friend, 15-year-old Paul Maxwell, were cruelly slaughtered by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) member Thomas McMahon and two others, who had placed a bomb in his fishing boat, Shadow V, in Mullaghmore, County Sligo, Ireland. Nicholas's brother Tim [see photo of both young brothers together] survived but blinded in one eye. For the sergeant's Mess Ball in the Guildhall, City of Portsmouth, 18th May 1973 6.5 inches x 8.75 inches folded.
An Original Cased War Merit Cross With Swords First Class In Original Box Wide pin fixing, Alloy metal in good order, with worn silver frosting. One of the highest German Third Reich awards for war combat service, but not necessarily in the face of the enemy. Just under the Knight's Cross version of the award. With relief Swastika between the cross and swords. A medal for bravery when in military and maritime service but not necessarily when facing the enemy. For example, awarded for rescuing wounded in minefields, rescuing men from sinking ships, bomb disposal, or bravery during aerial bombardment. Curiously the bravery required to achieve this medal could be greater than was required to receive the traditional combat bravery medal, the Iron Cross Ist Class. Both General Karl Wolff, & Friedrich Otto [SS-Oberstgruppenfûhrer] had and wore this form of award, as did SS-Oberstgruppenfûhrer Berger and SS General Karl Gebhardt
An Original Desk Paperknife Made From Duralumin Of Airship USS Akron Made from Duralumin taken from the construction of the airship. USS Akron (ZRS-4) was a helium-filled rigid airship of the U.S. Navy that was destroyed in a thunderstorm off the coast of New Jersey on the morning of 4 April 1933, killing 73 of her 76 crewmen and passengers. This accident was the largest loss of life for any known airship crash. During her accident-prone 18-month term of service, the Akron also served as a flying aircraft carrier for launching and recovering F9C Sparrowhawk fighter planes. With lengths of 785 ft (239 m), 20 ft (6.1 m) shorter than the German commercial airship Hindenburg, Akron and her sister airship the Macon were among the largest flying objects in the world. Although the Hindenburg was longer, she was filled with hydrogen, so the two U.S. airships still hold the world record for helium-filled airships.
An Original Early 20th Century Airship Propeller A Great Conversation Piece Ideal for a gentleman's study or office. A superb piece of aeronautica that also happens to be a stunning piece of art. 12 inches wide 25.5 inches long. Ideal for mounting on a base.
An Original French Bond Poster 1917-18. Subscribe to the National Defence Francais aux invalides dans la narcelle d'un zeppelin face a l'avion de Guynemer et a cote d'un tank souscrivez a l'emprunt de la defense national. A poster of an exhibition at the great French museum Les Invalides. In the square in front of the museum there was exhibited; a narcelle from a shot down Zeppelin, WW1 French ace Guynemer's plane, and a tank. Backed on to linen, from the American Forbes Library.
An Original Group Of Four Medals to An 8th Army 'Desert Rat' Including Africa Star, '39-'45 Star, War Medal and Defence Medal. The Eighth Army first went into action as an Army as part of Operation Crusader, the Allied operation to relieve the besieged city of Tobruk, on 17 November 1941, when it crossed the Egyptian frontier into Libya to attack Erwin Rommel's Panzer Army Africa. On 26 November the Commander-in-Chief Middle East Command, General Sir Claude Auchinleck, replaced Cunningham with Major-General Neil Ritchie, following disagreements between Auchinleck and Cunningham. Despite achieving a number of tactical successes, Rommel was forced to concede Tobruk and was pushed back to El Agheila by the end of 1941. In February 1942 Rommel had regrouped his forces sufficiently to push the over-extended Eighth Army back to the Gazala line, just west of Tobruk. Both sides commenced a period of building their strength to launch new offensives but it was Rommel who took the initiative first, forcing Eighth Army from the Gazala position. Ritchie proved unable to halt Rommel and was replaced when Auchinleck himself took direct command of the army. The Panzer Army Afrika were eventually stopped by Auchinleck at the First Battle of El Alamein. Auchinleck, wishing to pause and regroup the Eighth Army which had expended a lot of its strength in halting Rommel, came under intense political pressure from Winston Churchill to strike back immediately. However, he proved unable to build on his success at Alamein and was replaced as Commander-in-Chief Middle-East in August 1942 by General Harold Alexander and as Eighth Army commander by Lieutenant-General William Gott. Gott was killed in an air crash on his way to take up his command and so Lieutenant-General Bernard Montgomery was appointed in his place. Alexander and Montgomery were able to resist the pressure from Churchill, building the army's strength and adding a pursuit formation, X Corps, to the Army's XIII and XXX Corps. At the beginning of November 1942 the Eighth Army defeated Rommel in the decisive Second Battle of El Alamein, pursuing the defeated Axis army across Libya and reaching the Mareth defensive line on the Tunisian border in February 1943 where it came under the control of 18th Army Group. The Eighth Army outflanked the Mareth defences in March 1943 and after further fighting alongside the British First Army, the other 18th Army Group component which had been campaigning in Tunisia since November 1942, the Axis forces in North Africa surrendered in May 1943.
An Original Police Badge for the Seattle Police , USA From a collection we have just acquired from a now closed small private Police museum.4inches x 4.5 inches
An Original Police Badge for the Slidell, Louisiana Police, USA From a collection we have just acquired from a now closed small private Police museum.3.6 inches x 4.5 inches
An Original Police Badge for the Torrance Police, USA From a collection we have just acquired from a now closed small private Police museum.4.5 inchesx 3.75 inches
An Original Third Reich SS Dagger Belt Mount and Clip Fitting, SS Stamped SS and DRGM RZM UE8 stamped with maker logo AH for Axt & Hauerfabrik Solingen. Good tight clip spring surface with light surface corrosion [could easily be polished]. Good supple leather. An SS dagger meant to be worn by all ranks of the SS was introduced in 1933. This dagger was very similar to the SA style. The construction of the SS dagger consisted of black handles with an SS sigrunen rune symbol insert located just below the pommel. In addition, a small eagle holding a swastika was placed on the centre of the handle. Initially, production of the dagger was not under RZM control. It was not until 1934 that the RZM started overseeing production of the dagger, and production stopped in 1940. The SS dagger was presented to it's owner only at the special 9th of November ceremony when he graduated from SS Anwarter to SS-Mann. They were never issued at any other time. The SS dagger is one of the most desirable daggers to obtain by a collector. In a National Socialist context, the phrase Meine Ehre heißt Treue refers to a declaration by Adolf Hitler following the Stennes Revolt, an incident between the Berlin Sturmabteilung (SA) and the SS. In early April 1931, elements of the SA under Walter Stennes attempted to overthrow the head of the Berlin section of the NSDAP (Nazi Party). As the section chief, Joseph Goebbels, fled with his staff, a handful of SS under Kurt Daluege were beaten trying to repel the SA. After the incident, Hitler wrote a letter of congratulations to Daluege, stating … SS-Mann, deine Ehre heißt Treue! ("Man of the SS, your honour is loyalty"). Soon afterwards, Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler, made the modified version of this sentence the official motto of the organisation. The Schutzstaffel translated to Protection Squadron or defence corps, abbreviated SS—was a major paramilitary organization under Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party (NSDAP). It began in 1923 as a small, permanent guard unit known as the "Saal-Schutz" made up of NSDAP volunteers to provide security for Nazi Party meetings in Munich. Later, in 1925, Heinrich Himmler joined the unit, which had by then been reformed and renamed the "Schutz-Staffel". Under Himmler's leadership (1929–45), it grew from a small paramilitary formation to one of the largest and most powerful organizations in the Third Reich. Hitler's faithful leader of the SA Storm troopers, and until his execution, Himmlers superior and thus leader of Himmler's SS as well. Due to the alleged conspiracy against Hitler by Rohm, that was simply invented by the psychotic Henrich Himmler, leader of the SS. Rohm, alongside his senior General staff, were executed in a classic putsch, in an event known as 'The Night of the Long Knives'. We show three pictures in the gallery,
An Original WW1 Cased Bombing Award, From The Ligue Aeronautique De France. Un-issued condition. Awarded to bomber pilots and airmen for long distance bombing of the German forces in WW1. At the beginning of 1914 the development of aviation in France went through a union of the leading aerospace companies. Once created, in February 1914, under the presidency of General Bailloud, the Aeronautical Association of France after the merger of the General Aviation Association and the National Committee for Military Aviation. It was during this meeting that another association, the Air National League, agreed to turn into the new structure, which then took the name of Ligue Aeronautique De France When war broke out, the League supported the action of military aviation, and in November 1915, decided to reward, particularly bombers, and airmen which it considered the decisive role in the aerial bombing missions it wished develop … To this end, it decided to devote a sum of 30,000 francs to the award for bombers and airmen Thanks to the generosity of several donors, the initial sum was increased to more than 56,000 francs. Together, with this donation, the Executive Committee of the League created, in February 1916, a medallion registered to pay tribute "to pilots, observers and bombers for long distance bombing raids". The League made use of this cased medallion (most often encountered in bronze) created in 1909 by Pierre-Alexandre Morlon, and then personalizing it within the space reserved for this purpose in the centre of the reverse side (see photos that show this example blank before dedication ). The plate was accompanied by a letter, expressing the esteem and admiration from the Aeronautical League of France. The last photo in our gallery shows by example how they were engraved. 5.5 x 4 inches cased. Case hinge leather separated
An Original WW1 Period Watercolour Of LZ37 Otto van der Haegen was a German airship lieutenant, Zeppelin commander and head of the Aeronaut School of Berlin. He perished as commander of the airship LZ 37, on 7th June 1915, after a plane attack by the British pilot Reginald AJ Warneford at Ghent.This was about the first Zeppelin shot down in the First World War The wreck of the airship, which was located on an attack target run over Britain, crashed in the Ghent district of Sint-Amandsberg. In 1915 Zeppelins were first used by Germany for strategic bombing of the United Kingdom and France. LZ 37 was part of a raid with Zeppelin LZ 38 and LZ 39. While returning, she was intercepted in the air by R. A. J. Warneford in his Morane Parasol during its first raid on Calais on 7 June 1915. Warneford dropped six 20 pounds (9.1 kg) Hales bombs on the zeppelin which caught fire and crashed into the convent school of Sint-Amandsberg, next to Ghent, Belgium killing two nuns. The commander of LZ 37 and seven members of the crew were killed. One member crew miraculously survived. It was the first victory of a heavier than air aircraft over a lighter than air dirigible. Flight S/L Warneford was awarded the Victoria Cross for his achievement. Van der Haegen is buried in the former German cemetery in Ghent, where also a monument to the fallen of the airship LZ was built in 1937.
An Original WW2 British Special Constabulary Recruitment Poster Published for HMG by Fosh and Cross Ltd London. A propaganda information and recruitment poster. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale. Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return. When the U-boat commander Günther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss. The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring. Good condition 14.75 inches x 9.75 inches
An Original WW2 British Special Constabulary Recruitment Poster Published for HMG by Fosh and Cross Ltd London. A propaganda information and recruitment poster. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale. Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return. When the U-boat commander Günther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss. The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring. Good condition 14.5 inches x 9.5 inches
An Original WW2 German Ammunition Case A great and highly collectable original piece of WW2 militaria. Fully German marked and stencilled including all original zinc/tin lining. Overall areas of old expired wormholes. 14 inches x 7 inches x 19.25 inches Not suitable for export.
An Original WW2 Propganda Warning Poster 'Watch Your Talk For His Sake' An iconic warning approbation of WW2. A propaganda information warning poster. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale. Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return. When the U-boat commander Günther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss. The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring. 19.75 x 13.5 inches
An Original, Rare, 1930'S Nazi Zeppelin Art Deco Traveling Souvenir. A German Zeppelin model containing a 4 shot glass set Germany, 1930s nickel-plated steel A miniaturised traveling version of the Zeppelin cocktail bar set. Impressed marks on each piece. 1.5 w x 4.5 d x 1.75 h inches. A Zeppelin is a type of rigid airship pioneered by the German Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin in the early 20th century. It was based on designs he had outlined in 1874 and detailed in 1893. His plans were reviewed by committee in 1894 and patented in the United States on 14 March 1899. Given the outstanding success of the Zeppelin design, the term zeppelin in casual use came to refer to all rigid airships. Zeppelins were operated by the Deutsche Luftschiffahrts-AG (DELAG). DELAG, the first commercial airline, served scheduled flights before World War I. After the outbreak of war, the German military made extensive use of Zeppelins as bombers and scouts. The World War I defeat of Germany in 1918 halted the airship business temporarily. But under the guidance of Hugo Eckener, the deceased Count's successor, civilian zeppelins became popular in the 1920s. Their heyday was during the 1930s when the airships LZ 127 Graf Zeppelin and LZ 129 Hindenburg operated regular transatlantic flights from Germany to North America and Brazil. The Art Deco spire of the Empire State Building was originally if impractically designed to serve as a dirigible terminal for Zeppelins and other airships to dock. It was in this 1930's period that souvenirs and representations of the Zeppelin were made, especially in high society art curiosa, in the highly in vogue art deco style. This is one of those now rare and highly desireable peices, a portable item both functional and aesthetically attractive. The Hindenburg disaster in 1937, along with political and economic issues, hastened the demise of the Zeppelin. Small denting in the cover and body
An Original, Rare, German, C96 'Broomhandle' Mauser Shoulder Stock Holster Bearing the original Mauser trade maker logo stamp. Although copied for many decades this is a very rare, completely original, antique, example although with areas of old field repairs. In fact it is reasonably estimated that the original wooden box holster/stock is now far rarer than the gun itself today. The Mauser C96 is a semi-automatic pistol that was originally produced by German arms manufacturer Mauser from 1896 to 1937. The distinctive characteristics of the C96 are the integral box magazine in front of the trigger, the long barrel, the wooden shoulder stock which gives it the stability of a short-barreled rifle and doubles as a holster or carrying case, and a unique grip shaped like the handle of a broom. The grip earned the gun the nickname "Broomhandle" in the English-speaking world because of its round wooden handle, in the old Chinese Empire it was called the box cannon because of its rectangular internal magazine and the fact it could be holstered in its wooden box-like detachable stock. With its long barrel and high-velocity cartridge, the Mauser C96 had superior range and better penetration than most other pistols; the 7.63×25mm Mauser cartridge was the highest velocity commercially manufactured pistol cartridge until the advent of the .357 Magnum cartridge in 1935. The Mauser C96 pistol was extremely popular with British officers at the time and many purchased it privately. Mauser supplied the C96 to Westley Richards in the UK for resale. By the onset of World War I, the C96's popularity with the British military had waned. As a military sidearm, the pistols saw service in various colonial wars, as well as World War I, The Easter Rising, the Estonian War of Independence, the Spanish Civil War, the Chinese Civil War and World War II. The C96 also became a staple of Bolshevik Commissars and various warlords and gang leaders in the Russian Civil War, known simply as "the Mauser". Photo in the gallery of a "Württembergisches kanonier" with a Mauser C96 semi-automatic pistol
An Original, Very Rare, US 1st Special Service Force Case V-42 Combat Knife An original 'Black Devils' WW2 close combat knife. In American collecting terms, like the British Ist Pattern FS Knife, the Case V-42 Combat knife is the Holy Grail of knife collecting. We cannot over emphasise how rare an original example V-42 is. Firstly, the downside, it has no scabbard, the steel in part has old corrosion, the blade is worn down in part, the thumb hold grooving is worn off within the thumb recess, and there are obvious signs of considerable combat use [however, personally I like that very much M.H.]. But, on the upside, the leather binding is orginal, with a strengthing band in the mid section, the skull crusher pommel is nice and pointed as made, and, it is real,100% original, as rare as hen's teeth, and finally, it is not 10,000 Dollars plus, thus much more affordable. A good example with history, sold three years ago, in an auction in the US, for over 10,000 dollars US, yet today we believe that dagger could fetch closer to 15,000, as the market for original and rare early fighting knives has done nothing but rocket in these past couple of years. We have not seen another, 100% original example, sell on the open market since that fine one. That V-42 knife was issued to Staff Sergeant Arthur E. Duebner, 2nd Regiment, 1st Special Service Force. Sergeant Duebner carried the V-42 as a member of the 1st Special Service Force during the invasion of Kiska, Aleutian Islands in 1943, in the battles of Mt. LaDifnesa and Anzio in Italy and the amphibious landing in Southern France in 1944. When the 1st Special Service Force was disbanded in December 1944, S/SGT Duebner volunteered for duty with the 504th Airborne Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division. As a member of the 504th Infantry S/SGT Duebner fought in the battle of the Bulge and the Rhineland and Central European campaigns. Sergeant Duebner was wounded in action three times; twice in Italy and once in the Ardennes. The Devil's Brigade (also called The Black Devils and The Black Devils' Brigade and Freddie's Freighters, officially the 1st Special Service Force), was an elite, joint World War II American-Canadian commando unit organized in 1942 and trained at Fort William Henry Harrison near Helena, Montana in the United States. The brigade fought in the Aleutian Islands, Italy, and southern France before being disbanded in December 1944. The modern American and Canadian special operations forces trace their heritage to this unit. Scientist Geoffrey Pyke, of the British Combined Operations Command, envisioned the creation of a small, élite military force capable of fighting behind enemy lines in winter conditions. This would have been a commando unit that could be landed, by sea or air, into occupied Norway, Romania, and the Italian Alps on sabotage missions against hydroelectric plants and oil fields. In Norway, the chief industrial threat was the creation of the heavy water used in the German atomic weapon research at Rjukan. Furthermore, attacks on Norwegian power stations, which supplied the country with 49% of its power, might drive the Axis powers out of the country and give the Allies a direct link to Russia. In Romania, there were the strategically important Ploesti oil fields that met one quarter of the Germans' consumption, and Italian hydroelectric plants powered most of south German industry. Pyke requested that a tracked vehicle be developed especially for the unit, capable of carrying men and their equipment at high speed across snow-covered terrain. In March 1942 Pyke proposed an idea, which he had named Project Plough, to Lord Louis Mountbatten, Chief of Combined Operations Headquarters (COHQ) that Allied commandos be parachuted into the Norwegian mountains to establish a base on the Jostedalsbreen, a large glacier plateau, for guerrilla actions against the German army of occupation. These troops would be equipped with Pyke's proposed snow vehicle. Pyke persuaded Mountbatten that such a force would be invulnerable in its glacier strongholds and would tie down large numbers of German troops trying to dislodge it. However, given the demands upon both Combined Operations and British industry, it was decided to offer it instead to the United States at the Chequers Conference of March 1942. General George Marshall, Chief of Staff of the United States Army, accepted the suggestion for Project Plough. In April 1942, since no suitable vehicle existed, the U.S. government asked automobile manufacturers to look into such a design. Studebaker subsequently created the T-15 cargo carrier, which later became the M29 Weasel. In May 1942, the concept papers for Plough were scrutinized by Lieutenant Colonel Robert T. Frederick, a young officer in the Operations Division of the U.S. General Staff. Frederick predicted Plough would be a military fiasco on the following grounds. Firstly, he argued that Plough endeavored to achieve unrealistic objectives with the amount of troops that the plan called for. Similarly, he argued that the small, elite division would be outnumbered and overtaken in any defensive attempts to hold an area once it was captured. Furthermore, Frederick concluded that there was no concrete way to evacuate the troops after a mission. Finally, the plan had called for troops to be dropped by airplane to their targets, which Frederick said was impossible at the moment, as there were no planes to fly the men into Norway. Ultimately, he concluded that a small squad of elite men would not do enough damage to justify the risk of putting them into battle and instead proposed a series of strategic bombings to achieve the plan's objectives. Plough went ahead as proposed. General Marshall and General Eisenhower had already agreed to the operation with the British High Command and were unwilling to compromise a chance to open an American front in Europe. It was believed that Plough offered the possibility of defeating the Germans, and the Americans wanted allied efforts to shift to the Pacific Theatre. The sooner the Germans were defeated, it was argued, the sooner this would become a reality. The first officer picked to lead the unit, Lieutenant Colonel Howard R. Johnson, was kicked off the project for not getting along with Pyke and arguing with Mountbatten and Eisenhower about the feasibility of the plan. His replacement was suggested by Mountbatten and assigned by Eisenhower: LTC Frederick himself. He was given the task of creating a fighting unit for Project Plough and was promoted to colonel to command it. By July 1942 Frederick had eased Pyke out of the picture. Johnson went on to form and command the 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment. Colonel Frederick enjoyed a very high priority in obtaining equipment and training areas. Originally, due to its winter warfare mission, it had been intended that the unit should be equally made up of American, Canadian, and Norwegian troops. However, a lack of suitable Norwegians saw this changed to half American and half Canadian. In July 1942, the Canadian Minister of National Defence, James Ralston, approved the assignment of 697 officers and enlisted men for the project under the initial disguise that they were forming the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion (1CPB). Shortly after, due to the decision to raise a parachute school in Canada under the 1CPB designation, the Canadian volunteers served under the unofficial designation of 2nd Canadian Parachute Battalion. This was in name only; the 2CPB did not legally exist. (The Canadians would not be legally made into a unit of the Canadian Army until April–May 1943 under the official designation, 1st Canadian Special Service Battalion.) They would be paid by the Canadian government but be supplied with uniforms, equipment, food, shelter and travel expenses by the U.S., but nevertheless remained subject to their own army's code of discipline. It was agreed that a Canadian would serve as second in command of the Force and that half of the officers and one third of the enlisted men would be Canadian. However, after Lieutenant Colonel McQueen (the Canadian serving as second in command) broke his leg during parachute training, the highest ranking Canadian in the Force was Lieutenant Colonel Don Williamson who commanded the 2nd Regiment. The U.S. volunteers for the force consisted initially of officers from Fort Belvoir and Benning. Letters of recruitment were posted to all army units in the Southwest and on the Pacific coast. The letters called for single men, aged 21–35 with three or more years of grammar school. Occupations preferred: Rangers, lumberjacks, northwoodsmen, hunters, prospectors, explorers and game wardens. Inspection teams also scoured the western camps for ideal candidates. Those chosen, owing to the secrecy of the mission, were often told that they had been selected to undergo training for a parachute unit. Indeed the unit was so secretive, that many soldiers did not know where they were when they arrived in Helena for training, as the windows of the trains carrying the troops were painted black. The combat force was to be made up of three brigades. Each brigade was led by a lieutenant colonel and thirty-two officers and boasted a force of 385 men. The regiments were divided into two battalions with three companies in each battalion and three platoons in each company. The platoon was then broken up into two sections. Frederick was greatly admired by the soldiers in the First Special Service Force for his willingness to fight alongside the men in battle. On the beachhead in Anzio, for example, a nighttime Force patrol walked into a German minefield and was pinned down by machine gun fire. General Frederick ran into battle and assisted the litter bearers in clearing the wounded Force members.Following the Ottawa Conference, General Eisenhower was moved to London to plan the D-Day Invasion. Command of the European Theater was given to British General Henry Maitland Wilson. General Harold Alexander, leader of the 15th Group, had formulated the plan to land allied troops at Anzio in order to outflank German positions in the area. German Field Marshal Albert Kesselring commanded the four German divisions at Anzio, which included the Herman Goering Division and the 35th Panzer Grenadier Regiment of the 16th SS Panzergrenadier Division Reichsführer-SS Division. Combined German and Italian strength at Anzio was an estimated 70 000 men. The Special Force brigade was withdrawn from the mountains in January and on 1 February was landed at the beachhead created by Operation Shingle at Anzio, south of Rome, replacing the 1st and 3rd Ranger Battalions, which had suffered heavy losses at the Battle of Cisterna. Their task was to hold and raid from the right-hand flank of the beachhead marked by the Mussolini Canal/Pontine Marshes. 1st Regiment was positioned on the Force's right front, which comprised one-third of the entire line, while the 3rd Regiment guarded the remaining two-thirds of the line. 2nd Regiment, which had been reduced to three companies following the attacks on La Difensa, Sammucio and Majo, were tasked with running night patrols into Axis territory. Shortly after the SSF took over the Mussolini Canal sector, German units pulled back up to 0.5 miles (0.80 km) to avoid their aggressive patrols. The Force's constant night raids forced Kesselring to fortify the German positions in their area with more men than he had originally planned. Reconnaissance missions performed by the Devil's often went as deep as 1,500 feet (460 m) behind enemy lines. German prisoners were often surprised at how few men the Force actually contained. A captured German Lieutenant admitted to being under the assumption that the Force was a division. Indeed, General Frederick ordered several trucks to move around the forces area in order to give the enemy the impression that the Force comprised more men than it actually did. An order was found on another prisoner that stated that the Germans in Anzio would be "fighting an elite Canadian-American Force. They are treacherous, unmerciful and clever. You cannot afford to relax. The first soldier or group of soldiers capturing one of these men will be given a 10 day furlough.". It was at Anzio that the Germans dubbed the 1st Special Service Force the "Devil's Brigade." They were referred to as "black" devils because the brigade's members smeared their faces with black boot polish for their covert operations in the dark of the night. During Anzio, the 1st SSF fought for 99 days without relief. It was also at Anzio that the 1st SSF used their trademark stickers; during night patrols soldiers would carry stickers depicting the unit patch and a slogan written in German: "Das dicke Ende kommt noch," said to translate to "The Worst is yet to Come", placing these stickers on German corpses and fortifications. Canadian and American members of the Special Force who lost their lives are buried near the beach in the Commonwealth Anzio War Cemetery and the American Cemetery in Nettuno, just east of Anzio. The V-42 Dagger story; Based on the Fairbairn–Sykes commando knife designed by William E. Fairbairn and Eric A. Sykes, the Fighting Commando Knife, Type V-42 used a narrow-profile, double-edged stiletto blade made of high carbon steel. The V-42 was primarily designed by officers of the FSSF, including its commanding officer, Lt. Colonel Robert T. Frederick, who desired a combat knife that could be used to silently eliminate enemy soldiers as well as perform the role of a close-quarters combat knife. The blade's design has been attributed to Col. Frederick, who had encountered the Fairbairn–Sykes commando knife while on duty in England. While the V-42 had a double-edged blade like that of the Fairbairn–Sykes knife, it had a narrower stiletto blade profile designed to optimize penetration when used for thrusting, and the V-42 could easily penetrate a G.I. steel helmet and liner with a single thrust. With its relatively thin, narrow blade, the V-42 was designed from the outset for use as a fighting knife, and was consequently prone to breakage when used for utility chores such as opening ration tins or ammunition crates. Unusual for military combat knives of the period, the V-42's twin edges were double hollow-ground for increased cutting performance.The addition of the skull-crushing pommel was attributed to the input of Major Orval J. Baldwin, the FSSF Supply Officer. The thumb groove on the V-42's ricasso was designed to promote a flat grip with the thumb over the crossguard, which positioned the double-edged blade horizontally. In this manner a Forceman could slash an opponent with either a forehand or backhand stroke, while ensuring that his blade would slip between the ribs when used in a thrust or stab. V-42 stilettoThe V-42 was manufactured in the United States by Case.After a series of leg injuries incurred during training, the original leather sheath was reinforced in later versions with a metal tip designed to prevent the needle-like tip from penetrating the sheath. Since the force was originally trained for fighting in cold weather conditions, the sheath was designed long, so as to hang beneath the bottom of a G.I. Parka. First issued in 1942, the V-42 was the standard issue fighting knife issued to the FSSF, whose members generally referred to it as the Force Knife or V-42 Stiletto. All members of the Force were trained extensively in its use, though only members of the Force's Combat Echelon were actually issued their own V-42 knife. The V-42 was depicted on the badges of the Canadian Special Operations Forces Command, Canadian Forces' Joint Task Force 2 and one of the United States Army Special Forces badges. Case factory records indicate that approximately 3,000 V-42 knives were actually produced, but only one shipment of 1,750 knives to the FSSF was recorded by the Force's supply officer. Anecdote, said to be true?; In the USA the force found a factory that manufactured stickers, so they had a batch made up, printed on black, with white text, that simply said, in German, ‘The Worst is yet to come.' And they would go through these German emplacements and trenches, slitting every German soldier's throat. They would then slap these stickers on their faces and helmets. So thus the German's started calling them the Black Devils. A Lieutenant of the Herman Goering Division, found in his diary, had written " The Black Devils are all around us, every time we come into the line, we never hear them come"
An Original, WW1, German Kriegsmarine Vickers-Maxim I Pounder Pom Pom Shell Imperial Kriegsmarine Stamped. A superb fuzed shell head fully stamped and marked. With a 37mm calibre the water-cooled, belt-fed Maxim-Nordenfeldt (among others, with variants produced as Vickers-Maxim and Hotchkiss-Maxim) was the smallest item of artillery used during that war and boasted a firing rate of 60 rounds per minute, utilising a belt of 25 one-pound shells, each shell covering a distance ranging up to 3,000 yards. In World War I, it was used as an early anti-aircraft gun in the home defence of Britain. It was adapted as the Mk I*** and Mk II on high-angle pedestal mountings and deployed along London docks and on rooftops on key buildings in London, others on mobile motor lorries at key towns in the East and Southeast of England. 25 were employed in August 1914, and 50 in February 1916. A Mk II gun (now in the Imperial War Museum, London) on a Naval pedestal mounting was the first to open fire in defence of London during the war. However, the small shell was insufficient to damage the German Zeppelin airships sufficiently to bring them down. The Ministry of Munitions noted in 1922: "The pom-poms were of very little value. There was no shrapnel available for them, and the shell provided for them would not burst on aeroplane fabric but fell back to earth as solid projectiles … were of no use except at a much lower elevation than a Zeppelin attacking London was likely to keep" Nevertheless, Lieutenant O.F.J. Hogg of No. 2 AA Section in III Corps was the first anti-aircraft gunner to shoot down an aircraft, with 75 rounds on 23 September 1914 in France. The gun was experimentally mounted on aircraft as the lighter 1-pounder Mk III, the cancelled Vickers E.F.B.7 having been specifically designed to carry it in its nose. Hiram Maxim originally designed the Pom-Pom in the late 1880s as an enlarged version of the Maxim machine gun. Its longer range necessitated exploding projectiles to judge range, which in turn dictated a shell weight of at least 400 grams (0.88 lb), as that was the lightest exploding shell allowed under the St. Petersburg Declaration of 1868 and reaffirmed in the Hague Convention of 1899. Dated 1905. Not suitable for export, empty inert and safe.
An R.101 Airship Catastrophe Crash Memorial Service Card On October 5, 1930, the British airship R.101 crashed on a hill in Beauvais, France. The impact was gentle and survivable but the ship was inflated with hydrogen, and the resulting fire incinerated 46 of the passengers and crew. Two additional crew members died of their injuries soon after. The ship had never been flown at full speed, or on all engines, or in bad weather. But on October 4, 1930, the ship was dispatched to fly on all engines into a known storm, at a time of year known for bad weather, despite the recommendation of airship officers and meteorology experts. After struggling to maintain altitude over England and the Channel the ship crossed into France, where rain and wind damaged the unrepaired fabric at the nose of the ship and broke open gas bags in the bow, releasing the ship’s lifting gas. The overloaded and under-ballasted ship settled into a hillside in northern France and moments later the ship’s hydrogen erupted into flame. Calcium flares in the control car may have ignited, activated by exposure to water, but whatever the source of ignition, the fire destroyed the ship in minutes and killed most of those onboard, including Lord Thomson.
An Unfinished Cast Brass Model Aeroplane of WW2 KIA RAAF Sqn Pilot Officer This model of a WW2 RAF Beaufighter that was started by Pilot Officer Fox but sadly he never fully finished its construction, as he was tragically shot down and killed. It would be a most suitable historical piece to consider completing by a collector with just basic and rudimentary engineering skills. It was acquired from Mrs Myrtle Fox, his widow. RAF PO Fox, S F N (Flight Engineer) served in 460 Squadron, Royal Australian Air Force, during WW2, flying in a Lancaster bomber, number ED 525,. He was Shot down by Hauptmann Prinz zur Lippe-Weissenfeld of III/NJG1 on detachment to NJG3. All seven RAAF crew perished in the Lancaster on their designated Hamburg bombing run on the 30th July 1943 On the 30 July 1943 there were 198 Commonwealth Air Force Deaths. Aircraft Type: Lancaster Serial number: ED 525 Radio call sign: AR – Unit: 460 Sqn RAAF Lancaster ED 525 took off from RAF Binbrook at 2355 hours on 29 July 1943 to attack Hamburg, Germany. Bomb load was 1 x 4000lb and 2 x 1000lb bombs, 48 x 30lb, 510 x 4lb incendiaries. Nothing was heard from the aircraft after take off and it did not return to base. Twenty four aircraft from the squadron took part in the raid. Crew: RAAF 402507 FO Johnson, A J Captain (Pilot) † RAF WO Scruton, D G (Navigator) † RAF Sgt Ralph, F S (Bomb Aimer) † RAAF 411440 WO Burcher, R M (Wireless Operator Air Gunner) † RAF PO Fox, S F N (Flight Engineer) † RAAF 403397 FO O’Riordan, C T (Air Gunner) † RAAF 402508 WO Jones, P L E (Air Gunner) † Post war enquiries established that the aircraft was shot down by a night fighter on 30th July and crashed near Floglen, approx 41 miles north of Bremen, and that all the crew were killed. FO O’Riordan is buried in the Becklingen War Cemetery, Soltau, Germany which is about 45 miles east of Bremen. FO Johnson, Flt Sgt Burcher and Flt Sgt Jones are missing and are commemorated on the Runnymede Missing Memorial, Surrey, UK….. Pilot Officer Sydney Frederick Norman Fox 143802, 460 Sqdn., Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve who died on 30 July 1943 Age 30 Son of Frederick R. and Caroline Fox; husband of Myrtle Alice Fox, of Shoreham-by-Sea, Sussex. Remembered with Honour Runnymede Memorial. We show a page in the gallery from "Nachtjagd, Defenders of the Reich 1940-1943" by Martin Bowman that details the shooting down of P.O Fox's Lancaster. The plane has a 9 inch wingspan
Autograph Photo Martin Kühne Commander of the I./Fallschirmjäger-Regiment Martin Kühne Luftwaffe Hauptmann Commander of the I./Fallschirmjäger-Regiment 2, awarded his Knights cross on 29 February 1944. Martin Kuehne (1 November 1918 - 25 March 2003) what a highly decorated Major in the Fallschirmjäger during World War II . The Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross is awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Major Kuhne's Awards and decorations; ## Parachute Shield Badge (28 April 1940) ## Iron Cross (1939) ## 2nd Class (18 May 1940) ## 1st Class (18 May 1940) ## Ground Assault Badge of the Luftwaffe (26 May 1943) ## Honor Goblet of the Luftwaffe (7 October 1941) ## Medaglia d'Argento al Valor Militare (9 February 1942) ## Eastern Front Medal (16 July 1942) ## Libya Medal (11 February 1943) ## German Cross in Gold (23 July 1943) ## Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross on 29 February 1944 as Captain and commander of the I./Fallschirmjäger-regiment 2 The campaigns he took part in were; ## Crete ## Battle of the Netherlands ## Battle of Crete ## Operation Barbarossa ## Victory of Leningrad ## Second Battle of El Alamein ## Italian Campaign ## Gothic Line Offensive The Fallschirmjäger Knights Cross winners between 1939-1945 are totalling 133 recipients. 1 was awarded in Norway were awarded in Normandy 10 in Belgium 13 in Holland, early and late war 1 at Corinth 27 in Kreta 4 in Afrika 40 in Italy 8 on the Eastern Front 2 in the Ardennes 6 within the borders of Germany at the end of the war Out of the 133 recipients: 69 were also awarded the German Cross in Gold 6 were awarded posthumously 20 recipients were KIA 1 was executed after the war 3 were killed in accidents 3 died from wounds received in action after the event 1 was a pilot. This autograph photo was given personally by Major Kuhne, detailed on the reverse and signed twice, dated 1991. On October 23rd 1942 the second battle of El Alamein was launched, German and Italian forces started their retreat from the area on 3rd November. The British 8th army began to push the Axis forces westward through Egypt and Libya into Tunisia. The Allied high command decided on a plan to trap the Axis forces by landing a force into French North Africa and pushing Eastwards, while Montgomery’s 8th army pushed westwards and then northwards into Tunisia. German paratroops had been in North Africa since July 1942 when Major General Bernhard Ramcke’s Fallschirm Brigade arrived to take part in the battles at El Alamein. His brigade consisted of 4 battalions, the 1st battalion commanded by Major Kroh, 2nd Battalion commanded by Major Baron von der Heydte, 3rd Battalion commanded by Major Heubner and the 4th Fallschirm-Lehr Battalion comanded by Maj Burkhardt. It gave a good account of itself in action but was almost destroyed in the fighting around El-Alamein and the retreat afterwards and many of his men were lost in the general surrender of May 1943. The remnant of his unit were reformed into part of the new 2nd Parachute division in 1943. Excellent condition.
Ball Race Spare Part of 'Little Boy' Construction of The Manhattan Project Although barely 72 years old, it is probably one of the rarest items we are ever likely to offer. A superb, single, micro engineered ball race, one of a pair of spare parts, [and to be sold by us separately] we acquired from the late collection of Professor Samuel Eilenberg, Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at Columbia University in WW2. One of the spare parts used during the construction of 'Little Boy' Uranium Bomb, part of the ultra top secret Manhattan Project. This example is engraved with it's part code GYRO PT MK3 A. Code L.B.BOMB. Souvenirs of the Manhattan Project were taken by [or presented to] many of the consultants and scientists working on, or associated with, the greatest secret project of the 20th century, once the project was officially closed down in regards to Little Boy. For information purposes the diameter of the ball race is 160mm which is within a small tolerance of the diameter of the gun barrel [165mm] that was central to the construction of 'Little Boy'. This measurement may indeed be relevant to the ball races actual function or use within the project. Unfortunately due to the top secret nature of the whole event Prof Eilenberg did not reveal the ball races function, or even his no doubt significant personal contribution within the project, before his death in January 1998, only that he acquired it at Los Alamos in August 1945, apparently given out by Oppenheimer. The Manhattan Project was the project to develop the first nuclear weapon (atomic bomb) during World War II by the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada. Formally designated as the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), it refers specifically to the period of the project from 1941–1946 under the control of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, under the administration of General Leslie R. Groves. The scientific research was directed by American physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer. The project succeeded in developing and detonating three nuclear weapons in 1945: a test detonation of a plutonium implosion bomb on July 16 (the Trinity test) near Alamogordo, New Mexico; an enriched uranium bomb code-named "Little Boy" on August 6 over Hiroshima, Japan; and a second plutonium bomb, code-named "Fat Man" on August 9 over Nagasaki, Japan. The project's roots lay in scientists' fears since the 1930s that Nazi Germany was also investigating nuclear weapons of its own. Born out of a small research program in 1939, the Manhattan Project eventually employed more than 130,000 people and cost nearly $2 billion USD ($23 billion in 2007 dollars based on CPI). It resulted in the creation of multiple production and research sites that operated in secret. The three primary research and production sites of the project were the plutonium-production facility at what is now the Hanford Site, the uranium-enrichment facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the weapons research and design laboratory, now known as Los Alamos National Laboratory. Project research took place at over thirty different sites across the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. The MED maintained control over U.S. weapons production until the formation of the Atomic Energy Commission in January 1947. Included is an original photo print taken from HMS Colossus, [part of 11th Aircraft Carrier Squadron, that was based in the Pacific, commanded by Rear Admiral Harcourt]. It was taken on 7th August 1945 [the day after Little Boy was detonated]. It is a picture of two I/d profiles of two Japanese T/E fighters that were originally observed in July 1945. These photographs were sent to the Manhattan Project HQ, but why, to us, this remains a mystery. Also, it includes another souvenir, the serial tag from the Army Air Corps Bell and Howell sound projector, that apparently showed the original film of the detonation of 'Little Boy' to Professor Eilenburg and others from the project after the Enola Gay mission. We show in the gallery, for information only, a Paul R. Halmos photograph of Samuel Eilenberg (1913-1998), left, and Gordon T. Whyburn (1904-1969) in 1958 at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Edinburgh. For example, in relation to the desirability of original items connected to this monumentally historical mission, two other pieces were sold some 14 years ago in the US. The Little Boy was armed on the mission by removing the green safety plugs, and arming it with red arming plugs. This was undertaken by 23 year old Lt. Morris Richard Jeppson, who armed the bomb during the flight. For this perilous task he was awarded the Silver Star for his unique contribution to the mission. Jeppson, however, kept a few of the green plugs that signified his role in the bombing. He sold two of them in San Francisco for $167,500, at auction, in 2002, however, the US federal government claimed they were classified material and tried, but failed dismally, to block the sale. We were very fortunate to acquire these fascinating pieces, from Prof Eilenberg's collection, from a doctor, author, lecturer of oriental studies and fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society, who acquired them some years ago from a close colleague of Prof Eilenberg.
British Army GSM Campaign Service Medal Northern Ireland Bar. ERII Issued to Gunner Ferguson Royal Artillery. The General Service Medal (1962 GSM, also sometimes referred to as the Campaign Service Medal), was introduced in 1962 to combine the General Service Medal (1918), as awarded to the Army and RAF, and the Naval General Service Medal (1915). The 1962 GSM was awarded until 2007, when it was replaced by the Operational Service Medal.
British Military Binocular 7 x 50 Bino Prism No 5 Mk 5, N.I.L, 1944 & Case With War Dept. Broad Arrow mark. Very nice optics indeed just a tad misty. Bino prism No 5 Mk 5 x 7".the introduction of the No. 5 Mk V version which was similar to the MK II but more waterproof and could be filled with dry air to prevent condensation and fungus. In November 1940 the Ministry of Supply decided to set up a number of 'Shadow Companies'. They were to increase the manufacturing capacity of certain firms and also provide insurance against those firms home factories incurring war damage. Ross Ltd in Clapham and E.R.Watts and Sons Ltd in Camberwell were to share premises in Nottingham consisting of several floors in a Players cigarette factory. The Ministry would bear the costs acquiring the machinery and plant,( which would remain Government property ). In March 1941 Directors from Ross Ltd. Visited the premises and estimated the setting up costs. On 4 June 1941 Nottingham Instruments Ltd. Was incorporated with a nominal capital of £100. Ross Ltd held £74 worth of the shares and E.R.Watts and Sons Ltd. The remaining £26. The Ministry operated N.I.L. as an agency company which did not need to make an operating profit but paid a fee for its management services. It appears to have been dissolved in 1946. N.I.L.also made binoculars for the Air Force and “gunsights" 9 inches x 9 inches in case.
British Operational Service Medal, Afghanistan Bar Royal Logistics Corps in very good condition. Named to recipient. The Royal Logistic Corps (RLC) was formed on 5 April 1993. The RLC provides essential logistic support and services to the British Army wherever it is in the world. In peacetime and on operations it is the Corps’ job to support the movement of servicemen and women to where they need to be-whether by land, sea or air-and to store and deliver the essential equipment and supplies that the Army needs to do its job, from Challenger II battle tanks to food ration packs. The RLC is the only (Combat Service Support) Corps of the British Army with battle honours, derived from the usage of previous transport elements (Royal Waggon Train, etc.) as heavy cavalry. The battle honours are: Peninsula Battle of Waterloo Lucknow Taku Forts Peking
British Silver Wound Badge WW1, "For King and Empire Services Rendered" A genuine World War One Silver War Badge sometimes known as a Silver Wound Badge. It has the King's Cypher on it plus the words " For King and Empire - Services Rendered ". It has a vertical pin and clasp and it is numbered for the soldier. Very good condition. The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The badge, sometimes known as the "Discharge Badge", the "Wound Badge" or "Services Rendered Badge", was first issued in September 1916, along with an official certificate of entitlement. The large sterling silver lapel badge was intended to be worn on civilian clothes. The decoration was introduced as an award of "King's silver" for having received wounds or injury during loyal war service to the Crown's authority. A secondary causation for its introduction was that a practice had developed in the early years of the war in the United Kingdom where some women took it upon themselves to confront and publicly embarrass men of fighting age they saw in public places who were not in military uniform, by ostentatiously presenting them with white feathers, as a suggestion of cowardice. As the war had developed substantial numbers of servicemen who had been discharged from His Majesty's Forces with wounds that rendered them unfit for war service, but which were not obvious from their outward appearance, found themselves being harassed in such a manner and the badge, to be worn on the right breast while in civilian dress, was a means of discouraging such incidents being directed at ex-forces' personnel. It was forbidden to wear the badge on a military uniform. The badge bears the royal cipher of "GRI" (for Georgius Rex Imperator; George, King and Emperor) and around the rim "For King and Empire - Services Rendered".
British WW1 Rifle Volunteer Regimental Military Bugle The National Reserve was a register of trained officers and men who had no further obligation for military service. Its purpose was to enable an increase in military resources in the event of imminent national danger. The register was maintained by the County Associations that also organised the Territorial Force and they would frame their own rules for organising the reserve within their area. In October 1914 the National Reserve was formed into Protection Companies, which were attached to existing TF battalions, for the guarding of railways and other vulnerable points in Britain. That November, all Class I and II men were ordered to present themselves for enlistment. In March 1915 the Protection Companies were redesignated as Supernumerary Companies TF. In July 1915 there was a widescale trawl of these companies to identify men capable of marching 10 miles with a rifle and 150 rounds of ammunition. Those who were classified as medical Category A went to Service battalions, while Category C’s were posted to Provisional battalions. Cat B men were formed into the 18th-24th Battalions of the Rifle Brigade. These battalions were sent to Egypt and India at the end of 1915 to replace TF units committed to Gallipoli and Mesopotamia. The rump left in Britain eventually formed the 25th Battalion Rifle Brigade TF and served as a Garrison battalion at Falmouth. As for the Supernumerary Companies, they were eventually formed into the Royal Defence Corps.
Bronze Placque Honouring the 75th Birthday of Count Von Zeppelin Possibly commissioned by the German industrial car and engine manufacturer Maybach. They unveiled their new engine on the occasion of Count Zeppelin's 75th birthday on July 8, 1913. Under the management of the Deutsche Luftschiffahrts-Aktien-Gesellschaft (DELAG), the counts' airships were regularly making passenger flights and covering greater and greater distances. "I close my eyes and can feel again that sensation of floating lightly and gently through the air," writes Hermann Hesse - who went on later to win the Noble prize for literature - after one such flight. He enthuses, "I know for certain that as soon as I find an opportunity to fly again, I will do it with the very greatest of pleasure." 7.5 inches x 5 inches
Canada: 1918 (Aug) Aero Club of Canada 25c "flaming Zeppelin" Stamps label CLP2 tète-bêche pair, perfectly centred, one stamp very lightly mounted, the other unmounted, one with surface tear. A scarce collectable stamp from the very earliest Canadian Airmail service. We have seen good single stamps of this type achieving prices up to $1100. We are pricing as for a single stamp with it's matching companion free.
Cold War Minox Spy Camera, As Used By James Bond & Harry Palmer Actually from a former intelligence service agent, and used by him OHMSS [not the film], in its original leather case with serpent type chain. Late 1950's to 60's Minox Model B Subminiature Camera with Case, Chain. It would go very nicely with a PPK. Minox-B is a small high-quality subminiature camera that is small enough to fit in the palm of a hand. It was built by Minox in Germany as the successor to the post-war Minox A. For Many years it was the worlds most famous and widely used camera for espionage photography. Like its predecessor, the Minox-A, the body of the camera is made of aluminum. When closed, it measures only 97 x 27 x 15 mm, allowing it to be concealed easily, e.g. in the palm of a hand or somewhere in the operator's clothing. The camera is operated by opened by pulling it outwards from both ends. When closed, the film is advanced to the next position. The image on the right shows a Minox-B camera ready for use. A chain, that also acted as a measuring device, could be attached to one side of the camera, allowing it to be affixed to the user's clothing. The negatives are only 8 x 11 mm small. The Minox-B is fitted with a very high quality lens. When used in combination with high-grade film, it allowed black & white images with enormous detail to be obtained from the small negatives. The film strip itself is 9.2 mm wide and is rolled-up on a supply spool inside a small cartridge. It has no sprocket holes and allows 50 images to be taken with a single cartridge. In later years, colour film became available for the Minox-B, but it had signifficantly lower detail than the high-grade black & white film. The Minox-B was the first Minox subminiature camera to have a built-in light meter. The meter didn't require any batteries as it was based on a selenium cell. This ensured that the camera was always ready for use, even if it had been stored for a long period of time. Because of the built-in light meter, the Minox B was about 15 mm longer that its predecessors the Minox Riga and the Minox A. Minox-B cameras have been in production from 1958 to 1969. We have no doubt he was as he was alleged to be, for not only was he most cynical in nature, and highly non descript looking, he showed us two of his expired 1960's passports, both bearing different names, and an old pass document. None of which he should have kept naturally. He also gave us his name, Charles Brown, neither of which were on the passports. In a passing comment, giving no clue whatsoever but a merest hint, he mentioned that if he could have kept what he photographed he would have been a millionaire decades ago [but only in South America].
Desk Ornament of British Mills Bomb of WW1, With Re-Cast Lid and Hinge A super example of these interesting collectables, and a fabulous conversation piece. William Mills—a hand grenade designer from Sunderland—patented, developed and manufactured the "Mills bomb" at the Mills Munition Factory in Birmingham, England, in 1915. The Mills bomb was adopted by the British Army as its standard hand grenade in 1915, and designated as the No. 5. It was also used by the Irish Republican Army. The Mills bomb underwent numerous modifications. The No. 23 was a variant of the No. 5 with a rodded base plug which allowed it to be fired from a rifle. This concept evolved further with the No. 36, a variant with a detachable base plate to allow use with a rifle discharger cup. The final variation of the Mills bomb was the No. 36M, which was specially designed and waterproofed with shellac for use initially in the hot climate of Mesopotamia in 1917, but remained in production for many years. By 1918 the No. 5 and No. 23 were declared obsolete and the No. 36 (but not the 36M) followed in 1932. The Mills was a classic design; a grooved cast iron "pineapple" with a central striker held by a close hand lever and secured with a pin. Although the segmented body helps to create fragments when the grenade explodes, according to Mills' notes the casing was grooved to make it easier to grip and not as an aid to fragmentation. The Mills was a defensive grenade: after throwing the user had to take cover immediately. A competent thrower could manage 30 metres (98 feet) with reasonable accuracy, but the grenade could throw lethal fragments further than this. It could be fitted with a flat base and fired with a blank cartridge from a rifle with a "cup" attachment, giving it a range of around 150 m. At first the grenade was fitted with a seven-second fuse to accommodate both hand and rifle launch, but during combat in the Battle of France in 1940 this delay proved too long—giving defenders time to escape the explosion, or even to throw the grenade back—and was reduced to four seconds. The heavy, segmented bodies of "pineapple" type grenades result in an unpredictable pattern of fragmentation. After the Second World War Britain and the US adopted grenades that contained segmented coiled wire in smooth metal casings. The No. 36M Mk.I remained the standard grenade of the British Armed Forces and was manufactured in the UK until 1972, when it was completely replaced by the L2 series. The 36M remained in service in some parts of the world such as India and Pakistan where it was manufactured until the early 1980s. That the Mills bomb remained in use for so many years says much about its effectiveness. Inerts empty and safe, not suitable for export.
Deutche Kolonien Nazi Published Cigarette Card Album In Original Case “Deutsche Kolonien” , a cigarette card album containing a set of 270 coloured cards depicting life in the German colonies, by Cigarette Bilderdienst, Dresden, 1936, VGC, in its original carton; This is a beautiful 9-3/4 x 13-3/4 inch, 72 page full-colour book depicting and describing German colonies around the world which the government of Adolf Hitler still considered to be German in spite of their loss at the end of World War I. The most impressive and large album was published in 1936 by Cigaretten Bilderdienst in Dresden and contains all 270 splendid 2 x 2-1/2 inch full-colour varnished cigarette cards carefully attached in the appropriate pages upon each page. The text and the photos cover German colonies in East Africa, South Africa and the South Pacific. There is a competent history of each colony as well as economic, geographic and commercial information. The pictures are especially well-done in this album showing not only the uniforms and facilities of the German colonial troops, but the birds, animals, plants and native populations of the various countries. Gorgeous embossed cover, in very fine condition.
Die Großen der Weltgeschichte The great history of the world", complete cigarette card album, Publisher Eckstein Halaus GmbH, Dresden. Circa 1935. The Middle Ages Findings, Reformation , religious wars - The time of the Great Elector - The time of Frederick the Great - French Revolution , Napoleonic Wars - between Napoleon and Bismarck - The Bismarck era - On the eve of World War II
Dr Eckner President Calvin Coolidge Medal For the Flight of USS Los Angeles Made in 1924 to commemorate It's first flight across the Atlantic to Lakehurst, arriving on the 15th October 1924 On October 12, 1924, under the command of Dr. Eckener, LZ-126 (already known by its American naval designation ZR-3) lifted off from Friedrichshafen, Germany to begin its flight across the Atlantic for delivery to the United States Navy. After a successful crossing of the Atlantic ocean, LZ-126 landed at the United States naval base at Lakehurst, New Jersey at 9:56 AM on the morning of October 15, 1924. The Atlantic would not be crossed nonstop by air again until Charles Lindbergh’s flight in the Spirit of St. Louis in May, 1927. The transatlantic was considered an aviation triumph, and Captain Eckener and his crew were given a parade up Broadway in New York City, and were greeted at the White House by U.S. President Calvin Coolidge. It was in the wake of World War I that Eckener made perhaps his greatest contribution to the survival of the zeppelin. After the War, Germany was required to pay heavy reparations, not only for the war itself, but also for the destruction of German zeppelins by their crews, who preferred to destroy their own ships rather than allow them to fall into the hands of the Allies (in the way German sailors scuttled their ships at Scapa Flow). Eckener convinced the Allies to allow the Zeppelin Company to build a new ship, LZ-126, to be delivered to the Americans as ZR-3 USS Los Angeles in partial satisfaction of these reparation obligations. The photo in the gallery of Dr.Hugo Eckener being greeted by U.S. President Calvin Coolidge after the successful transatlantic delivery flight of LZ-126 in October, 1924. (Ernst Lehmann at far left; Hans Flemming behind Coolidge.) The construction of LZ-126 kept the Zeppelin Company alive, maintaining not only its plant and equipment, but also its workforce of its highly skilled employees. The construction and operation of LZ-126 also provided Eckener and his colleagues with the knowledge and experience they would use to build Graf Zeppelin and Hindenburg.
Dunkirk Evacuation May 1940 RAF Shot Down Messerschmitt Me Bf110 Stab 1/ZG1 Exactly as seen in the newly released blockbuster DUNKIRK, an original excavated part of the Me Bf 110 engine, the engine reducer cog, shot down by the RAF 54 and 65 squadron at the incredible Dunkirk evacuation. The German plane was piloted by Oblt Konrad Martin, who was killed, and Fw Herbert Kraft, the Radio Operator and Gunner was injured. The Me Bf 110 was shot down by Spitfires of 54 and 65 Squadron trying to defend the Dunkirk British Expeditionary Force and French army evacuation, and the German heavy fighter crashed at Sercus near St Omer south of Dunkirk on the 26th May 1940. The Messerschmitt Bf 110, often (erroneously) called Me 110, was a twin-engine heavy fighter (Zerstörer—German for "Destroyer") in the service of the Luftwaffe during World War II. Hermann Göring was a proponent of the Bf 110, and nicknamed it his Eisenseiten ("Ironsides"). It was armed with two 20 mm cannons, four 7.92 mm (.312 in) MG 17 machine guns, and one 7.92 mm (.312 in) MG 15 machine gun or twin MG 81Zs for defence. Development work on an improved type to replace the Bf 110, the Messerschmitt Me 210 began before the war started, but its teething troubles resulted in the Bf 110 soldiering on until the end of the war in various roles, alongside its replacements, the Me 210 and the Me 410. The Bf 110 served with considerable success in the early campaigns, the Polish, Norwegian and Battle of France. The Bf 110's lack of agility in the air was its primary weakness. This flaw was exposed during the Battle of Britain, when some Bf 110-equipped units were withdrawn from the battle after very heavy losses and redeployed as night fighters, a role to which the aircraft was well suited. The Bf 110 enjoyed a successful period following the Battle of Britain as an air superiority fighter and strike aircraft in other theatres. During the Balkans Campaign, North African Campaign and on the Eastern Front, it rendered valuable ground support to the German Army as a potent fighter-bomber (Jagdbomber or Jabo). Later in the war, it was developed into a formidable night fighter, becoming the major night-fighting aircraft of the Luftwaffe. Most of the German night fighter aces flew the Bf 110 at some point during their combat careers, and the top night fighter ace of all time, Major Heinz-Wolfgang Schnaufer, flew it exclusively and claimed 121 victories in 164 combat missions The plane was excavated after the war, and we acquired this significant part direct, through that approved MOD excavation. The Dunkirk evacuation, code-named Operation Dynamo, also known as the Miracle of Dunkirk, was the evacuation of Allied soldiers from the beaches and harbour of Dunkirk, in the north of France, between 26 May and 4 June 1940, during World War II. The operation was decided upon when large numbers of British, French, and Belgian troops were cut off and surrounded by German troops during the Battle of France. In a speech to the House of Commons, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill called the events in France "a colossal military disaster", saying "the whole root and core and brain of the British Army" had been stranded at Dunkirk and seemed about to perish or be captured. On the first day of the evacuation, only 7,669 men were evacuated, but by the end of the eighth day, 338,226 soldiers had been rescued by a hastily assembled fleet of over 800 boats. Many of the troops were able to embark from the harbour's protective mole onto 39 British destroyers of the Royal Navy and civilian merchant ships, while others had to wade out from the beaches, waiting for hours in the shoulder-deep water. Some were ferried from the beaches to the larger ships by what came to be known as the little ships of Dunkirk, a flotilla of hundreds of merchant marine boats, fishing boats, pleasure craft, yachts, and lifeboats called into service from Britain for the emergency. The BEF lost 68,000 soldiers during the French campaign and had to abandon nearly all of its tanks, vehicles, and other equipment. In his We shall fight on the beaches speech on 4 June, he hailed their rescue as a "miracle of deliverance". It cannot sensibly be sent outside of the UK due to its weight which is approx 30 kilos [although it can be, but at great shipping cost]. This fine film, Dunkirk, should be shown as compulsory viewing in every school in the UK. It is not so much 'lest we forget', it's more likely that most British school students, sadly, simply don't know at all.
Dutch M4 Bayonet for the M1 Carbine, Scabbard and Frog. Circa 1950's An original Dutch M4 bayonet for the M1 Carbine, complete with scabbard and webbing frog. The bayonet has a black steel blade which measures 6 3/4" long. The blade has no markings. It is in perfect condition. It is fitted with a crossguard which has a muzzle ring. The bayonet has brown coloured plastic grips in imitation of the leather ringed grips on the US model. The grips are secured with two screw bolts. The steel pommel incorporates a bayonet release mechanism which operates smoothly. The scabbard is the US style scabbard which has a green webbing frog. The scabbard is in very good condition. The frog is riveted to the scabbard with two rivets. It has a belt loop. This is a very nice complete and original bayonet, scabbard and frog.
Egyptian Currency Note 5 Piastres WW2 Issue 1940 Used by British 'Desert Rat' troops in the War in Africa campaign against Rommel's Afrika Corps. Issued under law No 50/1940. Used condition but good.
ERII Post 1953 British Army Gurkhas Rifles Cap Queen Elizabeths Own Full dress Kilmarnock cap with regimental badge in superb order. The 6th Queen Elizabeth's Own Gurkha Rifles was a rifle regiment of the British Indian Army comprising Gurkha soldiers of Nepalese origin, before being transferred to the British Army following India's independence. Originally raised in 1817 as part of the army of the British East India Company, the regiment has been known by a number of names throughout its history. Initially the unit did not recruit from the Gurkhas, although after being transferred to the British Indian Army following the Indian Rebellion of 1857, it became a purely Gurkha regiment, in due course with its regimental headquarters at Abbottabad in the North West Frontier Province of British India. After 1947 the regiment was one of only four Gurkha regiments to be transferred to the British Army and this continued up until 1994, when it was amalgamated with other Gurkha regiments to form the Royal Gurkha Rifles. Over the course of its 177-year history, the regiment was awarded 25 battle honours Second World War The Second World War saw the expansion of all ten Gurkha regiments of the British Indian Army, and the 6th Gurkhas raised a further two battalions, numbered as the 3rd and 4th Battalions. Over the course of the conflict, battalions of the regiment fought in Italy and Burma, and also in Waziristan on the North West Frontier (1940–41) where they served as garrison troops and saw action against Pathan tribesmen. In January 1943 the 2nd Battalion was attached to the 3rd Indian Motor Brigade which had just returned from the Western Desert after having been almost destroyed at the Battle of Gazala. At the end of the month the brigade was renamed as the 43rd Indian Infantry Brigade (Lorried). The brigade and its Gurkha battalions were sent to Italy in mid-1944 as an Independent brigade and fought in the Italian Campaign. It was during the Burma Campaign, that the regiment received its first Victoria Cross, in fact two awards were made to members of the regiment for actions on the same day. Captain Michael Allmand and Rifleman Tulbahadur Pun were awarded the VC for their actions during the fighting around the Pin Hmi Road Bridge at Mogaung in Burma on 23 June 1944 while serving with the 3rd Battalion who were taking part Operation Thursday, which was the second Chindit expedition. The 3rd Battalion's involvement in this operation proved very costly and they suffered 126 killed, 352 wounded and 7 missing. As well as the two previously mentioned VCs, members of the battalion also received the following awards: 2 DSOs, 3 IOMs, 6 MCs, 4 IDSMs, 12 MMs, 3 US Silver Stars. In 1946 the regiment was reduced to three battalions, following the disbandment of the 4th Battalion. A year later, India gained its independence and under the 1947 Tri Partite Agreement four regiments of the Brigade of Gurkhas were allocated to the British Army, while the other six were transferred to the newly formed independent Indian Army. The 6th Gurkhas were one of the regiments that were transferred to the British Army, although the 3rd Battalion was transferred to the 5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), which was one of the battalions that had been allocated to the Indian Army, and the regiment was thus reduced to two battalions once more. In 1959, the regiment was renamed as the 6th Queen Elizabeth's Own Gurkha Rifles in honour of Elizabeth II. As with other Gurkha regiments, the 6th Gurkhas primarily saw service in the Far East until the British withdrawal from East of Suez. Both battalions participated in the Malayan Emergency. Later, between 1962 and 1964, the 1st Battalion served in the United Kingdom. Between 1963 and 1966, both the 1st and 2nd Battalions saw service in Borneo during Confrontation. Royal Gurkhas Cap, 6th Badge
Essex Constabulary Police Officer's Custodian Helmet ERII In excellent condition. 1980's.
Fascinating German WW2 Public Notice Poster Regarding Two Luftwaffe Flyers Der flieger [flyer] Stefan Egidy hat sich vorsatzlich auf wache einen schuss in den oberschenkel beigebracht, um seine zeitweise versetzung in das helmatgeblet zu erreichen .er hat dabel einen ueberfall seitens franzosen vorgetauscht durch urtell des feldkriegsgerichts ist er wegen zerstzung der wehrkraft durch selbstverstummelung und wegen wachvergehen zu 5 jahren zucthaus und verlust der wehrwurdigkeit verurteilt worden. Roughly it translates that Flyer Stefan Egidy was court martialled for a self inflicted wounding and sentence to 5 years and loss of privileges? . Also Flieger [flyer] Niklaus Nels was similar court-martialled and sentenced to 3 years 6 months. German pilots were occasionally court-martialled for all manner of reasons, another one at the time was Born in Oberbalbach, Heinrich Ehrler, he grew up in the Weimar Republic and Third Reich as one of 12 children. He joined the military service in the Wehrmacht in 1935, initially service with the artillery and anti-aircraft artillery. He participated in the Spanish Civil War and following the outbreak of World War II transferred to the Jagdwaffe (fighter force). Following flight training, he was posted to the 4. Staffel of Jagdgeschwader 77 (JG 77—77th Fighter Wing), which was later redesignated to 4. Staffel of Jagdgeschwader 5 (JG 5—5th Fighter Wing). Scapegoated for the loss of the German battleship Tirpitz, Ehrler - who had been nominated for the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords prior to the disaster - was court-martialled, stripped of his command and sentenced to three years and two months Festungshaft (honorable imprisonment). Ehrler's sentence was later commuted and his loss of rank rescinded, and in February 1945 he was transferred to Jagdgeschwader 7. According to his fellow pilots, Ehrler thereafter flew in the increasingly desperate air battles without the purpose and dedication that had made him one of the Luftwaffe's most successful aces. On 4 April 1945, he shot down two Allied bombers for his final two victories, before destroying a third by ramming with his damaged aircraft after having run out of ammunition. His last recorded statement was "Theo, I have run out of ammunition. I'm going to ram this one. Good bye. We'll see each other in Valhalla." - Heinrich Ehrler's last transmission over the Squadron Radio Network before he rammed the B-24 bomber "Trouble in Mind," piloted by Captain John Ray, destroying both aircraft and killing himself. Central tear through middle can't be seen in photo
Fit For A Prince! A Stunning Omani Silver Jambiya With Gilt Belt And almost identical to another very fine silver Jambiya that was shown to HRH Prince Harry on his goodwill tour of Oman only this very week [see photos, credit to Tim Rocke/REX] However, their fine jambiya was £20,000 new and ours is but a fraction. A beautiful quality dagger, of typical form of the famous middle eastern Omani Jambiya, and in Oman it is called the Khanjar. This deluxe example is all silver with , with carved horn hilt further decorated with silver and it's original gilded waist belt. Jambiya of this quality were almost always usually custom made for presentation. Lawrence of Arabia had several very similar ones presented to him, they were his favourite dagger, and he was frequently photographed wearing them. One picture is a portrait of Lawrence with his silver Jambiya, near identical to this one. [Information only not included] Silver, usually more often than not, coin silver, not English hallmarked silver. The jambia, a curved Islamic dagger, is the main customary accessory to the clothing worn by Arabian men. For centuries the people of South Arabia have inherited the their jambiahs from generation to generation. There are several theories about the origin of the Jambia. There are historical facts, concerning the existence of the Jambia revealing that it used to be worn at Sheban times, in the Himiarite kingdom. They take the statue of the Sheban king (Madi Karb 500 bc ) as proof. This statue, which was discovered by an American mission in Marib in the 1950s, was found to be wearing a Jambia. Since The most expensive and famous jambiya was purchased by Sheikh Naji Bin Abdul-Aziz Al-Sha’if, who was able to pay US $1 million for one prized and ancient piece. This jambiah had a historical importance, belonging to Imam Ahmed Hamid Al-Din, who ruled Yemen from 1948 to 1962. The Imam’s most precious possession was transferred to Sheikh Hussein Al-Watari, who in turn sold it to Sheikh Al-Sha’if. According to Sheikh Muhammad Naji, the son of current owner of the most precious jambiah, his father’s prize is the most expensive and famous one in the country. Its cost was made so high because it is one of the best jambiahs ever made by Al-Saifani, and a piece of history, as well. The second highest price ever paid for a jambiah was for the one that Sheikh Ahmed Hamid Al-Habari sold to Sheikh Abdullah Bin Hussein Al-Ahmar for £440,000 GBP.
Floor Tile Removed From RMS Titanic. One of a number of floor tiles removed from the 2nd Class Lounge. Tiles from the Titanic and her sister ship the Olympic were removed due to leak tests [and replaced with carpeting] after April 7th. The removed tiles were sent to the ship builders Harland and Wolff and relaid in the drawing office in Belfast. This tile was purchased from the Harland and Wolff workshops in Belfast some time ago. Complete with a letter of authenticity from John Cross of White Star Line International, Titanic historian for the Falkirk Titanic Society and the White Star Line Preservation Society. The tile is a typical two part type, as was most popular with all the various tiled areas of the Titanic and Olympic, with a separate centre section, and it's condition is good but with some small edge losses to one side.RMS Titanic was the largest passenger steamship in the world when she set off on her maiden voyage from Southampton, England to New York City on 10 April 1912. Four days into the crossing, on 14 April 1912, she struck an iceberg and sank, resulting in the deaths of 1,517 people in one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history. An Olympic-class passenger liner, Titanic was owned by the White Star Line and constructed at the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast, Ireland (now Northern Ireland). She set sail for New York City with 2,223 people on board; the high casualty rate when the ship sank was due in part to the fact that, although complying with the regulations of the time, the ship carried lifeboats for only 1,178 people. A disproportionate number of men died due to the women and children first protocol that was followed. Titanic was designed by some of the most experienced engineers, and used some of the most advanced technologies available at the time. It was a great shock to many that, despite the extensive safety features, Titanic sank. The frenzy on the part of the media about Titanic's famous victims, the legends about the sinking, the resulting changes to maritime law, and the discovery of the wreck have contributed to the interest in Titanic.
French WW1 Military Gun Sight/Level by Huet of Paris Good condition sight used in the trench warfare of WW1 numbered 61/1660. Ideal military desk ornament. Dark patination.
George VIth Long Service Good Conduct Silver Medal Regular Army bar. Very good condition denamed. Awarded to WW2 & Korean War Regular Army soldiers and officers for at least 18 years unblemished service in the British Army.
German Anti-Aircaft or Anti Ship, Kriegsmarine Shell, The Uboat 3.7cm. C/30 Kriegsmarine waffenamt stamped and dated and fully marked. The C/30 was a single-shot, semi-automatic anti-aircraft gun that was loaded one round at a time which dropped its effective rate of fire to a mere 30 rounds per minute, far inferior to the 80-100 rounds per minute of its contemporary, the Bofors 40 mm anti-aircraft gun. The SK C/30U gun was modified for use by submarines. All mountings were suitable for use against both air and sea targets The Dopp LC/30 was a twin mount with each gun in a separate cradle. It had a six-man crew on the mount itself plus additional ammunition handlers. The mounting was manually traversed and elevated and was gyro-stabilized up to a limit of 19.5° degrees to counteract the roll and pitch of the ship. Most German ships, fleet torpedo boat or larger, carried at least one Dopp LC/30 mounting. The Einheitslafette C/34 (universal mounting model 34) was a single gun mounted on a pedestal with a two-man crew. The 3.7 cm SK C/30 was the German Kriegsmarine's primary 3.7 cm (1.5 in) anti-aircraft gun during the Second World War. It was superseded by the fully automatic 3.7 cm FlaK 43 late in the war. Some mounts were fitted with a 8 millimetres (0.31 in) gun shield. It was used on the smaller Kriegsmarine ships like the Schnellboot. A number were used on land to supplement the anti-aircraft defenses of ports. The Ubts LC/39 submarine mount used the SK C/30U gun. It was a simple pedestal mount with a two-man crew, one of whom trained the gun with the shoulder stirrup; the other used gears to elevate the gun. Inert empty and safe, but not suitable for export or for sale to under 18's..21 inches long overall
German Army WW2 NCO/Officers Uniform Breast Eagle Combat uniform machine woven badge fo NCO/Officers. Removed from a uniform From family repute this was taken by a British soldier, serving in Montgomery's command, from a German sergeant at Falaise Pocket, Normandy (August 1944) post D.Day. The Battle of the Falaise Pocket ended the Battle of Normandy with a decisive German defeat. Hitler's involvement had been damaging from the first, with his insistence on hopelessly unrealistic counter-offensives, micro-management of generals, and refusal to countenance withdrawal, when his armies were threatened with annihilation. More than forty German divisions were destroyed during the Battle of Normandy. No exact figures are available but historians estimate that the battle cost the German forces around 450,000 men, of whom 240,000 were killed or wounded. The Allies had achieved victory at a cost of 209,672 casualties among the ground forces, including 36,976 killed and 19,221 missing. The Allied air forces lost 16,714 airmen killed or missing in connection with Operation Overlord. The final battle of Operation Overlord, the Liberation of Paris, followed on 25 August and Overlord ended by 30 August, with the retreat of the last German unit across the Seine. The area in which the pocket had formed was full of the remains of battle. Villages had been destroyed and derelict equipment made some roads impassable. The remnants of battle, soldiers and civilians littered the area. Pilots reported being able to smell the stench of the battlefield hundreds of feet above it
German Cavalry Nickel P-Hilted Sabre WW2. Generally it was known as the cavalry sabre due to it's regular cavalry pattern form and used by the German cavalry regiments on horseback in WW2. Each German infantry division employed thousands of horses and thousands of men taking care of them. Despite losses of horses to enemy action, exposure and disease, Germany maintained a steady supply of work and saddle horses until 1945. Cavalry in the Army and the SS gradually increased in size, peaking at six cavalry divisions in February 1945. Made by Herder Solingen
German Emperor Medal, 1916, Admiral Franz von Hipper, Jutland May31st Brandenburg-Prussia, Kingdom of Wilhelm II, 1888-1918, German Emperor Medal in 1916, to Admiral Franz Ritter von Hipper and the Battle of the Skagerrak. Large bronze medal, of Admiral Hipper, portrait bust half left on the obverse, the reverse with his reconnaissance battalion, consisting of two ships and a zeppelin. Battle of Skagerrak 31st May 1916 Known as the Battle of Jutland. Franz Ritter von Hipper (13 September 1863 – 25 May 1932) was an admiral in the German Imperial Navy (Kaiserliche Marine). Franz von Hipper joined the German Navy in 1881 as an officer cadet. He commanded several torpedo boat units and served as watch officer aboard several warships, as well as Kaiser Wilhelm II's yacht Hohenzollern. Hipper commanded several cruisers in the reconnaissance forces before being appointed commander of the I Scouting Group in October 1913. He held this position until 1918, when he succeeded Admiral Reinhard Scheer as commander of the High Seas Fleet. He is most famous for commanding the German battlecruisers of the I Scouting Group during World War I, particularly at the Battle of Jutland on 31 May – 1 June 1916. During the war, Hipper led the German battlecruisers on several raids of the English coast, for which he was vilified in the English press as a "baby killer." His squadron clashed with the British battlecruiser squadron at the Battle of Dogger Bank in January 1915, where the armored cruiser Blücher was lost. At the Battle of Jutland, Hipper's flagship Lützow was sunk, though his ships succeeded in sinking three British battlecruisers. Bronze medallion 114mm.
German Kriegsmarine Leading Seaman Light Anti Aircraft Badge Summer Rig Geschutz fuhrer flak, On entering Kriegsmarine service all personnel were assigned and trained for a specific career. These careers consisted of a wide variety of specialty trades and functions with some of the careers restricted to certain rank groups. On successful completion of the appropriate training, personnel were issued distinctive career insignia to be worn on the upper left sleeve of the uniforms. For EM/NCO’s the career insignia could be worn combined with the rank insignia or as separate insignia. Regulations dictated that the base colour of the insignia was to match the colour of the uniform it was worn on, blue winter, white summer. Of Note: The Specialist career insignia for Junior NCO’s and EM’s was originally introduced in 1933, with a few later additions and was slightly different then the standard career insignia in that more in-depth training was required and the emblems were worked in red thread as opposed to the gilt metal, golden yellow or cornflower blue emblems of the standard career insignia. The Specialist career insignia was modified in 1940 and remained in use for the duration of the war. In all the Kriegsmarine utilized no fewer then thirty-one assorted specialist career badges. The Geschützführer-für Leichten Flak-Artillerie, (Gun Chief for Light Anti-Aircraft Artillery), badge was originally introduced in 1933 and was replaced with the new pattern in 1940.The 1940 pattern insignia consists of a vertically oval, ribbed, white cotton/rayon blend material base with a embroidered, vertical, winged, artillery shell with "flames" emanating from the top edge positioned above dual chevrons all in bright red cotton threads. The outer edge of the base has a strip of protective white cotton/rayon tape machine stitched in place. The insignia indicates the specialist career of a heavy anti-aircraft artillery gun chief.
German Third Reich DRL Sports Badge. DRL 1937 issue. [Deutsches Reichsabzeichen fu Liebsubungen]. Hitler considered this the one award all German's should have. The DRL Sports Badge Replaced the DRA Sports Badge in 1937. The difference being the addition of a Swastika. To qualify for the Bronze grade a men or women had to be between the ages of 18 and 32. They also had to past all 5 parts of a rigorous physical test within a 12 month period to qualify for the Bronze Grade. The 5 physical tests were in Swimming, Jumping, Running, Weight Throwing and Speed. The Speed Test for men consisted of running 10,911 yards in 50 minutes, or swim 1,091 yards in 29 minutes or cycle 12.5 miles in 45 minutes.Part of a very fine and significant collection of German medals and awards we were most fortunate to acquire from a grandnephew of a U-Boat commander. Both Heinrich Himmler Gestapo Chief, and Reinhard Heidrich wore the DRL sports badges.
German Third Reich Nazi Period WW1 Veterans Armband NS-Reichskriegerbund 1938. . In the name of Gleichschaltung, the Kyffhäuserbund was nazified after the Nazi takeover of power in 1933. Five years later, its name was altered to "NS-Reichskriegerbund 'Kyffhäuser' e.V." (Nationalsocialist Reich Warriors Association 'Kyffhäuser'), becoming the sole and exclusive organization representing the Veterans´ interests in the Third Reich. The Kyffhäuserbund was swiftly and unceremoniusly disbanded during the Second World War, in March 1943, by Adolf Hitler himself. Apparently the reason was the German defeat in the Battle of Stalingrad. Its assets in the whole Reich were transferred to the NSDAP. All its surviving local associations, which in the last phase of the war effort became the breeding ground for Volkssturm units, were also placed under the direct orders of the Nazi Party.
German Third Reich Officer's Sabre. Nickel Plated Dress Scabbard Made by Horster of Solingen. Lion's head pommel with synthetic ruby eyes. Oak leaf pattern cast knuckle bow. Excellent bright steel blade, near mint condition. Wire bound black celluloid grip. The German Army (German: Heer, was the land forces component of the Wehrmacht, the German armed forces, from 1935 to 1945. The Wehrmacht also included the Kriegsmarine (Navy) and the Luftwaffe (Air Force). During World War II, a total of about 15 million soldiers served in the German Army, of whom about seven million became casualties. Separate from the army, the Waffen-SS (Armed SS) was a multi-ethnic and multi-national military force of the Third Reich. Growing from three regiments to over 38 divisions during World War II, it served alongside the army but was never formally part of it. Only 17 months after Hitler announced publicly the rearmament program, the Army reached its projected goal of 36 divisions. During the autumn of 1937, two more corps were formed. In 1938, four additional corps were formed with the inclusion of the five divisions of the Austrian Army after the Anschluss in March. During the period of its expansion by Adolf Hitler, the German Army continued to develop concepts pioneered during World War I, combining ground (Heer) and air (Luftwaffe) assets into combined arms teams. Coupled with operational and tactical methods such as encirclements and the "battle of annihilation", the German military managed quick victories in the two initial years of World War II, prompting the use of the word Blitzkrieg (literally lightning war, meaning lightning-fast war) for the techniques used. The German Army entered the war with a majority of its infantry formations relying on the horse for transportation. The infantry remained foot soldiers throughout the war; artillery also remained primarily horse-drawn. The motorized formations received much attention in the world press in the opening years of the war, and were cited as the main reason for the success of the German invasions of Poland (September 1939), Norway and Denmark (April 1940), Belgium, France and Netherlands (May 1940), Yugoslavia (April 1941) and the early campaigns in the Soviet Union (June 1941). However their motorized and tank formations accounted for only 20% of the Heer's capacity at their peak strength.
German WW1 Medal of the German Legion of Honour. Deutsche Ehrendenkmünze des Weltkrieges der Deutschen Ehrenlegion. Awarded by the "Council of the Order" of the Union of Nationalist Soldiers to men or women who, during WWI and after dutifully served the Fatherland. This bronze medal, either gilded or coppered. Noteworthy is the portayal of the winged Victory crowning a German soldier on the obverse. The reverse shows the Iron Cross 1st Class with oak leaves around the lower rim of the medal. Along the upper edge of the medal is the text "FÜRS VATERLAND" (For the Fatherland) in Gothic lettering. The ribbon is formed with the then German national colours. For frontline troops a combat emblem was created for attachment to the ribbon : a gilt oak leaf wreath with a sword across. This medal was first proposed in the autumn of 1917 but it took till 1921 before the "Council of the Order", which was to effect the actual awarding, was formed. Recipients had to pay for their medal themselves and could, if they so wished, be entered in the German Legion of Honour. This organization was divided in "Ritterschaften" (knight groups) and its members could call themselves "Ritter der Deutschen Ehrenlegion" (Knight of the German Legion of Honour). Early in the Nazi era, by a decree of 15 May 1934, awards like these were forbidden and the German Legion of Honour joined the Kyffhäuser-Bund (the official veterans' organization) soon after.
German WW2 Artillery 15cm Howitzer Brass Shell Case Dated 1936, used by the Hummel the German self-propelled howitzers, and in artillery in the Afrika Korps. With full waffenamt markings and maker codes. The full designation of this self-propelled artillery gun was Panzerfeldhaubitze 18M auf Geschützwagen III/IV (Sf) Hummel, Sd.Kfz. 165.The German word ‘Hummel’ means bumblebee. This armoured fighting vehicle had a nasty sting. There were two main types of self-propelled guns in the German Army during WW2. One was fitted with an anti-tank gun and the other with an artillery howitzer, like the Hummel. A vehicle fitted with an artillery field howitzer was called a ‘Geschüetzwagen’, which is literally translated as a ‘gun vehicle’. The letters ‘Sf’ stand for ‘Selbstfahrlafette’ – self-propelled carriage. ‘Panzerfeldhaubitze’ means armoured field howitzer. Self-propelled artillery guns were developed to enable fast moving attacks to have artillery support that could keep up with the speed of advancing Panzer Divisions. They could use direct fire mode at targets they could see or, more commonly, use indirect fire at targets plotted on a map. They were not designed to be in the front line or engage in combat with tanks. They were motorized artillery guns that could fire high explosive HE shells over the heads of friendly troops. Most targets would have been given to the crew as map grid references by forward observation officers or infantry units under attack. Quite often, the gun crews could not see where their shells landed, as the target was so far away. They would have to rely on the forward observer to tell them if adjustments had to be made. Not suitable for export.
German WW2 Kriegsmarine Senior Petty Officer Signals Badge Summer Rig.
German WW2 Large Anti Tank Rifle Grenade, Gross Gewehr Panzergranate In excellent unexploded condition. Description; taken from US Bulletin No. 59, March 7, 1944 ; This grenade is fired from the rifled 3 cm. discharger cup (Schiessbecher) which can be fitted to most types of German rifles. It is of the hollow charge type and consists of a steel head containing the explosive and a light alloy or steel and plastic stem containing the fuze and gaine. The propelling cartridge contains a wooden bullet. The body which is of pressed steal contains a steel cone around which the main filler of T.N.T. is cast. A steel washer with a small central hole rests on the open end of the cone and above the latter is a steel ballistic cap. At the bottom of the T.N.T. is an exploder pellet of penthrite wax. Two varieties of the stem have been found, one entirely of light alloy, the other of plastic with a steel shank by which it is screwed on to the head of the grenade. At the base of the stem is a rifled band which corresponds with the rifling in the discharger cup. The stem is divided into compartments by a perforated septum, the lower containing the fuze, the upper the gaine. In the septum is a small flash pellet held in plaoe by a perforated screw plug. The gaine consists of a light alloy container into which is inserted a light alloy top hat containing the detonator, the space below being filled with penthrite wax. The fuze is in the after portion of the stem and consists of a striker over the top of which fits a retaining spring with four prongs bent downward into grooves in the striker body. Around the striker body is an arming collar which has two grooves cut on the inside. An arming spring is compressed between a lip on the arming collar and a second collar at the bottom of the striker body. Around the inside of the arming collar and resting on the striker body is a steel tape which acts as an additional safety device and prevents any possibility of the fuze being accidentally armed when screwing on the base plug. The entire assembly is closed by a base plug which positions the fuze by a stem which fits into a recess in the rear of the striker body. Operation On firing, the shock of discharge causes the arming sleeve to set back against its spring. The four prongs of the retaining spring are forced out of the lower groove in the arming sleeve and engage in the upper groove, retaining the arming sleeve in its lower position. This allows the steel tape to unwind and the striker is then free to move forward on impact firing the gaine. Not suitable to export, for sale to over 18s only, safe inert and empty
German WW2 Luftwaffe Officers Visor Cap Wreath and Cockade Very fine early quality, hand embroidered winged visor cap wreath and national cockade, heavy padded, hand embroidered in silvery-aluminium wire, all mounted on a black wool base. The reverse of the insignia still has black cloth backing intact, and is maker marked; approximately 15cm (6) in length; very fine quality example, in excellent condition
German WW2 Pilots Badge By Assman. Two part construction with rivets. The German Luftwaffe Pilots Badge was instituted on August 12th, 1935 by the order Reichsmarschall Herman Goering. The badge takes the form of a massive swooping eagle clutching a mobile swastika in it's talons . The Eagle is superimposed on a wreath of half laurel (left) and half oak leaves (right). This Luftwaffe Pilots Badge portrays an image of unbridled aggression and ferocity. Maker marked. The Luftwaffe was the aerial warfare branch of the German Wehrmacht during World War II. After the German Empire's World War I-era army air force, the Imperial German Army Air Service or in German, the Luftstreitkräfte from October 1916 onwards, and the naval air units of the Kaiserliche Marine (Imperial German Navy), collectively named the Marine-Fliegerabteilung, had been disbanded by May 1920 under the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, the Luftwaffe was reformed on 26 February 1935 and grew to become one of the strongest, most doctrinally advanced, and most battle-experienced air forces in the world when World War II started in Europe in September 1939. After the defeat of the Third Reich, the Luftwaffe was disbanded in 1946. One of the forerunners of the Luftwaffe, the Imperial German Army Air Service, was founded in 1910. After the defeat of Germany in WWI, the service was dissolved in 1920 under the conditions of the Treaty of Versailles. During the interwar period, German pilots trained in violation of the treaty in secret. By the summer of 1939, the Luftwaffe had nine Jagdgeschwader (fighter wings) mostly equipped with the Messerschmitt Bf 109E, four 'Zerstörergeschwader (destroyer wings) equipped with the Messerschmitt Bf 110 heavy fighter, 11 Kampfgeschwader (bomber wings) equipped with mainly the Heinkel He 111 and the Dornier Do 17Z and four Sturzkampfgeschwader (dive bomber wings). The Luftwaffe's Condor Legion experimented with new doctrine and aircraft during the Spanish Civil War. Throughout the history of the Third Reich, the Luftwaffe had only two commanders-in-chief. The first was Hermann Göring, with the second and last being Generalfeldmarschall Robert Ritter von Greim. When the Second World War began, the Luftwaffe was one of the most technologically advanced air forces in the world. From the start of the war till its end, it was engaged in war crimes and atrocities, starting with strafing civilian refugees to human experiments. In the summer of 1940, the Luftwaffe contributed to the unexpected success in the Battle of France. During the Battle of Britain, the Luftwaffe, despite causing severe damage to the Royal Air Force's infrastructure and British cities during the subsequent Blitz, did not achieve air superiority. The Defence of the Reich campaign gradually destroyed the Luftwaffe's fighter arm. Despite its belated use of advanced turbojet and rocket propelled aircraft for bomber destroyer duties, it was overwhelmed by Allied numbers and a lack of trained pilots and fuel. A last-ditch attempt, known as Operation Bodenplatte, to win air superiority in January 1945 failed. After the Bodenplatte effort, the Luftwaffe had ceased to be an effective fighting force. Göring. This is a mid-war feinzink Assmann pilot’s badge. Resoldered pin retainer.
German WW2 RAD Buckle by Gustav Brehmer Markneukirchen 1937 The RAD (Reichsarbeitsdienst) or Reich Labour Service was instituted to help alleviate the depression of Germany in 1934. It was similar to the WPA and other programs initiated by Roosevelt in the USA. Young men served a six month program of camp life, while taught the merits of drilling, digging, bridge and road building.
German WW2 War Merit Cross In bronze, with date 1939 to reverse, and with relief Swastika to front. A medal for bravery when in military or civilian service but not necessarily when facing the enemy. For example, awarded for rescuing wounded in minefields, bomb disposal or bravery during aerial bombardment. Curiously the bravery required to achieve this medal could be greater than was required to receive the traditional combat bravery medal, the Iron Cross, as the recipient would have had little or no combat adrenaline rush to aid his heroic act. In superb condition with original ribbon of issue.
German WWII Material Donation Certificate Eastern Front 1941 Interesting WW2 German certificate of honour for the efforts of material donation / wool collection for the German soldiers on the Eastern Front. Christmas 1941 21.0 cm x 14.5 cm, Good and collectable condition - Wunderschöne Ehrenurkunde für die geleistete Stoffspende / Wollsammlug für die Deutschen Soldaten an der Ostfront DankiIm Namen des Führers Weihnachten 1941. Framed in case.
Great War Period “On War Service 1916”. The Women’s Badge Serial numbered, maker marked by J.A.Wylie & Co. London. Affixed by a ball head pin. The women’s pattern triangular brooch was finally introduced in May 1916. It was available for women “engaged in the manufacture of munitions of war or other urgent war work”, which included women employed full-time in canteens “etc” of such establishments, skilled and unskilled workers, clerical staff in the approved companies, charladies, and cloakroom attendants. A woman could not be given a badge until she had two months on the job training and badges were not to be issued to girls under 16. No individual certificates were issued with the women’s badges and the employer could control allocation and re-allocation of badges, - they were basically left to their own devices in this respect although the same rules as for the men’s badges applied regarding illegal wearing and handing in when leaving employment or coming off war work. Amongst others, the Chief Inspector at Woolwich Arsenal appeared before the committee and reported that “his” women were keen to be issued with some form of badge, noting that “Apart from sentimental reasons, a badge enables it’s wearer to obtain cheap traveling facilities by rail under certain conditions and secures to it’s wearer preference on crowded trams.” (in other words the conductor would admit a woman who was badged in preference to one who wasn’t). Another point put forward to justify issuing badges was that “it will be useful as a protection to women. They have often to travel distances at night back from their work and an official badge will help secure them from annoyance.”, the MoM diarist earnestly noting here that “Special emphasis was laid on this last point.”
Group of 5 Medals for Soldier of the 1st Army Desert Rats Fighting Rommel Very good group. Italy Star, Africa Star 1935-45 Medal Defence Medal 1939-45 Star. 1st Army Bar.
Himmler's Third Reich Police Service, An 18 Year Long Service Polizei Medal Adolf Hitler instituted 3 classes of Police Long Service Awards in 1938, in order to recognize police personnel for their loyal service to the Third Reich and the Fuhrer. The medal featured here is the 2nd class, for 18 years of service, struck from an alloy and finished in a silver plate. The reverse reads "FUR TREUE DIENSTE IN DER POLIZEI" (For Loyal Service in the Police). Himmler and Heydrich wanted to extend the power of the SS; thus, they urged Hitler to form a national police force overseen by the SS, to guard Nazi Germany against its many enemies at the time—real and imagined.[78] Interior Minister Frick also wanted a national police force, but one controlled by him, with Kurt Daluege as his police chief.[79] Hitler left it to Himmler and Heydrich to work out the arrangements with Frick. Himmler and Heydrich had greater bargaining power, as they were allied with Frick's old enemy, Göring. Heydrich drew up a set of proposals and Himmler sent him to meet with Frick. An angry Frick then consulted with Hitler, who told him to agree to the proposals. Frick acquiesced, and on 17 June 1936 Hitler decreed the unification of all police forces in the Reich, and named Himmler Chief of German Police. In this role, Himmler was still nominally subordinate to Frick. In practice, however, the police was now effectively a division of the SS, and hence independent of Frick's control. This move gave Himmler operational control over Germany's entire detective force. He also gained authority over all of Germany's uniformed law enforcement agencies, which were amalgamated into the new Ordnungspolizei (Orpo: "order police"), which became a branch of the SS under Daluege. The Ordnungspolizei was separate from the SS and maintained a system of insignia and Orpo ranks. It was possible for policemen to be members of the SS but without active duties. Police generals who were members of the SS were referred to simultaneously by both rank titles during the war. For instance, a Generalleutnant in the Police who was also an SS member would be referred to as SS Gruppenführer und Generalleutnant der Polizei. In addition, those Orpo police generals that undertook the duties of both Senior SS and Police Leader (Höhere SS und Polizeiführer) gained equivalent Waffen-SS ranks in August 1944 when Himmler was appointed Chef der Ersatzheeres (Chief of Home Army), because they had authority over the prisoner-of-war camps in their area. Heinrich Himmler's ultimate aim was to replace the regular police forces of Germany with a combined racial/state protection corps (Staatsschutzkorps) of pure SS units. Local law enforcement would be undertaken by the Allgemeine-SS with the Waffen-SS providing homeland-security and political-police functions. Historical analysis of the Third Reich has revealed that senior Orpo personnel knew of Himmler's plan and were opposed to it.
Hindenburg Denkmal Für Das Deutsche Volk A Magnificent Publication Hindenburg, monument to the German people " An honorary gift for the 80th birthday of the President. A huge and impressive tome, with fantastic gilt tooling over scarlet cloth. A very large and weighty book. Very good condition. Copywright publication in 1922 but with additional photos and text from 1930's of Adolf Hitlers Third Reich Period 14 x 11 x 1.5 inches. 4 kilos
HMS Ceylon WW2 Sweetheart Badge or Tiepin HMS Ceylon was a Crown Colony-class light cruiser of the Royal Navy. She was of the Ceylon sub class, named after the island of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). The cruiser saw service in the Atlantic and Pacific theatres during the Second World War. In the postwar era, she participated in actions in Egypt and the Korean War.Built by Stephens at Govan and launched on 30 July 1942, she was completed on 13 July 1943. After two months in the Home Fleet she was transferred to the 4th Cruiser Squadron, with the Eastern Fleet and took part in many carrier raids, bombardments and patrols against Japanese-held territory, including Operations Cockpit, Meridian and Diplomat. In November 1944 she joined the British Pacific Fleet and sailed from Trincomalee on 16 January, taking part in a raid on Pankalan Bradan en route. By May 1945, however, she was back in the Indian Ocean, shelling the Nicobar Islands, and remained in that theatre until the end of the war. In October 1945 she returned to England for refit and lay-up.
Incredible, Historical, WW1 Family 'Saving Private Ryan' Type Group One of the most moving and poignant groups of medals and ephemera we have ever had in 80 years. William and Jane Groombridge, of Tunbridge Wells, Sussex, had four sons, three natural born, and an adopted son. This mixed medal group, memorial plaque, Princess Mary tins, letters from home and newspaper cuttings are from all those sons, and tragically, three of them perished serving King and Country during the war. One was killed in action saving wounded. The last son, Fred, we hope, but do not know for sure, survived the war. The set includes three Mary Boxes, a Mons bar medal pair and the death penny to one brother, a single medal to another brother, a dog tag for the adopted son, three newspaper clippings announcing each boys tragic death, and letters from three son's home sent from the trenches [and a field hospital], and a photograph of one with his company. One lad was shot by a sniper. This is not simply a set of memorablia of the Great War, but the remnants of a remarkable and tragic story of a small Sussex family's sacrifice. Three young men, all volunteers or regulars who paid the ultimate price for their country. "One life is all we have and we live it as we believe in living it. But to sacrifice what you are and to live without belief, that is a fate more terrible than dying" Joan of Arc. A donation for the charity 'Help For Heroes' will be made from this sale.
Italian Fascist MSVN [Black Shirts] 10 Year Service Cross Circa 1933 The front of the medal depicts a cross with four Fasces and a center circle with the letters "MVSN" standing for Milizia Volontaria per la Sicurezza Nazionale (National Security Volunteer Militia) and the reverse "DIECI ANNI" (ten years) with a red, white, green, and navy blue ribbon. The medal is un-marked, as issued and probably made by Lorioli of Milan. The Milizia Volontaria per la Sicurezza Nazionale (MVSN, "Voluntary Militia for National Security"), commonly called the Blackshirts or squadristi, was originally the paramilitary wing of the National Fascist Party and, after 1923, an all-volunteer Militia of the Kingdom of Italy. Its members were distinguished by their black uniforms (modelled on those of the Arditi, Italy's elite troops of World War I) and their loyalty to Benito Mussolini, the Duce (leader) of Fascism, to whom they swore an oath. The silk ribbon on this medal is it's original, the green stripe colour on the ribbon is almost entirely faded out to white .
Italian Fascist Period Medal For the 1936 Ethiopian War Signed By Mussolini Front has the usual bust of Vittorio Emmanuelle IIIrd & the back is well sculptured with the Fascio the mt. Ethiopia plus "Africa Orientale"& "Molti nemici-Molto. On October 3, 1935, Mussolini's Italy attacked Ethiopia without a declaration of war. Four days later, the League of Nations [now the United Nations] declared Italy an aggressor, but as usual, took no action against either Mussolini or Italy [as usual, nothing changes]. Italian troops held back until December of that year, when a border incident in the city of Wal Wal gave Italy its much needed excuse to attack Ethiopia. The truth was that an outmatched, outnumbered Ethiopia was conquered by the Italians in a little over 7 months. On May 2,1936, emperor Haile Selassie went into exile just before Italian forces entered the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa. On May 7, Italy officially annexed Ethiopia. Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini,29 July 1883 – 28 April 1945. He was an Italian politician, journalist, and leader of the National Fascist Party, ruling the country as Prime Minister from 1922 until he was ousted in 1943. He ruled constitutionally until 1925, when he dropped all pretense of democracy and set up a legal dictatorship. Known as Il Duce ("the leader"), Mussolini was the founder of fascism. On 24 July 1943, soon after the start of the Allied invasion of Italy, the Grand Council of Fascism voted against him, and the King had him arrested the following day. On 12 September 1943, Mussolini was rescued from prison in the Gran Sasso raid by German special forces. In late April 1945, with total defeat looming, Mussolini attempted to escape north, only to be quickly captured and summarily executed near Lake Como by Italian Communists. His body was then taken to Milan where it was hung upside down at a service station for public viewing and to provide confirmation of his demise
Italian MVSN Fascist WW2 Leader's Dagger M.V.S.N. Model 1937 dress dagger. Lacking chain hanger. The Italian equivalent of Hitler's SS. Although much rarer than the similar German SS chained dagger it is not as valuable, but only the third we have had in 10 years. The Model 1937 grip is unusual in that its features face the trailing edge rather than the more normal leading edge. The MVSN, Milizia Volontaria per la Sicurezza Nazionale, (Volunteer Militia for National Security) is more commonly called the Black Shirts. This was the only known form of dagger that Adolf Hitler ever wore. On his visit to Mussolini Hitler proudley wore his dagger [that had a personalised white ivory grip instead of regular black].Inspired by the military prowess and black uniforms of the Arditi, Italy's elite storm troops of World War I, the Fascist Blackshirts were organized by Benito Mussolini as the military tool of his political movement. The founders of the paramilitary groups were nationalist intellectuals, former army officers and young landowners opposing peasants' and country labourers' unions. Their methods became harsher as Mussolini's power grew, and they used violence and intimidation against Mussolini's opponents. In 1940 the MVSN was able to muster 340,000 first-line combat troops, providing three divisions (1st, 2nd and 4th - all three of which were lost in the North African Campaign) and, later in 1942, a fourth division ("M") and fifth division Africa were forming. Mussolini also pushed through plans to raise 142 MVSN combat battalions of 650 men each to provide a Gruppo di Assalto to each army division. These Gruppi consisted of two cohorts (each of three centuriae of 3 manipoli of 2 squadre each) plus Gruppo Supporto company of two heavy machine gun manipoli (with three HMG each) and two 81 mm mortar manipoli (with 3 Mortars each). Later 41 Mobile groups were raised to become the third regiment in Italian Army divisions as it was determined through operational experience that the Italian arm's binary divisions were too small in both manpower and heavy equipment. These mobile groups suffered heavy casualties due to being undermanned, under equipped and under trained. The three divisions were destroyed in combat in North Africa. The MVSN fought in every theater where Italy did. Length in scabbard is 14 inches. As with all our items, each one comes with our unique, lifetime guarantee, certificate of authenticity
Kriegsmarine Coastal Artillery Uniform Breast Eagle, Wool and Cotton Green ground with yellow eagle. A nice original Kriegsmarine yellow example. Coastal artillery was the responsibility of the Kriegsmarine, and most of the weapons employed in this manner were captured or obsolete weapons, their role was a defence against invasion, rather than proper coast defence against naval attack many of these guns were mounted in defensive works of either turrets or casemates. Marine Artillery Units were trained as ground artillery. There are several accounts of Naval Artillery Forward Observers during the Market Garden operation. Coastal batteries were used against ground targets all the way up the French coast, that is, if they could be turned towards the landward side. Also, something to keep in mind, Naval Artillerymen are trained to hit moving targets such as ships, not much of a stretch to hit relatively stationary ground targets and the like such as a battalion area or a road junction. Coordinates, angles, grids, and trajectories are calculated much the same and a big shell is a big shell regardless of the target…
L'Amerique en Guerre War Airborne Psychological Warfare Leaflet Nov. 1943 No. 75. An original 4 page fold out leaflet/newspaper published by the The Psychological Warfare Division, Supreme Headquarters. Dropped by the 8th Airforce in November 1943. In the European theatre, Allied leaflet operations to the occupied countries are regarded by some as the most effective of the various leaflet campaigns. If a French citizen was found in possession of one these leaflets it could mean immediate imprisonment or even execution. Along side the single-sheet "timeless" leaflets, were news based tracts including newspapers and magazines. The largest number of leaflets was disseminated over France, simply because the country was large with a widely dispersed population. Once British forces had been withdrawn from France it became obvious that the Germans were exerting strict control of the news. If any spirit of resistance was to be kept alive, the French had to receive news and encouragement from Britain and her Allies. Great work was done by the BBC via its radio network but the likely confiscation of radio receivers by the Germans meant that some other way had to found to penetrate the Nazi propaganda wall. The ideal would have been a daily air-disseminated newspaper but this was impracticable due to a shortage of available aircraft and the unpredictability of the weather. It was decided, therefore, to institute a newspaper named Le Courrier de L'air to be dropped at weekly intervals. The first issue was dropped in December 1940 and by the time France was liberated close on 200 editions had been printed. In November 1942, the Americans designed a magazine similar to "Courrier" which was entitled L'Amerique en Guerre and was delivered by American planes until August 1944. Each of the around 100 editions stated "Brought to the French people by the U.S.A.A.F".
Large Partial Newspaper Poster From a WW1 Zeppelin Raid Daily Mirror Zeppelin Raid Murder Verdict. It is likely it refers to a Zeppelin attack of January 31, 1916. An inquest into the death of Maud and Frederick Fellows was held on Tuesday, February 15, 1916 and the verdict highlighted the anger felt in the Black Country. Maud Fellows was 24 and had been walking with her sweetheart, Frederick Fellows who was unrelated to her, when the bomb had dropped near them. Frederick was killed on the spot, whilst Maud “was found terribly injured lying across his breast”. She died in hospital two weeks later, on the Saturday before the inquest. The jury found that they had been killed by a bomb from an enemy aircraft and controversially it returned a verdict of “wilful murder” against the Kaiser and the Crown Prince “as accessories before the fact”.One consequence of the Zeppelin Raid of January 31, 1916 was “the stimulating effect upon recruiting in some of the Staffordshire towns”, as one newspaper put it. The report from mid-February emphasised that “in one district sufficient recruits have been obtained since the occurrence to form nearly a couple of companies. By contrast, in the same district prior to the raid recruiting was at a very low ebb.” In another locality, recruitment had increased substantially by 50 per cent; whilst in a third a whole company had been raised in one week alone. The journalist stressed that “many men who have paid a visit to the areas in which the damage was caused have enlisted immediately”. As these posters were simply printed to advertise the days headlines they were 'time pertinant' so they were destroyed every day, and replaced with the next issues headlines the following morning, thus, almost all made were destroyed within 12 hours, so they are really most rare, and a unique piece of history from the earlist days of aeronautical warfare. 19 x 23.5 inches sold unframed. Would look stunning nicely reframed
Lenin & Stalin Soviet Silk Banner 'Workers of the Country [World] Unite' Superb quality and in fabulous condition, all woven silk with gilt bullion tassles on three sides. The coat of arms of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic (RSFSR) was adopted on 10 July 1918 by the government of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic (Soviet Union), and modified several times afterwards. It shows wheat as the symbol of agriculture, a rising sun for the future of the Russian nation. Used intially from 1918, through WW2 to the 1970's Cold War Era. The May Day parade itself was ordered by Marshal of the Soviet Union Joseph (Iosif) Stalin on June 22, 1945, by virtue of Order 370 of the Office of the Supreme Commander in Chief, Armed Forces of the USSR. This order is at follows: “ Order of the Supreme Commander in Chief, Armed Forces of the USSR and concurrent People's Commissar of State for National Defense To mark the victory over Germany in the Great Patriotic War, I order a parade of troops of the Army, Navy and the Moscow Garrison, the Victory Parade, on June 24, 1945, at Moscow's Red Square. Marching on parade shall be the combined regiments of all the fronts, a People's Commissariat of National Defense combined regiment, the Soviet Navy, military academies and schools, and troops of the Moscow Garrison and Military District. My deputy, Marshal of the Soviet Union Georgy Zhukov will be the parade inspector. Marshal Konstantin Rokossovsky will command the Victory Parade itself. I entrust to Col. Gen. Pavel Artemyev, the preparations and the supervision of the parade organization, due to his concurrent capacities as the Commanding General of the Moscow Military District and Commanding Officer in charge of the Moscow City Garrison. June 22, 1945. Order #370(signed) MARSHAL OF THE SOVIET UNION JOSEPH V. STALIN Supreme Commander-in-Chief, Armed Forces of the USSR And concurrent People's Commissar of National Defense of the USSR. Silk parade banner size 112 cm x 140 cm approx. The more scarce earlier issue, before the addition of the central star at the top of the wreath.
Malta's British Empire 'George Cross' for Heroism Commemorative Medal Available to veterans who served in Malta between the dates of 10th June 1940 and 8th September 1943 to be worn with pride not alongside gallantry decorations, but separately and distinctively. In April of 1942 King George VI in a dramatic and unprecedented gesture conferred the George Cross medal on the tiny Mediterranean island of Malta. As it transpired April was the final month of the great Luftwaffe offensive and possibly the most difficult period of the siege so devastatingly enforced by the Axis powers. The island and its population had been subjected to a constant and unrelenting bombardment since June 1940 and were not to experience any relief from these conditions until the final months of 1942 when supplies and aid began to reach the defenders in significant quantities. All over the world the people of the United Nations had followed the resistance of the islanders and those trying to bring aid by sea and air. The news of the award of the George Cross was internationally welcomed as it served in a tangible way to mark the heroism of all concerned. The Government of Malta dignified the fiftieth anniversary of the presentation of the George Cross to the island in 1942 by striking the 'Malta George Cross Fiftieth Anniversary Commemorative Medal'. The closing date for application was 15th April 1994. Next of kin could also apply for the medal which would only have been issued on receipt of a completed application form and proof of service in Malta between the dates of 10th June 1940 and 8th September 1943. The colours of the ribbon, two narrow stripes of white and red on a background of blue, are representative of the Malta flag and the George Cross.
Medal for Liberation of Transylvania Medal was instituted on 1 October 1940. The obverse has the bust of King Matthias Corvinus (1458-1490). Reverse showing arms of Transylvania with various names around the rim: 'Vitez, Nagybanyai, Horthy, Miklos, Kormanyzo, Orszaglasanak, XX, Eveben and others. The medal was instituted on 1 October 1940 to mark the return of part of Transylvania to Hungary. At the end of World War I, Hungary lost almost three-quarters of its territory, amongst them many areas with large Hungarian populations, including Transylvania. In mid-1940, with Romania under pressure from the Soviet Union and Bulgaria, Hungary lodged a claim to Transylvania. Germany and Italy led arbitration at Vienna and on 30 August Romania ceded approximately 43,500 square kilometres of territory and almost 2,400,000 people in northwest Transylvania to Hungary. The award was annulled after World War II and the territory returned to Romania. Mátyás Corvinus (1443-1490) was the son of John Hunyadi and reigned as King of Hungary from 1458 until his death. In 1479 to 1483 he retook Transylvania from the Ottoman Turks and is revered in Hungary as a national hero. Better than usual condition.Original ribbon.
Memorabilia of The Legendary 'Lawrence of Arabia's WW1 Driver, J.O.Seddon. In T.E. Lawrence's famed autobiography, The Seven Pillars of Wisdom, he lists J.O.Seddon within his Nominal Roll of men of the Hejaz Armoured Car Co. [attached from the R.A.S.C.] that were in Lawrence's service during his Arab Rebellion campaign against the Turkish forces. One of the greatest films [movies] of the 20th century was 'Lawrence of Arabia' starring Peter O'Toole and directed by the genuis David Lean. It depicted Lawrence's remarkable life during the Arab Rebellion and cemented his name forever in the world's consciousness. Mr J.O.Seddon was previously an intelligence officer before his appointment to Lawrence as a driver, in 1917 and 1918, driving Lawrence's armoured Rolls Royce etc. Seddon's treasured personal memorabilia, that we are most privileged to offer here, were used by Mr Seddon during his service to his country. They include, his sovereign cum vesta case [monogrammed POS by hand engraving], his alloy, embossed cigarette box, his vesta matchbook case [also monogrammed P.O.S.], and his service blue glass driving goggles. There is also a photocopy of a newspaper article announcing his death on January 13th 1949, and detailing his place as a WW1 hero, serving under one of the most famous British heroes of all time. However, it is furthermore most intriguing that P.O.Seddon was previously a serving intelligence officer, of which Lawrence may not have been aware, it is a matter of public record that the British General staff had little trust in Lawrence's abilities, and were frequently confounded by Prince Faisal's preferral of Lawrence's continued attachment and leadership in the Arab forces. Very much in part due to the strength of respect Lawrence commanded from his Arab confederates, including Faisal, in the tortuous campaign against the Turkish forces. One can conjecture that Seddon may have been placed in Lawrence's service by HMG, in order, as they might instruct, to 'keep an eye on him'. A photo in the gallery of Lawrence of Arabia enters Damascus 1918 in an armoured wood-body Rolls that has been adapted for desert warfare. Another photo in an armoured car of Prince Feisal (seated front, next to driver) and other men, sallying forth from Guweira. (With T.E. Lawrence in the back, according to the Marist archive.). In the gallery we also show a page from The Seven Pillars of Wisdom showing Seddons name
Mightier Yet! Every Day More Planes Every Day More Pilots Original WW2 Propaganda poster for the British wartime RAF and the mighty Spitfire. Printed for HM Stationary Office by J. Weiner Ltd London WC1. A propaganda information and recruitment poster. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale. Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return. When the U-boat commander Günther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss. The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring. Good condition 10 inches x 15 inches
Model Suit of Armour Tin plate construction depicting a knight in 14th century armour with the cross of St John of Malta on the breast plate, holding a sword standing on a wooden turned base. The knight 9 inches, overall 11 inches.
Most Intrigueing National Socialist and Volkisch Runology Carved Wood Totem A fascinating Third Reich themed artifact. Using the runic symbolism of sectional carvings of the curved sunwheel swastika [the sonnenrad], the toten-rune symbol of death, the bird, the tree of life, the dragon, Nazi men performing the Zieg Heil salute, and ancient armed helmeted Norsemen. A totem is a symbol that serves as an emblem of a group of people, such as a family, clan, lineage, or tribe. More often than not associated with the tribes of the Americas, but was also used around the world from ancient and now lost cultures, right up to the post war period such as this piece. In the early Third Reich of Hitler's Germany Volkisch theorists believed that Germany's Teutonic ancestors had spread out from Germany throughout Europe. Of the German tribes that spread through Europe, the theorists identified that the Burgundians, Franks, and Western Goths joined with the Gauls to make France; the Lombards moved south and joined with the Italians; the Jutes made Denmark; the Angles and Saxons made England; the Flemings made Belgium; and other tribes made the Netherlands. Both Hitler and Himmler saw a most special attraction to the Aryan theories that effectively became official policy. Himmlers Wewelsburg Castle, from 1934, was used by the SS under Heinrich Himmler and was to be expanded into a complex acting as the central SS cult-site, based entirely around Nordic runology. The German Faith Movement (Deutsche Glaubensbewegung) was a religious movement in Nazi Germany (1933–1945), closely associated with University of Tübingen professor Jakob Wilhelm Hauer. The movement sought to move Germany away from Christianity towards a religion based on Germanic paganism and Nazi ideas. The development of the German Faith Movement revolved around four main themes: 1st; The propagation of the 'blood and soil' ideology 2nd; The replacement of Christian ceremonies by pagan equivalents; 3rd; The most favoured pagan deity being the sun, as can be seen from the flag of the faith movement the rejection of Christian ethics and 4th; The cult of Hitler's personality. Carl Jung, in his 1936 essay Wotan saw the German Faith Movement as "decent and well-meaning people who honestly admit their Ergriffenheit and try to come to terms with this new and undeniable fact." He commends Hauer's book Deutsche Gottschau as an attempt "to build a bridge between the dark forces of life and the shining world of historical ideas". 35.25 inches x 6.75 x 3 inches. Approx 5 kilos.
Most Scarce1909 Graf Von Zeppellin Airship Z.3. Commemorative Bronze Plaque A bronze plaque issued to commemorate the Z3 Zeppelin Airship in 1909. Depicting the portrait bust of Graf Ferd. Von Zeppelin. The Z.3. Flying over Nuernberg. Maker marked A Hummel. Early original aviation souvenirs are most desireable and Zeppelin airship items particularly so. 10cm across
N.S.F.K. Donation Certificate Signed by "Der Führer der Standarte M.D.F.B. Der Dank des N.S.F.K.-Mannes für die Spende zur Uniformierung .The gratitude of the N.S.F.K.-personnel for the donation of 5 Reich Marks to acquire uniforms Gruppe 17 Ostmark Standarte 111. A most attractive piece of Art Deco art, a donation certificate, designed by Mistlbacher, featuring two diving biplanes with the NSFK insignia (Icarus figure and swastika) in the background, printed in various hues of blue and brown Signed by "Der Führer der Standarte M.D.F.B." The N.S.F.K. (National Socialist Flying Corps) was created in January of 1932, to promote interest in aviation throughout Germany. It was a male dominated association, although females were not discouraged from participating in events. The NSFK was very closely associated with the Hitler Youth (HJ) organization. Events by the NSFK involved model building with flying competitions of the completed projects, educational classes related to aeronautics followed by building and flying actual glider aircraft. Glider flying was the mainstay activity of the NSFK, although ballooning and balloon competitions were also held by the NSFK. As with most NSDAP organizations, sporting events of all kinds were popular and encouraged within the ranks of the NSFK. Essentially, the NSFK was divided into three sections - powered flight, gliders and ballooning. The NSFK also operated a ski school at Zell-am-See in Austria. The NSFK utilized nearly 4000 glider flying sites throughout Germany. The NSFK owned a total of sixteen gliding/aviation schools and four larger State Soaring Schools (Reichssegelschulen). The most famous of these soaring schools was one on the Wasserkuppe in the Rhon mountains, an area where the Fliegerdenkmal had been erected as a memorial to Germany's WWI fliers. (See the "Riedel Grouping page" for more information on Wasserkuppe and the Fliegerdenkmal.) Following the rise to power of Adolf Hitler, a Fuhrer decree incorporated the NSFK as a legal corporation into the Reich, and subsequently disbanded another aeronautical organization, the DLV (Deutsche Luftsport Verband). Led by a Korpsfuhrer, the first was Friedrich Christiansen, the NSFK continued its aeronautical educational focus and aviation events including model flight competitions, glider competitions and flying days were held throughout Germany. Membership in the NSFK was voluntary and exclusive. Members of the NSFK were prohibited from being members of other associations or groups such as the SS, the SA or the NSKK. Although participation in the NSFK could eventually lead to a pilots license, this license was not recognized by the Luftwaffe. An NSFK pilot would still need to complete flight training with the German Luftwaffe to become a Luftwaffe pilot. In most cases, NSFK aircraft and gliders had to share airfield space with Luftwaffe units and squadrons. There is no doubt that many future Luftwaffe pilots got their training and interest in aviation from participation in the NSFK. It is estimated that over 16,000 gliders were produced by Germany during WWII. At the age of 14, NSFK members or Hitler Youth members could begin their training toward earning their glider pilots rating. Nicely framed.11 x 15 inches, frame 13.25 x 17.25 inches
NEW YEAR GIFT VOUCHER A Gift Voucher is often the ideal solution to leave the decision of the item to choose to the person you wish to gift. They are available from us for all values, from only £20 upwards, and as required, and are entirely bespoke to the recipient. All are unique and customised for each and every occasion. We have priced this example in the gallery at £100, and the image shows our £200.00 voucher, but you can specify any alternative amount at all in the 'comment' section in the Webstore Order page.
Northern River Lancers - White Metal Hat Badge 1953 - 56 The 15th Northern River Lancers was an amphibious assault squadron of the Australian Army, the Lancers were designated 'A' Squadron, Amphibious Assault Regiment. The 15th Northern River Lancers were formed in 1948 and based in Northern New South Wales, in 1956 it was amalgamated with the 1st Royal New South Wales Lancers to become 1st/15th Royal New South Wales Lancers.
NSKK Silver Bullion Kepi Cap Eagle Badge
O.R. 1950 56th. Infantry Division [London], 'Black Cat' Formation Badge 56th. Infantry Division [London] divisional [flash] insignia. Printed example of the black cat [Dick Wittington's cat] combined with the sword of the City of London on a red square of wool. The regiment was later formed as the 56th Armoured Division [London] with the sword. The regular WW2 56th insignia has no sword. At the outbreak of war in September 1939, the division was mobilised as motorized infantry under the title of the 1st London Division. It was reorganised as an infantry division in June 1940 and renamed the 56th (London) Infantry Division on 18 November 1940. The divisional insignia during the Second World War was changed to an outline of a black cat in a red background. The cat stood for Dick Whittington's cat, a symbol of London. The division remained in the United Kingdom during the Battle of France, moving to the Middle East in November 1942, where it served in Iraq and Palestine, until moving to Egypt in March 1943 and thence forward to Libya and the front, in April. This involved the division, commanded by Major-General Eric G. Miles, travelling some 2,300 miles (3,700 km) by road, a notable achievement and testament to the organization of the division and the ability of its mechanics and technicians. The division sat out the Allied invasion of Sicily (except for the 168th Brigade, which was attached to the understrength 50th Infantry Division) and moved to Italy in September 1943, where they fought in the landings at Salerno under the command of the US Fifth Army. During this time the 201st Guards Brigade joined the division, to replace the 168th Brigade which returned to the division in October. In January 1944, the 56th Division, commanded now by Major-General Gerald Templer, saw service in the Battle of Monte Cassino, serving there until March 1944 and participated in the Anzio Campaign. After being withdrawn to Egypt at the end of March, the division, under Major-General John Y. Whitfield, returned to Italy in July 1944, where it took part in the Battles along the Gothic Line and remained there until after Victory in Europe Day. During the fighting of 1944 and 1945, some of the infantry battalions that suffered heavy casualties were disbanded, to make up for an acute manpower shortage. The division also took part in Operation Grapeshot, the Allied offensive which ended the war in Italy. Members of the 10th Battalion, Royal Berkshire Regiment, part of the 168th Brigade, climbing the heights of Calvi Risorta shortly after the invasion of Italy, October 1943 After crossing the Volturno in October 1943, the division entered the town of Calvi Vecchia. Their attempts to radio the Fifth Army to cancel a planned bombing on the town failed. As a last resort, the 56th released an American homing pigeon, named G.I. Joe, which carried a message that reached the allies just as the planes were being warmed up. The attack was called off and the town was saved from the planned air assault
Officer's Tunic WW2 Issue For Capt Devos Gloucestershire Regt. Acquired as part of a single officer's WW2 special forces kit. Capt. Devos. He served in the war in France and Germany [possibly elsewhere] and was promoted through to Lt. In 1944, and Capt. in early 1945. His officer's tunic denotes he was in the Gloucestershire Regt. His tunic is named, as are all his special forces, secret intelligence, and weapons training manual etc. plus his other kit and FS commando knife.. Also it came with an early war Brodie helmet with Div. Flash [tricolour of red whit and blue]. His tunic is superb with all his wartime patches etc. We also have his Sam Browne with a .45 cal holster that has been cut and customised for quicker draw. Plus his '42 dated canvas belt and '43 dated holster. Compass pouch dated '42. We are selling as separate lots as not all collectors collect all things.
On War Service 1915 Munitions Badge with Serial Number Made by T Fattorini On War Service 1915 badge. The On War Service 1915 badge was issued by the Ministry of Munitions, to women creating munitions for the war effort in 1915, one of the most hazardous occupations ever created, sadly it is not known how many women died making shells and amunition University of Manchester historian Dr Anne-Marie Claire Hughes said they were not officially recognised by the Government or the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. None of the victims' families received the death plaque or a scroll or letter and they also lost out on state benefits, she said. Dr Hughes, from the university's School of Arts Histories and Cultures, said: "Though very sad, the omission of women working as munitions workers was not a result of any hostility towards women workers or prejudice by the authorities. Indeed, many of the women who died were recognised during the war by their own communities and buried alongside their male comrades". Explosions at British munitions factories during World War I included the 1917 Silvertown explosion, in which 73 people were killed and over 400 injured, and a 1918 explosion at the National Shell Filling Factory, Chilwell, which killed over 130 workers These metal badges were worn by civilians during the First World War in order to indicate that the person wearing it was on engaged in important war-work. Several of these badges were officially produced and distributed nationally but many more were produced privately by employing companies to support their employees. Before conscription was introduced in 1916, the army relied on voluntary recruitment. It was assumed by many that a man not in uniform was avoiding joining up and was therefore often accused of shirking their duty to their country. The famous white feather campaign saw men not in uniform presented with a white feather as a symbol of cowardice. The official badges were intended to prove that the wearer was doing their duty to their country in a time of war in a different way. They were not in uniform, but they may have been working in munitions factories or in the dockyards carrying out work that was vital to the war effort. After conscription, the need for these badges faded, along with the white feather campaign. However, many continued to be worn throughout the war, especially by female shift workers for whom the badge could give priority boarding and fare concessions on public transport, as well as indicating that there was nothing disreputable about these ladies travelling alone at night.
Operation of Regulations of Zeppelin Airship Construction in Freidrichafen Published for the Zeppelin Co. in 10th Sept 1934. A paragraph withing the text makes a reference to the SA and SS but sadly as it is printed Gothic German it's devil to translate. The booklet contains operating istructions of the company including such details of working hours, winter and summer, and all manner of expected functions of the staff of the company. Not many of these documents survived. Dr Eckner is named on the last page as the company Fuhrer. The company that ran the Graf Zeppelin and Hindenberg transatlantic airships was the Nazi propaganda based company, titled the DZR, the Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei. The DZR was created at the instigation of Air Minister Hermann Göring as a way to increase Nazi control over zeppelin operations, and can be see as part of the larger policy of Gleichschaltung, or coordination, which affected all aspects of German life in the years following Hitler’s assumption of power. Consistent with Nazi ideology, the airship was expected to be more than just a private commercial venture; it was to be a public symbol of the new German nation. In a speech marking the founding of the DZR, Göring commented: “I hope that the new ship will also fulfill its duty in furthering the cause of Germany… The airship does not have the exclusive purpose of flying across the Atlantic, but also has a responsibility to act as the nation’s representative.”
Orginal 1950's Bedfordshire Constable's Police Helmet Plate Black night patrol badge. Most desireable and highly collectable example. A very nice example. I lug lacking. Obsolete issue.
Original Framed Picture of the Goodyear-Zeppelin Dock and USS Akron Framed in genuine alluminium and Duralumin taken from the construction of the airship. USS Akron (ZRS-4) was a helium-filled rigid airship of the U.S. Navy that was destroyed in a thunderstorm off the coast of New Jersey on the morning of 4 April 1933, killing 73 of her 76 crewmen and passengers. This accident was the largest loss of life for any known airship crash. During her accident-prone 18-month term of service, the Akron also served as a flying aircraft carrier for launching and recovering F9C Sparrowhawk fighter planes. With lengths of 785 ft (239 m), 20 ft (6.1 m) shorter than the German commercial airship Hindenburg, Akron and her sister airship the Macon were among the largest flying objects in the world. Although the Hindenburg was longer, she was filled with hydrogen, so the two U.S. airships still hold the world record for helium-filled airships. There is a similar Duralumin framed photo in the Naval History & Heritage Command from Washington, DC, USA. Some of the framed backing card is worn [picture and frame entirely unaffected] 8" x 10 " overall
Original German WW1 Silver Grade Wound Badge, In Excellent Condition With most of it's original silver plate finish present. A WW1 issue but worn in WW2. A WW2 souvenir from a WW2 British Royal Marine. The badge had three classes: black (3rd class, representing Iron), for those wounded once or twice by hostile action (including air raids), or frost-bitten in the line of duty; silver (2nd class) for being wounded three or four times, or suffering loss of a hand, foot or eye from hostile action (also partial loss of hearing), facial disfigurement or brain damage via hostile action; and in gold (1st class, which could be awarded posthumously) for five or more times wounded, total blindness, "loss of manhood", or severe brain damage via hostile action. Badges exist in pressed steel, brass and zinc, as well as some base metal privately commissioned versions. Those of the First World War were also produced in a cutout pattern. All versions of the Wound Badge were worn on the lower left breast of the uniform or tunic. The badge was worn below all other awards on the left. We have the paras medal as well.
Original German WW2 SA [StormTroopers] Military Sports Badge Award A most impressive award. Maker marked, W.Redo, Saar-Lautern, Eiguntum D.Oberste SA- Fuhrung. Pin back. A photo in the gallery of Erich Priebke a WW2 Gestapo German Officer, wearing this same form of award. The tests for the award consisted of three groups: physical exercises, defence exercises and field exercises: Group 1. Physical Exercise a) 100 yard sprint b) Long Jump c) Putting the Weight d) Long-distance throw (with dummy grenade) e) 3000 meter run Group 2.Defence Exercise (Wehrsport) a) 25 kilometer route march with a 27.5 lb pack b) Small caliber arms fire c) Aimed grenade throwing d) 200 meter race in gas-mask,over 4 obstcales a miniature"assault course" e) Swimming or cycling speed test f) Test of elementray First Aid techniques Group 3. Field Exercises (Gelandedienst) a) Map reading b) Judging terrain and estimating ranges c) Signalling d) Reconnaissance work Only members of the SA was eligible for this award 1933-1935. Instituted as the SA Sports Badge (SA Sport-Abzeichen) but renamed 1935
Original German WW2 SA [StormTroopers] Military Sports Badge Award A most impressive award. Maker marked And numbered. Pin back.. The tests for the award consisted of three groups: physical exercises, defence exercises and field exercises: Group 1. Physical Exercise a) 100 yard sprint b) Long Jump c) Putting the Weight d) Long-distance throw (with dummy grenade) e) 3000 metre run Group 2.Defence Exercise (Wehrsport) a) 25 kilometre route march with a 27.5 lb pack b) Small calibre arms fire c) Aimed grenade throwing d) 200 metre race in gas-mask, over 4 obstacles a miniature "assault course" e) Swimming or cycling speed test f) Test of elementray First Aid techniques Group 3. Field Exercises (Gelandedienst) a) Map reading b) Judging terrain and estimating ranges c) Signalling d) Reconnaissance work Only members of the SA was eligible for this award 1933-1935. Instituted as the SA
Original Parachute Jump Instructor APJI Wings Army Cloth Brevet Removed from uniform of a British Army Assistant Parachute Jump Instructor in the post wartime, in nice condition with small backing cloth loss . "We ought to have a corps of at least 5,000 parachute troops, including a proportion of Australians, New Zealanders and Canadians, together with trustworthy Norwegians and Frenchmen… I hear that something is being done already to form such a corps but only, I believe, on a very small scale. Advantage of the summer must be taken to train these troops, who can nonetheless play their part meanwhile as shock troops in home defence. Pray let me have a note from the War Office on the subject." Prime Minister Winston Churchill to General Sir Hastings Ismay 22 June 1940
Original Pembroke Yeomanry Regiment Cap Badge All white metal version. The Pembroke Yeomanry were formed in 1794, by Lord Milford when King George III was on the throne, William Pitt the Younger was Prime Minister of Great Britain, and across the English Channel, Britain was faced by a French nation that had recently guillotined its King and which possessed a revolutionary army numbering half a million men. The 1/1st Pembroke Yeomanry was mobilised on 4 August 1914 as part of the South Wales Mounted Brigade on the outbreak of the First World War. The brigade was assembled at Hereford and moved to East Anglia by the end of August 1914. It joined the 1st Mounted Division in August 1914, replacing 1st South Midland Mounted Brigade which moved to 2nd Mounted Division. In November 1915, the brigade was dismounted. It was replaced in 1st Mounted Division by 2/1st Eastern Mounted Brigade when it departed for Egypt. With the brigade, the regiment was posted to Egypt in March 1916. On arrival a detachment from the regiment formed part of the Imperial Camel Corps. On 20 March, South Wales Mounted Brigade was absorbed into the 4th Dismounted Brigade (along with the Welsh Border Mounted Brigade). In March 1917 they were re-roled as infantry and together with the Glamorgan Yeomanry were converted into the 24th (Pembroke & Glamorgan) Battalion, The Welsh Regiment. They joined 231st Brigade in the 74th (Yeomanry) Division. In May 1918, the Division moved to France, and the battalion saw action on the Western Front. As part of the 74th Yeomanry Division they were involved in the following battles Second Battle of Gaza, Third Battle of Gaza, Battle of Beersheba and the Battle of Epehy. The 24th Welch entered Ath on 11 November 1918, only two and a half hours before hostilities ceased. The 2nd Line regiment was formed in 1914. Early in 1915 it joined the 2/1st South Wales Mounted Brigade at Carmarthen and later moved to Llandilo and Dorchester. In September 1915, it moved with the brigade to the Yoxford area and joined the 1st Mounted Division. On 31 March 1916, the remaining Mounted Brigades were ordered to be numbered in a single sequence and the brigade became 4th Mounted Brigade. The regiment was based at Southwold during the raid by Admiral Boedicker's battle cruisers on Lowestoft in 1916. In July 1916 there was a major reorganization of 2nd Line yeomanry units in the United Kingdom. All but 12 regiments were converted to cyclists and as a consequence the regiment was dismounted and the brigade converted to 2nd Cyclist Brigade (and the division to 1st Cyclist Division). Further reorganization in November 1916 saw the regiment departing for the 1st Cyclist Brigade where it was amalgamated with the 2/1st Glamorgan Yeomanry as the 2nd (Pembroke and Glamorgan) Yeomanry Cyclist Regiment.[a] The regiment resumed its separate identity as 2/1st Pembroke Yeomanry in March 1917 at Aldeburgh. It moved to Benacre in July and to Lowestoft at the end of the year. It was still at Lowestoft in 1st Cyclist Brigade at the end of the war. During the Second World War, the Pembroke Yeomany on mobilisation formed two regiments - the 102nd Field Regiment and the 2nd Line 146th Field Regiment. The first line 102nd Field Regiment, formed from the two Pembrokeshire Batteries, landed at Algiers in February 1943 as part of the British First Army. After the fall of Tunis and the end of the Tunisia Campaign they converted to a medium artillery regiment and landed in Italy with the British Eighth Army, in December 1943, and fought in the Italian Campaign and by the end of the war they were on the banks of the River Po.
Original Portrait Rudolf Jordan Gauleiter Halle-Merseburg+ Magdeburg-Anhalt Portrait in oil on canvasd of Rudolf Jordan (21 June 1902 – 27 October 1988). He was a Nazi Gauleiter in Halle-Merseburg and Magdeburg-Anhalt in the time of the Third Reich. One of the notorious and prominent high command of Hitlers Third Reich. An original Nazi oil portrait from the 1930's. Most similar in the new Arian style to the Nazi portrait painter Fritz Erler, and his painting of 'Minister and Gauleiter Adolf Wagner', 1936. It was exhibited in the GDK, the Great German Art Exhibition, in 1939, in room 23. It was bought there by Hitler for 12.000 RM. In fact he bought two paintings by Fritz Erler: ‘Porträt des Staatsministers und Gauleiters Adolf Wagner‘ and ‘Porträt des Reichsministers Frick‘. They are now in the possession of the US Army Military Center of History. Possibly this portrait was also in that exhibition with the two other Gauleiter Wagner and Frick. Erlers similar style portrait of Hitler, also painted in his SA uniform, in 1931, is currently valued for sale at 725,000 Euros. Around 450 portraits depicting Hitler and other Nazi-officials and symbols are currently stored in the U.S. Army Center of Military History in Washington From 19 January 1931, Jordan was appointed Nazi Gauleiter of Halle-Merseburg, and then began rising within the Party ranks, acting as member of the Prussian Landtag between April 1932 and October 1933 and being appointed to the Prussian State Council and made an SA Gruppenführer. In the same year began the publication of the Mitteldeutsche Tageszeitung newspaper, led by Jordan. In March 1933 came his appointment as Plenipotentiary for the Province of Saxony in the Reichsrat and in November 1933 his election as a member of the Reichstag. On 20 April 1937, Adolf Hitler personally appointed him Reichsstatthalter (Reich Governor) in Braunschweig and Anhalt and NSDAP Gauleiter of Magdeburg-Anhalt. Jordan was succeeded as Gauleiter of Halle-Merseburg by Joachim Albrecht Eggeling. In the same year came Jordan's promotion to SA-Obergruppenführer. In 1939, Jordan became Chief of the Anhalt Provincial Government and Reichsverteidigungskommissar (Reich Defence Commissar, or RVK) in Defence District XI. On 18 April 1944 came Jordan's last leap up the career ladder when he was appointed High President (Oberpräsident) of the Province of MagdeburgIn the war's dying days, Jordan managed to go underground with his family under a false name. He was nonetheless arrested by the British on 30 May 1945, and in July of the next year, the Western Allies handed him over to the Soviets.Late in 1950 – after four years in custody in the Soviet occupation zone – Jordan was sentenced to 25 years in a labour camp in the Soviet Union. Only Federal Chancellor Konrad Adenauer's visit to Moscow managed to persuade the Soviets to reconsider Jordan's sentence, and then he was released on 13 October 1955. In the years to come, Jordan earned a living as a sales representative, and worked as an administrator for an aircraft manufacturing firm. He died in Munich. The Gardelegen massacre was the cold-blooded murder of inmates that had been evacuated from the Dora-Mittelbau concentration camp and some of its sub-camps on April 3rd, 4th and 5th. Around 4,000 prisoners had been bound for the Bergen-Belsen, Sachsenhausen or Neuengamme concentration camps, but when the railroad tracks were bombed by American planes, they had been re-routed to Gardelegen, which was the site of a Cavalry Training School and a Parachutist Training School. The trains were forced to stop before reaching the town of Gardelegen and some of the escaped prisoners had terrorized the nearby villages, raping, looting and killing civilians. The man who is considered to be the main instigator of the Gardelegen massacre is 34-year-old Gerhard Thiele , who was the Nazi party district leader of Gardelegen. On April 6, 1945, Thiele called a meeting of his staff and other officials at which he issued an order, which had been given to him a few days before by Gauleiter Rudolf Jordan , that any prisoners who were caught looting or who tried to escape should be shot on the spot. In 1932, Nazi Gauleiter Rudolf Jordan claimed that SS Security Chief Reinhard Heydrich was not a pure "Aryan". Within the Nazi organisation such innuendo could be damning, even for the head of the Reich's counterintelligence service. Gregor Strasser passed the allegations on to Achim Gercke who investigated Heydrich's genealogy. Gercke reported that Heydrich was "... of German origin and free from any coloured and Jewish blood". He insisted that the rumours were baseless. Even with this report, Heydrich privately engaged SD member Ernst Hoffman to further investigate and deny the rumours. The last two pictures in the gallery of Jordan with Hitler and his Gaulieters at his 50th birthday examining his convertible Volkwagen Beetle, and the Erler painting of Gauleiter Wagner, bought by Hitler. 2 foot x 3 foot unframed. Water stain at the rear of the canvas. Surviving original portraits of Third Reich leaders are now very rare for at the end of the war thousands of paintings –portraits of Nazi-leaders, paintings containing a swastika or depicting military/war sceneries– were destroyed. With knives, fires and hammers, they smashed countless sculptures and burned thousands of paintings. However around 8,722 artworks were shipped to military deposits in the U.S. From 1933 to 1949 Germany experienced two massive art purges. Both the National Socialist government and OMGUS (the U.S. Military Government in Germany) were highly concerned with controlling what people saw and how they saw it. The Nazis eliminated what they called ‘Degenerate art’, erasing the pictorial traces of turmoil and heterogeneity that they associated with modern art. The Western Allies in turn eradicated ‘Nazi art’. Whatever one considers about the actions of all of the entire third reich, art is art, and every piece is a representation of a portion of history, good or bad. One thing we learned very well from the tragic 1930s and 1940s is that classifying art as ‘non-art’ and forbidding books or art for political reasons is a dead-end street. No matter how much one dislikes Hitler, Napoleon, Caligula or Stalin, and no matter how much their depictions were used as propaganda, a painting or sculpture of them cannot be re classified as 'non art'. Part of the theory of Hannah Ahrend Johanna "Hannah" Arendt 14 October 1906 – 4 December 1975) was a German-born Jewish American political theorist. Though often described as a philosopher, she rejected that label on the grounds that philosophy is concerned with "man in the singular" and instead described herself as a political theorist because her work centers on the fact that "men, not Man, live on the earth and inhabit the world." It would nicely improve with some cosmetic restoration and cleaning.
Original Postcard of Kaiser Willhelm IInd With Autograph One of the postcard photos that the former Kaiser would personally send to admirers or hand gift to private visitors at his exile home, Huis Doorn [Doorn Manor], in Doorn, the Netherlands. Signature in dark blue over black and white matte card photograph. The property was purchased in 1919 by Wilhelm II, the last German Emperor, as his residence-in-exile (1920–1941), following his abdication after World War I. Wilhelm II 27 January 1859 – 4 June 1941) was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, ruling the German Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia from 15 June 1888 to 9 November 1918. He was the eldest grandchild of the British Queen Victoria and related to many monarchs and princes of Europe. During his years in exile, he was allowed to travel freely within a 15 mile radius of his house, but journeys farther than that meant that advance notice had to be given to a local government official. As he disliked having to kowtow to a minor official, he rarely journeyed beyond the "free" limit. The former Emperor regularly exercised by chopping down many of the estate's trees, splitting the logs into stacks of firewood, thereby denuding the matured landscape as the years progressed. Hence he was called by his enemies "The Woodchopper of Doorn". Wilhelm's asylum in the Netherlands was based on family ties with Queen Wilhelmina, whom, some claim, he embarrassed by his political statements. In fact, Wilhelm rarely spoke publicly, while in exile. His first wife, Dona, died at Huis Doorn and, afterwards, her body was taken back to Potsdam in Germany where she was buried in the Temple of Antiquities. Wilhelm could only accompany her on her last journey as far as the German border. In 1938, his grandson, Prince Louis Ferdinand, was married to Grand Duchess Kira of Russia, in Huis Doorn. Despite the Nazi occupation of Holland in 1940, Wilhelm went undisturbed by the Wehrmacht. Five of Wilhelm's beloved dachshunds are buried in the park. A marker is dedicated to the memory of his dog, "Senta", who was a favorite of Wilhelm and died in 1927 at the age of 20. Wilhelm II died of a pulmonary embolism at Huis Doorn, on 4 June 1941, with German occupation soldiers on guard at the gates of his estate. He was buried in a small mausoleum in the gardens, to await his return to Germany upon the restoration of the Prussian monarchy, according to the terms of his will. His wish that no swastikas would be displayed at his funeral was not heeded.
Original Russian USSR 1930's Propaganda Poster Unusual poster with munitions factory, airship and young woman with plane. Early Russian posters of the Lenin and Stalin period before the war are now becoming extraordinarily collectable. Another poster for the Battleship Potemkin Russian movie, [that is shown in our gallery for illustration purposes] designed by the Stenberg brothers in 1925, sold in November 2012 for 103,250 Pounds Sterling at Christies Auction in London. It arranged class elements into a powerful design of revolutionary upheaval. The poster comprises three pictorial elements: the battleship, the officer and the able seaman. Each of these signs is placed in relation to the others. The fragile balance of bourgeois society is revealed at its very tipping-point. Photographed in plastic protector case. 24.5 inches x 37 inches
Original Watercolour Painting Zeppelins over Eastchurch 1917 Nicely framed and mounted. Now the centenary anniversary of WW1 is upon us original great war memorabilia is very much in the forefront of collectors minds. The best-known German strategic bombing campaign during World War I was the campaign against England, although strategic bombing raids were carried out or attempted on other fronts. The main campaign against England started in January 1915 using airships. From then until the end of World War I the German Navy and Army Air Services mounted over 50 bombing raids on the United Kingdom. These were generally referred to as "Zeppelin raids": although both Zeppelin and Schütte-Lanz airships were used, the Zeppelin company was much better known and was responsible for producing the vast majority of the airships used. Weather conditions and night flying conditions made airship navigation and therefore bombing accuracy difficult. Bombs were often dropped miles off target (one raid on London actually bombed Hull) and accurate targeting of military installations was impossible. The civilian casualties made the Zeppelins an object of hatred, and they were widely dubbed “baby-killers”. With the development of effective defensive measures the airship raids became increasingly hazardous, and in 1917 the airships were largely replaced by aeroplanes. Although the direct military effect of the raids was small, they caused widespread alarm, leading to the diversion of substantial resources from the Western Front and some disruption to industrial production. Concern about the conduct of defence against the raids, the responsibility for which was divided between the Admiralty and the Army, led to a parliamentary inquiry under Jan Smuts, whose report was to lead to the creation of the Royal Air Force on 1 April 1918. The defence organisation developed by the British was an important precursor of the fighter direction system that would prove vital in winning the Battle of Britain. The raids were also influential because they led to an overestimation of both the material and psychological effects of the bombing of cities. Airships made about 51 bombing raids on England during the war. These killed 557 and injured another 1,358 people. More than 5,000 bombs were dropped on towns across Britain, causing £1.5 million in damage. 84 airships took part, of which 30 were lost, either shot down or lost in accidents. Aeroplanes carried out 27 raids, dropping 246,774 lb (111,935 kg) of bombs for the loss of 62 aircraft, resulting in 835 deaths, 1972 injured and £1,418,272 material damage
Original WW2 British Army Ghurka's Kukri With Belt Frog In military issue leather over wooden scabbard, with traditional frog belt mount. Overal in very nice condition for age. Tempered steel blade and carved wood hilt and steel ovoid pommel cap. The Kukri is the renown and famous weapon of the Nepalese Gurkha. Probably the most respected and feared warriors in the world, the Gurkhas of Nepal have fought in the Gurkha regiments of the British Army for around two centuries. With a degree of loyalty and dedication that is legendary, there is no greater soldier to be at one's side when in battle than the noble Gurkha. With a Kukri in his hand and the battle cry called, "Ayo Gorkhali!" ["the Gurkhas are coming!"], no foe's head was safe on his shoulders. Battle hardened German Infantry in WW1, or WW2 Japanese Shock Troops, have been known to tremble in their boots at the knowledge that they would be facing the Gurkhas in battle. Some of the most amazing feats of heroism have resulted in the most revered medal, the British Victoria Cross [ the world's greatest and most difficult to qualify for gallantry medal] being awarded to Ghurkas. The blade shape descended from the classic Greek sword of Kopis, which is about 2500 years old. Some say it originated from a form of knife first used by the Mallas who came to power in Nepal in the 13th Century. There are some Khukuris displaying on the walls of National Museum at Chhauni in Kathmandu which are 500 years old or even older, among them, one that once belonged to Drabya Shah, the founder king of the kingdom of Gorkha, in 1627 AD. But, some say that the Khukuri's history is possibly centuries older this. It is suggested that the Khukuri was first used by Kiratis who came to power in Nepal before Lichchhavi age, in about the 7th Century. In the hands of an experienced wielder Khukuri or Kukri is about as formidable a weapon as can be conceived. Like all really good weapons, Khukuri's or Kukri's efficiency depends much more upon skill than the strength of the wielder. And thus so that it happens, that a diminutive Gurkha, a mere boy in regards to his stature, could easily cut to pieces a gigantic adversary, who simply does not understand the little Gurkha's mode of attack and fearsome skill. The Gurkha generally strikes upwards with his Kukri, possibly in order to avoid wounding himself should his blow fail, and possibly because an upward cut is just the one that can be least guarded against however strong his opponent.
Original WW2 German SS Photograph on Agfa Photo Card A guard from the “Deutschland” 3rd Panzergrenadier Regiment which was part of the 2nd SS-Panzer Division “Das Reich”. He is wearing the early war black four pocket tunic with piped collar tabs. He wears an Sports Badge on his pocket and is wearing the early SS M18 WW1 steel helmet. In August 1939 Adolf Hitler placed the Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler (LSSAH) and the SS-Verfügungstruppe (SS-VT) under the operational command of the OKH, (Supreme High Command of the German Army). Events during the Invasion of Poland raised doubts over the combat effectiveness of the SS-VT. Himmler insisted that the SS-VT should be allowed to fight in its own formations under its own commanders, while the OKW tried to have the SS-VT disbanded altogether. Hitler was unwilling to upset either the army or Himmler, and chose a third path. He ordered that the SS-VT form its own divisions but that the divisions would be under army command. In October 1939 the SS-Verfügungstruppe (SS-VT) regiments, Deutschland, Germania and Der Führer, were organized into the SS-Verfügungs-Division with Paul Hausser as commander. Thereafter, the SS-VT and the LSSAH took part in combat training while under army commands in preparation for Operation Fall Gelb against the Low Countries and France in 1940. In May 1940, the Der Führer Regiment was detached from the SS-VT Division and relocated near the Dutch border, with the remainder of the division behind the line in Münster, awaiting the order to invade the Netherlands. Der Führer Regiment and LSSAH participated in the ground invasion of the Netherlands which began on 10 May. On the following day the rest of the SS-VT Division crossed into the Netherlands, participating in the drive for the Dutch central front and Rotterdam, which they reached on 12 May. After that city had been captured, the SS-VT Division, along with other German formations, were sent to "mop up" the remaining French-Dutch force holding out in the area of Zeeland and the islands of Walcheren and South Beveland. After the fighting in the Netherlands ended, the SS-VT Division was ordered to make for France. On 24 May the LSSAH, along with the SS-VT Division were positioned to hold the perimeter around Dunkirk and reduce the size of the pocket containing the encircled British Expeditionary Force and French forces. A patrol from the SS-VT Division crossed the canal at Saint-Venant, but was destroyed by British armor. A larger force from the SS-VT Division then crossed the canal and formed a bridgehead at Saint-Venant; 30 miles from Dunkirk. On the following day, British forces attacked Saint-Venant, forcing the SS-VT Division to retreat and relinquish ground. On 26 May the German advance resumed. On 27 May the Deutschland regiment of the SS-VT Division reached the allied defensive line on the Leie River at Merville. They forced a bridgehead across the river and waited for the SS Totenkopf Division to arrive to cover their flank. What arrived first was a unit of British tanks, which penetrated their position. The SS-VT managed to hold on against the British tank force, which got to within 15 feet of commander Felix Steiner's position. Only the arrival of the Totenkopf Panzerjäger platoon saved the Deutschland from being destroyed and their bridgehead lost. By 30 May, most of the remaining Allied forces had been pushed back into Dunkirk where they were evaluated by sea to England. The SS-VT Division next took part in the drive towards Paris. 4.75 inches x 6.75 inches
Original WW2 London Newspaper "French Ordered To Surrender" June 17 1940 A probably unique opportunity to buy this fabulous piece of WW2 history. Evening Standard final night edition, 12 pages, headlined; Petain Says "French Must Cease Fighting" .With other incredibly interesting reports of a German spy attempting to inspect Army Posts, an RAF raid on Tobruk and US Chairman of The Senate Foreign Affiars Committee Senator Key Pittman denouncing US flying hero Col. Lindbergh's speech urging the US to stop sending aid to the Allies. In the report it further states Colonel Henry Breckinridge, a former legal advisor to Lindbergh, in a speech to 20,000 US citizens in Boston, "Blood drenched Hitler is at our gates. If the Allies go down we stand alone to face the dictators"…. During the speech an elderly man arose and responded by shouting "Hooray for Hitler", wereupon a lady struck the Hitler fan on the head! With Paris fallen and the German conquest of France reaching its conclusion, Marshal Henri Petain replaces Paul Reynaud as prime minister and announces his intention to sign an armistice with the Nazis. The next day, French General Charles de Gaulle, not very well known even to the French, made a broadcast to France from England, urging his countrymen to continue the fight against Germany. A military hero during World War I, Petain was appointed vice premier of France in May 1940 to boost morale in a country crumbling under the force of the Nazi invasion. Instead, Petain arranged an armistice with the Nazis. The armistice, signed by the French on June 22, went into effect on June 25, and more than half of France was occupied by the Germans. In July, Petain took office as “chief of state” at Vichy, a city in unoccupied France. The Vichy government under Petain collaborated with the Nazis, and French citizens suffered on both sides of the divided nation. In 1942, Pierre Laval, an opportunistic French fascist and dutiful Nazi collaborator, won the trust of Nazi leader Adolf Hitler, and the elderly Petain became merely a figurehead in the Vichy regime. After the Normandy invasion in 1944, Petain and Laval were forced to flee to German protection in the east. Both were eventually captured, found guilty of high treason, and sentenced to die. Laval was executed in 1945, but provincial French leader Charles de Gaulle commuted Petain’s sentence to life imprisonment. Petain died on the Ile d’Yeu off France in 1951. Another article featured is by Michael Foot, former leader of the Labour Party. He pleads to not ask America for help, as their army power is small and airforce obsolete, but to seek Stalins assistance as he is not fooled by Hitler, and does not underestimate the Nazi menace. Sadly, he was, and he did, at least until Hitler invaded Russia in 1941. In fact at the time of the articles printing, Stalin was assisting the German War machine with oil, petrol and supplies of grain and other vital materials. Providing tank training bases and luftwaffe pilot training. This newspaper would look super framed for display.
Original WW2 Propaganda Poster "Coughs and Sneezes Spread Diseases" Probably one of the most famous and long lasting sayings of WW2, still in use [by some] today. A rare and amazing artefact of WW2. Printed for H.M Stationary Office by Chromoworks Ltd. London. A propaganda public health information poster. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A cartoon scene of man sneezing in crowded cinema, designed by Bateman – already well known for his ‘The Man Who' series. The design was to be used in the series ‘Coughs and Sneezes Spread Diseases', launched by the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Information. Advertiser's Weekly noted the launch of the campaign on October 22 1942, the second winter health scheme – consisting of four of Bateman's designs, alongside a more serious diagrammatic poster. Often a filmic extension of wartime posters featuring rhyming slogans, the publicity was designed to show how thoughtlessness helps to spread not only the common cold, but also many other diseases. Indeed, the whole 'coughs and sneezes' campaign, which extended beyond the war, was far more to with fighting absenteeism than concern about people catching a cold. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables, and keeping fit and healthy in order to continue the war effort. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale. 9.5 inches x 14.5 inches unframed
Original WW2 Propaganda Poster "Coughs and Sneezes Spread Diseases" Probably one of the most famous and long lasting sayings of WW2, still in use [by some] today. A rare and amazing artefact of WW2. Printed for H.M Stationary Office by T B & Co. Ltd London. A propaganda public health information poster. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. By Allan Carter. The design was to be used in the series ‘Coughs and Sneezes Spread Diseases', launched by the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Information. Advertiser's Weekly noted the launch of the campaign on October 22 1942, the second winter health scheme – consisting of four of Bateman's designs, alongside a more serious diagrammatic poster. Often a filmic extension of wartime posters featuring rhyming slogans, the publicity was designed to show how thoughtlessness helps to spread not only the common cold, but also many other diseases. Indeed, the whole 'coughs and sneezes' campaign, which extended beyond the war, was far more to with fighting absenteeism than concern about people catching a cold. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables, and keeping fit and healthy in order to continue the war effort. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale. 9.5 inches x 14.5 inches unframed
Original WW2 Propaganda Poster "Coughs and Sneezes Spread Diseases" Probably one of the most famous and long lasting sayings of WW2, still in use [by some] today. A rare and amazing artefact of WW2. Printed for H.M Stationary Office by Ford, Shapland & Co. London. Issued by the Ministry of Health. A propaganda public health information poster. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. By Keith Monk. The design was to be used in the series ‘Coughs and Sneezes Spread Diseases', launched by the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Information. Advertiser's Weekly noted the launch of the campaign on October 22 1942, the second winter health scheme – consisting of four of Bateman's designs, alongside a more serious diagrammatic poster. Often a filmic extension of wartime posters featuring rhyming slogans, the publicity was designed to show how thoughtlessness helps to spread not only the common cold, but also many other diseases. Indeed, the whole 'coughs and sneezes' campaign, which extended beyond the war, was far more to with fighting absenteeism than concern about people catching a cold. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables, and keeping fit and healthy in order to continue the war effort. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale. 9.5 inches x 14.5 inches unframed
Original WW2 Propaganda Poster, 'Careless Talk Costs Lives' An iconic warning approbation of WW2. A propaganda information warning poster. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale. Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return. When the U-boat commander Günther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss. The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring. 13 X 19.5 inches
Original WW2 Solid Silver Rifle Brigade Officers Silver Cap Badge Hallmarked Birmingham silver, Rifles Brigade Officers Silver Cap Badge - by J.R.Gaunt.. This painting by Terence Cuneo depicts the final moments of The Rifle Brigade in the battle for the Defence of Calais. The 8th Battalion of the Rifle Brigade fought across north west Europe as part of the 11th Armoured Division of the British Army in 1944 and 1945. It landed in France on D-Day plus four and then took part in some notable parts of the campaign to liberate Europe including Hill 112, the battle for Caen, the Normandy bocage country, the Falaise pocket, the liberation of Amiens and Antwerp, the 'Battle of the Bulge', and the crossings of the Rhine and Weser. The Battalion came to rest on the shores of the Baltic in May 1945. There was some very heavy fighting along the way.
Original WW2 Volunteer Recruitment Poster. 'Lend A Hand On The Land' A very fine propaganda recruitment poster for the Land Army. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale. Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return. When the U-boat commander Günther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss. The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring. 14.75 x 19.5 inches
Photo of U.S. Navy Consolidated N2Y-1 in The Hangar of Airship USS Macon (ZRS-5) in 1933/34. The USN equipped six N2Y-1s with hooks to train pilots for the Curtiss F9C Sparrowhawk fighters and also used the N2Y-1 as liaison planes between the ground and the airship. USS Macon (ZRS-5) was a rigid airship built and operated by the United States Navy for scouting. It served as a flying aircraft carrier, launching Sparrowhawk biplanes. In service for less than two years, in 1935 Macon was damaged in a storm and lost off California's Big Sur coast, though most of her crew were saved. The wreckage is listed as USS Macon Airship Remains on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. Less than 20 ft (6.1 m) shorter than Hindenburg, she and her sister, Akron, were among the largest flying objects in the world in terms of length and volume. Although the hydrogen-filled Hindenburg was longer, the two sisters still hold the world record for helium-filled airships. When the USS Macon was christened on March 11, 1933, it was the most sophisticated of the Navy’s lighter-than-air (LTA) fleet. The Macon exhibited the highest expression of naval LTA technology during its short career. At 785 feet in length, the airship’s size captured American fascination during flyovers of U.S. communities as chronicled in numerous advertisements, articles, and newsreels. The dramatic loss of the Macon and its sister ship, the Akron, within two years of each other contributed to the cancellation of the Navy’s rigid airship program. The archeological remains of the USS Macon lie off California’s Big Sur coast in NOAA’s Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. The site also contains the remains of four of the airship’s squadron of small Curtiss F9C Sparrowhawk scout aircraft which the Macon carried in an internal hangar bay. The Macon's fifth F9C-2 biplane is preserved at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, while four biplanes lie in the wreckage. Designed to carry five F9C Sparrowhawk biplanes, Macon received her first aircraft on board July 6, 1933 during trial flights out of Lakehurst, New Jersey. The planes were stored in bays inside the hull and were launched and retrieved using a trapeze. To achieve launching and recovery from the airship, a hook/anchor system was developed, dubbed by crews as "the flying trapeze". The Sparrowhawk had a hook mounting on its top wing that attached to the cross-bar of the trapeze. For launching, the biplane's hook was engaged on the trapeze inside the (internal) hangar, the trapeze was lowered clear of the hull into the (moving) airship's slipstream and, engine running, the Sparrowhawk would then disengage its hook and fall away from the airship. For recovery, the biplane would fly up underneath its mother ship, moving slightly faster than the airship, and in a somewhat tricky maneuver hook onto the trapeze; the width of the trapeze cross-bar allowed a certain lateral lee-way in approach, the biplane's hook mounting had a guide rail to provide some tolerance against relative vertical motion (see photo), and engagement of the hook was automatic on positive contact between hook and trapeze. More than one attempt might have to be made before a successful engagement was achieved, for example in gusty conditions. Once the Sparrowhawk was securely caught, its engine could be safely cut and it could then be hoisted by the trapeze back within the airship's hull. Sold unframed in mount. A nice original print photo. 14 x 13 mount, photo, 7.3 x 9.4 inches
Pieces From a Fairie Battle Plane, Shot Down In The Battle of France 1940 Shot down while strafing the second panzer division in France. Piloted and crewed by, Sgt W G Ross, Sgt F E Beames and Leading Aircraftsman J H K Gegg, 88 Squadron L5190. Retrieved through archealogical dig. With accompanying photos. All within a mounted frame.
Portfolio of Prints SS Personel "Pictures and Ideas on the Racial Question" Loose prints in an SS portfolio from original pencil sketches of SS personnel, many identified on the print, each print bears the date 1936 of the original drawing. The portfolio comes with a copy of the introduction by Himmler. Published by Forster & Bovries, Zwickau, in a large black portfolio card folder with silver printed titles and large SS runes. "Wolfgang Willrich: Vom Lebensbaum Deutscher Art Bilder und Gedanken zur Rassenfrage (From the Lifetree of the German Species, Pictures and ideas on the racial question) Mappe 2. Willrich was one of the finest National Socialist artists. This portfolio of his work, showing portraits of SS members from all over the Reich, was intended to emphsise the racial identity of the Germanic folk. It was first published prior to WW2 by Blood and Soil Publishers, Goslar. Folder 17 inches x 12 inches. Prints 11.75 inches x 16.5 inches overall all in good condition.
Presented to Japanese Ambassador General Baron Oshima For Adolf Hitler by Gauleiter Sauckel of Thuringen. An important, unique, historical portfolio presentation set of famous historical German documents, awarded as a gift from Adolf Hitler. Personally presented by Fritz Sauckel, Hitler's representative, who was one of Hitler's ruling elite and the Gauleiter of Thüringen from 1927-1945, on the personal instructions of Adolf Hitler, and hand inscribed in the document portfolio for the Japanese Ambassador. This is a truly extraordinary and unique historical artifact from the relationaship between the two infamous Axis powers and the warm personal friendship between Hitler and the Japanese Emperor's representative to Germany. On 17th November 1942 he presented this amazing portfolio of hand made paper facsimiles of writings, letters and drawings by Goethe, Herder, Hebbel, Wieland, Nietzsche & Schiller from the Reich's Geothe Archive Museum, to the Imperial Japanese Ambassador, General Baron Hiroshi Oshima. Baron Oshima was also one of the most important Japanese leaders of WW2 and the Axis Powers. The portfolio has a presentation certificate, in hand scripted calligraphy, dedicating the presentation to General Oshima from Gauleiter Stauckel and dated 17th November 1942. These two individuals were two of the most infamous and influential characters of WW2. Hitler awarded Japanese ambassador to Nazi Germany Hiroshi Oshima the Grand Cross of the Order of the German Eagle (1st class) as a token of Hitlers personal thanks for the bombing and the attack on Pearl Harbour that ultimately brought America into WW2. On this occasion he said: “ You gave the right declaration of war. This method is the only proper one. Japan pursued it formerly and it corresponds with his own system, that is, to negotiate as long as possible. But if one sees that the other is interested only in putting one off, in shaming and humiliating one, and is not willing to come to an agreement, then one should strike as hard as possible, and not waste time declaring war." In 1944, U.S. Army Chief of Staff George C. Marshall declared that 'our main basis of information regarding Hitler's intentions in Europe is obtained from Baron Oshima's messages from Berlin.' Carl Boyd reveals how the Allies got that intelligence and used it to help win World War II."--David Kahn, author of The Codebreakers. This portfolio is most sizeable and all the papers are of the finest quality and the whole is in remarkable condition for age. A unique souvenir of WW2 and the infamous partnership between Germany and Japan. The Gauleiter was the highest ranking political leader at the Gau level of political administration within the Reich, and Gauleiter Stauckel was one of the accused at the world renown Nuremberg trials after the war, and he was executed after being found guilty of War Crimes. This portfolio is numbered 12 on the outer cover and the last page. 3 facsimile pictures, singularly mounted, 10 manuscript facsimile documents of original old texts, some folded, or in booklet form containing many pages, all by Goethe, Herder, Schiller etc etc. I large main printed text folder that is effectively a translation into large Germanic print of each facsimile document. A literal translation might be; [To] His excellency the Imperial Japanese Ambassador General Oshima. To the conclusion of the grandeur of Japan, drawings in the name of Thuringen from Gauleiter and Reichstathalter. Overall size of folder. 36 cm x 50cm
RAF Campaign Medal, Malaya Peninsula and Long Service Good Conduct Medal Also miniatures and a boxed General Service Medal. All to Corporal Rose RAF 1952-1974. Excellent condition uncleaned.
Rare, Complete and Original, Triumph Magazine Portfolio of Flying Original 1930's issue. Softcover, in exceellent condition, about 3.5 x 5.25 inches but folds out to about 14 x 5.25 inches, folds out to 4 panels with each panel have two small booklets (about 3 x 2 inches each), each booklet contains 7 small b&w photos or illustrations, the booklets are as follows: Queer Aircraft ( glider plane; Westland-Hill Pterodactyl 3 seater; Northrop Beta monoplane; Focke Wulf; Cierva autogiro; seaplane; mono-spar 3 seater ), ---All in a Days Flying ( iceberg patrol; aerial mountie gets his man; stemming the stampede; answering an SOS; Air Mail; the flying shop (delivering goods to natives); rescuing stranded mountaineers ) ---Trail Blazers of the Air ( Charles Lindbergh; Richard Byrd; J A Mollison; Charles Kingsford-Smith; Bert Hinkler; Amy Johnson; Alan Cobham ) ---Stunting in Space ( wing walkers, acrobats, dare devils; etc ) ---War Hawks ( a zeppelin hunter; machine gunning the artillery; dog fight; British blimp bombs a submarine; destroying an observation balloon; etc) ---Great Gas Bags ( the Graf zeppelin; Picard's Stratosphere balloon; USS Akron; jumping balloon; Spanish observation balloon; American airship moored; a plane carrying airship ) ----Guardians of the Empire's Airways ( fighter taking off from aircraft carrier Furious; 20 ton RAF monoplane; Blackburn Napier torpedo plane; desert patrol; loading a bomber; getting an RAF searchlight ready; catapulting a plane from a submarine ) ---Planes of all Nations ( Belgian fighter; british 38 seaterand Puss Moth; French Paris to London liner; Italian S.55 flying boat; Junker; Swiss Dornier Do-X; American military transport plane ),
Regular Army Long Service Good Conduct Medal Pair, Welsh Guards GVR Army LSGC, with ‘Regular Army’ bar suspension (2730053 GDSMN C. S. HUGHES M.S.M. W.Gds).and his WW1 Civilisation Medal. One of England's premier regiments, and part of the Her Majesty's Household Guards Division. By the time of the First World War the most senior of the Guards Regiments, the Grenadier Guards, prepared to celebrate their 260th anniversary. At about the same time the youngest of the Guards Regiments, the Welsh Guards, was just being formed. During the Great War, the Guards served in every major campaign on the western front, from the early August days of 1914 at Mons, straight through to the occupation of Cologne after the Armistice in 1919. In 1915, at the request of King George V, the five Guards Regiments were brought together into their own division: The Guards Division. As their own division, the Guards continued to build a reputation as a very disciplined and dependable division that exceeded all expectations. At the end of the war, King George V honored the individual privates of the Guards Division with a title aside from Private. They would from that point on, respectfully be known as... Guardsmen. In December 1919 Guardsman Claude Hughes was awarded the MSM the Meritorious Service Medal, that medal was sadly lost
Reich Marshall Herman Goering Propaganda Poster With Luftwaffe Sword In very good condition for age. Rarely surviving piece from the the pre war Germany.Weil wir einig sind, sind wir stark, weil wir stark sind, sind wir frei. ... Hermann Göring", " Because We Are United We Are Strong, Because We Are Strong We Are Free" 28th of February to 6th Martch 1938. [weekly slogans of the National Socialist German Workers' Party]. Another original copy of it is in the George C Marshall Foundation library During World War II, Marshall as Army Chief of Staff (1939–1945) was the most important military figure in the U.S. military establishment and of great significance in maintaining the Anglo-American coalition. After the war, he was named special ambassador to China (1945–1947), Secretary of State (1947–1949), President of the American Red Cross (1949–1950), and Secretary of Defense (1950–1951). In 1953 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his role in proposing, encouraging legislative action, and supporting the European Recovery Program (known as the Marshall Plan). For nearly 20 years he was a major U.S. leader, militarily, politically and morally, and he is still widely admired today.
Reich Party Day Badge 1937 The first Nazi Party rallies took place in 1923 in Munich and in 1926 in Weimar. From 1927 on, they took place exclusively in Nuremberg. The Party selected Nuremberg for pragmatic reasons: it was in the center of the German Reich and the local Luitpoldhain was well suited as a venue. In addition, the Nazis could rely on the well-organized local branch of the party in Franconia, then led by Gauleiter Julius Streicher. The Nuremberg police were sympathetic to the event. Later, the location was justified by the Nazi Party by putting it into the tradition of the Imperial Diet (German Reichstag) of the Holy Roman Empire, considered as the First Reich. After 1933, the rallies took place near the time of the Autumn equinox, under the title of "The German people's National Party days" (Reichsparteitage des deutschen Volkes), which was intended to symbolize the solidarity between the German people and the Nazi Party. This point was further emphasized by the yearly growing number of participants, which finally reached over half a million from all sections of the party, the army and the state.
Rifle Brigade Brooch, 71 Diamonds Set in Gold Multicoloured Metal & Enamels WW1 to WW2 Vintage. Absolutely divine piece for a military lady. A stunning piece of finest military jewellry in superb condition. Not at all to be confused with the standard, lesser grade smaller diamond pieces, that are more usually found. In it's tooled leather Asprey of Bond St. box. The sweetheart brooch is of large size [slightly wider at it's widest than a British 50 pence coin] and it is set with approximately 71 brilliant diamonds, in a gold coloured metal mount of white and yellow. With three, coloured enamel embellishments, of red, green and blue enamel. It bears the title, 'Rifle Brigade' inset in yellow, the 'Prince Consorts Own' also inset in yellow, and the regimental colour of 'Waterloo' also in yellow. It has a white strung bugle and crown, and all is surmounted with the King's crown with red enamel centre. Single bar pin with safety clasp. Size 33mm x 28mm
Royal Air Forces Association Flag Traditional blue ensign with RAF Assoc badge. Good order overall. Post war. 36 inches X 76 inches
Royal Engineers Edwardian Officer’s Busby Plume Holder. King's crown surmounting the royal crest. A superb near mint gilt example. Flaming grenade, the ball mounted with Royal Arms on “Ubique” scroll, another scroll below “Quo Fas et Gloria Ducunt”. Reverse retains plume holder and slider. Gilt stunningly toned. The Royal Engineers trace their origins back to the military engineers brought to England by William the Conqueror, specifically Bishop Gundulf of Rochester Cathedral, and claim over 900 years of unbroken service to the crown. Engineers have always served in the armies of the Crown; however, the origins of the modern corps, along with those of the Royal Artillery, lie in the Board of Ordnance established in the 15th century. In Woolwich in 1716, the Board formed the Royal Regiment of Artillery and established a Corps of Engineers, consisting entirely of commissioned officers. The manual work was done by the Artificer Companies, made up of contracted civilian artisans and labourers. In 1772, a Soldier Artificer Company was established for service in Gibraltar, the first instance of non-commissioned military engineers. In 1787, the Corps of Engineers was granted the Royal prefix and adopted its current name and in the same year a Corps of Royal Military Artificers was formed, consisting of non-commissioned officers and privates, to be officered by the RE. Ten years later the Gibraltar company, which had remained separate, was absorbed and in 1812 the name was changed to the Corps of Royal Sappers and Miners. The Corps has no battle honours. In 1832, the regimental motto, Ubique' & 'Quo Fas Et Gloria Ducunt ("Everywhere" & 'Where Right And Glory Lead"; in Latin fas implies "sacred duty"), was granted. The motto signified that the Corps had seen action in all the major conflicts of the British Army and almost all of the minor ones as well. In 1855 the Board of Ordnance was abolished and authority over the Royal Engineers, Royal Sappers and Miners and Royal Artillery was transferred to the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces, thus uniting them with the rest of the Army. The following year, the Royal Engineers and Royal Sappers and Miners became a unified corps as the Corps of Royal Engineers and their headquarters were moved from the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich, to Chatham, Kent.
Royal Scottish Clan Glengarry Badge 'In Defence' Lion Rampant, Gilt WW1 period. A very nice Glengarry badge of the Scottish Royal crest. The glengarry bonnet is a traditional Scots cap made of thick-milled woollen material, decorated with a toorie on top, frequently a rosette cockade on the left side, and with ribbons hanging down behind. It is normally worn as part of Scottish military or civilian Highland dress, either formal or informal, as an alternative to the Balmoral bonnet or tam o' shanter. The Royal Regiment of Scotland wears the glengarry with diced band and black cock feathers as its ceremonial headdress. Traditionally, the Glengarry bonnet is said to have first appeared as the head dress of the Glengarry Fencibles when they were formed in 1794 by Alexander Ranaldson MacDonell of Glengarry, of Clan MacDonell of Glengarry. MacDonell, therefore, is sometimes said to have invented the glengarry - but it is not clear whether early pictures of civilians or fencible infantry show a true glengarry, capable of being folded flat, or the standard military bonnet of the period merely 'cocked' into a more 'fore-and-aft' shape. The first use of the classic, military glengarry may not have been until 1841, when it is said to have been introduced for the pipers of the 79th Foot by the commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Lauderdale Maule. It was only in the 1850s that the glengarry became characteristic undress headgear of the Scottish regiments of the British Army. By 1860, the glengarry without a diced border and usually with a feather had been adopted by pipers in all regiments except the 42nd (Black Watch), whose pipers wore the full dress feather bonnet. In 1914, all Scottish infantry regiments were wearing dark blue glengarries in non-ceremonial orders of dress, except for the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) who wore them in rifle green, and the Scots Guards, who wore peaked forage caps or khaki service dress caps. 2.25 inches high
Russian Lubok Poster Of WW1 Capture of an Austrian Zeppelin August 1914 This original 1914 print is showing Romanov era Russians firing on an Austrian airship and there is it's twin that that is held in the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “An Austrian airship heading toward Russia was spotted near the Russian-Austrian border. Our troops, despite their fierce fight with the enemy, saw the airship and fired at it forcefully. The airship was forced to land in an area occupied by our troops, and we captured it along with the military pilots. On August 8 1914 the airship was placed on three cargo platforms that were joined together and was brought to Kiev.” Lubok is a Russian word for popular prints created from woodcuts, engravings, etchings, or later, by using lithography. The prints were often characterized by simple, colourful graphics depicting a narrative, and could also include text. Lubok gained popularity in Russia beginning in the late 17th century. The prints, which often depicted narratives from a historical event, literature, or a religious tale, were used to make such stories accessible to illiterate people. These expressive prints had a wide range in tone, from humorous to instructive to sharp political and social commentary. The images were clear and easy to understand, and some of the pictures were serialized, predecessors of the modern comic strip. Prints could be reproduced inexpensively, and were thus a way for the masses to display art at home. Initially, this artistic style was not taken seriously by the upper classes, but by the end of the 19th century, lubok was so well-regarded that it inspired professional artists. During World War I, lubok informed Russians about events on the frontlines, bolstered morale, and served as propaganda against enemy combatants. Segodniashnii Lubok (Today's Lubok) was organized by the Moscow publisher Gorodetsky to produce propagandistic posters and postcards in support of Russia's war effort. It stands out from similar publishers that had sprung out all over Russia at the start of WWI by the quality of the artists and poets it attracted - Kazimir Malevich, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Artistakh Lentulov, Ilya Mashkov, David Burliuk, and Vasilli Chekrugin among them. The look of their posters was inspired by old mass-produced woodcut prints, "lubki". This was a deliberate decision, an attempt to produce posters accessible to uneducated masses, and to appeal to the nationalist sentiment - folk art forms were considered purely Russian, and unspoiled by Western influences. Based on the war events described. 16.5 x 22.75 inches sold unframed Would look stunning nicely reframed
Sachsen [Saxon] WW1 Helmet Plate Other ranks, possibly garde as it bears a garde reiter type star, however the regular colours are reversed. In 1854 Frederick Augustus II's brother, King John of Saxony, succeeded to the throne. A scholar, King John translated Dante. King John followed a federalistic and pro-Austrian policy throughout the early 1860s until the outbreak of the Austro-Prussian War. During that war, Prussian troops overran Saxony without resistance and then invaded Austrian (today's Czech) Bohemia. After the war, Saxony was forced to pay an indemnity and to join the North German Confederation in 1867. Under the terms of the North German Confederation, Prussia took over control of the Saxon postal system, railroads, military and foreign affairs. In the Franco-Prussian War of 1870, Saxon troops fought together with Prussian and other German troops against France. In 1871, Saxony joined the newly formed German Empire. When the First World War started, the two Saxon Army Corps, and the XII (Royal Saxon) Reserve Corps were mobilized as part of the 3rd Army under command of the former Saxon War Minister, Generaloberst Max von Hausen. The 3rd Army fought in the battle of the Frontiers, mainly in the battles of Dinant and Charleroi. After the Second Army's retreat after the First Battle of the Marne, Hausen saw his own flank exposed and ordered a retreat. After the stabilization of the front on the Aisne River, on September 9, 1914, Hausen was relieved of his command due to illness and replaced by General Karl von Einem. The Saxon troops were used mostly at the Western Front. As the war progressed, through the necessary additions the units becoming increasingly mixed with troops from the other German states. During the war Saxony mobilized a total of about 750,000 soldiers, of whom about 229,000 did not return.
Scarce Winter War Finnish Civil Guard M.1928/1935 Mosin Nagant bayonet This type of bayonet was issued with Finnish Mosin Nagant rifles, mainly with M.1928. This was a standard Civil Guard bayonet during the Winter War. The Winter War was a military conflict between the Soviet Union and Finland in 1939–1940. It began with the Soviet invasion of Finland on 30 November 1939 (three months after the outbreak of World War II), and ended with the Moscow Peace Treaty on 13 March 1940. The League of Nations deemed the attack illegal and expelled the Soviet Union from the League on 14 December 1939. The Soviets possessed more than three times as many soldiers as the Finns, thirty times as many aircraft, and a hundred times as many tanks. The Red Army, however, had been crippled by Soviet leader Joseph Stalin's Great Purge of 1937. With more than 30,000 of its officers executed or imprisoned, including most of those of the highest ranks, the Red Army in 1939 had many inexperienced senior and mid-level officers. Because of these factors, and high morale in the Finnish forces, Finland repelled Soviet attacks for several months, much longer than the Soviets expected. This lovely rare bayonet was made in Finland by HACKMAN & CO. and accordingly marked on the blade. The serial/issue number is stamped on the front part of the grip ("75515") (with a Civil Guard "S"]. The pommel displays the last tow digits of it's matched rifle, the bayonet was issued with [89]. Polished rivets on the grips. Single edged blade. Complete with an original M.1935 steel scabbard. Fine+. The blade is nice and clean. The wooden grips are in fine condition with some handling marks. The M.1935 scabbard has a lot of it's original blue finish.
Scottish Clan Badge Amicitia Reddit Honores Shell, Hallmarked Edinburgh Silver. [Friendship Gives Honour). In the 14th century the family were close allies of the Earls of Douglas, to whom they were squires, and about the end of that era they are first defined as Hoppringle of that Ilk, holding the lands of Earlside in Lauderdale. Descendants were much in evidence at the Courts of James IV and V, at least two being trumpeters in the tail of James IV and one falling at his side at Flodden in 1513. For 100 years, from about 1489, a succession of Pringle ladies, usually younger daughters, were Prioresses of the Convent at Coldstream. The association of Pringles with the woollen industry may be traced to 1540 when one of their name held the responsibility for overseeing the shearing, storage and transportation of the wool from the King’s sheep. In 1592 various Pringles appeared before the King, with other Border lairds, giving an oath to faithfully serve the Wardens of the East and Middle Marches, and evidence of their extended land-holdings is shown by no less than six cadet families standing surety, one for the other, in keeping the peace. Five years later, Pringle of that Ilk and Pringle of Smailholm subscribed to a Bond of Manrent, taking it upon themselves the burden of ensuring the good behaviour of Pringles in general. The last Pringle of that Ilk died in 1737, after which the principal family became the Pringles of Stitchill, the lands of which were acquired c.1630. Of this latter house, Sir Robert was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia in 1683 and, although the lands have now been sold, the Baronetcy has survived into the 21st century
Scottish Regimental Bonnet Badge Thistle and St Andrews Cross 52nd Lowland Regt. Post 1953, Very high quality heavy silver plate badge. With garter motto "Nemo me impune lacessit" 2" x 2"
Scottish Silver Buchanen 'Audaces Juvo' Clan Glengarry Badge 1930's Not hallmarked silver. Clan Buchanan Audaces Juvo – “I Help the Brave”. Is an armigerous Scottish clan whose origins are said to lie in the 1225 grant of lands on the eastern shore of Loch Lomond to clergyman Sir Absalon of Buchanan by the Earl of Lennox. A Dexter Hand Holding Up A Ducal Cap Proper., Tufted On The Top With A Rose Gu., All Within Two Laurel-Branches In Orle Vert. Traditionally, the Glengarry bonnet is said to have first appeared as the head dress of the Glengarry Fencibles when they were formed in 1794 by Alexander Ranaldson MacDonell of Glengarry, of Clan MacDonell of Glengarry. MacDonell, therefore, is sometimes said to have invented the glengarry - but it is not clear whether early pictures of civilians or fencible infantry show a true glengarry, capable of being folded flat, or the standard military bonnet of the period merely 'cocked' into a more 'fore-and-aft' shape. The first use of the classic, military glengarry may not have been until 1841, when it is said to have been introduced for the pipers of the 79th Foot by the commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Lauderdale Maule. It was only in the 1850s that the glengarry became characteristic undress headgear of the Scottish regiments of the British Army. By 1860, the glengarry without a diced border and usually with a feather had been adopted by pipers in all regiments except the 42nd (Black Watch), whose pipers wore the full dress feather bonnet. In 1914, all Scottish infantry regiments were wearing dark blue glengarries in non-ceremonial orders of dress, except for the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) who wore them in rifle green, and the Scots Guards, who wore peaked forage caps or khaki service dress caps.
Set of German WW2 Revierförster Rank Collar Tabs This is a set of third reich period German Revierförster rank shoulder boards in the Forestry Service, a favourite of Reich Marshal Goring. The tabs are constructed forest-green woolen backer. The obverse of the tabs are ordained with extremely fine, high quality, silver aluminum twisted wire in the shape of two vertically positioned oak leaves in the centre of the tab, with a twig of three leafs in the bottom left and right corners. Both tabs are edged on all four sides with fine quality twisted wire fastened to the sides using invisible green threads.
Silver Metropolitan Police Coronation Medal, George Vth 1911 Named to PC Bramble. Very good condition. Original ribbon with silver Spink and Son mount.
Silver Plaque For the Airshow Of Vincennes in 1928 A beautiful plaque also called a table medal. Depicting early flying machines. 75mm x 55mm
Simply Superb Hand Painted Portrait Miniature of an Irish Guards Officer 20th century wartime portrait. It was in the Irish Guards officer, that John Kipling, son of one of England's greatest poets and novelists, Rudyard Kipling, who was declared missing presumed killed, at Loos 1915. As we understand it this officer may be 2nd Lieut. G. Romer. Very fine painted on ivory, with stunning detail and a wonderfully fresh and vibrant colour. In a square gilt frame, with dart edging and plush velvet rear cover. Domed glass front. One cannot fail to notice this is the handsome visage of a fresh faced youth, probably no more than 18 or 19, who likely unknowingly went to face the most appalling conditions and privations at the front. Conditions no soldier today has any comparison to [thank goodness]. Some might say it's nearest comparison was described in Dante Alighieri's Inferno. Part one of his early 14th century three part poem, the Divine Comedy. In it Dante describes his journey through hell, which few would deny is a journey almost replicated by every officer and soldier who fought on the Western Front in the Great War. The Irish Guards were formed on 1st April 1900 by order of HRH Queen Victoria to commemorate the bravery of the Irish people who fought in the Boer war. The Irish Guards played a major part in both World Wars, winning a total of six Victoria Crosses including the last to be presented in the Second World War and have seen armed conflict in many parts of the world since 1945. The strength of the Regiment on mobilisation in 1914 was 997. During the Great War 293 Officers and 9340 Other Ranks served as Irish Guardsmen of whom 115 Officers and 2235 Other Ranks gave their lives and a further 195 Officers and 5541 Other Ranks were wounded. The numbers don't add up because some of the individuals were wounded more than once and are counted accordingly. On the 8th September 1914 the Battle of Marne started and this was to be the turning point when the German advance from Mons was halted just east of Paris, and the Allies began the advance northwards towards AINSE where the 1st Battalion crossed by pontoon on the 14th September 1914. In mid-October the BEF was moved to cover the Channel Ports and from the 21st October to the 12th November 1914 the 1st Battalion fought continuously in the first battle of YPRES, losing more than 700 men. That winter saw the beginning of the long period of trench-warfare, which lasted until the final battles in 1918. Life consisted of mostly monotony, often intense discomfort from the cold and mud, but with an ever-increasing number of casualties from the shelling, machine guns, sniping, mortaring, mining and raids. From time to time they took part in great set-piece battles such as FESTUBERT, LOOS (this was the first time the Regiment's newly formed 2nd Battalion was in action) THE SOMME, YPRES, CAMBRAI and ARRAS. Each success or failure meant a few hundred yards gained or lost, but the lists of casualties were always large, right up until the last great offensives of the German army in 1918. The collapse of the Russian revolution in 1917 meant that the German eastern front was closed enabling them to redeploy those involved to the western front and against the Allies. On the 21st March sixty-four German Divisions were flung against the point where the British and French Armies met at HAZEBROUCK. The Germans were nearly successful in their attempt to reach the Channel Ports, however the tide was turned during the summer and in August 1918 the Allied Armies took the offensive at places such as HINDENBURG LINE and CANAL NORD. By November 1918 Germany was defeated and the Armistice was signed on the 11th November 1918, by which time the 1st Battalion were at MAUBEUGE, which was only a few miles from MONS, where they had first come under fire in 1914.
Super Private Purchase FS Knife Of A Former Auxiliary 'Resistance' Officer Although not as recognisable these knives are much rarer than even the rarest 1st Pattern FS Knives. In absloute sleeper untouched for 60 years condition. A great close combat knife with a similar FS type knife blade and cross guard, but with a slightly curved tip. The tip had a purposeful slight curve into the central spine, as a better advantage to throat slitting from behind. The auxiliary officer could have been issued with a standard FS, but apparently much preferred a private purchase knife, as a military issue knife that would have certainly given the game away if he was wearing it while living in normal, civilian country wear dress. Anonymity was essential in these matters. Without exception all of these Auxiliary officers were men of the very highest valour, discretion and honour. None of them revealed their secret status, even unto death many decades after the war. It was only when their status was revealed as no longer 'Top Secret' that even their existence became known to their closest families in the 1970's. The Auxiliary Units or GHQ Auxiliary Units were specially trained, highly secret units created by the United Kingdom government during the Second World War, with the aim of resisting the expected occupation of the United Kingdom by Nazi Germany, after a planned invasion codenamed Operation Sea Lion. Having had the advantage of seeing the fall of several Continental nations, the United Kingdom was the only country during the war that was able to create such a resistance movement in advance of an invasion. The units, sometimes referred to as a part of the British Resistance Organisation, were initiated by Winston Churchill in the early summer of 1940. He appointed Colonel Colin Gubbins to found them. The Auxiliary Units answered to GHQ Home Forces, but were organised as if part of the local Home Guard. Operational Patrols consisted of between four and eight men, often farmers or landowners and usually recruited from the most able members of the Home Guard, who also needed an excellent local knowledge and the ability to live off the land. As cover, the men were allocated to "Home Guard" battalions 201 (Scotland), 202 (northern England), or 203 (southern England) and provided with Home Guard uniforms, though they were not actually Home Guard units. Around 3,500 such men were trained on weekend courses at Coleshill House near Highworth, Wiltshire, in the arts of guerrilla warfare including assassination, unarmed combat, demolition and sabotage. Recruits for Coleshill reported to the Highworth post office, from where the postmistress Mabel Stranks arranged for their collection. Each Patrol was a self-contained cell, expected to be self-sufficient and operationally autonomous in the case of invasion, generally operating within a 15-mile radius. They were provided with a concealed underground Operational Base (OB), usually built by the Royal Engineers in a local woodland, with a camouflaged entrance and emergency escape tunnel; it is thought that 400 to 500 such OBs were constructed. Some Patrols had an additional concealed Observation Post. Patrols were also provided with a selection of the latest weapons including a silenced pistol or Sten Gun and Fairbairn-Sykes "commando" knives, quantities of plastic explosive, incendiary devices, and food to last for two weeks. Members anticipated being shot if they were captured, and were expected to shoot themselves first rather than be taken alive. The mission of the units was to attack invading forces from behind their own lines while conventional forces fell back to the last-ditch GHQ Line. Aircraft, fuel dumps, railway lines, and depots were high on the list of targets, as were senior German officers. Patrols secretly reconnoitered local country houses, which might be used by German officers, in preparation. Lt Col.Gubbins was a regular British Army soldier, who had acquired considerable experience and expertise in guerrilla warfare during the Allied intervention in the Russian Civil War and the Anglo-Irish War. Most recently, he had returned from Norway, where he headed the Independent Companies, the predecessors of the British Commandos. Subsequently, he would move to the Special Operations Executive (SOE). The Auxiliary Units were kept in being long after any immediate Nazi threat had passed and were stood down only in 1944. Several Auxiliary Unit members later joined the Special Air Service. Many men saw action in the campaign in France in late 1944, notably in Operation Houndsworth and Operation Bulbasket. The units' existence did not generally become known by the public until the 1990s, though a book on the subject was published in 1968. An essential book on this subject is; The Last Ditch: Britain's Secret Resistance and the Nazi Invasion Plan
Super Scottish Clan Badge Mea Gloria Fides, Griffon Head and Coronet Silver colour, but not hallmarked. Mea Gloria Fides, Fidelity is my glory. Possibly the Gallagher clan, the Gallagher motto is the same, this the heraldic symbol not normally a griffon.
Superb & Rare Spanish Fascist Nationalist Volunteer Award of the Civil War Detailed in relief with a Fascist soldier giving the fascist salute, and the symbol of the fascist Falange [a group of arrows]. There were numerous foreign volunteers to both sides of the Spanish Civil War, in fact for many, especially the German Condor Legion, it was the rehearsal for WW2, and this was awarded to a fascist supporting foreign volunteer. A most high quality plaque medallion. Awarded to Edmond Hoton, by the Falange Española Tradicionalista y de las Juntas de Ofensiva Nacional Sindicalista (FET y de las JONS) the Traditionalist Spanish Phalanx of the Committees of the National Syndicalist Offensive. It was the sole legal party of the Francoist dictatorship in Spain. It emerged in 1937 of the merger of the Carlist Party with the Falange Española de las JONS. With the eruption of the Civil War in July 1936, the Falange fought on the Nationalist side against the Second Spanish Republic. Expanding rapidly from several thousand to several hundred thousand, the Falange's male membership was accompanied by a female auxiliary, the Sección Femenina. Led by José Antonio's sister Pilar, this latter subsidiary organization claimed more than a half million members by the end of the war and provided nursing and support services for the Nationalist forces. The command of the party rested upon Manuel Hedilla, as many of the first generation leaders were dead or incarcerated by the Republicans. Among them was Primo de Rivera, who was a Government prisoner. As a result, he was referred to among the leadership as el Ausente, (the Absent One). After being sentenced to death on November 18, 1936, Primo de Rivera was executed on November 20, 1936 (a date since known as 20-N in Spain), in a Republican prison, giving him martyr status among the Falangists. This conviction and sentence was possible because he had lost his Parliamentary immunity, after his party did not have enough votes during the last elections. After Franco seized power on 19 April 1937, he united under his command the Falange with the Carlist Comunión Tradicionalista, forming Falange Española Tradicionalista y de las JONS (FET y de las JONS), whose official ideology was the Falangists' 27 puntos—reduced, after the unification, to 26. Despite this, the party was in fact a wide-ranging nationalist coalition, closely controlled by Franco. Parts of the original Falange (including Hedilla) and many Carlists did not join the unified party. Franco had sought to control the Falange after a clash between Hedilla and his main critics within the group, the legitimistas of Agustín Aznar and Sancho Dávila y Fernández de Celis, that threatened to derail the Nationalist war effort. None of the vanquished parties in the war suffered such a toll of deaths among their leaders as did the Falange. Sixty per cent of the pre-war Falange membership lost their lives in the war. However, most of the property of all other parties and trade unions were assigned to the party. In 1938, all trade unions were unified under Falangist command. The Conservative government of the UK maintained a position of strong neutrality and was supported by elites and the mainstream media, while the far left mobilized aid to the Republic. The government refused to allow arms shipments and sent warships to try to stop shipments. It became a crime to volunteer to fight in Spain, but about 4,000 went anyway. Intellectuals strongly favoured the Republicans. Many visited Spain, hoping to find authentic anti-fascism. They had little impact on the government, and could not shake the strong public mood for peace. The Labour Party was split, with its Catholic element favouring the Nationalists. It officially endorsed the boycott and expelled a faction that demanded support for the Republican cause; but it finally voiced some support to Loyalists. Romanian volunteers were led by Ion Mo?a, deputy-leader of the Iron Guard ("Legion of the Archangel Michael"), whose group of Seven Legionaries visited Spain in December 1936 to ally their movement with the Nationalists. Despite the Irish government's prohibition against participating in the war, around 600 Irishmen, followers of Irish political activist and Irish Republican Army leader Eoin O'Duffy, known as the "Irish Brigade", went to Spain to fight alongside Franco. The majority of the volunteers were Catholics, and according to O'Duffy had volunteered to help the Nationalists fight against communism. The medallion bears at the base, engraved and cast, Al Senor Edmond Hoton, Bruselas II Ano Triunfal [We believe this translates to, Mr Edmond Horton, Brussels, two triumphant years]. We have traced only one Edmond Hoton who was an author in occupied Belgium during the war. We have shown some scenes from one of his books. If he was the medal winning nationalist volunteer in the Spanish Civil War, he may well have 'changed his colours' so to speak after experiancing the German occupation first hand from 1939 to 1944. 2.75 inches x 2.75 inches
Superb German WWII Kriegsmarine Carl Zeiss 10 x 80 Binocular On Stand. Original German World War Two 10 x 80 German Kriegsmarine painted Naval issue Binoculars by Carl Zeiss. Most commonly seen being used by the Kriegsmarine on Ship Bridges and on Conning Towers of U-Boats, these are the giant 10 x 80 Binoculars so much favoured in WW2. There are adjustments for eye relief, width and a selection of various filters from Clear (Klar) to Dark (Dunkel). It has steel sun shades and a padded brow piece [replaced] together with the binoculars tripod. Binocular marked: ""D.F. 10 X 80" over Nazi eagle and Kriegsmarine M, & IV/1, with manufacturers code blc [Carl Zeiss Jena] underneath which the set's serial number is given. Operational, clear optics in overall excellent condition for age, some lens surface coating flaking, but making this nothing short of an extraordinary find. The Kriegsmarine was the navy of Nazi Germany from 1935 to 1945. It superseded the Imperial German Navy of World War I and the inter-war Reichsmarine. The Kriegsmarine was one of three official branches of the Wehrmacht, the armed forces of Nazi Germany. The Kriegsmarine grew rapidly during German naval rearmament in the 1930s (the Treaty of Versailles had limited the size of the German navy previously, and prohibited building of submarines). Kriegsmarine ships were deployed to the waters around Spain during the Spanish Civil War, under the guise of enforcing non-intervention, but in reality supporting the Franco side of the war. In January 1939 Plan Z was ordered, calling for naval parity with the Royal Navy by 1944. However, when World War II broke out in September 1939, Plan Z was shelved in favour of building submarines (U-boats) and prioritizing land and air forces. The Commander-in-Chief of the Kriegsmarine (as for all branches of armed forces during the period of absolute Nazi power) was Adolf Hitler, who exercised his authority through the Oberkommando der Marine. The Kriegsmarine's most famous ships were the U-boats, most of which were constructed after Plan Z was abandoned at the beginning of World War II. Wolfpacks were rapidly assembled groups of submarines which attacked British convoys during the first half of the Battle of the Atlantic but this tactic was largely abandoned in the second half of the war. Along with the U-boats, surface commerce raiders (including auxiliary cruisers) were used to disrupt Allied shipping in the early years of the war, the most famous of these being the heavy cruisers Admiral Graf Spee and Admiral Scheer and the battleship Bismarck. However, the adoption of convoy escorts, especially in the Atlantic, greatly reduced the effectiveness of commerce raiders against convoys. At the outbreak of war, the Kriegsmarine had a relatively small fleet of 57 submarines (U-boats).This was increased steadily until mid-1943, when losses from Allied counter-measures matched the new vessels launched. The principal types were the Type IX, a long range type used in the western and southern Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans; and the Type VII, the most numerous type, used principally in the north Atlantic. Type X was a small class of minelayers and Type XIV was a specialized type used to support distant U-boat operations – the "Milchkuh" Types XXI and XXIII, the "Elektroboot", would have negated much of the Allied anti-submarine tactics and technology, but only a few of this new type of U-boat became ready for combat at the end of the war. Post-war, they became the prototypes for modern submarines, in particular, the Soviet Whiskey class. During World War II, about 60% of all U-boats commissioned were lost in action; 28,000 of the 40,000 U-boat crewmen were killed during the war and 8,000 were captured. The remaining U-boats were either surrendered to the Allies or scuttled by their own crews at the end of the war. We use in the gallery for illustration purposes three original photos showing the various different types of large fixed position binoculars used on the Kriegsmarine bridges during WW2. With the wooden tripod they can be used on deck or as easily on land for all manner and functions as required.
Superb Negretti and Zambra Pocket Open Face Compensated Barometer Altimeter An Edwardian pocket barometer that incorporates an altitude scale on the outer case wall with a rotating bezel set to up to 15,000 feet. The fabulous gilt on the case is in near mint condition, and it has been pressure bag tested sucessfully to ensure it is operating. Used by mountineers and also flyers of the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Naval Air Service during WW1. Large panel fitted type, dial 2.5/8th inches across, they also made variants to mount on the knee or wrist, and heights up to 7000 feet. A simply fabulous collectors piece, of sublime quality and an absolutely superb instrument for a gentleman's desk or study. The firm was founded in 1850 by H. Negretti and J. W. Zambra and soon gained a good reputation both at home and abroad owing to the excellence of its products. In the early days the firm's activities were confined to the manufacture of meteorological or, as they were called then, Philosophical Instruments, and several patents were granted to Negretti & Zambra covering many improvements in design and construction. In 1851 they patented a maximum thermometer In 1857, they specially devised and constructed for Admiral Fitzroy the double bulb Deep Sea Thermometer for taking sea temperatures at great depths. This was the only type still employed 100 years later for great depths and was made for depths up to 15,000 feet and to withstand a pressure of seven tons without damage. Another important improvement of those early days was enamelling the backs of thermometer tubes which enabled an extremely fine thread of mercury to be seen and consequently a much more sensitive thermometer to be employed. Practically all present day glass thermometers have enamelled backs. Aneroid Barometer construction and the instruments used by Mr. Glaisher in his balloon experiments were made by Negretti and Zambra. In his -Travels in the Air," page 89, he writes-- A third Aneroid graduated down to five inches . . . Read the same as the Mercurial Barometer throughout the high ascent to seven miles, September 5th, 1862. I have taken this instrument up with me in every subsequent high ascent." These various improvements show that as the demand for scientific instruments increased Negretti and Zambra endeavoured to produce suitable instruments to give satisfactory results under exacting conditions and that from the early days quality was always their first consideration. In the circumstances it was not surprising that the firm received the Highest Awards at all the international Exhibitions at which they showed their instruments. .During the 1914/1918 war the firm was almost entirely engaged on work for the Ministry of Munitions on the production of various instruments.
Superb WW1 Slouch Hat Badge of the 5th Mounted Rifle Ortago Hussars A super original badge of one of the great and heroic New Zealand Horse Regiments. Probably for officers as it is gilded and manufactured with a separate silver central shield attached. Bears a small makers affixed label, Gaunt of London. The Otago Mounted Rifle Regiment was a New Zealand Mounted Regiment formed for service during the Great War. It was formed from units of the Territorial Force consisting of the 5th Mounted Rifles (Otago Hussars) the 7th (Southland) Mounted Rifles and the 12th (Otago) Mounted Rifles. They saw service during the Battle of Gallipoli, with the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade and was later withdrawn to Egypt. They later left the brigade and served in served in France with the New Zealand Division becoming the only New Zealand Mounted troops to serve in France. Battle of Gallipoli Battle of Flers - Courcelette. 15–22 Sep 1916. Battle of Morval. 25–28 Sep 1916. Battle of Le Transloy. 1–18 Oct 1916. Battle of Messines. 7–14 Jun 1917. Battle of Polygon Wood. 26 Sep – 3 Oct 1917. Battle of Broodseinde. 4 Oct 1917. Battle of Passchendaele. 12 Oct 1917. Battle of Arras. 28 Mar 1918. Battle of the Ancre. 5 Apr 1918. Battle of Albert. 21–23 Aug 1918. Battle of Bapaume. 31 Aug – 3 Sep 1918. Battle of Havrincourt. 12 Sep 1918. Battle of the Canal du Nord. 27 Sep – 1 Oct 1918. Battle of Cambrai. 8–9 Oct 1918. Pursuit to the Selle. 9–12 Oct 1918. Battle of the Selle. 17–25 Oct 1918. Battle of the Sambre. 4 Nov 1918, including the Capture of Le Quesnoy.
The 1929 Round The World Zeppelin Flight Silver Table Medal At the behest of American newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, whose media empire was the major commercial backer of the project with four staffers among the flight's nine passengers, the Graf's "Round-the-World" (Weltrundfahrt 1929) flight in August 1929 officially began and ended at Lakehurst Naval Air Station in New Jersey. As with many of the airship's other flights, however, its expenses were also heavily offset by the carriage of souvenir mails to and/or from Lakehurst, Friedrichshafen, Tokyo, and Los Angeles. A U.S. franked letter flown on the whole trip from Lakehurst to Lakehurst, for instance, required US$3.55 in postage or the equivalent of roughly $45 in current dollars if based on the CPI. The $200,000 Hearst paid for exclusive media rights would currently be the equivalent of $2.5 million if figured on the same basis. Route of Graf Zeppelin's round-the-world flight. Built in Friedrichshafen, Germany Started at Lakehurst NAS, USA Eastward to Germany Eastward to Kasumigaura Naval Air Base, Japan Eastward to Los Angeles back to Lakehurst Returned to Germany. Hearst correspondent Lady Grace Drummond-Hay was on board making her the first woman to circumnavigate the globe by air. Also representing Hearst among the passenger complement were correspondents Karl von Wiegand and Australian Arctic explorer Sir Hubert Wilkins, and photographer/newsreel cameraman Robert Hartmann. The US Government was represented by Naval airshipmen LCDR Charles Rosendahl and LT Jack C. Richardson who flew as official observers In silver 2.2 inches across
The 1970 Original Sealed Pattern Buckle of The Gambia Prisons With original Crown Agents label and lead seal. The first and original buckle that all further buckles made were copied. A very rare collectors piece.
The NDSAP SA/SS Greatcoat Armband 1930's. This NSDAP SA/SS Armband is in super colour condition but with some moth hole, and extra long for coat wear. The colours of the wool are the original bright tones, being the same as the day it was made. The center area has an oblong shaped sewn white lined satin field, and there is a two-piece black satin lined swastika sewn to the field. The white field still retains its original pristine shade of white and there is no sign of age or dirt. The SA and SS both wore woolen armbands [without the usual black stripes for SS] on their greatcoats. This armband was designated for this purpose.
The Rarest Enfield 'Hook Quillon' 1907 Pattern Bayonet Issued in 1911 Probably for many collectors, especially Australian, it is the most desirable and rarest regulation bayonet ever made or issued. This is an original 1907 Pattern SMLE sword bayonet, issued in 1911, bearing it's original King Edwards Crown, with ER stamp and Enfield maker stamp. And as was standard issue to the WW1, ANZAC, Australian Light Horse. The hook quillon SMLE issue bayonet, is a the very pinnacle of Great War bayonet collecting. They were used predominantly by the Australian Infantry and Light Horse Brigade in WW1, and due to their use in Gallipoli and the dessert were never returned to the ordnance for regulatory quillon removal as was instructed. In over 45 years we have had barely a handful of these rarest full hook quillon bayonets in original condition and unaltered, but the regular type we have handled, by comparison, many many thousands in the same period of time. Australian Light horse were like mounted infantry in that they usually fought dismounted, using their horses as transport to the battlefield and as a means of swift disengagement when retreating or retiring. A famous exception to this rule though was the charge of the 4th and 12th Light Horse Regiments at Beersheba on 31 October 1917. In 1918, some light horse regiments were equipped with sabres, enabling them to fight in a conventional cavalry role in the advance on Damascus. However, unlike mounted infantry, the light horse also performed certain cavalry roles, such as scouting and screening, while mounted. The light horse were organised along cavalry rather than infantry lines. A light horse regiment, although technically equivalent to an infantry battalion in terms of command level, contained only 25 officers and 400 men as opposed to an infantry battalion that consisted of around 1,000 men. Around a quarter of this nominal strength (or one man in each section of 4) could be allotted to horse-holding duties when the regiment entered combat. A regiment was divided into three squadrons, designated "A", "B" and "C" (equivalent to a company), and a squadron divided into four troops (equivalent to but smaller than a platoon). Each troop was divided into about 10 four-man sections. When dismounting for combat, one man from each section would take the reins of the other three men's horses and lead them out of the firing line where he would remain until called upon. By the outbreak of World War I, there were 23 light horse regiments within Australia's part-time military force, consisting of 9,000 personnel. These were organised as follows: 1st Light Horse Brigade (Queensland): 1st (Central Queensland), 2nd (Queensland Mounted Infantry), 3rd (Darling Downs), 4th (Northern Rivers Lancers) and 27th (North Queensland) Light Horse Regiments 2nd Light Horse Brigade (New South Wales): 5th (New England) and 6th (Hunter River Lancers) Light Horse Regiments 3rd Light Horse Brigade (New South Wales): 7th (New South Wales Lancers), 9th (New South Wales Mounted Rifles), 11th (Australian Horse) and 28th (Illawarra) Light Horse Regiments 5th Light Horse Brigade (Victoria): 13th (Gippsland), 15th (Victorian Mounted Rifles), and 16th (Indi) Light Horse Regiments 7th Light Horse Brigade (Victoria): 17th (Campaspe), 19th (Yarrowee), and 20th (Corangamite) and 29th (Port Phillip Horse) Light Horse Regiments 8th Light Horse Brigade (South Australia): 22nd (South Australian Mounted Rifles), 23rd (Barossa), and 24th (Flinders) Light Horse Regiments 25th (Western Australian Mounted Infantry) Light Horse Regiment 26th (Tasmanian Mounted Infantry) Light Horse Regiment. The bayonet has excellent markings to the blade and it's scabbard leather but the any surviving regt markings on the steel hilt mounts are now fully obscured by age.
Two Field Dressings WW2 British Army Issue. Unwrapped and in excellent condition.
US Army WW2 Garrison Cap, Khaki, Officer's Tropical Issue With Quarter Master label, dated June 1945. Pattern date 1942. Good condition.
USSR Russian 1930's Propaganda Poster Beautiful condition and fabulous graphics. Published Moscow 1931. Showing Soldier, Pilot and Worker in the foreground and aircraft, industrial plant, zeppelin and tractor production in the background. Early Russian posters of the Lenin and Stalin period before the war are now becoming extraordinarily collectable. Another poster [that is shown in our gallery for illustration purposes] for the Battleship Potemkin Russian movie, designed by the Stenberg brothers in 1925, sold in November 2012 for 103,250 Pounds Sterling at Christies Auction in London. It arranged class elements into a powerful design of revolutionary upheaval. The poster comprises three pictorial elements: the battleship, the officer and the able seaman. Each of these signs is placed in relation to the others. The fragile balance of bourgeois society is revealed at its very tipping-point. 21.75 inches x 28 inches sold unmounted
Very Good WW2 Third Pattern FS Knife From a WW2 Commando Veteran With ribbed cast grip double edged traditional blade. Leather scabbard with all tabs present and two rivets. Unusual conical pommel nut. This with a WW1 'Thistle Hilt' fighting knife by John Milner of Sheffield came direct to us from the elderly daughter of a [Scottish] WW2 commando who used his father's Scottish Thistle Knife [sold seperately] until he received this third pattern FS Knife. The British Fairbairn Sykes dagger officially made, issued service dagger, was created for the newly formed 'Special Forces' commandos. The story about the Fairbairn Sykes Fighting knife starts in England 1940. In 1940 the British formed special commandos to carry out raids. The initiative came from Winston Churchill in 1940. On the 8 June 1940, Section M09 of the War Office was brought into being. The name commando was taken from small effective mobile Boer units during the war in South Africa 1899-1902. Two of the first instructors were Captain William Ewart Fairbairn (b. 28 February 1885, d. 20 June 1960) and Captain Eric Anthony Sykes (b. 5 February 1883, d. 12 May 1945). These middle aged gentlemen trained the young soldiers in a new and difficult mode of close-combat fighting at the Commando Basic Training Centre, Achnacarry, Scotland. Churchill described the commandos as 'a steel hand from the sea' The need for a proper fighting knife, for these commandos, was apparent from the first few weeks of training specialized personnel. As Fairbairn later wrote, "…the authorities did not recognize a fighting knife as part of the equipment of the fighting services. In fact, such a thing as a fighting knife could not be purchased anywhere in Great Britain." Until now, there had never been an official knife for the British armed services, although many types of knife had been authorised for use in the past. Bowie style knives were carried by some of the Imperial Yeomantry during the South African War of 1900-1901, and in World War I cut-down bayonets, privately purchased hunting knives, or captured German issue folding knives were extensively utilised. In November 1940 there was a meeting between W. E. Fairbairn, E. A. Sykes and Robert Wilkinson Latham at Wilkinson Sword Company. Fairbairn and Sykes described the type of knife they envisioned and the purpose for which it was intended. As discussion continued, preliminary sketches were drawn up and modified time and time again. As Robert Wilkinson Latham tells it: 'In order to explain exactly their point, the two men rose to their feet and one, it was Fairbairn my grandfather mentioned, grabbed the wood ruler from his desk and the two men danced around the office in mock combat'. W. E. Fairbairn had also brought with him an example of a suitable fighting knife. The system they devised utilised techniques drawn from Jiu Jitsu, Gatka, Kung Fu and 'Gutter Fighting'. It proved extremely effective. They were natural choices for the job. Both had served in the Shanghai Municipal Police Force, facing death daily in the dark, narrow streets and alleys of the city against armed thugs and organised gangs. In Shanghai they had made some fighting knives out of bayonets. The meeting resulted in the Fairbairn Sykes Fighting knife that was manufactured by Wilkinson Sword Co. They eventually changed the design a number of times to evolve into the current 3rd pattern. The 1st pattern is by far the rarest, and the fewest types of FS ever made, as the second pattern, and the other variant's were produced fairly quickly after the first pattern's original order from the British Government, issued on the 14th November 1940, was fulfilled by January 1941. In original superb scabbard with original leather tabs and elastic retainer. [*Private H Campbell.]
Very Rare British MK X No 2 Fencing Musket from 1915. Produced by Webley & Scott Ltd simulating the SMLE rifle with long pattern plunger bayonet, it is intended for the safe instruction of bayonet fighting. This is a purpose built pre-WW1 training aid with polished wooden butt and forend, tubular steel body and spring-loaded long plunger with button end. The butt stamped with manufacturer’s markings, Webley and Scot, full Ordnance markings and dated 1915. Fine Condition. A rarity for the serious British Military Rifle Collector. See The Lee Enfield Story by Ian Skennerton page 466. OA 161cm (Plunger 43cm)
Very Rare British MK X No 2 Fencing Musket from 1915. Produced by Webley & Scott Ltd simulating the SMLE rifle with long pattern plunger bayonet, it is intended for the safe instruction of bayonet fighting. This is a purpose built pre-WW1 training aid with polished wooden butt and for end, tubular steel body and spring-loaded long plunger with button end. The butt stamped with manufacturer’s markings, Webley and Scot, full Ordnance markings and dated 1915. Fine Condition. A rarity for the serious British Military Rifle Collector. See The Lee Enfield Story by Ian Skennerton page 466. OA 161cm (Plunger 43cm)
Very Rare WW1 German Airship Bataillon Nr.1 Sword, of the Guarde Infantry. Airship Battalion officer's swords are so rare as to be virtually unavailable. We have not even heard or seen an example in over 30 years. The German Airship Battalions were a small yet vital part of the Kaiser's Imperial German war machine. It was a mix of old and new technology that created the amazing new air services which in turn resulted in the iconic and hugely successful psychological warfare, of the highly feared and indomitable, so called, Hun in the Sky. The very beginning of true aerial warfare as we know it today. Some of the most famous stories of the war were based around the German Airships [Zeppelins and the like] and their continued use by Hitler's Third Reich right up to the late 1930's [as can be seen, impressively and incredibly depicted, in the third of the Indiana Jones movies] shows just how important they were considered. Any souvenirs or militaria from those early services are incredibly sought after, and very scarce indeed. All the weaponry connected with those services are particularly rare and very highly prized. At the start of World War I the Imperial German Army had five Luftschiffer (airship) battalions and one airship company. They were used as frontline observation posts and the larger ships as long range bombers. Fatalities of the crews were very high indeed due to their vulnerability. This sword is the best you could possibly hope for, as, not only does it have a deluxe etched blade, with two blued panels regimentally marked for the Luftschiffer Battalion No1, but detailed etched pictures of a horse drawn supply train and an airship. It also bears the Imperial Garter Star to represent this battalion was part of the Guard Infantry. The most elite part of the Imperial German armed forces, based in Berlin and assigned to the front lines in France and Belgium. The hilt is plated steel with wire bound fishskin grip. A blackened steel scabbard with slight denting.
Watercolour, Zeppelin LZ 47 [Tactical No LZ 77] Bodensee by Manfred Hassel Signed and In super condition. Mounted on card. An original early Aeronautical watercolour of WW1 beautifully executed. Attacks on England and France dropping a total of 12,610 kg (27,800 lb) of bombs. Destroyed by enemy fire on 21 February 1916 in the Battle of Verdun, killing the crew of 15. Reports at the time indicated LZ 77 had searchlights, eight machine guns, two so-called 'revolver' guns in the top lookout post, was accompanied by fixed-wing aircraft and at least one other Zeppelin and had orders to bomb the nearby railway lines. P Class Zeppelin Airships LZ 47 (LZ 77) and LZ 49 (LZ 79) were deployed to Namur in order to carry out bombing raid on Paris. LZ 49 (LZ 79) bombed Paris on the 29/30 of January, but was damaged by ground fire and was destroyed in a forced landing at Ath in Belgium. The Army Zeppelins were then used to support the German army in the early phases of the battle of Verdun. On 21 February, the first day of the German offensive, four of the six available Zeppelins set out to bomb the French supply lines. LZ 65 (LZ 95), the first Q class Zeppelin, was badly damaged by anti-aircraft fire and was destroyed in a crash landing at the base in Namur. The P class LZ 47 (LZ 77) was hit by anti-aircraft fire over Revigny, catching fire and killing the crew of 11, and LZ 58 (LZ 88) was forced to return to its base by squalls and snow showers. The P class was an enlarged version of the preceding M class. On 5 August 1914 the Zeppelin company put forward a proposal to the German Navy Ministry for a design based on LZ 26. This had been started as a passenger carrying craft for DELAG and was the first Zeppelin with a duralumin framework, and also had the strengthening keel inside the hull structure. The proposed design was larger, with the volume increased from 25,000 m3 (880,000 cu ft) to 31,900 m3 (1,126,000 cu ft) and a fourth engine was added. As well as being larger, allowing a greater range and bomb load, the P class introduced enclosed crew accommodation. The Zeppelin P Class was the first Zeppelin airship type to be produced in quantity after the outbreak of the First World War. 22 of the type were built as well as 12 of a lengthened version, the Q Class . They were used for many of the airship bombing raids on the United Kingdom in 1915-16, for naval patrol work over the North Sea and Baltic and were also deployed on the eastern and south-eastern fronts. Painting front size 16.25 x 9 inches
We Are Always Pleased to See Personal Visitors To Our Shop In Brighton we are frequently described as one of the top visitors attractions of the City, and hundreds of thousands of tourists [and regular visitors] come to see us every year. We evolved from one of the oldest established family businesses in Sussex, with a client base that includes Heads of State, Presidents, Princes and Kings. But whether you are a movie star, a professor, a postmen or a student all are treated with the same courtesy. Every sale is important to us, beit a badge for £5 or a first edition for £5,000. Every day we are told that, to some, this is their favourite shop in the world, so we believe we have a great responsibility, to our customers, our reputation, and to the amazing city of Brighton. To view our history during the past century click the photo to the left to see more photos of our store today, and also 3 original vintage photos from our archive. One from around 1920, one of our 1920's vintage horse drawn pantechnichon [still in use till 1969] and one of our 'more modern' trucks in the 1970's. An article, written on us, at City News Live is copied below [ link; http://citynewslive.com/travel/fullstory-newsID-20592.html ] *********and this is the article, below, as published;*********** With so many different histories to offer, you can feel freer in Brighton than in most British cities to select trips which coincide with your interests – and of course, you're much more likely to find in Brighton things to do which bring the history you love to life. For the lover of militaria, a visit to The Lanes Armoury is a must with a difference. The Armoury's housed in a three-storey 16th century building and is a real treasure trove – it's a museum which is not a museum as everything is for sale. It has been nominated and then short-listed for the British Antique & Collectors Awards as the best Antique Shop in Great Britain and is the latest incarnation of a much older business – Hawkins – which was one of the earliest and largest dealers in Antiques and Collectibles within Europe. It's their specialisation in Arms, Armour, Militaria, and Books which really marks them out and creates such a fascinating and fantastic place to visit. From bronze-age swords, suits of armour, guns, revolvers, duelling pistols, American Civil war swords through to medals and World War II weapons, it's all there to be viewed and drooled over. It's not a museum but when you leave, you've had the same experience!.
We Constantly Seeking Items From Airships, RFC, Zeppelin & Balloon Corps. Please contact us if you wish to sell any items from the WW1 Royal Flying Corps, the Imperial German Air Force, the German Airships, Balloons and Zeppelins. Anything related to the Luftschiff
Why Not Sponsor A Guide Dog From Only £4 A Month Back in the 1960's and 70's in order to sponsor guide dogs, it often involved the complete cost to fully supply and train a Guide Dog, our very first dog that we sponsored and paid to train was 'Lyn'. Today all you have to do is to go to http://www.guidedogs.org.uk/ [copy and paste] fill in the form, and it can be done online in only five minutes. It's really simple, but that simple five minutes can change someone's life forever. The first four British guide dogs - Judy, Flash, Folly and Meta - completed their training at Wallasey, Wirral in 1931, and three years after this The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association was formed. This would not have been possible without the work of Muriel Crooke and Rosamund Bond, German shepherd breeders who trained the first guide dogs. The first permanent trainer for Guide Dogs was Captain Nikolai Liakhoff, who came to England in 1933. In 1956 Guide Dogs began to recruit volunteers to become puppy walkers. A few years later a breeding programme was introduced and by 1970 these components of Guide Dogs’ work had grown so much they were given their own premises at Tollgate House, near Leamington Spa. The most influential figure in the development of Guide Dogs’ puppy walking and breeding programmes was the late Derek Freeman MBE. In 1964, the charity’s work was introduced to a new generation when the children’s television programme Blue Peter launched an appeal to collect silver foil and milk bottle tops. Blue Peter raised enough to fund two guide dog puppies, Cindy and Honey, whom the programme followed through their training. This feature was repeated in the early 1980s, again in 2006 with Andy Akinwolere and puppy Magic and in 2014 another puppy Iggy.
Wreckage from The Very First German Plane Shot Down by RAF in WW2 Undoubtedly a most significant yet unassuming artifact from the very beginning of the air war of WW2. Recovered from the very first plane shot down by the RAF since 1918. Aeronautical alloy from that Dornier Do17p. The first German aircraft shot down over France during the war was this Dornier Do 17P of 2(F)123, brought down by Pilot Officer Mould's Hawker Hurricane of No. 1 Squadron RAF on 30 October 1939. The Dornier, Wrk Nr. 4414, constructed at Blohm & Voss, crashed near Vassincourt, killing all three of its crew, Hauptmann Balduin von Norman, Oberleutnant Hermann Heisterberg and Feldwebel Friedrich Pfeuffer. Pilot Officer Peter Mould scored the squadron’s first kill when he downed a Dornier DO17 engaged in a high-level reconnaissance flight. The combat report indicated that the Dornier “appeared to have been taken by surprise as no evasive tactics were employed and no fire was encountered by PO Mould.” In the tradition of their forebearers of the Royal Flying Corps, the squadron took souvenirs from the crash site near Toul, and celebrated the victory in style. Mould, though, was sobered on seeing the wreckage, and confessed to Paul Richey that he was “bloody sorry I went and looked at the wreck. What gets me down is thought that I did it.” “30/10/39 Local patrol maintained throughout the day. At 14:30 hrs three enemy aircraft were seen at a high altitude over the aerodrome. The aerodrome defence section immediately took off in pursuit and one of the raiders was overtaken at 18,000ft ten miles west of Toul and shot down by P/O Mould. The other two escaped in cloud. The enemy shot down was a Dornier and appeared to have been taken by surprise as no evasive tactics were employed and no fire was encountered by P/O Mould” Fellow No 1 Sqn pilots P/O Paul Richey and Sgt Soper took off in pursuit of the Dornier, but to no avail, and after a fruitless 15 minute search they returned to Vassincourt. Peter 'Boy' Mould had just finished refueling after a patrol when the German flew over, he took off immediately and using the supercharger override climbed to 18,000ft where caught up with his victim as Paul Richey recounted in his famous book, ‘Fighter Pilot’ “He did an ordinary straight astern attack, and fired one longish burst with his sights starting above the Dornier and moving slowly round the fuselage. The Hun caught fire immediately, went into a vertical spiral, and eventually made a large hole in the French countryside. It exploded on striking the ground, and there were no survivors. The remains of a gun from the machine, together with a bullet-holed oxygen bottle now adorned our Mess.” The Dornier Do17P, a twin camera equipped photo-reconnaissance aircraft from 2(F)123, was destroyed in the crash. All three of the crew were killed. Hauptmann Balduin von Norman und Audenhove, Oberleutnant Hermann Heisterbergk and Feldwebel Friedrich Pfeuffer were buried locally by the French. They were later reinterred in a common grave in the German military cemetery at Andilly. 2(F)123 were based at Wüzburg under the direct command of Luftflotte 3; Von Normann led the unit of 12 aircraft until his death in the crash. The location of the crash site is Traveron, a very small hamlet on the Meuse in Eastern France, about 20 miles South West of Nancy. Annexed to Sauvigny. This item is certified with a lifetime guarantee of authenticity. It was one of two pieces we acquired from the aeronautical archaeologist from the initial dig recovery.
WW1 Bavarian Combat Veteran's Silver Badge A WWI Bavarian veteran’s badge that is in near perfect condition and is complete with metal tabbed ribbons. The badge has a powerful Lion gripping a Bavarian shield and “Bayer Kriegerbund 1874” on the obverse. The reverse is complete with functioning pin and is nicely maker marked for Deschler & Sohn.
WW1 British-Canadian Anti Prussian Propaganda Medal Dated 1914, but made later in the war. To commemorate the execution by Germany of Capt. Fryatt. The medal features on one side a naked figure of death on a horse, riding over crops, and the words "NACH PARIS" and the date "1914" In a border around the perimeter on the obverse, a quote by Goethe; "THE PRUSSIAN IS CRUEL BY BIRTH. CIVILIZATION WILL MAKE HIM FEROCIOUS". In the centre the words "LOUVAIN, THE LUSITANIA, EDITH CAVELL, CAPT. FRYATT, THE ZEPPELIN VICTIMS". LOUVAIN (the city burned by Germany) THE LUSITANIA (British passenger ship that sailed from the US and was sunk by German U-Boats EDITH CAVELL [A British nurse that was executed by a firing squad of the German military CAPT. FRYATT [Executed by a German military court for so called 'piracy', alledgedly committed by defending his unarmed merchant passenger ship, during an attempted sinking by a U Boat, by ramming the attacking U.Boat.] THE ZEPPELIN VICTIMS (referring to the civilians killed by the Zeppelin bombing raids]. Apparently the medals were made in England and Canada.
WW1 Essex Regt Sterling Silver and Multi Colour Enamel Sweetheart Brooch During the First World War, the Essex Regiment provided 30 infantry battalions to the British Army. The 3rd (Special Reserve) (formerly Militia) battalion was mobilised to supply drafts to the two Regular battalions. On the outbreak of war, the Territorial battalions (4th-7th, and 8th (Cyclist) Battalions), all formed second line (2/4-2/8th) and eventually third line (3/4th-3/8th) battalions. Three service battalions (9th, 10th and 11th) and one reserve battalion (12th), were formed from volunteers in 1914 as part of Kitchener's Army. A further service battalion (13th (West Ham)), was raised by the Mayor and Borough of West Ham. Reserve battalions were created as the war progressed, including the 14th (from the depot companies of the 13th), the 15th, 16th and 17th (from provisional battalions), the 18th (Home Service) and 1st and 2nd Garrison Battalions. The regiment's battle honours for the First World War include Le Cateau, Ypres, Loos, Somme, Cambrai, Gallipoli and Gaza. The 1st Battalion took part in the first day of the Battle of the Somme on 1 July 1916. The battalion, which comprised W, X, Y, and Z companies, took up position in the British trenches at 3:30 am. At 8:40 am, the battalion received orders to advance and clear the German first-line trenches. It was delayed by heavy enemy fire and congestion in the communication trenches. The Newfoundland Regiment advancing to the left of the Essex battalion was almost entirely wiped out as it advanced towards the German lines. At 10:50 am, the Essex companies were in position and received orders to go "over the top". The companies came under heavy artillery and machine gun fire almost as soon as they appeared over the parapet, causing heavy losses. The attack became bogged down in no man's land. The battalion received orders from 88th Brigade headquarters to recommence the attack at 12:30 pm, but at 12:20 pm the battalion commander advised brigade HQ that "owing to casualties and disorganisation", it was impossible to renew the attack. The survivors of the battalion received orders to hold their position along the line of 'Mary Redan' – 'New Trench' – 'Regent Street'
WW1 German Red Cross - Prussian Country Club of the Red Cross Badge The Prussian country club of the Red Cross goes back to 1864. It was founded on February 8, 1864 in Prussia . A little later, in November 1866, Queen Augusta founded the Patriotic Women's Association of the Red Cross in Prussia, then still separated. On April 20, 1869, the 12 existing national associations of the Red Cross established the "Central Committee of German Associations for the protection in the field of wounded and diseased warriors". Since 13 December 1879 it is called "Central Committee of German Associations of the Red Cross". On October 6, 1898, the National Conference of more than 26 national associations took place in Stuttgart. At this conference it was decided that all national associations uniformly bear the name "country club of the Red Cross". Until the end of World War 1 achievements were honored by the awards of each sovereign in the country club of the Red Cross.
WW1 Period Silver Clan Graham Badge, Motto Ne Oublie Not hallmarked silver. The motto of the Graham Clan is "Ne Oublie." It means “Do Not Forget.”Graham Clan Crest: A falcon armed, killing a stork. Origins of the clan. There is a tradition that the first Graham was one Greme who broke the Roman Antonine Wall driving the Roman legions out of Scotland. However the likely origin is that the chiefs of Clan Graham were of Anglo-Norman origin. The Manor of Gregham is recorded in William the Conqueror's Domesday Book. When David I claimed the throne of Scotland, Graham was one of the knights who accompanied him. Sir William de Graham was present at the erection of Holyrood Abbey, witnessing its foundation charter. The first lands that the chiefs of Clan Graham appear to have held were around Dalkeith in Midlothian. Sir Nicholas de Graham attended the Parliament of 1290 where the Treaty of Birgham was signed
WW1 Tommy's 'Fum's up' or 'Touch Wood' Charm The goodluck charm of the WW1 Tommy. Bead head and movable arms. Used and carried in the trenches by the soldiers, they first appeared in around 1880 and were available in many forms but all around the same theme. It was the outbreak of WWI that saw his popularity soar. This was also when the wooden head first appeared and he became a touch wood charm as well as a Fumsup charm. He was sent to soldiers from sweethearts as a good luck charm and there are some lovely stories to be found on the internet today from families who still have their Fumsup charms that saw their Grandfathers through WWI and in some cases WWII as well. Photo on an old Fum'sup advert for information only [not included]
WW1 Trench Art Knife Made from the barrel bands of Artillery Shells Trench Art desk knife engraved with '1918 Langley Batterie'
WW1 US Naval Officer's Sword Named to [Lt. Commander in 1914, later, Captain by 1939] Glenn S Burrell USN. Very good original gilt mounts, overall in very nice order, the blade is very good, but has a small area of rusting at the forte by the officer's name.
WW1 Watercolour of LZ 62. Sent on Several Bombing Missions to England Bears the name of German artist Claus Bergen, dated 1917. Titled for it's subject and the name of the Zeppelin forces commander Peter Strasser. Claus Bergen trained at the Royal Academy in Munich under Karl von Marr. He began his career as illustrator of Karl May’s Winnetou and travel stories and in 1910 his illustrations were exhibited at the Exposition Universelle in Brussels.He became an artist of great rupute during WW1 and he painted several scenes of German Zeppelins, some bombing London, and he even served in the German Navy in order to paint the Kriegsmarine ships and boats in service during the war. After the Great war he became a favourite of Hitler painting many military naval subjects etc. which continued throughout WW2. After WW2 he painted for President Kennedy and many of his works are in renown collections and institutions. However, although it bears the name Claus Bergen we are not art dealers and familiar with his work, so we cannot be certain it is by the same Claus Bergen of repute. We are pricing this painting as a fine piece of well executed WW1 aeronautical art, and not guaranteed as a painting by 'the' Claus Bergen. 26cm x 19.5 cm unframed. The naming on the front may be an identification of the artist Claus Bergen, and the subject, Zeppelin LZ62 at Seerappen, Konigsberg 1917 with Iron Cross Emblem, added by the original owner and not to represent a signature by the artist himself. At sometime it has been posted from Wurtemberg and bears the remains of a 71/2 Pfennig stamp. The back bears details of commanders of Zeppelins and information of Kapitan-Leutnant Alois Bocker's crew of L33, and also of a shooting down near Potters Bar [probably of Strasser's L31]. This painting may have been owned by a British soldier and it was sent home as war booty from Wurtemberg in around 1919.
WW2 1940 Shot Down Me109 Parts, Pilot Oblt. Heinz Kupka of Jagdgeschwader 3 Fantastically historical Messerschmitt parts of a the Me109 shot down on June 30th 1940, by RAF 56 squadron, after the capitulation of France [and the sorrowful end the Battle of France] and just 10 days before the 'Battle of Britain' began in July. These parts were recovered from an archealogical dig in 2012. Last year six near wrecked condition Me109s sold for £4,000,000.00. Boarded by one of the archeologists. The list of kills for Oblt. Heinz Kupka of Jagdgeschwader 3 include ; 14/05/1940 Oblt. Heinz Kupka 8 JG 3 Lysander Gembloux 19.50pm and on 06/06/1940 Oblt. Heinz Kupka 8 JG 3 Blenheim Hiermont-Yvrench: 700m 11.15am Jagdschwader 3 "Udet" was formed on 1 May 1939 in Bernburg/Saale from JG 231. JG 3 was one of the Luftwaffe's fighter units that took part in the Battle of France. A particularly fruitful period over France occurred from 14–17 May 1940. Allied bombers had attempted to prevent the German armour from crossing the Meuse and sent waves of inadequately protected bombers to do the job. As a result, 90 Allied bombers were shot down and the 14 May became known as the "day of the fighters" within the Luftwaffe. I./JG 3 destroyed seven fighters without loss on this day. On 15 May five were destroyed, again for no losses. On 17 May an entire formation of 13 Bristol Blenheims were shot down by I./JG 3. A total of 19 Allied aircraft were shot down by I./JG 3 alone on that day. The unit claimed some 179 aircraft shot down. Oberleutnant Lothar Keller was top claimant with 10 kills, and I./JG 3 Gruppenkommandeur Maj. Günther Lützow scored 9. I./JG3 was the most successful Gruppe, with 88 enemy aircraft destroyed for ten Bf 109s lost while six pilots were killed and one wounded. JG 3 later flew intensively in the Battle of Britain. On 21 August 1940, Oberstleutnant Lützow was appointed Kommodore of JG 3. He recorded 8 more victories during the aerial battles over England. Lützow was awarded the Ritterkreuz (Knights Cross) on 18 September. By the end of 1940 its most successful pilots were Oblt. Erwin Neuerberg (11 claims) and Lt Helmut Meckel (9 claims). The Geschwader lost some 51 pilots killed or POW July–December 1940. I Gruppe alone had destroyed exactly 50 enemy machines, but in exchange of 32 Messerschmitts of which 20 were lost to enemy action. Ten pilots were killed or missing while a further 11 were captured Willy Messerschmitt designed the BF109 during the early 1930s. The Bf109 was one of the first all metal monocoque construction fighters with a closed canopy and retractable undercarriage. The engine of the Me109 was a V12 aero engine which was liquid-cooled. The Bf109 first saw operational service during the Spanish Civil War and flew to the end of World War II, during which time it was the backbone of the Luftwaffe fighter squadrons. During the Battle of Britian the Bf109 was used in the role of an escort fighter, a role for which it was not designed for, and it was also used as a fighter bomber. During the last days of May 1940 Robert Stanford-Tuck, the RAF ace, got the chance to fly an Me109 which they had rebuilt after it had crash landed. Stanford-Tuck found out that the Me109 was a wonderful little plane, it was slightly faster than the Spitfire, but lacked the Spitfire manoeuvrability. By testing the Me109, Tuck could put himself inside the Me109 when fighting them, knowing its weak and strong points. With the introduction of the improved Bf109F in the spring of 1941, the type again proved to be an effective fighter during the invasion of Yugoslavia and during the Battle of Crete and the invasion of Russia and it was used during the Siege of the Mediteranean island of Malta. The Bf109 was the main fighter for the Luftwaffe until 1942 when the Fw190 entered service and shared this position, and was partially replaced in Western Europe, but the Me109 continued to serve on the Eastern Front and during the defence of the Reich against the allied bombers. It was also used to good effect in the Mediterranean and North Africa in support of The Africa Korps. Large framed panel 24 x 32 inches.
WW2 Advertising Poster for The National Gallery 'War Pictures' Printed for H.M.Stationary Office by Hubners Ltd. On their way to the Myra Hess concerts in October 1939, visitors to the National Gallery couldn’t help noticing the forlorn bare walls where the paintings had been before the war. Art under fire Before long, a series of temporary exhibitions was organised – a rarity for museums and galleries at the time. There were also rolling displays of contemporary war art organised by the WAAC (War Artists’ Advisory Committee) that Kenneth Clark had helped set up at the outset of war. The temporary exhibitions spanned a large variety of subjects, ranging from ‘Nineteenth Century French Paintings’ and ‘British Painting since Whistler’ to War Pictures By British Artists and ‘Greater London: Towards a Master Plan’. These exhibitions were often disrupted by the damage inflicted by the nightly bombing raids during the Blitz. This didn’t affect the large number of visitors attending. In fact there was much debate as to whether visitors should be asked to leave during the many air-raid warnings that occurred each day. By 1942 the bombing raids had lessened. It was now felt that one painting could be brought up to London from Manod every month. It was put on show in splendid isolation with some accompanying documentary material. Every night the work was removed from display and stored in the underground strong room for safety. The arrival of each painting was a news event. The picture of the month scheme exists in the Gallery to this day. Posters are a true form of art with a purpose as they were designed to deliver a particular message through striking designs. These original vintage posters were created to grab the attention of passers-by, presenting artists with the challenge of condensing the message or a concept into a precise, short visual and written form in a single artwork. They are important items of social history that capture the essence of the time they were printed. Original vintage posters are recognised as a sound art investment that can be enjoyed every day. 25 x 18.5 inches
WW2 Australian Instructional Corps - Officer Bronze and Enamel Hat Badge A mighty rare badge of WW2. Australian Instructional Corps - Officer Bronze and Enamel Hat Badge 1921 - 55. Worn from 1930 to 1942. The Australian Instructional Corps (AIC) was the permanent force posting unit for the Warrant Officer Instructors of the Australian Army from 1921 to 1955. Complete with two lugs. A highly desirable hat badge. These were worn by Warrant Officer trainers who were responsible for the training of the Militia Battalions and Regiments (Citizen Military Forces) from 1921 to 1942 and the Volunteer Defence Force (VDF) from 1942 to 1945 as well as the 2nd AIF post 1939. The AIC ran qualification courses for militia and AIF officers and NCOs at specialist schools across the country. Many of the instructors were commissioned as Officers or were employed as senior NCO's in these war time formations. The AIC reached its peak in 1942 with 234 quartermasters and 889 warrant officers so both types of these insignia can be quite hard to come by
WW2 Burma Star Association Lapel Badge The Burma Star Association was officially founded on the 26 February 1951 with 2,000 founder members. The badge of the Association incorporates a replica of the Burma Campaign Star. Permission to take advantage of this singular honour was supported by His Majesty King George VI in consultation with Earl Mountbatten and Field Marshal Viscount Slim and the badge and title were accepted by the College of Heralds. This fact recognises the rigorous nature of climate, topography and the extremely debilitating conditions in which to wage a successful campaign against a determined and fanatical enemy, thus making this Association unique among post war ex-Service Associations.The first President of the Association was Field Marshal Viscount Slim (Uncle Bill) who held this position until his death on 14 December 1970.
WW2 Canadian Red Cross Blood Donor Enamel Lapel Badge Screw back, maker marked.
WW2 German 7.5cm High Explosive PAK 40 Head Round A most scarce and rarely seen to survive the war intact and thus unfired. Also fitted to armoured half track personel carrier. SdKfz. 231/22 Ausf. D with Pak 40/L60. The weapon was effective against almost every Allied tank until the end of the war. The Pak 40 was much heavier than the Pak 38; its decreased mobility meant that it was difficult or even impossible to move without an artillery tractor on boggy ground.The 7.5 cm Pak 40 (7,5 cm Panzerabwehrkanone 40) was a German 75 millimetre anti-tank gun developed in 1939-1941 by Rheinmetall and used during the Second World War. The Pak 40 formed the backbone of German anti-tank guns for the latter part of World War II, mostly in towed form, but also on a number of tank destroyers such as the Marder series. Approximately 23,500 Pak 40's were produced. A modified version of the gun designed specifically for vehicle-mounting was the 7.5 cm KwK 40, which differed primarily in using more compact ammunition which allowed greater numbers of rounds to be carried inside the vehicles. The KwK 40 armed many of the German mid-war tank and destroyer designs, replacing the Pak 40 in the later role. Depending on the source, the Pak 40 may be referred to as the 7.5/L46, referring to the barrel's length in calibres. There were two versions of the KwK 40, which would be referred to as the 7.5/L43 or 7.5/L48. The Pak 40 was the standard German anti-tank gun until the end of the war, and was supplied by Germany to its allies. Some captured guns were used by the Red Army. After the end of the war the Pak 40 remained in service in several European armies, including Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Finland, Norway, Hungary and Romania. About 20,000 Pak 40s were produced, and about 3,500 more were used to arm tank destroyers. The unit manufacturing cost amounted to 2,200 man-hours at 12,000 RM. A lighter automatic "weapon system" version incorporating a twelve-round magazine, the heaviest of the Bordkanone series of heavy calibre aircraft guns, was used as the BK 7,5 in the Henschel Hs 129B-3 ground attack aircraft and the Junkers Ju 88P-1 bomber destroyer, and even intended as a production fitment for a possible He 177A-3/R5 heavy bomber adaptation late in 1942, originally prototyped in the field with BK 5 cannons, themselves adapted from the 5 cm KwK 39 tank gun from the Panzer III. Not suitable for export safe and inert not for sale to under 18's. Weighs 6 kilos. 14.5 Inches long overall
WW2 German Eastern Front Winter Medal Awarded for service during 15 November 1941 to 15th April 1942, for being wounded in action, killed in action or for 14 to 60 days served in active combat between the dates Nov 1941 to April 1942 on the Eastern Front. Designed by a serving SS Soldier SS Uuntersharfuhrer E. Kraus it was held in high regard by serving soldiers. It's issue was officially decommissioned by the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht on the 4th of September 1944. The ribbon was red, white and black [symbolic of blood, snow and death].
WW2 German General Assault Badge In good condition, pin fastener lacking. The standard issue General Assault badge was introduced on 1st June 1940, by Generaloberst Walther von Brauchitsch, as a combat award to SS and Heer armed support personnel who were ineligible for the Infantry or Panzer Assault badges. Criteria for award of the badge was basically the same as the criteria for award of the Infantry and Panzer Assault badges, with the main qualification being participation in three separate assaults in a supporting role. On its introduction it was titled the Engineers Assault Badge [Pionier-Sturmabzeichen} as it was only intended for award to combat engineers, but quite soon after its introduction it’s issue was extended to other personnel anti-tank and anti-aircraft, artillery and assault gun personnel, personnel and medical personnel. Personnel who had single handedly destroyed an enemy tank were awarded the standard General Assault badge, but by 1943 it was decided that the General Assault Badge was insufficient in recognising the number of assaults that the support personnel participated in, which resulted in upgrades to the award, and the introduction of four Special Grade of the General Assault badges in June 1943. The Special Grade badges followed the same design of their predecessor but were larger, two piece construction awards, with a rectangular numbered panel to the bottom of the wreath.
WW2 German Machinegunners Close Combat Knife / Bayonet Seitengewehr fur Machinegewher-Schutzenor Kurzes' Seitengewehr 98. The short close combat type bladed knives used by German MachineGunners and provided as privately-purchased bayonets [reference; The A to Z of Bayonets K: Karabiner 98 by Graham Priest]. Although patterned with a bayonet type hilt it was not intended for that use as machine gunners never carried rifles. This is a very nice example by Karl Eickhorn of Solingen. During World War II, American G.I.s called the German MG42 machine gun “Hitler’s buzz saw” because of the way it cut down troops in swaths. The Soviet Red Army called it “the linoleum ripper” because of the unique tearing sound it made—a result of its extremely high rate of fire. The Germans called the MG42 Hitlersäge or “Hitler’s bone saw”—and built infantry tactics around squads of men armed with the weapon. However, the gunners had a need for a close combat defensive weapon, for guns were often over run, and this short close combat bladed bayonet fitted the bill very nicely indeed. Many military historians argue that the Maschinengewehr 42 was the best general-purpose machine gun ever. It fired up to 1,800 rounds per minute in some versions. That’s nearly twice as fast as any automatic weapon fielded by any army in the world at the time.“It sounded like a zipper,” Orville W. “Sonny” Martin, Jr., who was a second lieutenant with the U.S. Army’s 13th Armoured Division, said in an oral history of infantry and armor operations in Europe. “It eats up a lot of ammunition and that makes for a logistical problem, but it eats up a lot of people, too.” When the war began in 1939, the Germans had a solid, reliable general-purpose machine gun—the MG34. But it was expensive and difficult to manufacture. The German high command wanted front-line troops to have more machine guns. That meant a weapon designed to deliver a high rate of fire like the MG34, but which was cheaper and quicker to produce. Mauser-Werke developed a machine gun that fired a 7.92-millimeter Mauser cartridge fed into the gun from either a 50-round or 250-round belt. What’s more, the company manufactured the machine gun from stamped and pressed parts, welding the components together with a technique that reduced production time by 35 percent.
WW2 Iron Cross First Class Bravery Decoration The Iron Cross comes in two grades, Second Class and First Class. This example the Iron Cross First Class could only be awarded for an act of outstanding bravery and also to one who had previously received the Iron Cross Second Class. Hence, the First Class was more restricted and more highly prized. When the Iron Cross First Class was awarded, the Iron Cross Second Class was signified with a small ribbon attached to a button. Adolf Hitler was awarded this identical type of 1st Class Iron Cross in WW1, and always wore it throughout WW2 with pride. Next to the Victoria Cross, it is the most famous medal in the world. The Iron Cross was awarded for bravery in battle as well as other conspicuous military contributions in a battlefield environment. In order to receive the Iron Cross 1st Class Heer and Waffen SS men would have to perform three to four further acts of courage from the one that earned him the 2nd Class; The Luftwaffe and Kriegsmarine had the following criteria; the award was regularly awarded to U-boat Commanders upon sinking 50,000 tons and to Luftwaffe pilots when they achieved six or seven confirmed kills; Of course these were only guidelines, and a single act of great importance or a long steady career could earn the individual the Cross. The Iron Cross 2nd Class came with a ribbon and was worn in one of two different methods: When in formal dress, the entire cross was worn mounted alone or as part of a medal bar. For everyday wear, only the ribbon was worn from the second hole in the tunic button. The Iron Cross is a black four-pointed cross with white trim, with the arms widening toward the ends, similar to a cross pattée. It was designed by the neoclassical architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel and reflects the cross borne by the Teutonic Knights in the 14th century. Initially the Iron Cross was worn with the blank side out. This did not change until 1838 when the sprig facing could be presented. Since the Iron Cross was issued over several different periods of German history, it was annotated with the year indicating the era in which it was issued. For example, an Iron Cross from the First World War bears the year "1914", while the same decoration from the Second World War is annotated "1939". The reverse of the 1870, 1914 and 1939 series of Iron Crosses have the year "1813" appearing on the lower arm, symbolizing the year the award was created. The 1813 decoration also has the initials "FW" for King Frederick William III, while the next two have a "W" for the respective kaisers, Wilhelm I and Wilhelm II. The final version shows a swastika. A cross was the symbol of the Teutonic Knights (a heraldic cross pattée), and the cross design (but not the specific decoration) has been the symbol of Germany's armed forces (now the Bundeswehr) since 1871. As with all our items, each one comes with our unique, lifetime guarantee, certificate of authenticity
WW2 Kriegsmarine Oberbootsmann (Chief Petty Officer) Shoulder Board The Kriegsmarine's most famous ships were the U-boats, most of which were constructed after Plan Z was abandoned at the beginning of World War II. Wolfpacks were rapidly assembled groups of submarines which attacked British convoys during the first half of the Battle of the Atlantic but this tactic was largely abandoned in the second half of the war. Along with the U-boats, surface commerce raiders (including auxiliary cruisers) were used to disrupt Allied shipping in the early years of the war, the most famous of these being the heavy cruisers Admiral Graf Spee and Admiral Scheer and the battleship Bismarck. However, the adoption of convoy escorts, especially in the Atlantic, greatly reduced the effectiveness of commerce raiders against convoys. After the Second World War, the Kriegsmarine's remaining ships were divided up amongst the Allied powers and were used for various purposes including minesweeping.
WW2 Kriegsmarine Petty Officer Bandsman Trade Badge, Summer Rig
WW2 Luftwaffe Generals Visor Cap Wreath and Cockade in Gold Bullion On Blue To gear for the European war, Luftwaffe needed a high command equivalent to Army (Oberkommando des Heeres OKH) or Navy (Oberkommando der Marine OKM). Thus on 5 February 1935, Air Force Command (Oberkommando Der Luftwaffe OKL) was created. Then in 1939, the Luftwaffe was again reorganized. The credit for the formation of a true Air Force High Command goes to General der Flieger Günther Korten commander of Air Fleet 1 and his Chief of Operations General der Flieger Karl Koller. They both campaigned to carve out a command out of Goring's all compassing Reich Air ministry. The intent was to put Luftwaffe on a true wartime footing, by grouping all the essential military parts of the RLM into a single command.Each Luftflotte was further divided into air districts ( Luftgaue) and flying Corps (German: Fliegerkorps). Each Luftgau had 50 to 150 officers led by a Generalmajor. It was responsible for providing administrative and logistical structure as well as resources to each airfield. The Fliegerkorps on the other hand were in charge of the operation matters related to flying such as unit deployment, air traffic control, ordnance and maintenance. Since this structure was making ground support structure available to flying units, the flying units were freed from moving the support staff from one location to another as the unit relocated. Once the unit arrived at its new location, all the airfield staff would come under the control of the commander of that unit
WW2 Nahkampfspange erste Stufe, Silver Close Combat Clasp, Friedrich Linden Of the roughly 18 – 20 Million soldiers of the German Wehrmacht and Waffen-SS only around 9,500 were awarded this Silver class award. It was initiated by Adolf Hitler on the 25th November 1942 to recognise personal bravery, by a member of the Army Navy or SS, in close combat hand-to-hand engagements, with rifle pistol bayonet or hand grenade, while on foot and unsupported, It was worn above the left breast pocket. The German WW2 'Silver' Class of this prestigious award was presented for a period of 20 to 30. days in close combat with the enemy (the rally of close combat days was recorded in a soldier’s pay book). The reverse has the correct silver finished “coke bottle” shaped pin which is good and functions nicely. The hinge sits atop a raised guide ridge. The reverse is marked with the correct manufacturer’s logo on the right side of the back plate with the distinctive circle trio, encompassing the initials “F.L.L.” "Friedrich Linden, of Lüdenscheid". To the left is the name of the designer, W.E. Peekhaus of Berlin. A very sound example of a highly desirable award. Good original examples of these high class Third Reich combat awards just do not show up very often. Original photograph of Wehrmacht Captain Russland in 1943, displaying the Close Combat Clasp and he is also wearing his Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross. Another photo of Reichsführer der SS, Heinrich Himmler, presenting the Close Combat Clasp to Unteroffizier Heinz Rudolph, Unteroffizier Kray, Unteroffizier Adam Schaub und Obergefreiter Georg Felsner (left to right)
WW2 National Fire Service Badge. The National Fire Service (NFS) was the single fire service created in Great Britain in 1941 during the Second World War; a separate National Fire Service (Northern Ireland) was created in 1942. The NFS was created in August 1941 by the amalgamation of the wartime national Auxiliary Fire Service (AFS) and the local authority fire brigades (about 1,600 of them). It existed until 1948, when it was again split by the Fire Services Act 1947, with fire services reverting to local authority control, although this time there were far fewer brigades, with only one per county and county borough. The NFS had full-time and part-time members, male and female. Its uniform was the traditional dark blue double-breasted tunic, and it adopted the peaked cap worn by the AFS instead of the peakless sailor-style cap which had been worn by many pre-war fire brigades (including the London Fire Brigade). The peaked cap was retained by fire services after the war. When they were on duty, but in the frequent long stretches between calls, many firemen and firewomen performed vital wartime manufacturing work, in workshops in the fire stations or adjacent to them. This was entirely voluntary, but since many of the wartime personnel had worked in factories before the war it was work with which they were familiar and skilled. War service meant considerable risk, and members of the NFS were called to attend the aftermath of German bombing raids and coastal shelling from France, or often whilst these attacks were still ongoing. Casualties were inevitable, and there is one record of one volunteer who died on duty aged just 19, and was awarded the Certificate for Gallantry as a result. He is buried in the Hamilton Road Cemetery, Deal, Kent. The Chief of the Fire Staff and Inspector-in-Chief throughout the war (until 28 February 1947, when he retired) was Sir Aylmer Firebrace, former Chief Officer of the London Fire Brigade. Small enamel service use losses to letters
WW2 Period Chinese Bank of Communications 25-Yuan Note, 1941, serial no. 784417 green, electric direct current generator, Zeppelin and plane at centre. Established in 1908, Bank of Communication claims a long history in China and is one of the banks to have issued banknotes in modern Chinese history.
WW2 SS Polizei Family Collection, Photos, Pass Books and Paperwork etc. A complete WW2 and pre WW2 SS Polizei 'Soika' family collection all regarding one man and his son? Who both served in the German polizei and SS in WW2. Papers, pass books, silver RZM pattern uniform cuff title sown to uniform cuff, original personal photographs of Polizei briefings, and a personal portrait photo of the younger SS Polizei Division family member, an order of some kind to him signed by SS polizei Obersturmfuhrer and typed Waffen SS papers [in German], and an polizei cap badge. The cap badge has had old cap mount repairs. The 4th SS Polizei Panzergrenadier Division was one of the thirty-eight divisions fielded as part of the Waffen-SS during World War II. The division was formed in 1939 as part of the Ordnungspolizei or Orpo (uniformed national police). While all German police organizations were controlled by Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler in his capacity as Chief of German Police in the Interior Ministry, they were not at this time considered part of the SS, nor was the Polizei Division on par with the other Waffen-SS divisions. This status was reflected in the quality of the equipment they were issued and their retention of police insignia and rank structure. The division was transferred to the Waffen-SS in 1942 and was upgraded to a Panzergrenadier division. It fought in France, the Soviet Union, Greece (where it orchestrated the Distomo massacre) and Pomerania and surrendered to the Americans in May 1945. The division was formed in October 1939, when 15,000 members of the Ordnungspolizei were drafted and placed together with artillery and signals units transferred from the army. These men were not enrolled in the SS and remained policemen, retaining their Orpo rank structure and insignia. Himmler's purpose in forming the division was twofold: in a period of heated bureaucratic infighting and competition for manpower, it permitted him to get around the recruitment caps the Wehrmacht had succeeded in placing on the SS, it also provided a means for his policemen to satisfy their military obligation and avoid army conscription. The first commander was Generalleutnant der Polizei (Major-General) Karl Pfeffer-Wildenbruch, a career police commander who had been a general staff officer during World War I; simultaneous with his appointment he was also commissioned as an SS-Gruppenführer. The division was equipped largely with captured Czech materiel and underwent military training in the Black Forest combined with periods on internal security duties in Poland. During the invasion of the Soviet Union (Operation Barbarossa), the division was initially part of the reserve with Army Group North. In August 1941, the division saw action near Luga. During heavy fighting for the Luga bridgehead the division lost over 2,000 soldiers including the commander, Arthur Mülverstadt. After a series of failed attacks in swampy and wooded terrain, the division, along with army formations, fought its way into the northern part of Luga, encircling and destroying the Soviet defenders. In January 1942, the division was moved to the Volkhov River sector, and on 24 February it was transferred to the Waffen-SS; its personnel changing their police insignia to that of the SS. The formation was involved in heavy fighting between January and March which resulted in the destruction of the Soviet 2nd Shock Army. The remainder of the year was spent on the Leningrad front
WW2 Third Reich Customs Officials Shoulder Board A WW2 Third Reich Customs (Zoll) Official epaulette. The Green & silver epaulette with silver and green inner sections, on a green wool field. Metal 'RZD' (Reichszolldienst) monogram
WWII German African Campaign Medal - The item featured here is the WWII German-Italian African medal. It was issued to soldiers who participated in the joint campaign between German and Italian soldiers in North Afrika. Not it's original issue ribbon which should contain green as well. This medal is the red bronze variant with the artist's name (LORIOLI MILANO) in raised letters over the left claw of the alligator. The DE MARCHIS maker mark is centered at the bottom in stamped letters. The condition good, with minor tarnish apparent.
WWII German Leather Flying Helmet, With Earphones, Throat Microphones, and cable with plug. A superb cold weather Luftwaffe WW2 flying helmet in great condition. Micophone maker coded for “Deutsche Telephonewerke und Kabelindustrie A.G.”With the advent of military aircraft in WWI most of the early pilots soon discovered that appropriate protective headgear was a necessity due to the cold and the all too frequent occurrence of oil leaking into the slipstream and covering the pilot. Originally the German military was caught unprepared and no specific headgear or uniforms for pilots were available. This resulted in the pilots utilizing commercially produced motor car helmets. These tight fitting, soft leather helmets proved to be ideal and future flight helmets were basically modified versions of the early motor car helmets. During WWII the Luftwaffe utilized no fewer then ten slightly different models of flight helmets with the main modifications being helmets issued for summer or winter wear and helmets with or without integral radio communication fittings. The German air armada produced 119,871 airplanes in a period between 1939 and 1945. The pilots who manned those planes were respected and popular in the Third Reich and the stories of their victories were often part of the Nazi propaganda campaign. The Luftwaffe operated with 3,400,000 personnel throughout the war. German day and night fighter pilots claimed roughly 70,000 aerial victories during World War II, 25,000 over British or American and 45,000 over Russian flown aircraft. Their losses, on the other hand, were high as well ? approximately 14,800 day and night pilots lost their life and 6,900 were wounded in action. The Luftwaffe had 103 pilots who shot down over 100 airplanes. Note that a fighter ace needs to shoot down five or more enemy aircraft to earn his title. One throat microphone chipped