The Ultimate Resource for Militaria


Here you will find over 100,000 items of militaria for sale on-line


You have most likely reached this page from a search engine.

The item you are searching for can be found on the

Holland Patch website

Why not click on the Enter button below to see the other Dealers on MilitariaMart


Click here to enter
The following items can be found on the Holland Patch website ,
with full descriptions, photographs and prices.
A good late wartime/ early postwar un-issued British Parachute qualification wing This a fine example of a standard British made late war/early postwar period Parachute qualification wing. The Parachute qualification wing was introduced in early 1941 for everyone who had passed the Parachute Training school located at Ringway near Manchester Airport. These wings came in all different shapes and sizes. The Parachute qualification wing was issued after the soldier had qualified for them after 8 jumps. 2 from a balloon and 6 from a aircraft. This wing is except from a moth nip on the right wing (see photo) in a nicely un-issued condition
A nice late '30 early '40 Welsh Guards embroided shoulder title This a is good example of a nice late '30 early'40 Welsh Guards embroided shoulder title. The Welsh Guards were increased to three battalions during the Second World War. The 1st Battalion fought valiantly in all the campaigns of the North-West European Theatre. The 2nd Battalion, part of the 20th Independent Infantry Brigade (Guards), fought briefly in Boulogne, France, in late May 1940 whilst the 1st fought in the battles of Belgium and France as part of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) GHQ Troops. In May 1940 at the Battle of Arras, the Welsh Guards gained their second Victoria Cross by Lieutenant Christopher Furness, who was subsequently killed in action. The 1st Battalion was subsequently part of the retreat to Dunkirk, where they were involved in the legendary Dunkirk evacuation that saw nearly 340,000 Allied troops return to the United Kingdom, against all odds. The 3rd Battalion, Welsh Guards, which was formed at Beavers Lane Camp in 1941, fought throughout the arduous North African Campaign, in the Tunisia Campaign and the Italian campaigns in 1943. While they battled on in those theatres the 1st and 2nd joined the Guards Armoured Division, with the 1st Battalion being infantry, assigned to the 32nd Guards Brigade, and the 2nd Battalion being armoured, part of the 6th Guards Armoured Brigade. The two battalions worked closely, being the first troops to re-enter Brussels on 3 September 1944 after an advance of 100 miles in one day in what was described as 'an armoured lash unequalled for speed in this or any other war' led by Major-General Sir Allan Henry Adair, the divisional commander. This title is in a perfect un-issued condition.
5th Armoured Division Canadian shoulder divisional sign This is a good example of a Canadian 5th Armoured Division divisional sign made of smooth maroon \'Melton\' wool. The 5th Armoured took part in the Italian Campaign until the end of 1944 seeing notable action on the Hitler Line after the Allied breakthrough at Cassino in May 1944 and also during Operation Olive on the Gothic Line in August 1944. During the latter battle its single infantry brigade was augmented by a second, which was raised using reinforcements and units serving in other roles. Among them was 4th Princess Louise Dragoon Guards - 1st Canadian Division\'s armoured recce unit. As with other Allied armoured divisions in the Mediterranean, local resources were used to establish an additional infantry brigade, the 12th Canadian Infantry Brigade. In January 1945, the division moved by truck, train, and naval transport to Belgium via Livorno and Marseille. After arriving, it disbanded the 12th Brigade, and re-equipped to join the First Canadian Army in time to participate in the final offensives across the Rhine. This divisional sign is in a perfect and a un-issued condition.
A 1938 dated set of very early British made aluminium standard issued mess tins This is a fine example of a very early 1938 dated aluminium standard issued mess tin set and was recently found on a small village carboot sale on the coast of Belgium. When Patt. ’37 W.E. was introduced, the Haversack was specially divided to allow carriage of a new Mess tin. L. of C. B1624, approved in 1938, mentions a rectangular Mess tin, but it was not until B2537, approved 27th April 1939, that the new Mess tin was announced! Called simply Tins, mess the sub-detail added “…rectangular, aluminium, complete…”. It comprised Bodies, inner and Bodies, outer, one being smaller and nested inside the larger. The steel handles folded over the top of each Body and the assembly fitted inside a khaki, cotton drill cover. This issued set of 1938 mess tins is made by the Stratford on Avon based company of N.C.J.Ltd. (N.C. Joseph, Limited) and is in found as is condition and never been cleaned before. A very early and so very diffcult to find set of British made mess tins.
A 1940 dated SMLE .303 rifle ammunition cotton bandolier This is a neat example a difficult to find 9/40 dated SMLE .303 rifle ammunition cotton bandolier. SAA (small arms ammunition) was often supplied in lightweight cotton bandoliers of 50 rounds (5 pockets each containing two charger clips of 5 rounds each). These were packed inside crates but could be issues to individual men to carry. This example is in a slightly issued condition with some minor traces of use and is made by P.B.& Co Ltd
A 1945 dated 15th Parachute Battalion, Indian Parachute Regiment christmas greetings post card This is a good example of a 1945 dated 15th Parachute Battalion part of the Indian Parachute Regiment christmas greetings post card. The card is in a good condition voided of any writing.
A British Airborne 'Light Bulp' qualification badge This is a un-issued 'Light Bulp' qualification badge who was given to members of the Airlanding Regiments and supporting units who were flown in by glider and had not done the regular Parachute course which were earning them the Parachute wing. Instead of the 7 jump require for the Parachute wing they did 5 jumps to earn them the 'Light Bulp'. The were wearing the light bulp on there lower right sleeve. This one has the well known 'cheese cloth' backing is in a perfect issued condition and has been cut down to have smarter appearance.
A British Airborne 'Light Bulp' qualification badge This is a un-issued 'Light Bulp' qualification badge who was given to members of the Airlanding Regiments and supporting units who were flown in by glider and had not done the regular Parachute course which were earning them the Parachute wing. Instead of the 7 jump require for the Parachute wing they did 5 jumps to earn them the 'Light Bulp'. The were wearing the light bulp on there lower right sleeve. This one has the well known 'glue or paste' backing and is in a perfect un-issued condition.
A British made RAF (Royal Air Force) FRANCE shoulder title worn by all French volunteers This is a good example of a British made RAF (Royal Air Force) FRANCE shoulder title worn by all volunteers who served in one of the Squadrons formed by the France volunteers in the UK during the war. This example is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A British made RAF (Royal Air Force) FRANCE shoulder title worn by French volunteer officers This is a good example of a British made RAF (Royal Air Force) FRANCE shoulder title worn by French volunteer officers who served in one of the Squadrons formed by the France volunteers in the UK during the war. This example is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A British/Canadian made embroided Regina Rifles Regiment shoulder title. This is a good example of a British/Canadian made embroided Regina Rifles Regiment shoulder title. Details from the regiment were called out on service on 26 August 1939 and then placed on active service on 1 September 1939 as The Regina Rifle Regiment, CASF (Details), for local protection duties. The details called out on active service were disbanded on 31 December 1940. The regiment subsequently mobilized The Regina Rifle Regiment, CASF, for active service on 24 May 1940. It was redesignated the 1st Battalion, The Regina Rifle Regiment, CASF, on 7 November 1940 and embarked for Britain on 24 August 1941. On D-Day, 6 June 1944, it landed in Normandy, France as part of the 7th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Infantry Division, and it continued to fight in North-West Europe until the end of the war. The 1st Battalion was disbanded on 15 January 1946. The title is in a perfect un-issued condition.
A difficult and sought after example of a British made Canadian Chaplain Service printed shoulder title This is a good example of a difficult and sought after British made Canadian Chaplain Service printed shoulder title. At the outbreak of hostilities between the British Commonwealth and Hitler’s Germany, the Canadian Military was scrambling to rebuild itself from the interwar era of complacency and neglect. There was no chaplain service and as reactivated units were being rushed to Europe, the chaplains of the First War were sent as experienced men. It soon became apparent that younger men would be needed to serve in the active regiments and by the time of the invasion of NW Europe many younger clergy had been recruited and placed into the field. Canadian practice was to post one chaplain per battalion. Within a brigade, the denominational needs of the men were met by having chaplains of the member battalions share their services. Thus, a Roman Catholic could attend Mass with the Roman Priest of a neighboring battalion as a member of the Church of Canada (Anglican) could attend the Mass with another battalion. In Canada, members of the Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian (some) and Congregationalist churches came together to form the Union Church of Canada and they supplied chaplains as well. In any case, the chaplain of a battalion served the needs of all members under his charge. It is of some import to note that the Government created two parallel chaplain departments, one Roman Catholic and one Protestant (Jewish faith needs were assigned to the Protestant branch). As most chaplains were authorized a jeep or tilly, their personal combat gear would have been much like most officers without the small arms. Besides the items of religious use, the chaplains would also have carried notebooks and maps for recording where internments had taken place along with making notes for use later on when writing letters to those back home. Depressingly in most chaplains’ eyes was the issuance of a finger printing kit for obtaining prints from unknown or unidentifiable remains. In the end, such information might help identify someone and provide the means to help settle some bereaved families back home of what happened to their loved one. This title is in a perfect and issued condition. A sought after title of one of the smaller units within the Canadian Armed Forces.
A difficult and sought after example of a British made Canadian Chaplain Service printed shoulder title This is a good example of a difficult and sought after British made Canadian Chaplain Service printed shoulder title. At the outbreak of hostilities between the British Commonwealth and Hitler’s Germany, the Canadian Military was scrambling to rebuild itself from the interwar era of complacency and neglect. There was no chaplain service and as reactivated units were being rushed to Europe, the chaplains of the First War were sent as experienced men. It soon became apparent that younger men would be needed to serve in the active regiments and by the time of the invasion of NW Europe many younger clergy had been recruited and placed into the field. Canadian practice was to post one chaplain per battalion. Within a brigade, the denominational needs of the men were met by having chaplains of the member battalions share their services. Thus, a Roman Catholic could attend Mass with the Roman Priest of a neighboring battalion as a member of the Church of Canada (Anglican) could attend the Mass with another battalion. In Canada, members of the Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian (some) and Congregationalist churches came together to form the Union Church of Canada and they supplied chaplains as well. In any case, the chaplain of a battalion served the needs of all members under his charge. It is of some import to note that the Government created two parallel chaplain departments, one Roman Catholic and one Protestant (Jewish faith needs were assigned to the Protestant branch). As most chaplains were authorized a jeep or tilly, their personal combat gear would have been much like most officers without the small arms. Besides the items of religious use, the chaplains would also have carried notebooks and maps for recording where internments had taken place along with making notes for use later on when writing letters to those back home. Depressingly in most chaplains’ eyes was the issuance of a finger printing kit for obtaining prints from unknown or unidentifiable remains. In the end, such information might help identify someone and provide the means to help settle some bereaved families back home of what happened to their loved one. This title is in a perfect and issued condition. A sought after title of one of the smaller units within the Canadian Armed Forces
A difficult to find and sought after standard issued 1939 dated WD (War Department) bread knife This is a perfect example of a difficult to find and sought after standard issued 1939 dated WD (War Department) bread knife I found recently at a military fair in Belgium. These early bread knifes were all (1939/1940) dated instead of the later one's. These knifes wear part of the standard issued cutlery set and were part of the soldiers holdall. This example is in a perfect and slight used condition. A hard to find personal item these days.
A difficult to find plastic (bakelite) The Border Regiment cap badge This is a good example of a nice plastic cap badge to The Border Regiment. The badge is in a nice condition for it's age and is made by the well know firm of Stanly&Sons in Walsall. It has the number 1-A on the back. It is one of the few who are diffucult to find these days. The badge is slighty curved due to age and storage and is priced accordingly.
A difficult to find plastic (bakelite) The Border Regiment cap badge This is a perfect example of a nice plastic cap badge to The Border Regiment. The badge is in a good condition and is made by the well know firm of Stanly&Sons in Walsall. It has the number 1-A on the back. The badge is one of the few who are diffucult to find these days.
A difficult to find set of British war time camouflage windproof smock and trousers This is a neat and good set of a British war time dated camouflage windproof smock and trousers. This two-piece smock and trousers suit, the Windproof Camouflaged set was intended to be worn as an oversuit on top of wool vest, shirt and jersey, or over the Battledress. The pattern of printed camouflage was unique to this form of dress and it became popular with the Special Air Service and various commando units, being retained on a wide-scale use by Special Forces well into the post-war years. However, during the later stages of the Second World War, entire infantry units are known to have been issued with the suit in Belgium during the cold winter of 1944-45. The jacket is made by the well known (they made also the Dennison Smock) Manchester based CWS Ltd (Co-operative Wholesale Society) company, the jacket is not dated but CWS Ltd is known to do that with there clothing and has a size 1. The trousers is made by the London based company of S.Boder&Co. Ltd. and is dated 1943 with a size 7. Both pieces are in perfect and almost un-issued condition with all the buttons still present. There are some minor stains from years of slightly handling i.e storage. A neat set of a difficult to find piece of British camoflaged clothing. Hard to upgrade. Email me for more pictures if needed.
A difficult to find set of British war time camouflage windproof smock and trousers Additional pictures ......
A early post war i.e late '40 SAS (Special Air Service) qualifiction wing This is a neat example of a early post war i.e late 1940's SAS (Special Air Force) qualification wing. This type of wing, better known as the '47 or '49 Pattern was issued to who succeeded their training. The Special Air Service traces its origins to 1941 and the Second World War, and was reformed as part of the Territorial Army in 1947, named the 21st Special Air Service Regiment (Artists Rifles). 22 Special Air Service Regiment, part of the regular army, later gained fame and recognition worldwide after successfully assaulting the Iranian Embassy in London and rescuing hostages during the 1980 Iranian Embassy siege, lifting the regiment from obscurity outside the military establishment. This example has some remains of some glue to the reverse but is further in a perfect condition.
A early war time LMG (Light Machine Gunner) proficiency badge This is a good example of a early war time LMG (Light Machine Gunner) proficiency badge. The badge is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A early wartime 1941 dated un-issued Commando/Infantry cap comforter This is a neat example of a item of head-gear as iconic and evocative of the Commandos as the green beret. Worn by every British soldier at some time in his career, the cap comforter began as a form of informal working headdress whilst on manual tasks within camp and as a comfortable undress cap on active service since the early 19thCentury. To the unaware it appears to be a short scarf but when turned partially inside out and fitted on the head it becomes a woollen hat. Cap comforters were worn during the First World War as a warm alternative to the service dress cap, the fabric often pulled low over the ears in the cold winter trenches. Their casual and non-rigid appearance made them an ideal item for night time trench raids, and later they became synonymous with the apparel of the commando of the Second World War. Void of insignia, the cap comforter was practical in every sense and could be stowed without fear of creasing in any pocket or pack. This unissued example is J.W.&S Ltd.maker marked has a War Department broad-arrow stamped and dated 1941. Except form 2 small moth nips and some staining from years of storage and little use this cap comforter is in a perfect condition.
A early wartime webbing binoculars strap This is a good example of a early/mid wartime webbing binoculars strap. Mostely missing from the standard Army issued binoculars.
A excellent post war British 23rd SAS (Special Air Service) padded parachute qualification wing This is a good example of a post war British 23rd SAS (Special Air Service) padded parachute qualification wing. The unit was founded in 1959, as an additional regiment of the Territorial Army, and was created from the former Reserve Reconnaissance Unit, itself descended from the body of the organisation known as Military Intelligence 9. The regiment's first commander was H. S. Gillies, at the time a lieutenant colonel. Anthony Hunter-Choat OBE was the commanding officer of the regiment from 1977 to 1983. Sebastian Morley, at that time a major, was for a period commander of D squadron until his resignation sometime during 2008. This example is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A fine example of a WAR pamphlet No.32 The Airborne Forces, published and issued by the Army Bureau of Current Affairs written by Captain Anthony Cotterell This is a good example of a WAR pamphlet No.32 called The Airborne Forces, published and issued by the Army Bureau of Current Affairs on November 28th 1942. ‘WAR’ was a series of ‘restricted’ pamphlets issued fortnightly by the British Army Bureau of Current Affairs from September 1941 until just after the end of WW2 which provided information to officers of the army about progress of the war and the activities of branches of the armed forces in all theatres, with the intention that they should pass it on to the fighting troops. Authorship is often anonymous and/or by staff writers but there are a few attributions to some notable contributors, including Eric Linklater, Anthony Cotterell and Orde Wingate. This number covers the early days of British Airborne Forces and one of there first operations, Operations Biting aka the Bruneval Raid. This number is in a nice issued condition with some comments of a previuos owner (see photo's). A nice little wartime Airborne related.
A fine example of a WAR pamphlet No.32 The Airborne Forces, published and issued by the Army Bureau of Current Affairs written by Captain Anthony Cotterell This is a good example of a WAR pamphlet No.32 called The Airborne Forces, published and issued by the Army Bureau of Current Affairs on November 28th 1942. ‘WAR’ was a series of ‘restricted’ pamphlets issued fortnightly by the British Army Bureau of Current Affairs from September 1941 until just after the end of WW2 which provided information to officers of the army about progress of the war and the activities of branches of the armed forces in all theatres, with the intention that they should pass it on to the fighting troops. Authorship is often anonymous and/or by staff writers but there are a few attributions to some notable contributors, including Eric Linklater, Anthony Cotterell and Orde Wingate. This number covers the early days of British Airborne Forces and one of there first operations, Operations Biting aka the Bruneval Raid. This number is in a nice issued condition with two small holes on the left side were it has been in a binder at some time. A nice little wartime Airborne related.
A good and early war time period so called 'cherry type' embroided serif type lettering Parachute shoulder title This is a good example of a good mid war period embroided serif type lettering Parachute shoulder title. Introduced at the end of 1943 to replace the then worn Airborne shoulder title by the Parachute Regiment. This type was replaced by the well known dark bleu on light bleu Parachute Regiment shoulder title. This example is in a fine condition except from a small moth nip beneath the second A and nexxt to the P. These 'cherry type' shoulder titles are harder to find these days.
A good and nice un-issued Poland shoulder title This is a good example of a un-issued white on red Poland shoulder title. Worn by Polish volunteers who had joined a Infantry, Commando or Parachute unit.
A good and nice un-issued set of Poland shoulder titles This is a good example of a un-issued set of white on red Poland shoulder titles. Worn by Polish volunteers who had joined a Infantry, Commando or Parachute unit. A good un-issued set.
A good and nice un-issued set of Poland shoulder titles This is a good example of a un-issued set of white on red Poland shoulder titles. Worn by Polish volunteers who had joined a Infantry, Commando or Parachute unit. A good un-issued set.
A good and nicely issued postwar 1959 dated British Beret Basque Ltd. red beret This is a good example of a nicely issued postwar 1959 dated British Beret Basque Ltd. red beret. British Beret Basque Ltd. is a North Yorkshire based company and are making berets since May 1937. At some time in the past the orginal owner has removed the slider pocket on the inside of the liner to have a more propper fit for this badge. This 1959 dated example is in a nice issued condition with a orginal mounted Queens crown anodised Parachute Regiment cap badge and is only missing one metal ring on one of the air fents.
A good and nicely used mid war period British Parachute qualification wing This a fine example of a standard British made mid war period Parachute qualification wing. The Parachute qualification wing was introduced in early 1941 for everyone who had passed the Parachute Training school located at Ringway near Manchester Airport. These wings came in all different shapes and sizes. The Parachute qualification wing was issued after the soldier had qualified for them after 8 jumps. 2 from a balloon and 6 from a aircraft. This wing is in a nicely and removed from uniform condition and a nice detail is that the canopy, rigger lines and container are been personalized with white blanco.
A good and un-issued Canadian made standard Infantry khaki wool 1945 dated beret This is a neat example of a standard issued Canadian made khaki wool 1945 dated infantry beret. During the Second World War, a khaki beret was adopted throughout the Canadian Army, with the Canadian Armoured Corps (later Royal Canadian Armoured Corps) wearing the black beret and parachute troops wearing the maroon beret adopted by British airborne forces. The 2nd Canadian Parachute Battalion (the Canadian component of the First Special Service Force) wore a red beret with the dress uniform. Wartime berets were much fuller in cut than postwar berets. This example is made by one of the few war time makers of berets, the Toronto based company of Dorathea Knitting Mills Limited. The beret it self has a good 7 1/8 size and will fits easaly on any mannequin. The beret has a badge of the Hastings & Prince Edward Regiment attached but is not original to the beret. The beret is further in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A good British made RCCS (Royal Canadian Corps of Signals) 4th Canadian (Armoured) Divisional shoulder patch This is a good example of a printed British made RCCS (Royal Canadian Corps of Signals) 4th Canadian (Armoured) Divisional shoulder patch. The 4th Canadian (Armoured) Division was created during World War II by the conversion of the 4th Canadian Infantry Division at the beginning of 1942 in Canada. The division proceeded overseas in 1942, with its two main convoys reaching the United Kingdom in August and October. The division spent almost two years training in the United Kingdom before crossing to Normandy in July 1944. In the United Kingdom, it participated in war games together with the Polish 1st Armoured Division, and later fought in France, the Low Countries, and Germany, both divisions followed very close paths. The division participated in the later stages of the Battle of Normandy at the Falaise Pocket, the advance from Normandy and spent almost two months engaged at the Breskens Pocket. It wintered in the Netherlands and took part in the final advance across northern Germany. This example is in a nice removed from uniform condition.
A good early type wartime un-issued British Parachute qualification wing This a fine example of a standard British made early period Parachute qualification wing. The Parachute qualification wing was introduced in early 1941 for everyone who had passed the Parachute Training school located at Ringway near Manchester Airport. These wings came in all different shapes and sizes. The Parachute qualification wing was issued after the soldier had qualified for them after 8 jumps. 2 from a balloon and 6 from a aircraft. This wing is in a nicely un-issued condition.
A good early wartime Queens Regiment shulder title This is a neat example of a good early wartime Queens Regiment shulder title. The 1st Battalion was serving in British India on the outbreak of the Second World War but did not see action until 1942 against the Imperial Japanese Army. The 1st Queens fought in the Burma Campaign throughout the war as part of the 33rd Indian Infantry Brigade,[37] 7th Indian Infantry Division, of the British Fourteenth Army under Lieutenant General William "Bill" Slim. The 2nd Battalion, initially commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Robert Knox Ross until April 1940, spent the early years of the war in the Middle East and Syria before also going out to the Far East. They were part of the 16th Brigade, 6th Infantry Division which was later redesignated as the 70th Infantry Division and were involved in Operation Thursday, the second Chindits campaign. The Chindits were the creation of Brigadier Orde Wingate. After suffering heavy casualties in the Chindits campaign, 2nd Queen's reverted to being an ordinary infantry battalion, nicknamed PBI (Poor Bloody Infantry), and served with 29th Infantry Brigade,[39] part of 36th Infantry Division from May 1945 onwards.
A good early wartime tin of OINTMENT ANTI GAS NO 2 This is a good example of a early wartime tin of OINTMENT ANTI GAS NO 2. These tins were part of the standard issued gasmasks and are almost missing from the gasmask bag it self. This is tin is in a reasonable condition except from some minor rusting to the inside of the lid. Difficult to find these days. A good item to complete your gasmask.
A good example of a Airborne related LMG (Large Machine Gun) trade badge This is a good example of a Airborne related LMG (Large Machine Gun) trade badge. I'am not sure if this is a wartime or just post war used trade badge. The badge is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A good example of a Airborne related MT (Motor Transport) trade badge This is a good example of a Airborne related MT (Motor Transport) trade badge. I'am not sure if this is a wartime or just post war used trade badge. The badge is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A good example of a British army issued and nicely used Tea ration tin This is a perfect example of a standard British army issued and nicely used Tea ration tin. You will find those Tea ration tin's in a few different layouts and this one is one of the most commen to find. THis tin is in a nicely used and issued condition and still got its original orange rubber seal in the lid. A nice tin to add to your British collection.
A good example of a difficult to find embroided RAChD shoulder title to the Royal Army Chaplains Department This is a neat example of a difficult to find embroided shoulder title to the Royal Army Chaplains Department. The Army Chaplains' Department (AChD) was formed by Royal Warrant of 23 September 1796. Previously chaplains had been part of individual regiments, but not on the central establishment. Only Anglican chaplains were recruited until 1827, when Presbyterians were recognised. Roman Catholic chaplains were recruited from 1836, Methodist chaplains from 1881, and Jewish chaplains from 1892. The Department received the "Royal" prefix in February 1919 for its services during World War I. Some 4,400 Army Chaplains were recruited between 1914 and 1918; 179 lost their lives on active service and three were awarded the Victoria Cross. The RAChD is the only branch of the Army to perpetuate the tradition of dividing supporting troops into "departments". When Airborne Forces first was formed in 1940, members of the RAChD were amongst the first members to join. Chaplains undertook the same training at Hardwick Hall and Ringway as the soldiers. The first Chaplain to jump operationally was Padre RE Price who dropped with the 1st Battalion at Souk el Arba on 16 November 1942. Since the ens of the Second World War, Army Chaplains have continued to serve an important role within Airborne Forces. This shoulder title is in a perfect and un-issued condtion with its khaki cloulered gauze backing. Difficult to find these days.
A good example of a difficult to find shoulder title to the Royal Army Chaplains Department This is a neat example of a difficult to find shoulder title to the Royal Army Chaplains Department. The Army Chaplains' Department (AChD) was formed by Royal Warrant of 23 September 1796. Previously chaplains had been part of individual regiments, but not on the central establishment. Only Anglican chaplains were recruited until 1827, when Presbyterians were recognised. Roman Catholic chaplains were recruited from 1836, Methodist chaplains from 1881, and Jewish chaplains from 1892. The Department received the "Royal" prefix in February 1919 for its services during World War I. Some 4,400 Army Chaplains were recruited between 1914 and 1918; 179 lost their lives on active service and three were awarded the Victoria Cross. The RAChD is the only branch of the Army to perpetuate the tradition of dividing supporting troops into "departments". When Airborne Forces first was formed in 1940, members of the RAChD were amongst the first members to join. Chaplains undertook the same training at Hardwick Hall and Ringway as the soldiers. The first Chaplain to jump operationally was Padre RE Price who dropped with the 1st Battalion at Souk el Arba on 16 November 1942. Since the ens of the Second World War, Army Chaplains have continued to serve an important role within Airborne Forces. This shoulder title is in a perfect and un-issued condtion with its khaki cloulered gauze backing. Difficult to find these days.
A good example of a difficult to find so called type 6 British made Canadian parachute qualification wing This is a neat example of a difficult to find so called type 6 British made Canadian parachute qualification wing. This type of wing was introduced to the members of the Battalion at the end of 1944 and could be privately purchased from local taylors. Due to their unusual design this type of wing were not permitted to be worn on there best or working battledress jackets, only on their waliking out battledress jacktes.This example is in a perfect and un-issued condition. Hard to find these days.
A good example of a early single white on black Commando shoulder title This is a good example of a early wartime, regrettably single, white on black commando shouder title. Worn in the early stage of forming the Commando units before the use of the numbered shoulder titles. A nice commando title in a un-issued condition.
A good example of a early type British made 1st Polish Armoured Division shoulder patch with a small never seen before label pin for on the collar This is a neat example of a early type British made 1st Polish Armoured Division shoulder patch with a small never seen before label pin for on the collar. The Polish 1st Armoured Division (Polish 1 Dywizja Pancerna) was an armoured division of the Polish Armed Forces in the West during World War II. Created in February 1942 at Duns in Scotland, it was commanded by Major General Stanis³aw Maczek and at its peak numbered approximately 16,000 soldiers. The division served in the final phases of the Battle of Normandy in August 1944 during Operation Totalize and the Battle of Chambois and then continued to fight throughout the campaign in Northern Europe, mainly as part of the First Canadian Army. This nice small grouping excists of a early British made shoulder patch on so called 'angola cloth' and a small, never seen before, nicely detailed label pin made with cold enamel. A nice set which is hard to find.
A good example of a early un-issued No.1 Commando shoulder title This is a perfect example of a nicely early un-issued No. 1 Commando shoulder title. No.1 Commando was a unit of British Commandos and part of the British Army during the Second World War. It was raised in 1940 from the ranks of the existing independent companies. Operationally they carried out a series of small scale cross channel raids and spearheaded the Operation Torch landings in North Africa. They were then sent to the India as part of the 3rd Commando Brigade and took part in operations in the Burma Campaign. During the Second World War only eight commandos were recipients of the Victoria Cross two of the eight were from No.1 Commando. After the war they were sent to reoccupy Hong Kong before being amalgamated with No.5 Commando and became known as No. 1/5 Commando. The amalgamated No. 1/5 Commando was disbanded in 1946. This title is hard to find these days.
A good example of a early un-issued No.5 Commando shoulder title This is a neat example of a early numbered un-issued No.5 Commando shoulder title. Formed in July 1940, the unit took part in a couple of small-scale raids in France in 1941 and contributed some personnel to Operation Chariot before taking part in the landings on Madagascar in 1942. In late 1943 it was sent to India with the rest of the 3rd Special Service Brigade and subsequently took part in operations in Burma throughout 1944 and 1945. Following the end of the war the unit undertook occupation duties in Hong Kong where they were amalgamated with No. 1 Commando on 23 March 1946 to form 1/5 Commando before eventually being disbanded in February 1947.
A good example of a Forces Françaises Libres (Free French Forces) enameled pin badge This is a good example of a Forces Françaises Libres (Free French Forces) enameled pin badge. There is normal use and aged wear to the badge with natural patina. The pin and catch function properly. There are no cracks or chips in the enamel on the badge. The back of the badge has a registered number 83830 and measures 15mm x 32mm . The two-barred cross, the so-called Cross of Lorraine, was the symbol of the Free French Forces. It was part of the coat-of-arms of the French province of Lorraine, a large part of which had been annexed by Germany between 1871 and 1970, and again from 1940 to 1944. The cross stood for the aim to recover France’s lost land. And nice little pin badge
A good example of a FULL wartime period standard issued Players Navycut and Gold Flake small cigarettes package I was lucky to find recently at a militaria fair in Belgium four FULL wartime period NAAFI marked small cigarettes packages, two package of the well known brands of Players Navycut and Gold Flake each. These small packages, containing 10 cigarettes each, were standard issued to every soldier. These cigarettes could also be bought from the local NAAFI (Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes) store. Unfortunately one of the two Players Navycut packages has a slightly damage on the side (see photo). The price is naturaly for one package of cigarettes. Just mention in your order which brand you prefer. Only the slightly damage Players Nayvcut is remaining for sale.
A good example of a late war British made Canadian The Cape Breton Highlanders embroided shoulder title This is a nice example of a late war British made embroided Canadian The Cape Breton Highlanders shoulder title. Details of The Cape Breton Highlanders were called out on service on 26 August 1939 and then placed on active service on 1 September 1939, as The Cape Breton Highlanders, CASF for local protection duties. They called out on active service were disbanded on 31 December 1940. The regiment mobilized the 1st Battalion, The Cape Breton Highlanders, CASF for active service on 1 January 1941. It embarked for Great Britain on 10 November 1941. It landed in Italy on 10 November 1943 as part of the 11th Infantry Brigade, 5th Canadian Armoured Division. The battalion moved to North-West Europe from 20 to 26 February 1945 as part of OPERATION GOLDFLAKE, where it continued to fight until the end of the war. The overseas battalion was disbanded on 15 February 1946. This example with its typical Brtish hessain backing is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A good example of a nice un-issued No.3 Commando shoulder title This is a perfect example of a nicely un-issued No.3 Commando shoulder title. No.3 Commando can trace its origins back to World War II, when it was formed as the 3rd Special Service Brigade. The Commandos were formed as forces to perform raids on occupied Europe. Many of these raids were relatively small affairs, but some were very large, such as the 1942 Dieppe Raid, and the attack on St. Nazaire to cripple the dry dock there. This title has a black so called 'gauze' cloth backing which you see apear on mid war time shoulder title's and is further in a prefect un-issued condition. Hard to find these days.
A good example of a nicely worn and issued No.1 Commando shoulder title This is a perfect example of a nicely worn and issued No. 1 Commando shoulder title. The No. 1 Commando was a unit of British Commandos and part of the British Army during the Second World War. It was raised in 1940 from the ranks of the existing independent companies. Operationally they carried out a series of small scale cross channel raids and spearheaded the Operation Torch landings in North Africa. They were then sent to the India as part of the 3rd Commando Brigade and took part in operations in the Burma Campaign. During the Second World War only eight commandos were recipients of the Victoria Cross two of the eight were from No. 1 Commando. After the war they were sent to reoccupy Hong Kong before being amalgamated with No. 5 Commando and became known as No. 1/5 Commando. The amalgamated No. 1/5 Commando was disbanded in 1946. This title has a white cheese cloth backing which you see apear on mid war time shoulder title's and is further in a prefect issued condition. Hard to find these days.
A good example of a orginal American 'press-release' photograph depicting British Airlanding troops during a training session in a Hotspur glider This is a nice example of a orginal American 'press-release' photograph depicting British Airlanding troops during a training session in a Hotspur glider. The photograph still retains its original (machine-typed) press information page glued to back. This large-sized picture - it measures 23.0 x 18.5 cms - is neatly printed in a black and white on a semy glossy paper and showing members of the 2nd Battalion the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry during a training session in a Hotspur glider. The photo is nicely 10-19-42 dated and is a nice issued condition.
A good example of a orginal American 'press-release' photograph depicting British parachute troops practicing their jumps A good example of a orginal American 'press-release' photograph depicting British parachute troops practicing their jumps. The photograph still retains its original (machine-typed) press information page glued to back. This large-sized picture - it measures 18.0 x22.5 cms - is neatly printed in a black and white on a semy glossy paper.
A good example of a orginal British 'press-release' photograph depicting British parachute troops practicing their jumps A good example of a orginal American 'press-release' photograph depicting British parachute troops practicing their jumps. The photograph still retains its original (machine-typed) press information page glued to back. This large-sized picture - it measures 24.0 x 18.5 cms - is neatly printed in a black and white on a semy glossy paper.
A good example of a orginal British 'press-release' photograph depicting Indian parachute troops before take off for their practicing jump This is a good example of a orginal British 'press-release' photograph depicting Indian parachute troops before take off for their practicing jump. Some of the men are wearing a khaki coloured balaklava. And have a look at the British PJI holding a camouflaged outer back of the mans X type parachute. This small sized picture - it measures 14.0 x 14.5 cms - is in a nice but used condition.
A good example of a scarce and sought after British Military Intelligence Section 9 and/or Special Operations Executive related Battle Dress blouse buckle compass This is a neat and scarce to find example of a army issued British Battle Dress blouse buckle compass. Early Royal Air Force and army issued uniform Battle Dress blouses used a toothed buckle for securing the belt section on the bottom of the blouse. The buckle was made of a non-ferrous metal. The compass element was an arrow shaped piece of magnetized material concealed on the back portion of the buckle. The compass pivot was staked on a small swivel joint and when not in use was folded flat against a cross bar. The compass portion was stored on the opposite side of the same cross bar. A slider mounted on the same cross bar retains both the pivot pin and the compass needle assembly. To use as a compass, the slider is moved to release the compass element and the pivots swung to a vertical position. The buckle is placed on a stable horizontal surface and the compass needle assembly placed on the pivot. The pointed end of the compass points toward the North Magnetic pole. The buckle it self is voided of any markings. This type of escape compass is one of the rarer and difficult to find of the wartime escape compasses that were developed by Major William Christopher Clayton Hutton and his men at the British Military Intelligence Section 9. A scarce and diffucult to find escape item.
A good example of a scarce and sought after British Military Intelligence Section 9 and/or Special Operations Executive related Battle Dress blouse buckle compass This is a neat and scarce to find example of a army issued British Battle Dress blouse buckle compass. Early Royal Air Force and army issued uniform Battle Dress blouses used a toothed buckle for securing the belt section on the bottom of the blouse. The buckle was made of a non-ferrous metal. The compass element was an arrow shaped piece of magnetized material concealed on the back portion of the buckle. The compass pivot was staked on a small swivel joint and when not in use was folded flat against a cross bar. The compass portion was stored on the opposite side of the same cross bar. A slider mounted on the same cross bar retains both the pivot pin and the compass needle assembly. To use as a compass, the slider is moved to release the compass element and the pivots swung to a vertical position. The buckle is placed on a stable horizontal surface and the compass needle assembly placed on the pivot. The pointed end of the compass points toward the North Magnetic pole. The buckle it self is voided of any markings. This type of escape compass is one of the rarer and difficult to find of the wartime escape compasses that were developed by Major William Christopher Clayton Hutton and his men at the British Military Intelligence Section 9. A scarce and diffucult to find escape item
A good example of a standard issued 1903 pattern leather waist belt This is a good example of a standard issued 1903 pattern leather belt. The Bandolier Equipment Pattern 1903 Waist Belt, Mk. I, was introduced with the Pattern 1903 Bandolier Equipment in List of Changes entry §12389, dated 20th October 1903. It is a simple leather strap 1 3/4-inches wide. It is fitted with a loose brass buckle and leather runner which is missing from this belt unfortunately. The belt it self is in a good and issued condition and isn't dated. A piece of personal equipment that isn't easy to find these days.
A good example of a un-issued Women's Transport Service FANY (First Aid Nursing Yeomanry) shoulder title This is a neat example of a un-issued Women's Transport Service FANY (First Aid Nursing Yeomanry) shoulder title. The Women's Transport Service (FANY), as they were known in WW2, was, and still is, an independent, voluntary self financing organisation. When the A.T.S were formed WTS(FANY) were approached to provide drivers and instructors for this service and those who chose to take on this role became known as 'FANY ATS' and wore a 'FANY' flash on their uniform, they were taken on the payroll and remaind ATS for the duration. Those who remained with the Corps were know as 'Free FANYs' and took on various roles. The shoulder title is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A good example of difficult to find British made 1942 dated shaving brush This is a neat example of a difficult to find 1942 dated and official issued shavind brush. This shaving brush, made by the Cawnpore based company of Brushware Ltd. is in a excellent condition. These shaving brushes were part of the standard personal kit which each soldier had with him during the war. Each soldier was issued a holdall for his personal toiletries which a shaving brush was part off. This example is in a perfect condition.
A good example of wartime 82nd All American Airborne Division shoulder patch This is a good example of wartime 82nd All American (knicked named Almost Airborne) Airborne Division shoulder patch. The 82nd Division was redesignated on 13 February 1942 as Division Headquarters, 82nd Division. It was recalled to active service on 25 March 1942, and reorganized at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana, under the command of Major General Omar N. Bradley. On 15 August 1942, the 82nd Infantry Division became the Army's first airborne division, and was redesignated the 82nd Airborne Division. In April 1943, its paratroopers deployed to North Africa under the command of Major General Matthew B. Ridgway to take part in the campaign to invade Italy. The division's first two combat operations were parachute assaults into Sicily on 9 July and Salerno on 13 September. The initial assault on Sicily, by the 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, was the first regimental-sized combat parachute assault conducted by the United States Army. With two combat assaults under its belt, the 82nd Airborne Division was now ready for the most ambitious airborne operation of the war so far, as part of Operation Neptune, the invasion of Normandy. The division conducted Operation Boston, part of the airborne assault phase of the Operation Overlord plan. On 17 September 1944, the 82nd conducted its fourth World War II combat assault. Fighting off German counterattacks, the 82nd captured its objectives between Grave, and Nijmegen. Its success, however, was short-lived because the defeat of other Allied units at the Battle of Arnhem. After a period of duty on the Arnhem front, the 82nd was relieved by Canadian troops, and sent to France. On 16 December, the Germans launched a surprise offensive through the Ardennes Forest which became known as the Battle of the Bulge. Two days later the 82nd joined the fighting and blunted General Gerd von Rundstedt's northern penetration of American lines. Following Germany's surrender, the 82nd entered Berlin for occupation duty, lasting from April until December 1945. This patch is in a perfect and un-issued condition and are difficiult to find these days.
A good example of wartime 82nd All American Airborne Division shoulder patch This is a good example of wartime 82nd All American (knicked named Almost Airborne) Airborne Division shoulder patch. The 82nd Division was redesignated on 13 February 1942 as Division Headquarters, 82nd Division. It was recalled to active service on 25 March 1942, and reorganized at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana, under the command of Major General Omar N. Bradley. On 15 August 1942, the 82nd Infantry Division became the Army's first airborne division, and was redesignated the 82nd Airborne Division. In April 1943, its paratroopers deployed to North Africa under the command of Major General Matthew B. Ridgway to take part in the campaign to invade Italy. The division's first two combat operations were parachute assaults into Sicily on 9 July and Salerno on 13 September. The initial assault on Sicily, by the 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, was the first regimental-sized combat parachute assault conducted by the United States Army. With two combat assaults under its belt, the 82nd Airborne Division was now ready for the most ambitious airborne operation of the war so far, as part of Operation Neptune, the invasion of Normandy. The division conducted Operation Boston, part of the airborne assault phase of the Operation Overlord plan. On 17 September 1944, the 82nd conducted its fourth World War II combat assault. Fighting off German counterattacks, the 82nd captured its objectives between Grave, and Nijmegen. Its success, however, was short-lived because the defeat of other Allied units at the Battle of Arnhem. After a period of duty on the Arnhem front, the 82nd was relieved by Canadian troops, and sent to France. On 16 December, the Germans launched a surprise offensive through the Ardennes Forest which became known as the Battle of the Bulge. Two days later the 82nd joined the fighting and blunted General Gerd von Rundstedt's northern penetration of American lines. Following Germany's surrender, the 82nd entered Berlin for occupation duty, lasting from April until December 1945. This patch is in a perfect and un-issued condition and are difficiult to find these days.
A good example of wartime 82nd All American Airborne Division shoulder patch This is a good example of wartime 82nd All American (knicked named Almost Airborne) Airborne Division shoulder patch. The 82nd Division was redesignated on 13 February 1942 as Division Headquarters, 82nd Division. It was recalled to active service on 25 March 1942, and reorganized at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana, under the command of Major General Omar N. Bradley. On 15 August 1942, the 82nd Infantry Division became the Army's first airborne division, and was redesignated the 82nd Airborne Division. In April 1943, its paratroopers deployed to North Africa under the command of Major General Matthew B. Ridgway to take part in the campaign to invade Italy. The division's first two combat operations were parachute assaults into Sicily on 9 July and Salerno on 13 September. The initial assault on Sicily, by the 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, was the first regimental-sized combat parachute assault conducted by the United States Army. With two combat assaults under its belt, the 82nd Airborne Division was now ready for the most ambitious airborne operation of the war so far, as part of Operation Neptune, the invasion of Normandy. The division conducted Operation Boston, part of the airborne assault phase of the Operation Overlord plan. On 17 September 1944, the 82nd conducted its fourth World War II combat assault. Fighting off German counterattacks, the 82nd captured its objectives between Grave, and Nijmegen. Its success, however, was short-lived because the defeat of other Allied units at the Battle of Arnhem. After a period of duty on the Arnhem front, the 82nd was relieved by Canadian troops, and sent to France. On 16 December, the Germans launched a surprise offensive through the Ardennes Forest which became known as the Battle of the Bulge. Two days later the 82nd joined the fighting and blunted General Gerd von Rundstedt's northern penetration of American lines. Following Germany's surrender, the 82nd entered Berlin for occupation duty, lasting from April until December 1945. This patch is in a perfect and un-issued condition and are difficiult to find these days.
A good mid war period embroided serif type lettering Parachute shoulder title This is a good example of a good mid war period embroided serif type lettering Parachute shoulder title. Introduced at the end of 1943 to replace the then worn Airborne shoulder title by the Parachute Regiment. This type was replaced by the well known dark bleu on light bleu Parachute Regiment shoulder title. This example is in a fine condition except a small moth nip beneath the second A.
A good original printed probalbly so called 'local madé' Indian Beach Group formation sign This a neat example of a probably so called 'local made' Indian beach group formation sign. The 46 Indian Beach Group took part in Operation Zipper, September1945. Operation Zipper is to be launched from Ceylon (Sri Lanka) and various parts of India, was planned for September 1945. It was too far advanced to be cancelled and went ahead as an exercise but without naval or aerial bombardments. It entailed landings on the West Coast of the Malay Peninsula north of Port Dickson and south of Port Swettenham (now Klang). General Robert’s XXX1V Indian Corps (5th, 23rd, 25th and 26th Indian Divisions, 3rd Commando Brigade and one Parachute Brigade of the British 6th Airborne Division, comprised a force of more than 100,000 men. These men were expect to get some warm reception from the Japanese Army who were stationed up in Kuala Lumpur. At that time of the Zipper landing, there were 6,000 Japanese troops stationed in Kuala Lumpur but they did not give any threat to the landing forces. Three different landing zones were selected. 25th Division will landed on Morib Beach, 37th Brigade will get to the Bagan Lalang Beach, 10 miles south Morib and 23rd Division will scattered on Port Dickson beach. The Zipper convoy had sailed from Bombay, Madras, Calcutta and Rangoon, and were converging on the Malayan coast at Port Swettenham. Escorted by HMS Nelson, flying the flag of Admiral Walker, and Richelieu, the cruisers Nigeria, Cleopatra and Ceylon, the 21st Aircraft Carrier Squadron of Royalist ( Commodore Oliver ) and the escort carriers Hunters, Stalkers, Archer, Khedive, Emperor and Pursuer and fifteen destroyers, the first D-Day assault convoys arrived off their beaches at first light on 9 September. A nice and difficult badge to find.
A good original South Staffordshire Regiment cap badge with it's original 'HollandPatch' backing This is a very nice and difficult to find example of a cap badge to the South Staffordshire Regiment with it's original 'Holland Patch' cloth backing. The history of the 'Holland Patch' goes back to 1794 when the Battalion sailed for Holland where they were involved in fighting the French which was their first major campaign. Until 1942, the cloth was an oval, which exceeded the cap badge, but was cut down in half and could only be seen through the knot on the badge. The badge and backing are in a perfect and nicely used condition.
A good set of British made Canadian Queen\'s Own Cameron Highlanders shoulder titles This is a good example of a British made set of Canadian Queen\'s Own Cameron Highlanders shoulder titles. Four battalions of the Cameron Highlanders served in World War II in total and one of them served with the 6th Infantry Brigade as part of the Canadian 2nd Infantry Division. This set, which is a un-issued condition has a black gauze and gleu backing.
A good set of British/US made Canadian Parachute Battalion shoulder titles and wing This is a good example of a set of badges to the Canadian Parachute Battalion. The set exists of a set of British made shoulder titles with the well known \'gleu-backing\' and were issued to the Battalion shortly before leaving England for Canada in June 1945. The parachute wing is example of a US made one with a white mesh cotton backing typical for US made badges on a black background. A scarce set of badges and difficult to find these days.
A good un-issued Women's Transport Service FANY (First Aid Nursing Yeomanry) shoulder title This is a neat example of a un-issued Women's Transport Service FANY (First Aid Nursing Yeomanry) shoulder title. The Women's Transport Service (FANY), as they were known in WW2, was, and still is, an independent, voluntary self financing organisation. When the A.T.S were formed WTS (FANY) were approached to provide drivers and instructors for this service and those who chose to take on this role became known as 'FANY ATS' and wore a 'FANY' flash on their uniform, they were taken on the payroll and remaind ATS for the duration. Those who remained with the Corps were know as 'Free FANYs' and took on various roles. The shoulder title is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A good wartime British i.e France so called 'propaganda' post card dipicting two parachute trained men just after a training jump This is a neat example of a nice issued good wartime British i.e France so called 'propaganda' post card dipicting two parachute trained men just after a training jump. These 'propaganda' postcard were issued to boosted the spirit of the British i.e France people and to get some income for the war effort. This example is in a nice issued condition with some minor staining from years of slightly handling i.e storage.
A good wartime British made 53rd (Welsh) Infantry Division shoulder badge This is a nice example of a good wartime British made 53rd (Welsh) Infantry Division shoulder badge. The 53rd (Welsh) Infantry Division was an infantry division of the British Army that fought in both World War I and World War II. Originally raised in 1908 as the Welsh Division, part of the Territorial Force (TF), the division saw service in World War I, being designated 53rd (Welsh) Division in mid-1915, and fought in the Gallipoli Campaign and in the Middle East. Remaining active in the Territorial Army (TA) during the interwar period as a peace-time formation, the division again saw action in World War II, fighting in North-western Europe from June 1944 until May 1945.
A good wartime British made 53rd (Welsh) Infantry Division shoulder badge This is a nice example of a good wartime British made 53rd (Welsh) Infantry Division shoulder badge. The 53rd (Welsh) Infantry Division was an infantry division of the British Army that fought in both World War I and World War II. Originally raised in 1908 as the Welsh Division, part of the Territorial Force (TF), the division saw service in World War I, being designated 53rd (Welsh) Division in mid-1915, and fought in the Gallipoli Campaign and in the Middle East. Remaining active in the Territorial Army (TA) during the interwar period as a peace-time formation, the division again saw action in World War II, fighting in North-western Europe from June 1944 until May 1945.
A good wartime embroided 'thombstone' shape Combined Operations formation badge This is a good example of a embroided Combined Operations formation facing right badge. The phrase "combined operations" was first introduced by the British War Office in World War II to denote multi-service activities, those that involved air, land or naval forces acting together, and coordinated by the Combined Operations Headquarters. This example is in a good and in un-issued condtion and would be a great set with the No.3 Commando shoulder title I have for sale under number 50541
A good wartime issued British parachute qualification wing This a fine example of a standard British made mid war period parachute qualification wing. The parachute qualification wing was introduced in early 1941 for everyone who had passed the Parachute Training school located at Ringway near Manchester Airport. These wings came in all different shapes and sizes. The parachute qualification wing was issued after the soldier had qualified for them after 8 jumps. 2 from a balloon and 6 from a aircraft. This wing is in a nicely and removed from uniform condition.
A good wartime nicely issued 'padded' British parachute qualification wing This a fine example of a standard British made mid i.e late war period so called 'padded' parachute qualification wing. The parachute qualification wing was introduced in early 1941 for everyone who had passed the Parachute Training school located at Ringway near Manchester Airport. These wings came in all different shapes and sizes. The parachute qualification wing was issued after the soldier had qualified for them after 8 jumps. 2 from a balloon and 6 from a aircraft. This wing is in a nicely and removed from uniform condition
A good wartime nicely un-issued 'padded' British parachute qualification wing This a fine example of a standard British made mid war period so called 'padded' parachute qualification wing. The parachute qualification wing was introduced in early 1941 for everyone who had passed the Parachute Training school located at Ringway near Manchester Airport. These wings came in all different shapes and sizes. The parachute qualification wing was issued after the soldier had qualified for them after 8 jumps. 2 from a balloon and 6 from a aircraft. This wing is in a nicely and removed from uniform condition
A good wartime nicely used British Parachute qualification wing This a fine example of a standard British made mid war Parachute qualification wing. The wing is in a nicely used and removed from uniform condition
A good wartime nicely used British Parachute qualification wing This a fine example of a standard British made mid war period Parachute qualification wing. The Parachute qualification wing was introduced in early 1941 for everyone who had passed the Parachute Training school located at Ringway near Manchester Airport. These wings came in all different shapes and sizes. The Parachute qualification wing was issued after the soldier had qualified for them after 8 jumps. 2 from a balloon and 6 from a aircraft. This wing is in a nicely and removed from uniform condition.
A good wartime nicely used British Parachute qualification wing This a fine example of a standard British made mid war period Parachute qualification wing. The Parachute qualification wing was introduced in early 1941 for everyone who had passed the Parachute Training school located at Ringway near Manchester Airport. These wings came in all different shapes and sizes. The Parachute qualification wing was issued after the soldier had qualified for them after 8 jumps. 2 from a balloon and 6 from a aircraft. This wing is in a nicely and removed from uniform condition.
A hard and difficult to find printed Glider Pilot Regiment shoulder title This is a neat example of a difficult to find un-issued printed Glider Pilot Regiment. The Glider Pilot Regiment was a British airborne forces unit of the Second World War which was responsible for crewing the British Army's military gliders and saw action in the European Theatre of World War II in support of Allied airborne operations. Established in 1942, the regiment was disbanded in 1957. This example had been cut down to have smarter appearance and has loose corner which in not uncommen with printed shoulder titles.
A named grouping of difficult to find British made AFPU (Army Film and Photo Unit) badges This is a truly very attractive and rare example of a named set of AFPU (Army Film and Photo Unit) badges.and a leather case. This set is named to Sergeant Roy H "Tubby' Palmer. Sergeant Palmer was a photographer within three AFP section, 1, 2 and 5. This small grouping consists of a set of British made embroided AFPU badges and a leather named case. In early 1942, 30 cameramen were sent to Cairo, Egypt to form AFPU's Number 1 Section. This group, led by Major David MacDonald (a former GPO Film Unit member) first recorded the retreat forced by the German Afrikakorps under General Rommel and then the offensive following the First Battle of El Alamein. It was at the start of the Alamein offensive that Sergeant Billy Jordan MM, skilfully filmed the opening artillery barrage. Footage of the North African campaign was used in the making of Desert Victory which won a best war documentary Academy Award in 1943. During the North African Campaign, the AFPU Number 1 Unit of 32 men, suffered four killed, seven wounded and six captured. Section Number 2 covered the campaigns through Tunisia (from which the 1944 documentary Tunisian Victory was made) and then through the landings on Sicily and Italy. AFPU Number 5 Section was formed during 1943, of 36 volunteers drawn from various regiments and led by Major Hugh Stewart. AFPU cameramen and photographers accompanied various army units in all theatres of action, including the Commandos, the Chindits, paratroopers, Special Air Service, Special Boat Squadron and the Long Range Desert Group. Ten AFPU members were attached to the main divisions during the Normandy landings in June 1944. Their recordings made during the campaign saw cameramen amongst the first waves ashore and then in the fighting inland. AFPU recorded battles during the Italian campaign and across Western Europe including Monte Casino, Liberation of Paris, Arnhem, the Rhine Crossing and the discovery of Belsen Concentration Camp. It is possible the Sergeant Palmer was one of the ten members who were assigned to the main Divisions during the early hours of D-Day on the 6th of June. These badges are in a perfect un-issued condition and the leather case have seen some action but is nicely used.
A near mint i.e. un-issued British Kangol Wear Limited 1945 dated khaki beret This is a perfect example of a near mint condition British Khaki Beret. The beret is very clearly makers marked Kangol Wear Limited and 1945 dated. The size compromises 7 3/4. Furthermore the beret is clearly WD marked and fitted with it's original stock label. The beret appears un-issued but has some marks from years of storage i.e handeling. Hard to be upgraded.
A neat and actually difficult to find Dutch Waffen-SS so called 'aanmeldings formulier' recruitment/application form titled 'Dat’s ‘n leven van stavast' (That’s a life of steadiness) A neat and actually difficult to find so called 'aanmeldings formulier' recruitment/application form/folder for the Dutch Waffen-SS volunteer legion aka 'Vrijwilligers Legioen' titled 'Dat’s ‘n leven van stavast' (That’s a life of steadiness). These recruitment/application forms were handed out or were to be found at the various Dutch Waffen-SS so called 'aanmeldings/wervings kantoren' in The Hague and Amsterdam. These application forms are depicting a Waffen-SS Untersturm-führer (2nd Lieutenant) to the Westland Division. The application form can be folded open and a two sided poster appears. The form seems to be in a un-issued condition, but with in the middle two small opening from 70 years of storage. A neat Dutch Waffen-SS volunteer item which are harder to find these days.
A neat and difficult to find badge to the Polish 2nd Rifles Battalion This a a good example of a neat and difficult to find badge to the Polish 2nd Rifles Battalion. This unit holds the distinction of being the first infantry unit organized on British soil and was pressed into service as early as July 1940 in the Loch Lomod region of Scotland. The badge with the Royal Stewart tartan backing was displayed on the left hand side FS caps and also painted onto helmets. It was also supposedly worn with the backing on the traditional four cornered ‘rogatywka’ caps. The badge without the tartan backing was also worn on the left breast pocket of the uniform tunic. This example is in a nicly used condition and is unfortunately missing its cotter pin but is easy to replace.
A neat and scarce example of a bullion type British War Correspondent slip on shoulder title This is a scrace and difficult to find bullion type British War Correspondent slip on shoulder title. It has its two securing straps to reverse and is in a overal good and un-issued condition. Scarce and difficult to find these days.
A neat and text book example of a issued and removed from uniform printed shoulder title to the Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment) This is a good and text book example of a issued printed shoulder title to the Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). After garrison service in the interwar years, the Sherwood Foresters next saw action in the Second World War. The regiment served in the Norwegian Campaign, the Battle of France, the North African and the Italian campaigns. They also saw action in the Far East. Nearly 27,000 men served in the regiment's 17 battalions, suffering 1,500 killed. The regiment won 10 battle honours and 400 decorations, including a VC. Other battalions saw service in Italy and North Africa. the 2nd Battalion in particular saw some of the fiercest fighting of the whole war during the Battle of Anzio with the 1st Infantry Division. A nice issued example.
A neat British made difficut to find Reconnaissance Corps plastic cap badge This is a good example a nicely used plastic cap badge to the Reconnaissance Corps. The cap badge is slightly bent to form it to the beret and made by the well know maker Stanley&Sons in Walsall. A nice and difficult to find plastic cap badge.
A neat example of a British made 'bullion' Officers Canadian 2nd Divisional shoulder patch This is a perfect example of a British made Canadian 2nd Division patch in 'bullion'. After following a period of reconstruction and retraining from 1942–1944, the division joined II Canadian Corps as part of the Second British Army for the Allied Invasion of Normandy. 2nd Division saw significant action from 20 July – 21 August in the battles for Caen and Falaise. Joining the newly activated headquarters of the First Canadian Army in the assault on northwestern Europe, the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division played a significant role in the retaking of the Channel ports, the Battle of the Scheldt, and the liberation of the Netherlands. The division was deactivated shortly after the end of the war. The Divisional patch is in a perfect an un-issued condition.
A neat example of a British made printed Royal Canadian Corps of Signals, 1st Canadian Corps shoulder patch This is a neat example of a British made printed Royal Canadian Corps of Signals, 1st Canadian Corps shoulder patch. This example is in a perfect and un-issued condtion.
A neat example of a difficult to find a sought after No.5 Troop, 3 Commando shoulder badge This is a neat example of a difficult to find a sought after early No.5 Troop, 3 Commando shoulder badge. No.3 Commando was, despite it's name, the first Commando unit to be formed in 1940. Up to 1941 they had no shoulder title but did wear individual troop patches. 'D' Troop, for instance, wore a white full face death head in a blue 'D' on a dark green background. In 1941, the troops changed from letters to numbers. This example, coming from a old collection is in a perfect and un-issued condition. Hard to find these days.
A neat example of a difficult to find Polish plastic aka bakelite cap badge This is a neat example of a slightly used British made Polish plastic cap badge for the Polish free forces. The badge itself has a nice silver appearence to the front and is maker marked. A badge that is difficult to find these days. Coming from my personal collection. The badge is in a nice condition.
A neat example of a difficult to find Polish plastic aka bakelite cap badge This is a neat example of a slightly used British made Polish plastic cap badge for the Polish free forces. The badge itself has a nice silver appearence to the front and is maker marked. A badge that is difficult to find these days. Coming from my personal collection. The badge is in a nice condition.
A neat example of a difficult to find shoulder title to the Rough Riders. This is e neat example of a single shoulder title to the Rough Riders. The Rough Riders started out as 283 Light Anti-Aircraft Battery (City of London Yeomanry) TA and became 1st Air-landing Anti-Aircraft Battery in 1942. What info I have is that 283rd Light Anti-Aircraft Battery RA joined 1st Airborne Division on 03.12.1942 and became 1st Airlanding Light Anti-Aircraft Battery RA till 21.02.1944 when it was dispanded. They did wear the light blue on purple title all through there 2 year time with the Division. 1st A-L LAA Battery did go with 1st Airborne Division to North Africa, but were not deployed in action as such. At least one "Rough Rider" did serve during the Battle of Arnhem. Captain Graham Chatfield-Roberts, TD, Urquhart's ADC, was a Rough Rider and came originally from the 1st A/L LAA Battery. He remained in the TA post-war, was promoted to Lt-Colonel, and commanded The City of London Yeomanry (Rough Riders) (TA) during the 1950s.
A neat example of a good mid war period set of No.5 Commando embroided shoulder titles This is a neat example of a set of mid war period shoulder titles to No.5 Commando. No. 5 Commando was a battalion-sized commando unit of the British Army during the Second World War. Formed in July 1940, the unit took part in a couple of small-scale raids in France in 1941 and contributed some personnel to Operation Chariot before taking part in the landings on Madagascar in 1942. In late 1943 it was sent to India with the rest of the 3rd Special Service Brigade and subsequently took part in operations in Burma throughout 1944 and 1945. Following the end of the war the unit undertook occupation duties in Hong Kong where they were amalgamated with No.1 Commando before being disbanded on 23 March 1946. This shoulder titles are in a good and un-issued condition and has the well known glue backing.
A neat example of a good set of printed badges to the 52nd (Lowland) Infantry Division This is a nice printed set of a Mountain scroll and shield to the 52nd (Lowland) Infantry Division. On 9 October 1944, soon after the division arrived on the Continent the 52nd Lowland Division was assign to the First Canadian Army to help open the vital port of Antwerp. Therefore the first major operations of the 52nd were not in mountainous terrain or through the air, but deployed below sea level on the flooded polders around the Scheldt Estuary of Belgium and the Netherlands. Operation Vitality and Operation Infatuate were aimed at capturing South Beveland and the island of Walcheren to open the mouth of the Scheldt estuary. This would enable the Allies to use the port of Antwerp as a supply route for the troops in North-West Europe. It was in this vital operation that the 52nd Division was to fight its first great battle with brilliant success. In January 1945 the 52nd Division participated in Operation Blackcock, the clearing of the Roer Triangle between the rivers Meuse and Roer. The set in in a nice and removed from uniform condition. Hard to find these days.
A neat example of a mid war period 'serif type' lettering Commando white on black shoulder title This is a good example of a mid war period white on black 'serif type' lettering Commando shoulder title. This type whas introduced around 1943 before the numbered Commando titles were issued. This one is in a perfect and un-issed condtion for its age. Difficult to find.
A neat example of a mid war period so called 'block type' lettering Commando white on black shoulder title This is a good example of a mid war period white on black so called 'block type' lettering Commando shoulder title. This type whas introduced around 1943 before the numbered Commando titles were issued. This one is in a perfect and un-issed condtion for its age.
A neat example of a mid war period so called 'block type' lettering South Stafford white on red shoulder title This is a good example of a mid war period white on red embroided so called 'block type' lettering South Stafford shoulder title. This type whas introduced around 1943. This one is in a perfect and un-issed condtion for its age.
A neat example of a mid-war period un-issued embroided Reconnaissance Corps shoulder title This is e perefect example of a mid-war period embroided Reconnaissance shoulder title. The Reconnaissance Corps or simply Recce Corps was a short-lived elite corps of the British Army whose units provided the mobile spearhead of infantry divisions from the Far East to Europe during the Second World War. It was formed from Infantry Brigade Reconnaissance Groups on 14 January 1941. All the Brigade reconnaissance groups of each infantry Corps were formed into reconnaissance battalions, each usually bearing the number of its relevant Division. Initially, coming from infantry units, reconnaissance units used the infantry designations of battalions, companies and platoons. However from June 1942 the Corps changed to the cavalry descriptions of regiments, squadrons and troops. It became part of the Royal Armoured Corps in 1944, still maintaining its own cap badge with two lightning strikes supporting an upright spear. With the end of the war, this number of reconnaissance units was not needed and the Corps was disbanded in August 1946. Reconnaissance duties reverted to Regular armoured units of the Royal Armoured Corps. The title is in a perfect un-issued condition with the well known glue backing.
A neat example of a mid-war period un-issued embroided Reconnaissance Corps shoulder title This is e perefect example of a mid-war period embroided Reconnaissance shoulder title. The Reconnaissance Corps or simply Recce Corps was a short-lived elite corps of the British Army whose units provided the mobile spearhead of infantry divisions from the Far East to Europe during the Second World War. It was formed from Infantry Brigade Reconnaissance Groups on 14 January 1941. All the Brigade reconnaissance groups of each infantry Corps were formed into reconnaissance battalions, each usually bearing the number of its relevant Division. Initially, coming from infantry units, reconnaissance units used the infantry designations of battalions, companies and platoons. However from June 1942 the Corps changed to the cavalry descriptions of regiments, squadrons and troops. It became part of the Royal Armoured Corps in 1944, still maintaining its own cap badge with two lightning strikes supporting an upright spear. With the end of the war, this number of reconnaissance units was not needed and the Corps was disbanded in August 1946. Reconnaissance duties reverted to Regular armoured units of the Royal Armoured Corps. The title is in a perfect un-issued condition with the well known glue backing.
A neat example of a nice and not so often found 'Belgian Army in United Kingdom' breast pocket badge This is a perfect example of a nice and issued not so often found 'Belgian Army in United Kingdom' breast pocket badge. This nicely issued and polished example was made by the Brussles based company called de Greef from 1944 till just after the war. The Belgian Goverment in excile decided that a badge whas to created which could be worn by all Belgian military personal. On November 24, 1942 this badge whas created to be worn by military personal of all ranks. The metal badge had to be worn on the right breast pocket of there battle dress jacket or service dress. The badge is showing a Belgian heraldic lion facing to the left surmounted by a Belgian King's crown and surrounded by a scroll saying 'Belgian Army in United Kingdom'.
A neat example of a nice un-issued embroided not so often seen type Parachute Regiment shoulder title This is a perfect example of a nicely un-issued embroided not so often type shoulder title to the Parachute Regiment. These embroided shoulder titles were introduced half way trough 1943. The title has a dark blue lettering on pale blue backing and is in a nicely condition. Difficult to find these days. Simply a nice example of this shought after shoulder title!
A neat example of a nicely used and difficult to find printed Parachute Regiment shoulder title This is a perfect example of a nicely used and issued printed shoulder title to the Parachute Regiment. These printed shoulder titles were introduced half way trough 1943. The title has a dark blue lettering on pale blue backing and is a nicely and a little bit grubby issued condition. Difficult to find these days.
A neat example of a scarce Norwegian Free Forces British made Haakon 7 silver hallmarked capbadge This is a neat example of a scarce and difficult silver cap badge worn aswell by the member of the Norwegian Linge Company. H7 was the monogram of the Norwegian head of state, King Haakon VII (7th), who reigned from 1905 to 1957. When Germany invaded Norway in 1940 as a part of World War II, the royal family fled the country, and Haakon VII later spearheaded the Norwegian resistance in exile in the United Kingdom. H7 became one of several symbols used by the Norwegian populace to mark solidarity and loyalty to the King. The cap badge is in a prefect and never been cleaned condition. A scarce and difficult badge to find.
A neat example of a scare to find Commando Signals shoulder title This is a perfect example of a difficult and scare to find Commando Signals shoulder title. The Commando Signals were formed from the Special Service Brigade Signals in 1942 and served with Commando Headquarters. There were 2 signalmen per Commando troop. From March 1942, to June 1943, Special Service Brigade Signals wore a black square patch with a silver lightning bolt and dagger crossed with the letters S S on either side. Their patch was designed by A.J. Leahy, the first Commando Signals. This was replaced in July 1943 by a shoulder title with the words COMMAND SIGNALS in red on a navy blue background. This title was worn until mid 1945. This example is in a perfect issued and removed from uniform condition. A hard to find title these days.
A neat example of a so called 'slag exemplaar' (battle field 'relic' i.e. left behind item) British Recognition scarf as used mainly by British and American Airborne Forces This is a neat example of a so called 'slag exemplaar' (battle field 'relic' i.e. left behind item) British Recognition scarf as used mainly by British and American Airborne Forces These scarfs came in 2 different layouts, a yellow and a green neon colour with a white and a brown coloured trim and were produced by various makers. Use of these panels was not limited to Commonwealth Forces but these were also issued to US Airborne Forces. They were carried by US Paratroopers on both the Normandy and Holland jump. This example is voided of any date and/or maker marks and has unfortunately a few smole holes i.e, rips due use i.e storage. A nice example with some history
A neat example of a un-issued British Airborne gliderborne qualification badge This is a un-issued 'Light Bulp' qualification badge who was given to members of the Airlanding Regiments and supporting units who were flown in by glider and had not done the regular Parachute course which were earning them the Parachute wing. Instead of the 7 jump require for the Parachute wing they did 5 jumps to earn them the 'Light Bulp'. The were wearing the light bulp on there lower right sleeve. This one has the well known so calles gleu/startch backing. These Light bulps are harder to find these days.
A neat example of a un-issued British made Queens Own Cameron Highlanders, 2nd Division shoulder title This is a neat example of a nicely British made Queens Own Cameron Highlanders shoulder title. Four battalions of the Cameron Highlanders served in World War II, and ten representative battle honours were chosen to be borne on the King's Colour. This single shoulder title is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A neat example of a United States Army Issued so called TM 30-350 Greek language guide This is a perfect example of a United States Army Issued so called TM 30-350 1943 dated Greek language guide. The booklet has a green thick paper cover and is complete with all 60 pages. These bookltes were issued to every U.S. Soldier in the Greek campaign. A nice additions to any collection.
A neat example of a very early, Great War period, LG (Lewis Gun) proficiency badge This is a good example of a very early, Great War period, LG (Lewis Gun) proficiency badge. I have heard that the lack of a wreath around the letters signifies that the qualification badge is for a Territorial Force soldier rather than a regular Army soldier. The badge is in a perfect condition and has the early hessian backing.
A neat example of a war time standard issued U.S. army TL122B pocket flashlight This is a perfect example of a war time standard issued U.S. army TL122B pocket flashlight. The TL (Torch Light) 122 type was introduced just after world war two started with type TL122A (see number 50571). Later during the war two more types, type B and C, were introduced. This example for sale is the second ‘crookneck’-type model and the first one made of OD green plastic. It still has a glass lense, but it doesn’t seem as prone to breaking as in its predecessor (type TL122A). This one is made by the Bright Star Company, one of the few manufacturers. These TL122 flash lights would have been a favoured item by the U.S. Airborne Troops and by British Airborne Troops. This example is in a nicely issued condition.
A neat little set of 3 early postwar postcard size official 'Arnhem AFPU (Army Film and Photo Unit)' photographs published by the MOD (Ministry of Defence) in 1945 This is a perfect little set, comprising of 3 official published so called 'Arnhem' photographs taken by 2 of the 3 War Correspondents who were attached to the Public Relations team of the 1st Airborne Division and were tasked to film and photograph the fighting during the Battle of Arnhem. Just after the war, August or September 1945, the British MOD (Ministry of Defence) published a serie of photographs consiting of around 58 (exact number unknown) photographs taken by 2 of the 3 War Correspondents, Sergeant Dennis Smith and Sergeant Mike Lewis. Sergeant Norman Walker, a AFPU (Army Film and Photo Unit) member as well took only some cine images with his 35mm Bell & Howell. The idea of the MOD was that public could buy these photographs as a sort of momento. The 3 photographs I'am offering for sale were taken by Smith and Lewis. The first one is showing 2 jeeps driving on the Utrechtseweg opposite the Hartenstein Hotel were now the Airborne Memorial is. The second photograph is of a group of lucky ones who came back after crossing the river. This one whas taken at the back of the girls college located at the Groesbeekseweg in Nijmegen. One of the man showing on this photograph is Sergeant J.W.Denning, HQ Platoon 9th Field Company, Royal Engineers (the man left of the 2 Engineers). The third photograph is showing Corporal Ron Mills of the 181st Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps kneeling beside the field grave of Trooper William Edmond who was a member of Number 9 Section, C Troop of the 1st Airborne Reconnaissance Corps. Edmond was one of the man who was wounded in the ambush of C Troop by SS Battalion Krafft on the sand tracks along side the railway line just east of Wolfheze on the first day. The field grave was located in the garden of a house on the Duitsekampweg in Wolfheze. The 3 photographs are voided of any writing beside there original BU numbers. This little set of original photographs are post card sized 13.8 x 8.4 cm and are hard to find these days.
A neat little set of 3 early postwar postcard size official 'Arnhem AFPU (Army Film and Photo Unit)' photographs published by the MoD (Ministry of Defence) in 1945 This is a perfect little set, comprising of 3 official published so called 'Arnhem' photographs taken by 2 of the 3 War Correspondents who were attached to the Public Relations team of the 1st Airborne Division and were tasked to film and photograph the fighting during the Battle of Arnhem. Just after the war, August or September 1945, the British MOD (Ministry of Defence) published a serie of photographs consiting of around 58 (exact number unknown) photographs taken by 2 of the 3 War Correspondents, Sergeant Dennis Smith and Sergeant Mike Lewis. Sergeant Norman Walker, a AFPU (Army Film and Photo Unit) member as well took only some cine images with his 35mm Bell & Howell. The idea of the MOD was that public could buy these photographs as a sort of momento. The 3 photographs are voided of any writing beside there original BU numbers. This little set of original photographs are post card sized 13.8 x 8.4 cm and are hard to find these days.
A neat little set of seven small size personal photographs dispicting a group of Parachute trained personal some were in India dated August 1942 This is a great little set of seven never been encountered before small size 9.0 cm by 6.3 cm personal photographs dispicting a group of Parachute trained personal some were in India dated August 1942 and most likely beloning to one of the company's of the 151/156 Parachute Battalion or one of the Battalions of the Indian Parachute Regiment. On two of the photographs the name of Johnny Lee appears but can't find any information about him. On three of the photographs they are wearing there bungy parachute trainig helmets and one member is wearing his just earned parachute qualification wing (most likely one with a dark blue backing) on his bungy training helmet. This set is in a nice condtion execept from one small tear on one of the photographs. This little set of photohgraphs will do great in any Parachute Regiment related collection.
A neat set of absolute stonemint printed Airborne 'Pegasus' Division shoulder formation signs They don't come better as this stonemint pair of matching printed Pegasus Airborne Division formation signs, they are getting harder to get now. First introduced in 1942 and designed by Major E.Seago based on the Greek saga of the winged horse Pegasus and his rider Bellerophon. This perfect matching set is in a good and un-issued condition.
A neat set of printed Airborne 'Pegasus' Division shoulder formation signs This is a neat example of a nicely used scarce set of printed Pegasus shoulder patches. This set is a little bit dirty but in a perfect removed from uniform condition. A nice and hard to find set these days.
A neat set of printed Airborne 'Pegasus' Division shoulder formation signs This is a good example of a slightly non matching pair of printed Pegasus Airborne Division formation signs. First introduced in 1942 and designed by Major E.Seago based on the Greek saga of the winged horse Pegasus and his rider Bellerophon. This slightly non matching set is in a nice condition and these printed examples are harder to find these days.
A neat set of stonemint embroided Airborne 'Pegasus' Division shoulder formation signs They don't come better as this stonemint pair of matching glue/starchback pegasus, they are getting quite rare now..
A neat set of stonemint embroided Airborne 'Pegasus' Division shoulder formation signs They don't come better as this stonemint pair of matching glue/starchback pegasus, they are getting difficult to find now. First introduced in 1942 and designed by Major E.Seago based on the Greek saga of the winged horse Pegasus and his rider Bellerophon. This perfect matching set is in a good and un-issued condition.
A neat set of un-issued embroided Airborne 'Pegasus' Division shoulder formation signs They don't come better as this nicely un-issued pair of matching embroided Pegasus Airborne Division formation signs, they are getting harder to get now. First introduced in 1942 and designed by Major E.Seago based on the Greek saga of the winged horse Pegasus and his rider Bellerophon. This perfect matching set is in a good and un-issued condition. Hard to upgrate.
A neat set of un-issued printed shoulder titles to the Suffolk Regiment This is a neat set of printed shoulder titles to the Suffolk Regiment. Five Battalions of the Suffolk Regiment fought during the Second World War all over the world. The First Battalion formed part of the British Expeditionary Force in the 3rd Division. It fought in France and Belgium in 1940 and was evacuated from Dunkirk. After arduous training, still with the 3rd Division in the United Kingdom, it landed as part of the Assault Brigade on 6 June 1944 on Sword Beach, Normandy. It fought with distinction throughout the Normandy campaign and thereafter in Belgium, Netherlands and Germany right through to the end of the war ending up near Bremen. The set of shoulder titles are in a un-issued and perfect condition. Difficult to upgrade !
A neat so called 'left behind' '37 pattern MECo (Mills Equipment Company) 1938 dated webbing revolver holster This is a neat example of a nicely used and issued so called 'left behind' '37 pattern MECo (Mills Equipment Company) 1938 dated webbing revolver holster. This holster I found a couple of weeks ago on a small fair in Belgium. This '37 pattern webbing revolver holster is nicely used and must be and is certainly a so called 'left behind' item from the Dunkirk Campaign from 26 May to 4 June 1940. The Mills Equiment Company, MECo for sort, is one of the well known pre great war manufacturer of army webbing equipment. This 1938 dated webbing holster is in a nicely used and issued condition and difficult to find these days.
A neatly early account of 'British Paratroops' by Lawrence Fairhall This is a nice example of a early account of the development of British Airborne Forces and how the British army adopted them. With pictures of Hotspur gliders and an early photo of a Horsa. Reduced in size due to wartime paper economy, size is 14.5 cm by 12 cm and has 20 pages and was printed by Sydenham&Co. Ltd Bournemouth. This a neatly small booklet and is in a perfect condition except from that the middle page is loose from the booklet. A nice period reference booklet.
A neatly early account of \'British Paratroops\' by Lawrence Fairhall This is a nice example of a early account of the development of British Airborne Forces and how the British army adopted them. With pictures of Hotspur gliders and an early photo of a Horsa. Reduced in size due to wartime paper economy, size is 14.5 cm by 12 cm and has 20 pages and was printed by Sydenham&Co. Ltd Bournemouth. This a neatly small booklet and is in a perfect condition. A nice period reference booklet.
A nice British made Canadian shoulder title to The Calgary Regiment This is a nice example of A nice British made Canadian shoulder title to The Calgary Regiment. When the Canadian Armoured Corps was created, the Calgary Regiment lost its status as an infantry regiment and transferred to the new corps. A reserve regiment remained in Calgary. The regiment was composed of 400 members of the reserve battalion, drawing also from reinforcement personnel from the Seaforth Highlanders of Canada and the Loyal Edmonton Regiment. The original 'A' Squadron was drawn from Olds and district, 'B' Squadron from Stettler area, 'C' Squadron from Red Deer, and Headquarters from Calgary, High River, and Okotoks district. In March 1941 the regiment moved to Camp Borden, becoming part of the First Army Tank Brigade and in June 1941 sailed for Great Britain. Matilda tanks were initially used on the Salisbury Plains, but these were replaced later in the year by the first manufactured Churchills. The overseas unit trained on various vehicles in Canada and the United Kingdom, and in August 1942 took the Churchill tank into battle for the first time at Dieppe. The unit was rebuilt after the raid, having left large numbers of tanks and crews behind. A notable casualty was Lieutenant Colonel "Johnny" Andrews, who was killed in action. In late February 1945 the regiment was moved to Leghorn and embarked to Marseilles, France, where it moved by rail to the North-West Europe theatre. The regiment moved to the Reichswald Forest and on 12 April 1945 fought in the Second Battle of Arnhem, supporting the 49th (West Riding) Infantry Division to Ede, the Netherlands. The regiment's final actions of the Second World War were in support of the 1st Belgium Brigade in clearing the resistance between the Nederrijn and Waal Rivers. When the overseas unit returned to Canada in 1945, it was disbanded, and the Calgary Regiment continued its service as a reserve armoured unit. The shoulder title is in a perfect and un-iisued condition.
A nice 1st Canadian Armoured Brigade British made printed shoulder patch This is a good example of a nice 1st Canadian Armoured Brigade British made printed shoulder patch. The 1 Canadian Army Tank Brigade, later known as 1 Canadian Armoured Brigade, was composed of the 11th, 12th and 14th Canadian Armoured Regiments and saw service in the Italian campaign and in north-west Europe during the Second World War. It was one of only two independent Canadian armoured brigades in combat. This example is in a perfect and un-issued condition. Difficult to find these days.
A nice a difficult to find British standard issued soldiers and NCO's wartime collarless shirt This is a neat example of a difficult to find British standard issued soldiers and NCO's wartime collarless shirt. Long sleeved, step-in, collarless shirt made of khaki KF fabric. The shirt features three button opening to the chest. Normaly it has metal galvanised dish buttons but this example is fitted with US made buttons instead for a smarter appearance. This example is made by McI H.M.&Co Ltd. and has a size 5 which is a very large size. This example is in nice and slightly issued condition. Hard to find these days.
A nice and attractive example of a RAF (Royal Air Force) No 1 Parachute Training School badge i.e brooch This is a neat example of a excellent and sought after original 1940s vintage RAF No 1 Parachute Training School badge finished in enamel and gilding metal with a King's crown made by renowned Birmingham based badge maker HW Miller. The brooch measures 33mm x 23mm with rear clasp and pin in excellent condition for attachment. Maker Stamped to rear - H.W. MILLER Ltd. No.1 Parachute Training School RAF (No.1 PTS) is a Royal Air Force training unit that was initially based at RAF Ringway, now Manchester Airport and is currently based at RAF Brize Norton. It was formed at Ringway on 21 June 1940 as the Central Landing School and from 1 October 1940 it was designated as the Parachute Training Squadron of the Central Landing Establishment. Following growth in the unit's task, it became an independent unit as the Parachute Training School on 15 February 1942. Following formation of a second school in India, the current name of No.1 Parachute Training School was adopted on 27 July 1944. This badge i.e brooch is in a perfect an un-issued condition.
A nice and difficult to find all ranks white “P” on a black background Phantom arm badge This is a neat example of a scarce and difficult to find all ranks white “P” on a black background Phantom arm badge. Phantom’s origins can be traced back to November 1939, when Lieutenant-Col George Frederick ‘Hoppy’ Hopkinson was sent as a Military Observer to the No 3 British Air Mission in Belgium. There, he pioneered new methods of reconnaissance operations which utilised small mobile patrols using wireless communications, to provide radically improved reconnaissance in real time from the front line. The collective codename for these Missions was ‘Phantom’ and this became the codename for the newly formd regiment. They were based at Pembroke Lodge, Richmond Park, London and consisted of 150 officers and 1,250 other ranks.They carefully recruited men with various specialised skill-sets; linguists, drivers and mechanics, from a diverse range of units. Recruits undertook rigorous training in many fields of expertise including wireless communication and cipher to enable them to develop their unique brand of reconnaissance. During the Battle of Arnhem a group of 5 men under command of Lieutenant N.A.Hey whas attached to Divisional HeadQuarters. They were flew in by glider including a jeep with trailer and a motorcycle. All ranks wore a badge with a white “P” on a black background on the right upper arm of their battledress uniform. This example is in a perfect removed from uniform condition. A hard to find badge which will do good in any Special Forces badge collection.
A nice and difficult to find Canadian Prince Edward Island Light Horse cap badge This is a neat example of a difficult to find Canadian Prince Edward Island Light Horse cap badge. The Prince Edward Island Light Horse was first organized in 1901. In World War I it helped to form part of the 6th Canadian Mounted Rifles, Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF). In World War II the Light Horse saw action in Italy and Northwest Europe, and took part in the liberation of Holland in 1945. In 1946 there was an amalgamation of The Prince Edward Island Light Horse and The Prince Edward Island Highlanders to become The Prince Edward Island Regiment, 17th Reconnaissance Regiment. This example is in a almost perfect and un-issued condition. A rare badge to find these days.
A nice and difficult to find jewellers made Officers Parachute Regment cap badge This is a neat example of a difficult to find jewellers made Officers cap badge. This example is one of the so called 'solid cast' badges made by one of the high jewellers. Unfortunately this example is missing any of the jewellers markings on the back but that was not uncommon to find during the war. This example is further in a perfect and un-issued condtion. A difficult to find example.
A nice and difficult to find late '30 early '40 standard issued green enamel mug This is one of the difficult to find pieces of standard British equipment. The enamel mug issued to all British troops is now days difficult to find. This compromises the dark green enamel cup which is the distinct wartime issue. Post War the dark red enamel cup was issued which you do come across time to time. This example is not dated which is not unusual for these wartime mugs. In aoverall nice issued condition.
A nice and difficult to find plastic cap badge to the Royal Ulster Rifles This is a neat example of a plastic cap badge to the Royal Ulster Rifles. The 1st Battalion is well know for their actions during the invasion in Normandy during the night of the 6th of June 1944. This badge is in a excellent and perfect condition. There are no marking on the back. A good and RARE badge these days.
A nice and difficult to find plastic i.e bakelite Army Air Corps cap badge This is a nice example of a plastic i.e bakelite Army Air Corps badge worn by members of the Glider Pilot Regiment. A metal AAC badge was also worn by the early members of the Parachute Regiment in North Africa. This one is in a perfect condition and has two brass coloured lugs to the back. And is made by the well known maker Stanley&Sons.
A nice and difficult to find Polish Airborne Forces cloth embroided white eagle on a mid grey oval backing intended to wear on the grey beret This is a neat and difficult to find un-issued Polish Airborne Forces cloth embroided white eagle on a mid grey oval backing intended to wear on the grey beret. These embroided version came in different shapes and sizes and were short lived because the metal eagle was more preferred by the ever smart and uniform conscious Polish troops. This fine example is in a nice un-issued condition.
A nice and difficult to find printed matching set of 'thombstone' shape Combined Operations shoulder insignia This is a nice example of a difficult to find matching set of 'thombstone' shape Combined Operations shoulder insignia. The Combined Operations badge depicts an eagle, a submachine gun and an anchor, reflecting the three service arms; the Royal Air Force, the British Army and the Royal Navy. These Combined Operations shoulder patches are coming in all sorts of shape, size and make. This set is in a nice condition. A nice matching set to find.
A nice and difficult to find printed Reconnaissance shoulder title This is a good example of a sought after en difficult to find printed Reconnaissance shoulder title. The Reconnaissance Corps, or simply Recce Corps, was a corps of the British Army, formed during the Second World War whose units provided the mobile spearhead of infantry divisions. It was formed from infantry brigade reconnaissance groups on 14 January 1941. All the brigade reconnaissance groups of each infantry corps were formed into reconnaissance battalions, each usually bearing the number of its relevant division. This example is in a perfect and un-issued condition and ia hard to be upgraded.
A nice and difficult to find so called early white metal 'sand cast' local made AAC (Army Air Corps) beret badge This is a need example of a nice and difficult to find so called early 'sand cast' local made AAC (Army Air Corps) beret badge. This type of a white metal Army Air Corps beret badge was mainly worn by members of the Glider Pilot Regiment. The AAC badge was also worn by the early members of the Parachute Regiment in North Africa. This example is in a perfect condition and has two silver coloured lugs to the back and has the typical 'sant cast' backing. This type is very difficult to find and will be a nice addition to any special forces collection.
A nice and early Canadian made a so called 'cutt down' Westminster Regiment, 5th Armoured Division patch This is a neat example of a nice and early Canadian made a so called 'cutt down' Westminster Regiment, 5th Armoured Division patch. During the Second World War the regiment formed a part of Major General Burt Hoffmeister's 5th Canadian Armoured Division ("The Mighty Maroon Machine")taking part in the Italian Campaign before being transferred to Europe and participating in the liberation of Holland. The 2nd Battalion, Westminster Regiment served in the reserve force stationed in Canada. This type of Divisional patch were worn until July 1944 when the division finally standardised its shoulder title. A nice and difficult to find Canadian Division patch.
A nice and issued BRITISH WAR CORRESPONDENT WW2 slip-on shoulder title This is neat example of a so called 'bullion' made aka 'goud draad' BRITISH WAR CORRESPONDENT slip-on shoulder title. It has its two securing straps to reverse and is in a overal good and issued condition. Scarce and difficult to find these days.
A nice and issued mid/late war period left facing embroided so called 'taylor made i.e private purchase' Airborne 'Pegasus' Divisional formation sign This is a neat example of a mid/late war period left facing embroided so called 'taylor made i.e private purchase' Pegasus badge. First introduced in 1942 and designed by Major E.Seago based on the Greek saga of the winged horse Pegasus and his rider Bellerophon. This example is in a perfect and nicely issued condition. These Pegasus signs are harder to find these days.
A nice and neatly used 15th (Scottish) Infantry Division formation badge A good example of a nice used embroided formation badge to the 15th (Scottish) Infantry Division. The Division is well known for their action during the Normandy campaigns. The badge is in a nice used condition.
A nice and original set of womans ATS (Auxiliary Territorial Service) Military Police PROVOST shoulder titles This is a perfect example of a set of wartime PROVOST shoulder title worn by both Officers and Auxiliaries who served with the military police wing of the ATS (Auxiliary Territorial Service). The titles it self are in a good and removed from uniform condition. A nice a good set of swhich you won't find easy these days.
A nice and original womans Auxiliary Territorial Service PROVOST shoulder title This is a perfect example of a wartime PROVOST shoulder title only worn by both Officers and Auxiliaries who served with the military police wing of the Auxiliary Territorial Service. The title it self is in a good condition except from some paper remains form a scrapbook. A nice a good title which you won't find easy these days.
A nice and probably local hand made US Army YANK Correspondent metal cap ie shoulder badge This is a good example of a probably local hand made US Army YANK Correspondent metal cap ie shoulder badge. Their jobs require war correspondents to deliberately go to the most conflict-ridden parts of the world. Once there, they attempt to get close enough to the action to provide written accounts, photos, or film footage. Thus, being a war correspondent is often considered the most dangerous form of journalism. This badge, of a brass based metal is in a perfect nicely issued condition with minor corrosion of years storage ie minor handeling and still retains its correct original locking attaching pin. A nice little US Army badge.
A nice and rare to find Special Operations Executive issued so called 'striker board' used by the resistance movements in Europe This is a perfect example of a rare and not so often seen so called striker board. I was lucky to find a damaged package of six single Special Operations Executive issued striked boards. These were issued and dropped by the S.O.E. for the resistance on main land Europe. The striker boards are displayed at the official S.O.E. Descriptive Catalogue of Special Devices and Supplies on page 49 (see picture). These striker boards came in two different sizes. small and a large version. These boards I'am offering are the small version and are measering 4.0 by 4.5 cm. The price is naturally per striker board. Please note that when ordered via the web-site the item does not show immediately reserved. This is a nice and rare little addition to any Special Forces and Resistance collection.
A nice and scarce embroided matching set of \'thombstone\' shape Combined Operations shoulder insignia This is a nice example of a scarce matching set of \'thombstone\' shape Combined Operations shoulder insignia. These Combined Operations shoulder patches are coming in all sorts of shape, size and make. This set is in a perfect un-issued condition and has a gleu backing. A nice and scarce matching set to find.
A nice and scarce printed matching set of \'thombstone\' shape Combined Operations shoulder insignia This is a nice example of a scarce matching set of \'thombstone\' shape Combined Operations shoulder insignia. These Combined Operations shoulder patches are coming in all sorts of shape, size and make. This set has a right facing patch which had been removed from a tunic and a left facing patch which is in a un-issued condition.. A nice and scarce matching set to find
A nice and SCARCE set of a printed Pegasus and matching Airborne strip This is a neat example of a perfect matching set of a printed Pegasus shoulder patch and a matching Airborne strip. These badge\'s are difficult to find on their own. So to find a set that has been always together is hard to find. The set in is a perfect issued and removed from uniform condition. This a rare and honest set of badge\'s.
A nice and sought after British made Infantry/Special Forces camouflage scrim scarf This a good example of a nicely issued and sought after British made Infantry/Special Forces camouflage scrim scarf. Discerned by the unique pattern of weave seen on correct WW2 scarves with several loose strands & one entwined single strand making up its construction these are becomingly increasingly hard to find in their correct format. This example has a few smal holes in the scarf and measures 90.0 x 77.0 cm. A nice item to add to your Special Forces collection.
A nice and un-issued black on green shoulder title to the Royal Ulster Rifles This is a neat example of a nicely and un-issued black on green shoulder title to the Royal Ulster Rifles. The regiment's history dates backs to the reign of King George III. In 1793 the British army expanded to meet the commitments of the war with the French First Republic. As part of that expansion it raised two new regiments of foot, the 83rd and the 86th. At the same time the counties Antrim, Down and Louth regiments of militia were raised. When war was declared the 1st Battalion was serving in India, with 31 Infantry Brigade, which was trained in mountain warfare. When the brigade returned to the United Kingdom, it was decided that, with its light scale of equipment, it brigade could be converted into a glider-borne unit. Renamed 1 Airlanding Brigade, part of 1st Airborne Division but later transferred to 6th Airborne Division as part of 6 Airlanding Brigade). Carried in Horsa gliders, the battalion took part in Operation Mallard during the D-Day landings in 1944 and Operation Varsity, the airborne element of Operation PLUNDER, the crossing of the Rhine in March 1945. The Rifles had the unique distinction of being the only British infantry regiment to have both of its regular battalions involved in the Normandy landings. Riflemen of the Royal Ulster Rifles, 6 Airlanding Brigade, aboard a jeep and trailer, driving off Landing Zone N past a crashed Airspeed Horsa glider on the evening of 6 June. In 1947 the Rifles were grouped with the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers and Royal Irish Fusiliers into the North Irish Brigade. A year later, the regiment formed a pipe band, wearing saffron kilts and playing Irish Warpipes. In 1968 the Royal Ulster Rifles amalgamated with the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers and the Royal Irish Fusiliers to form The Royal Irish Rangers (27th (Inniskilling), 83rd and 87th). A further amalgamation took place with the Ulster Defence Regiment in 1992 to form The Royal Irish Regiment (27th Inniskilling, 83rd, 87th and The Ulster Defence Regiment).
A nice and un-issued British made Canadian shoulder title to the 8th New Brunswick Hussards, 5th Armoured Regiment This is a perfect example of a British made shoulder title to a Canadian Regiment. The Second World War provided the regiment’s first opportunity for active service as a formed unit, initially as the 4th Canadian Motor Cycle Regiment and then as the 5th Armoured Regiment. The regiment landed in Italy on 19 December 1943 at Naples and saw action soon and frequently thereafter. The bloody battles of Cassino and the Liri Valley, the Metfa Crossing, Ceprano, The Gothic Line, Missano Ridge, Coriano, the Lamone River Crossing, and Coventello were grim testimony to the regiment’s fighting effectiveness. In February 1945, the Hussars sailed from Italy to Southern France, and then moved by rail to Northwest Europe. After refitting the tanks, the regiment went into action in Holland, breaking through to Putten in mid-April. The regiment then moved north for the final actions of the war at the Delfzijl Pocket where 3,000 German soldiers surrendered to the regiment. On 26 January 1946, the regiment arrived in Halifax and the next day reached Sussex, New Brunswick where it was demobilized.
A nice and un-issued early/mid war period left facing embroided standard issued Airborne 'Pegasus' Divisional formation sign This is a neat example of a early/mid war period left facing embroided standard issued Pegasus badge. First introduced in 1942 and designed by Major E.Seago based on the Greek saga of the winged horse Pegasus and his rider Bellerophon. This example is in a perfect and nicely issued condition. These Pegasus signs are harder to find these days.
A nice and un-issued early/mid war period right facing embroided so called 'taylor made i.e private purchase' Airborne 'Pegasus' Divisional formation sign This is a neat example of a early/mid war period right facing embroided so called 'taylor made i.e private purchase' Pegasus badge. First introduced in 1942 and designed by Major E.Seago based on the Greek saga of the winged horse Pegasus and his rider Bellerophon. This example is in a perfect and nicely issued condition. These Pegasus signs are harder to find these days.
A nice and un-issued embroided Devonshire Regiment shoulder title This is a good example of a un-issued and nice embroided shoulder title to the Devonshire Regiment. The Devonshire Regiment was a line infantry regiment of the British Army which served under various titles and served in many wars and conflicts from 1685 to 1958, such as the Second Boer War, World War I and World War II. In 1958 the regiment was amalgamated with the Dorset Regiment to form the Devonshire and Dorset Regiment which, in 2007, was amalgamated with the Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiment, the Royal Green Jackets and The Light Infantry to form The Rifles. During 1943 the 12th Battalion became a Glider borne unit within the newly formed 6th Airlanding Brigade, 6th Airborne Division and saw heavy action during the rest of the war including Normandy and the river Rhine in 1945. This example is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A nice and un-issued highly detailed white metal Army Air Corps cap badge This is a good example of a un-issued white metal Army Air Corps badge and mainly worn by members of the Glider Pilot Regiment. The AAC badge was also worn by the early members of the Parachute Regiment in North Africa. This one is in a perfect condition and has two brass coloured lugs to the back and has never been cleaned..
A nice and un-issued highly detailed white metal Army Air Corps cap badge This is a good example of a un-issued white metal Army Air Corps beret badge and mainly worn by members of the Glider Pilot Regiment. The AAC badge was also worn by the early members of the Parachute Regiment in North Africa. This example is in a perfect condition and has two brass coloured lugs to the back and has never been cleaned.
A nice and un-issued highly detailed white metal Army Air Corps cap badge This is a good example of a un-issued white metal Army Air Corps beret badge and mainly worn by members of the Glider Pilot Regiment. The AAC badge was also worn by the early members of the Parachute Regiment in North Africa. This example is in a perfect condition and has two brass coloured lugs to the back with it's original cutter pin present and has never been cleaned. Difficult to find these days.
A nice and un-issued highly detailed white metal voided crown Army Air Corps cap badge This is a good example of a un-issued white metal voided crown variation Army Air Corps badge and mainly worn by members of the Glider Pilot Regiment. The AAC badge was also worn by the early members of the Parachute Regiment in North Africa. This one is in a perfect condition and has two brass coloured lugs to the back and has never been cleaned..
A nice and un-issued set of 'serif' type lettering Royal Army Service Corps shoulder titles This is a perfect un-issued and scarce set of Royal Army Service Corps shoulder titles with the 'serif' type lettering. The Royal Army Service Corps was a corps of the British Army. It was responsible for land, coastal and lake transport; air despatch; supply of food, water, fuel, and general domestic stores such as clothing, furniture and stationery administration of barracks; the Army Fire Service; and provision of staff clerks to headquarters units. These 'serif' type lettering titles have been seen on portrait photographs taken of members of the 250 (Airborne) Light Composite Company, Royal Army Service Corps. The titles are in a perfect and un-issued condtion with its hessian backing. Hard to find these days.
A nice and un-issued set of 'serif' type lettering Royal Army Service Corps shoulder titles This is a perfect un-issued and scarce set of Royal Army Service Corps shoulder titles with the 'serif' type lettering. The Royal Army Service Corps was a corps of the British Army. It was responsible for land, coastal and lake transport; air despatch; supply of food, water, fuel, and general domestic stores such as clothing, furniture and stationery administration of barracks; the Army Fire Service; and provision of staff clerks to headquarters units. These 'serif' type lettering titles have been seen on portrait photographs taken of members of the 250 (Airborne) Light Composite Company, Royal Army Service Corps. The titles are in a perfect and un-issued condtion with its hessian backing. Hard to find these days.
A nice and un-issued set of mid war period embroided so called 'taylor made i.e private purchase' Airborne 'Pegasus' Divisional formation signs This is a neat example of a perfect un-issued mid war period embroided so called 'taylor made i.e private purchase' Pegasus badge's. First introduced in 1942 and designed by Major E.Seago based on the Greek saga of the winged horse Pegasus and his rider Bellerophon. This example is in a perfect and nicely un-issued condition. These Pegasus signs are harder to find these days.
A nice and un-issued wartime embroided Kings Own Scottish Borderers shoulder title This is a nice example of a un-issued mid war period white on red embroided Kings Own Scottish Borderers shoulder title. The 7th Battalion is famous for their actions during the Battle of Arnhem. This title is in a perfect amd un-issued condition. Difficult to find.these days.
A nice and un-issued wartime embroided Kings Own Scottish Borderers shoulder title This is a nice example of a un-issued wartime white on red embroided Kings Own Scottish Borderers shoulder title. The 7th Battalion is famous for their actions during the Battle of Arnhem. The title is in a good and perfect condition and has a early wartime hessian type backing.
A nice and un-issued wartime embroided Kings Own Scottish Borderers shoulder title This is a nice example of a un-issued wartime white on red embroided Kings Own Scottish Borderers shoulder title. The 7th Battalion is famous for their actions during the Battle of Arnhem. The title is in a good and perfect condition and had the well known paste backing.
A nice and un-issued wartime printed Kings Own Scottish Borderers shoulder title This is a nice example of a un-issued wartime printed Kings Own Scottish Borderers shoulder title. The 7th Battalion is famous for their actions during the Battle of Arnhem. The title is in a good and perfect condition. Hard to find.
A nice and unissued British made printed Canadian The Perth Regiment shoulder title This is good example of nice and unissued British made printed i.e. canvas Canadian The Perth Regiment, 5th Canadian Armoured Division, shoulder title. The Perth’s tasking since 1936 had been that of a Corps Machine Gun Battalion, The Perth Regiment (MG), and for the first 18 months of the war the unit trained in this capacity. On March 4, 1941 the Perth's were then notified they would become part of the 5th Canadian Armoured Division. This assignment changed the regimental tasking from a Corps Machine Gun Battalion to that of Motorized Infantry, The Perth Regiment (Motor). The Perths would remain in Europeuntil January 1946. They would return on the Queen Elizabeth anddock in New York on January 14th 1946. At its zenith the Regimentconsisted of 1,047 all ranks, May 30th, 1945. On January 16th1946, the Perths, 13 officers and 354 other ranks would detraining Stratford. This example of a difficult to find shoulder title is in a perfect condition and is coming from a old Belgium collection.
A nice and unissued set of American made wartime Netherlands Marines shoulder titles This is a neat set of American made wartime Netherlands Marines shoulder titles on twill material. In World War II, a Korps Mariniers unit in Rotterdam preparing to ship out to the Dutch East Indies successfully defended the bridges across the Maas, preventing German paratroopers in the center of the city from rendezvousing with conventional German infantry. The Germans ended the stalemate by bombing Rotterdam. The threat of an attack by marines caused its German captain to scuttle the Antilla in Aruba in 1940. When the surrender was declared and the Dutch soldiers came out of their positions, the German commander who was expecting a full battalion of men was stunned to see only a few Dutch Marines emerge in their green uniforms. He ordered his men to salute them out of respect for their bravery and determination and labeled them Zwarte duivels (The Black Devils). Some Mariniers later joined the Princess Irene Brigade to fight against the Germans. They distinguished themselves in combat near the Dutch city of Tilburg in the autumn of 1944. Starting in 1943, the United States Marine Corps trained and equipped a new brigade, the Mariniersbrigade, of the Korps Mariniers at Camp Lejeune and Camp Davis in North Carolina in preparation for amphibious landings against the Japanese in the Dutch East Indies. The Japanese surrendered before such landings were needed, but the Mariniersbrigade, fully trained and equipped, left North Carolina in six transports in 1945 and fought against the Indonesians in their National Revolution for independence. It was part of the A Division, which was itself commanded by a Korps Mariniers officer. It was disbanded in 1949. The Dutch kept Western New Guinea after the Indonesian National Revolution and the Korps Mariniers served there until 1962 when it was granted independence. The same year it was invaded and incorporated into Indonesia. This set is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A nice and unissued set of British made embroided Canadian Princess Louise Fusiliers shoulder titles This is neat example of nice and unissued set British made embroided Canadian Princess Louise Fusiliers, 5th Canadian Armoured Division, shoulder titles. As an officially constituted unit of Canada, The Princess Louise Fusiliers were authorized in 1867. During the unit's history, it has undergone several name changes. The onset of World War II saw more action for the Fusiliers, when they were sent to Italy as part of the 5th Canadian Armoured Division. The regiment fielded two machine gun companies, the 11th Independent MG Coy. in support of the 11th Infantry Brigade, and the 12th Independent MG Coy. in support of the 12th Infantry Brigade. In British and Commonwealth armoured divisions of that period, independent MG coys. consisted of a HQ platoon, plus one platoon operating Browning .50 cal. heavy MGs and a second platoon operating 107mm heavy mortars; they were heavy direct-fire support units. In February 1945 the 5th Armoured was transferred from Italy to Belgium, and these two companies participated in the liberation of the Netherlands from late March to the German surrender. During the conflict, the regiment received nine more battle honours, bringing their total count to 16. This set is in a perfect un-issued condition.
A nice bi metal Canadian made Princess Louise Fusiliers cap badge This is a good example of a nice slightly used Canadian Princess Louise Fusiliers cap badge made by the well known Canadian Montreal based W.Scully Ltd. badge maker. As an officially constituted unit of Canada, The Princess Louise Fusiliers were authorized in 1867. During the unit's history, it has undergone several name changes. On November 5, 1869, the regiment was named the 66th The Halifax Battalion of Infantry. Originally consisting of six companies, it later gained two more. The onset of World War II saw more action for the Fusiliers, when they were sent to Italy as part of the 5th Canadian Armoured Division. The regiment fielded two machine gun companies, the 11th Independent MG Coy. in support of the 11th Infantry Brigade, and the 12th Independent MG Coy. in support of the 12th Infantry Brigade. In British and Commonwealth armoured divisions of that period, independent MG coys. consisted of a HQ platoon, plus one platoon operating Browning .50 cal. heavy MGs and a second platoon operating 107mm heavy mortars; they were heavy direct-fire support units. In February 1945 the 5th Armoured was transferred from Italy to Belgium, and these two companies participated in the liberation of the Netherlands from late March to the German surrender. During the conflict, the regiment received nine more battle honours, bringing their total count to 16. Following WWII, the PLF converted back to a light infantry unit. Their most recent battle honour, received in 1999 following a lengthy struggle by unit officers to discover the necessary supporting documents, was for the unit's actions at Arnhem in 1945. This cap badge is in a never been cleaned and good condition with it's original cutter pin.
A nice British Boiled Sweets ration tin This is a neat example of a not so often seen British ration tin. These Boiled Sweets tins were issued to every soldier during the war. They come in different text and weight. This one is made by J.P.Ltd and was packed in Septermber 1943.
A nice British made (Gaunt&Sons) Poland pilot wing This a a perfect example of a British made, made by J.R.Gaunt&Sons Ltd. London, Polish pilot wing. The many Polish volunteer pilots who served in the RAFduring the war wore British uniforms with their Polish Pilot badges displayed on the left upper chest. This wing is in a perfect condition and had its original suspension chain and hook attached.
A nice British made Canadian Lorne Scots shoulder title This ia a good example of a nice British made Canadian Lorne Scots shoulder title. The Lorne Scots was one of the first regiments to be mobilized in the Second World War but never served as a cohesive regiment. Instead, members of the Regiment were organized into defence platoons and attached to various brigade, division and army headquarters. Members of The Lorne Scots served in every theatre of war in which Canada fought with the exception of Hong Kong. A platoon of Lornes served with the Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada at the capture of Boulogne. Other platoons took part on the raid at Dieppe and landed on the beaches of Sicily. This example is in a nice un-issued condition.
A nice British made Free French (Cross of Lorraine) Libre Lapel Badge This is a good example of a nice British made Free French (Cross of Lorraine) Libre Lapel Badge. Free France and its Free French Forces (French: France Libre and Forces francaises libres) were the government-in-exile led by Charles de Gaulle during the Second World War and its military forces that continued to fight against the Axis powers as an Ally after the fall of France. The two-barred cross, the so-called Cross of Lorraine, was the symbol of the Free French Forces. It was part of the coat-of-arms of the French province of Lorraine, a large part of which had been annexed by Germany between 1871 and 1970, and again from 1940 to 1944. The cross stood for the aim to recover France’s lost land. The badge is in a nice overal condition and is numbered on the back 83830. The badge measures 3.2x1.6 cm.
A nice British made SAAF/SALM (South African Air Force/ Suid Afrikaanse Lug Mag) cap badge This is a good example of a British made SAAF/SALM (South African Air Force/ Suid Afrikaanse Lug Mag) cap badge. The SAAF saw mainly action in the Western Desert and North Africa. By the end of May 1943, the SAAF had two Wings and sixteen squadrons in the Middle East and North Africa with 8,000 men. With the end of the North African campaign, the SAAF role underwent change – becoming more active in fighter bomber, bomber and PR operations as opposed to the fighter role performed in the desert. This badge is in a nice slightly issued condition.
A nice British Royal Corps of Signals printed shoulder title This is a perfect example of a printed shoulder titel to the Royal Corps of Signals. The title is in a nice un-issued condition. These title are getting harder to find these days.
A nice British SCARCE small Horlicks Ration tin This is a fine example of a SCARCE Horlicks Ration tin. The big one\'s you can still find if you have a good look but the small one\'s are difficult to find. The tin is in a good condition for its age.
A nice British SCARE Horlicks Emergency 24 Hour Ration tin The tin is in a overall good and slightly used condition. It has still its orange rubber seal present. A nice and saught after ration tin.
A nice British wartime SCARE Plastic (bakelite) South Staffordshire Regiment cap badge This is a perfect example of a mind plastic cap badge to the South Staffordshire Regiment. A hard and diffucult to find cap badge. The badge is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A nice British/Canadian made 2nd Corps Canadian Artillery corps badge This is a good example of a nice British/Canadian made 2nd Corps Canadian Artillery corps badge in black. It must be a fault by the manufacturer using black cloth instead of dark blue for its 2nd Corps badges. Ths badge is in a un-issued condition.
A nice condition Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry white on red shoulder title This is a nicely and un-issued shoulder title to the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. The 2nd Battalion is famous for their actions during the coup-de-main at Pegasus Bridge in Normandy in June 1944 during Operation Overlord aka D-Day. The title is in a good un-issued condition and more of the sought after units.
A nice difficult to find matching set of printed Beach Groups Royal Engineers & 8th GHQ Troops Engineers formation patches This is a good example of a hard to find matching set of printed Beach Groups Royal Engineers & 8th GHQ Troops Engineers formation patches. These Beach groups were composed of specialist units of the Army, Navy, and R.A.K. formed in a complete amphibious formation. The naval element was made up of R.N. Signals and R.N. Commandos; the R.A.F. provided a balloon barrage section for the defence of the beaches and specialists who prepared the way for the R.A. F.'s airstrips; the Army provided an infantry battalion for the seizing of the beach and the defence of the beachhead perimeter, Royal Engineer Field Companies, Mechanical F.quipment Platoons, a Stores Section and Transportation units, R.A.S.C. general transport companies with D.U.K.W.'s, a D.I.D. and Petrol supply unit, an R.A.M.C. unit, C.M.P. traffic control, and an R.E.M.E. Recovery Section and Pioneer Companies. Beach groups first operated in the landings in Sicily. On 6th June 1944, D Day, on the Normandy beaches beach-group troops landed with the assault troops and distinguished themselves in the establishment and maintenance of the beachhead. Both badges are in a nice issued and removed from uniform. condition.
A nice difficult to find un-official 2nd type 1st Battalion, The Border Regiment Airborne shoulder title This is a neat example of a RARE and un-offical so called 2nd type shoulder title to the 1st Battalion The Border Regiment. The Battalion is famous for their action's during the Battle of Arnhem in September 1944. "The coloured Border cloth shoulder title was taken into wear by the 1st Battalion in 1942. The colours of yellow and green were the facing colours of the 34th and 55th Foot Regiments. All the other battalions continued to wear the white on red title." This so called 2nd type was introduced at the end of 1944 and this example is in a perfect un-issued condition with some minor paper remants to the back.
A nice early dated Commando/Special Forces Cap Comforter I was lucky enough to find three early dated cap comforters recently. All three are in a great and in a un-issued condition. These are neat example\'s of early dated, 1940 cap comforter\'s. The one\'s who are dated 1944, 1945 are more easier to find than a early dated one. Mainly used by the British Commando Forces, the cap comforter could be worn folded into itself to form a stocking cap as needed or be worn as a scarf. Of course they a priced for a singel cap comforter. Altrough the date\'s are not so clearly to read these cap comforter\'s are in a mint un-issued condition.
A nice embroided shoulder title to the Inns of Court Regiment This is a good example of a difficult to find Inns of Court embroided shoulder title. The modern history of the regiment began again in 1859, shortly after Crimea, with the formation of the 23rd Middlesex (Inns of Court) Rifle Volunteer Corps. In 1881, the unit became a battalion of the Rifle Brigade and was renamed the 14th Middlesex (Inns of Court) Rifle Volunteer Corps in 1889. The regiment then formed part of the 2nd London Volunteer Brigade and the "Grey Brigade". In 1888 a mounted infantry detachment was formed and subsequently became known as "B" (M.I.) Company, and a contingent of 30 mounted infantry, 19 cyclists and 1 signaller joined the City Imperial Volunteers for service in South Africa during the Boer War. In 1939 the mounted squadron joined a cavalry training regiment in Edinburgh, but this was disbanded in 1940. From January 23, 1941, until January 15, 1943, the regiment was part of the 9th Armoured Division in Great Britain.[4] From 1943, it was under the direct command of 1 Corps, the assault formation of 21 Army Group and later led the advance of 11th Armoured Division. On D-Day, "C" Squadron of the regiment landed on Juno Beach with the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division. During the campaign in Northwest Europe of 1944-45, the Inns of Court, organized as an armoured car regiment, was the reconnaissance asset of the I Corps. Following further defence reforms, the unit became known as 68 (Inns of Court & City Yeomanry) Signal Squadron from 1 April 1969, when, with an establishment of eight officers and 85 other ranks, it became part of the newly formed the 71 (Yeomanry) Signal Regiment (Volunteers), which itself had been formed from the recently disbanded yeomanry regiments. The shoulder title is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A nice example of a British made Polish Officers parachute collar kite to intend to wear on a Officers Service Dress This is a perfect example of a British made Polish Officers Parachute collar kite to intend to wear on the collar of the Service Dress. This collar kite had a metal based parachutist on a grey coloured backing with a yellow top lining as intendend to wear by the Polish Parachute Infantry and is backed with a piece of brown paper. This kite is in a perfect and un-issued condition. Difficult to find these days.
A nice example of a early post war (late '40 early '50) Belgium parachute qualification wing for tropical use This a a neat example of a early post war (late '40 early '50) Belgium parachute qualification wing for tropical use. This early example is based on the British World War Two parachute qualification wing design. Later on the Belgiums were going to use a diffent style of wing with a different colour. This example has four female studs on the back for use on a tropical uniform. A nice and early example of a Belguim parachute qualification wing. Difficult to find.
A nice example of a issued 2nd pattern 7th Armoured Division divisional shoulder patch This is a good example of a 2nd pattern 7th Armoured Division divisional shoulder patch made on heavy felt. The 7th Armoured Division was a British armoured division that saw service during the Second World War where its exploits made it famous as the Desert Rats. After the Munich Crisis, the division was formed in Egypt during 1938 as the Mobile Division (Egypt) and its first divisional commander was the acclaimed tank theorist Major-General Sir Percy Hobart. During January 1940, the name of the unit was changed to the 7th Armoured Division. It was during this period that the nickname "Desert Rats" was coined. The division fought in most major battles* during the North African Campaign; later it would land and fight in Italy before being withdrawn to the United Kingdom where it prepared to fight in North West Europe. It began landing in Normandy during the afternoon of 6 June and fought its way across Europe ending the war in Kiel and Hamburg, Germany. The 7th Armoured Brigade was detached from the division during early 1942 and fought the Japanese during the fighting in Burma, it then returned to the Mediterranean Theatre and fought in Italy. Although the division was disbanded during the 1950s, the history, name and the famous 'Desert Rat' flash is carried on by the 7th Armoured Brigade. The patch is in a nice issued condition.
A nice example of a issued and nicely used printed shoulder title to the Dorset Regiment This is a good example of a nicely used printed shoulder title to the Dorset Regiment. In the Second World War, eight hostilities-only battalions were raised. The 1st Battalion was part of 231st Infantry Brigade for the duration of the war, fighting in Malta, Sicily, and Italy. It landed on Gold Beach on D-Day and fought with the Brigade in the Battle of Normandy and North-West Europe. The 2nd Battalion was part of 5th Infantry Brigade throughout the war, participating in the Battle of France and the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940. In 1944, it took part in the Burma Campaign of 1944-1945 and the Battle of Kohima. The 4th and 5th Battalions fought in the liberation of Northwest Europe in 1944-1945. The 30th Battalion was with 43rd Infantry Brigade in North Africa and the invasion of Sicily, after which it spent the rest of the war in Gibraltar. This example is in a nicely used (with a minor stain beneath the R) and removed from uniform condition.
A nice example of a late '40 or early '50 Special Air Service issued cap badge This is a nice example of a late '40 or early '50 Special Air Service issued cap badge. Have been told that this type of cap badge was used to the Artists Rifles within the 21 Special Air Service TA (Territorial Army). The Special Air Service traces its origins to 1941 and the Second World War, and was reformed as part of the Territorial Army in 1947, and named the 21st Battalion, SAS Regiment, (Artists Rifles). The Regular Army 22 SAS later gained fame and recognition worldwide after successfully assaulting the Iranian Embassy in London and rescuing hostages during the 1980 Iranian Embassy siege, lifting the regiment from obscurity outside the military establishment. The number 21 SAS was chosen to perpetuate two disbanded wartime regiments 1 SAS and 2 SAS, with the 1 and the 2 being reversed into 21. 21 SAS was active during the Malayan Emergency and in many subsequent conflicts.
A nice example of a matching set of Canadian made The Royal Regiment of Canada shoulder title's This is a neat example of a wartime Canadian made set of shoulder title's to the Royal Regiment of Canada. The regiment mobilized The Royal Regiment of Canada, CASF, for active service on 1 September 1939. It embarked for garrison duty in Iceland with "Z" Force on 10 June 1940, and on 31 October 1940 it was transferred to Great Britain. It was redesignated the 1st Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Canada, CASF, on 7 November 1940. The battalion took part in the raid on Dieppe on 19 August 1942. It landed again in France on 7 July 1944, as part of the 4th Infantry Brigade, 2nd Canadian Infantry Division, and continued to fight in North-West Europe until the end of the war. The overseas battalion was disbanded on 31 December 1945 This set in in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A nice example of a un-issued 2nd pattern 7th Armoured Division divisional shoulder patch This is a good example of a 2nd pattern 7th Armoured Division divisional shoulder patch made on heavy felt. The 7th Armoured Division was a British armoured division that saw service during the Second World War where its exploits made it famous as the Desert Rats. After the Munich Crisis, the division was formed in Egypt during 1938 as the Mobile Division (Egypt) and its first divisional commander was the acclaimed tank theorist Major-General Sir Percy Hobart. During January 1940, the name of the unit was changed to the 7th Armoured Division. It was during this period that the nickname "Desert Rats" was coined. The division fought in most major battles* during the North African Campaign; later it would land and fight in Italy before being withdrawn to the United Kingdom where it prepared to fight in North West Europe. It began landing in Normandy during the afternoon of 6 June and fought its way across Europe ending the war in Kiel and Hamburg, Germany. The 7th Armoured Brigade was detached from the division during early 1942 and fought the Japanese during the fighting in Burma, it then returned to the Mediterranean Theatre and fought in Italy. Although the division was disbanded during the 1950s, the history, name and the famous 'Desert Rat' flash is carried on by the 7th Armoured Brigade. The patch is in a nice un-issued condition.
A nice fully matching set of Kings Own Scottisch Borderers shoulder titles This is a perfect example of a fully matching set of white on red lettering Kings Own Scottisch Borderers shoulder titles with a glue backing. The set has a few moth nips but further in a nice condition.
A nice genuine multi-colored silk escape map C/D for Europe, including Holland, Belgium, France and Germany. This is a good example of a nice genuine multi-colored silk C/D escape map for Europe, including Holland, Belgium, France and Germany. Maps of Europe were printed on silk or fabric material for the aircrew flying over Europe and paratroopers dropping into France or Holland. These maps were specifically printed on fabric so that no noise was made when using them or damage caused to the map in the event of them getting wet. This double-sided escape map is the most desirable that covers the bulk of areas of the war in the ETO. It was carried in the Maps Only pouch. The map is in a 1:250.000 scale is in a nicely issued condition.
A nice Intelligence Corps cap badge
A nice issued and used printed British made Canadian Governor General's Footguards shoulder title This is a neat example of a nice issued and used British made printed Canadian Governor General's Footguards shoulder title. The Governor General's Foot Guards originated in Ottawa, Ontario, on 7 June 1872 as the 1st Battalion Governor General's Foot Guards. Details from the regiment were called out on service on 26 August 1939 and then placed on active service on 1 September 1939 for local protection duties. The details were disbanded on 31 December 1940. The regiment mobilized The Governor General's Foot Guards, CASF, for active service on 24 May 1940. On 26 January 1942, it was converted to armour. It embarked for Great Britain on 23 September 1942. On 24 July 1944, it landed in France as part of the 4th Armoured Brigade, 4th Canadian Armoured Division, and it continued to fight in North-West Europe until the end of the war. This example is in a nice and issued condition.
A nice issued British made Canadian Calgary Highlanders, 2nd Division shoulder title This is a perfect example of a nicely British made issued Calgary Highlanders shoulder title. On 6 July 1944, one month after the Normandy landings, the regiment landed in France. In Operation Spring, the Calgary Highlanders were part of the Battle of Verrières Ridge, along with the Black Watch, in which the regiment took heavy casualties. The unit saw extensive action in Normandy, marched through Dieppe with the 2nd Division in September 1944 as liberators, then moved on to the fighting for the Channel Ports. By the end of September the regiment was in Belgium and forced a crossing of the Albert Canal, northeast of Antwerp. The regiment saw extensive fighting in the Netherlands in October 1944, opening the way to South Beveland, and then west to the Walcheren Island Causeway where the brigade fought an extended battle beginning on Hallowe'en night. From November to February 1945 the regiment wintered in the Nijmegen Salient, then was back in action in the Rhineland fighting, clearing the last approaches to the River Rhine itself. Fighting resumed on the far bank in March, and city fighting in Doetinchem and Groningen followed. The regiment ended the war on VE Day on German soil. The shoulder title is in a perfect and issued condition.
A nice issued British made Canadian Calgary Highlanders, 2nd Division shoulder title This is a perfect example of a nice British made un-issued Calgary Highlanders shoulder title. On 6 July 1944, one month after the Normandy landings, the regiment landed in France. In Operation Spring, the Calgary Highlanders were part of the Battle of Verrières Ridge, along with the Black Watch, in which the regiment took heavy casualties. The unit saw extensive action in Normandy, marched through Dieppe with the 2nd Division in September 1944 as liberators, then moved on to the fighting for the Channel Ports. By the end of September the regiment was in Belgium and forced a crossing of the Albert Canal, northeast of Antwerp. The regiment saw extensive fighting in the Netherlands in October 1944, opening the way to South Beveland, and then west to the Walcheren Island Causeway where the brigade fought an extended battle beginning on Hallowe'en night. From November to February 1945 the regiment wintered in the Nijmegen Salient, then was back in action in the Rhineland fighting, clearing the last approaches to the River Rhine itself. Fighting resumed on the far bank in March, and city fighting in Doetinchem and Groningen followed. The regiment ended the war on VE Day on German soil. The shoulder title is in a perfect and issued condition.
A nice issued printed South Stafford shoulder title This is a good example of a nicely used and issued printed South Stafford shoulder title. The 2nd Battalion of this Regiment is famous for their actions during the Operation Ladbroke, the Airborne landings at Sicily in July 1943 and there actions during the ill fated Operation Market Garden meeting heavy fighting at Oosterbeek and near the bridge at Arnhem. This example is in a nicely removed from uniform condition. Hard to find these days.
A nice late '40 early '50 SAS (Special Air Service) beret badge This is a nice example of a nice late '40 early '50 SAS (Special Air Service) beret badge. The Special Air Service traces its origins to 1941 and the Second World War. It was reformed as part of the Territorial Army in 1947, named the 21st Special Air Service Regiment (Artists Rifles). The 22nd Special Air Service Regiment, which is part of the regular army, gained fame and recognition worldwide after its televised rescue of all but one of the hostages held during the 1980 Iranian Embassy siege. This badge is in a nice un-issued condition and has a typical wartime hessian like backing. Hard to upgrade.
A nice late war i.e early post war 'cash tape' type Belgium Commando shoulder title This is a good example of a nice late war i.e early post war 'cash tape' type Belgium Commando shoulder title. I have seen the Belgium shoulder title before in the same white on khaki colours and in the 'cash tape' type. These type of titles would have been introduced after the Belgium Commando would have been used the British red on dark blue. This example is in a perfect and un-issued condition. Difficult to find these days.
A nice late war i.e early post war embroided Belgium Commando shoulder title This is a good example of a nice late war i.e early post war embroided Belgium Commando shoulder title. I have seen the Belgium shoulder title before in the same white on khaki colours in a 'cash tape' type. These type of titles would have been introduced after the Belgium Commando would have been used the British red on dark blue. This example is in a perfect and un-issued condition. Difficult to find these days.
A nice little Belgian national flag as intended to wear by Belgian volunteers on there upper arm of there battle-dress blouse I was lucky to find 3 small identical Belgian or British made Belgian national flags as intended to wear by all ranks of the Balgian volunteers who were part of the Allied Army's in England during the war. Members of No 4 Troop, No 10 Commando (I.A.) wore the flag below the No.10 Commando on there right shoulder. These little Balgian flag's are difficult to find and are in a nice and un-issued condition. The price is naturally for one flag.
A nice little Belgian national flag as intended to wear by Belgian volunteers on there upper arm of there battle-dress blouse I was lucky to find recently 5 small identical Belgian or British made Belgian national flags as intended to wear by all ranks of the Belgian volunteers who were part of the Allied Army's in England during the war. Members of No 4 Troop, No 10 Commando (I.A.) wore these flags below the No.10 Commando shoulder title on there right shoulder. These little Belgian flag's are difficult to find and are in a nice and un-issued condition. The price is naturally for one flag.
A nice little Norwegian national flag as intended to wear by Norwegian volunteers on there upper arm of there battle-dress blouse I was lucky to find 2 small identical Norwegian national flags as intended to wear by all ranks of the Norwegain volunteers who were part of the Allied Army's in England during the war. Members of No 5 Troop, No 10 Commando (I.A.) wore the flag below the No.10 Commando on there right shoulder. Volunteers within the Royal Air Force wore a blue version of this little flag. These liitle Norwegian flag's are difficult to find and are in a perfect and un-issued condition. The price is naturally for one flag.
A nice little Norwegian national flag as intended to wear by Norwegian volunteers on there upper arm of there battle-dress blouse This is a neat example of a difficult to find Norwegian national flag as intended to wear by all ranks of the Norwegain volunteers who were part of the Allied Army's in England during the war. Members of No 5 Troop, No 10 Commando (I.A.) wore the flag below the No.10 Commando on there right shoulder. Volunteers within the Royal Air Force wore a blue version of this little flag. These liitle Norwegian flag's are difficult to find and this example is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A nice little Norwegian/NORGE shoulder title as intended to wear by Norwegian volunteers on there upper arm of there battle-dress blouse This is a neat example of a difficult to find Norwegian/NORGE shoulder title as intended to wear by all ranks of the Norwegain volunteers who were part of the Allied Army's in England during the war. Members of No 5 Troop, No 10 Commando (I.A.) wore the flag below the No.10 Commando on there right shoulder. Volunteers within the Royal Air Force wore a blue version of this shoulder title.. These Norwegian shoulder titles are difficult to find and this example is in a perfect and issued condition
A nice little set of three printed British made Canadian and British shoulder patches This is a neat little set of three printed British made Canadian and British shoulder patches. This small group consist of a printed 21st Army Group GHQ and Lines of Communication Troops & British Troops in France shoulder patch, a Canadian RCEME (Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers) shoulder title and a Canadian National shoulder title. This little grouping was recently found during a Belgium house clearence. All three badges are in a nicely condition.
A nice local made 3rd Indian Infantry 'Chindits' Divisional badge This is a nice example of a probably local made 3rd Indian Infantry 'Chindits' Divisional badge. The Chindits (officially in 1943 77th Indian Infantry Brigade and in 1944 3rd Indian Infantry Division) were a British India "Special Force" that served in Burma and India in 1943 and 1944 during the Burma Campaign in World War II. They were formed into long range penetration groups trained to operate deep behind Japanese lines. The operations were marked by prolonged marches though extremely difficult terrain by underfed troops weakened by malaria and illnesses such as dysentery. The Chindits were the brainchild of the British army's unconventional WW2 commander: Orde Wingate. The badge is in a perfect and almost un-issued condition. Difficult to find.
A nice local made or British made Chindit shoulder title During the Second World War a Special Force was trained in Commando methods to infiltrate behind the Japanese lines in Burma. They were known as the CHINDITS, a name given to them by their leader, Major-General Orde C. Wingate, D.S.O. After the initial expedition in 1943 the full force was marched or landed in the jungle on makeshift air-strips by glider or Dakota aircraft 200 miles behind enemy lines in March 1944. The mission was successfull and called Operation Thursday, this eventually started the rot, which led to the Japanese surrender. The force suffered many casualties killed, wounded or taken prisoner. Many of the survivors still suffer today from the hardship, rigours and strain of the two long arduous campaigns, when the only contact with base was by radio, all supplies came by air-drop. The Chindits were very much an International Force, which include British, Burma Rifles, Hong Kong Volunteers, Gurkhas and West African Serviceman. The R.A.F. and First Air Commando , U.S.A.A.F. provided air support. The title is in a nice and un-issued condition. Harder to find these days.
A nice local made slightly padded 3rd Indian Infantry 'Chindits' Divisional badge This is a nice example of a slightly padded probably local made 3rd Indian Infantry 'Chindits' Divisional badge. The Chindits (officially in 1943 77th Indian Infantry Brigade and in 1944 3rd Indian Infantry Division) were a British India "Special Force" that served in Burma and India in 1943 and 1944 during the Burma Campaign in World War II. They were formed into long range penetration groups trained to operate deep behind Japanese lines. The operations were marked by prolonged marches though extremely difficult terrain by underfed troops weakened by malaria and illnesses such as dysentery. The Chindits were the brainchild of the British army's unconventional WW2 commander: Orde Wingate. The badge is in a perfect and almost un-issued condition. Difficult to find.
A nice localy made, most certain Italian, Polish 14th Wielkopolska Armoured Brigade shoulder patch This is a good example of nice localy made, most certain Italian, Polish 14th Wielkopolska Armoured Brigade shoulder patch. This unit was added in 1945 to the Polish 2nd Armoured Brigade and became Polish 2nd Warsaw Armoured Division later that year. A nice badge to see.
A nice matching set of embroided Reconnaissance shouder titles This is a good matching set of embroided Reconnaissance shoulder titles. The Reconnaissance Corps, or simply Recce Corps, was a corps of the British Army, formed during the Second World War whose units provided the mobile spearhead of infantry divisions. It was formed from infantry brigade reconnaissance groups on 14 January 1941. All the brigade reconnaissance groups of each infantry corps were formed into reconnaissance battalions, each usually bearing the number of its relevant division. This set is in a nice un-issued condition with some paper remains on both titles coming from a scrapbook.
A nice matching set of embroidered Border Regiment shoulder titles This is a good example of a very nice and matching pair of shoulder titles to the Border Regiment. Introduced half way through the war with its typical British 'glue or paste backing'. A nice white on red embroided lettering and in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A nice named grouping of badges to the Canadian The Royal Regina Rifles, 3rd Canadian Infantry Division This is a nice named grouping of badges to a member of the Canadian The Royal Regina Rifles, 3rd Canadian Infantry Division. This nice grouping consists of one cap badge, four embroided shoulder titles, two rank chevrons, three metal shoulder titles, a medal bar with two medal ribbons for a France Germany Star and Candian Volunteer Servive medal and a souvenir handkerchief. This set of badges belonged to Rifleman W.L.Rawles. He was born is Bridgwater and emigrated to Canada in the late '30 an joined the Royal Regina Rifles getting army number L27317, These is little know about his service records.
A nice non matching set of a embroided Pegasus and a Airborne arms-of-service strip This is a good example of a regrettable non macthing set consiting of a embroided Pegasus patch and a Airborne arms-of-service strip. The Pegasus patch was first introduced in 1942 and designed by Major E.Seago based on the Greek saga of the winged horse Pegasus and his rider Bellerophon. The Airborne arms-of-service strips was introduced at the end of 1942 and were in use by a mix of Parachute and Glider trained soldiers of the 1st, 6th and the Canadian Airborne Troops till the end of 1944. There is a variation of types and makers of these Airborne strips and Pegasus patches. These examples for sale are in a nice worn condition with some minor discolouring to the Pegasus patch. This set is priced accordingly.
A nice Officers 'silver' Border Regiment cap badge This is perfect example of a nice and beautiful so called 2 piece Officers 'silver' made Border Regiment cap badge. Unfortunately this example isn't hallmarkt but I'am certain this example is made of silver. It is beautiful made with lots of detail to the cross and the center piece showing the Chinees dragon is made of white en red enamel. This example is in a perfect condition and has never been cleaned. A nice badge of heavy quality and one of the nices I have had for a long time.
A nice original un-issued German made so called 'Dachau type' 1st type pattern Croatian Waffen-SS Volunteer Sleeve Shield This is a nice original Waffen-SS 1st type pattern Croatian volunteer's sleeve shield as intended for members within the '13.Waffen-Gebirgs-Division der SS "Handschar" (Kroatische Nr.1)'. The 13th Waffen Mountain Division of the SS "Handschar" (1st Croatian) was a mountain infantry division of the Waffen-SS. It was the first non-Germanic Waffen-SS division, and its formation marked the expansion of the Waffen-SS into a multi-ethnic military force. The shield is in a perfect and un-issued condition. Hard to upgrade.
A nice original un-issued German made so called 'Dachau type' Estionian Waffen-SS Volunteer Sleeve Shield This is a good example of a nice original un-issued German made so called 'Dachau type' Estionian Waffen-SS Volunteer Sleeve Shield.The 20th Waffen Grenadier Division was a unit of the Waffen SS established on 25 May 1944 in German-occupied Estonia during World War II. Formed in Spring 1944 after the general conscription-mobilization was announced in Estonia on 31 January 1944 by the German occupying authorities, the cadre of the 3rd Estonian SS Volunteer Brigade, renamed the 20th Estonian SS Volunteer Division on 23 January 1944, was returned to Estonia and reformed. Additionally 38,000 men were conscripted in Estonia and other Estonian units that had fought on various fronts in the German Army. The Division fought the Red Army on the Eastern Front and surrendered in May 1945. The shield is in a perfect and un-issued condition. Hard to upgrade.
A nice original un-issued German made so called 'Dachau type' Norwegian Waffen-SS Volunteer Sleeve Shield This is a good example of a nice original un-issued German made so called 'Dachau type' Norwegian Waffen-SS Volunteer Sleeve Shield. About 15 000 Norwegians volunteered to the Wehrmacht or SS during the years 1940-1945, and an estimate of 7000 reached the front lines in some way. The recruiting of Norwegians for the 5. SS- Panzerdivision ”Wiking” formation started on the 12/1-41. SS-PzDiv Wiking consisted of three Standarten (regiments): “Westland” for the Dutch and Flemings, “Germania” for Germans and Volksdeutsche, (ethnic Germans), and “Nordland” for Nordic volunteers. About 800 Norwegians served in "Wiking", and most were assigned to “Nordland´s” infantry, but some were with different artillery units, or other branches – and was placed in all three Standarten. THe shield is in a perfect and un-issued condition. Hard to upgrade.
A nice RARE and difficult to find un-official 1st Battalion, The Border Regiment Airborne shoulder title This is a neat example of a unfortunately not complete (missing its purple cloth backing) RARE un-offical shoulder title to the 1st Battalion The Border Regiment. The Battalion is famous for their action's during the Battle of Arnhem in September 1944. "The coloured Border cloth shoulder title was taken into wear by the 1st Battalion in 1942. The colours of yellow and green were the facing colours of the 34th and 55th Foot Regiments. All the other battalions continued to wear the white on red title." Unfortunately this example is missing its purple cloth backing, but is easy to replace but that wil be up to the new owner. The title is further in a nicely issued condition with some minor dirt from years of storage i.e slightly handeling. The title is priced accordingly.
A nice set of 2 British and German reproduction wartime maps of the Arnhem area This is a nice set of 2 British and German reproduction wartime maps of the Arnhem area. The set consists of a full colour reprint of a Army Map Service US Army 1944 dated map of part 6 NW Arnhem - 388 Ginkel (size 59x42 cm) as used by the 1st Airborne Division at Arnhem and a German full colour reprint of Sonderausgabe Nr 3 stand 1940 40 West Arnhem.(size 40x52 cm) as produced by the German Army Headquarters. These maps are a ideal tool for a local Battle Field tour or a nice display at your collection or re-enactment event. The maps are coming a nice plastic map.
A nice set of a printed Poland title and a SCARCE plastic Poland cap badge This is a nice an good wartime set of Poland badges. The set excists of a printed British made Poland shoulder title and a British made Poland plastic cap/beret badge. The plastic cap badge is made by the well know firm of Stanly&Sons in Walsall. The tip of the right wing of the Polish eagle has \'melted\' in some stage, but further the plastic badge is in a nice almost mind condition. A good set of Poland badges. Difficult to find these days.
A nice set of badge to the 155th or 157th Infantry Brigade, 52nd (Lowland) Infantry Division This nice set of badges to the KOSB (Kings Own Scottish Borderers) and the 52nd (Lowland) Infantry Division was found last year during a house clearence in the area of Brussels, Belgium and came from a old collection. The KOSB cap badge and the 52nd (Lowland) Infantry Division badge's are period mounted on a piece of original Leslie tartan cloth. The Leslie tartan cloth has some moth damage to the back from years of storage i.e handeling and is further is a nice condition. It's total measuring is 10.0 x 13.5 cm.
A nice set of badges and headgear to a Officer of The King's Own Royal Regiment (Lancaster) This is a neat set to a Officer of the King's Own Royal Regiment (Lancaster) consisting of a set of printed King's Own shoulder titles, a set of red arms-of-service stripes and a 1940 (date letter Q) dated general service cap with a brose Officer's cap badge. The King's Own Royal Regiment (Lancaster) was a line infantry regiment of the British Army. It served under various titles and fought in many wars and conflicts, including both the First and Second World Wars, from 1680 to 1959. In 1959 the regiment was amalgamated with the Border Regiment to form the King's Own Royal Border Regiment which itself was amalgamated, in 2006, with the King's Regiment (Liverpool and Manchester) and the Queen's Lancashire Regiment to form the Duke of Lancaster's Regiment (Kings, Lancashire and Border). This set is in a nice and issued cindition and the general service cap is a perfect almost mint condition.
A nice set of early embroided Commando shoulder titles This is a perfect example of a nice matching set of embroided Commando shoulder titles. Worn in the early stage of forming the Commando units before the use of the numbered shoulder titles. A nice set to add to any collection.
A nice set of early printed Commando shoulder titles This is a perfect example of a nice matching set of printed Commando shoulder titles. Worn in the early stage of forming the Commando units before the use of the numbered shoulder titles. This set has one title that is in a used and removed from uniform condition and they other is in a un-issued condition. A nice and hard to find set.
A nice single embroidered Border Regiment shoulder title This is a good example of a very nice single shoulder title to the Border Regiment. Introduced half way through the war with its typical British 'glue or paste backing'. A nice white on red embroided lettering and in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A nice single from uniform removed Airborne 'Pegasus' Division shoulder formation sign This is a neat example of a single from uniform removed Airborne 'Pegasus' Division shoulder formation sign. First introduced in 1942 and designed by Major E.Seago based on the Greek saga of the winged horse Pegasus and his rider Bellerophon.
A nice single left facing embroided Airborne 'Pegasus' Division shoulder formation sign This is a neat example of a single nicely embroided left facing Airborne 'Pegasus' Division shoulder formation sign. First introduced in 1942 and designed by Major E.Seago based on the Greek saga of the winged horse Pegasus and his rider Bellerophon.
A nice single un-issued Airborne 'Pegasus' Division shoulder formation sign This is a neat example of a single un-issued Airborne 'Pegasus' Division shoulder formation sign. First introduced in 1942 and designed by Major E.Seago based on the Greek saga of the winged horse Pegasus and his rider Bellerophon.
A nice single white on red embroided Dorset Regiment shoulder title This is a need example of a single shoulder title to the Dorset Regiment. In the Second World War, eight hostilities-only battalions were raised. The 1st Battalion was part of 231st Infantry Brigade for the duration of the war, fighting in Malta, Sicily, and Italy. It landed on Gold Beach on D-Day and fought with the Brigade in the Battle of Normandy and North-West Europe. The 2nd Battalion was part of 5th Infantry Brigade throughout the war, participating in the Battle of France and the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940. In 1944, it took part in the Burma Campaign of 1944-1945 and the Battle of Kohima. The 4th and 5th Battalions fought in the liberation of Northwest Europe in 1944-1945. The 30th Battalion was with 43rd Infantry Brigade in North Africa and the invasion of Sicily, after which it spent the rest of the war in Gibraltar. In 1958 the regiment amalgamated with The Devonshire Regiment to form the Devonshire and Dorset Regiment. This title is in a nice un-issued condition.
A nice slightly not matching pair of mid war embroided shoulder titles to the Parachute Regiment This is a neat example of a nice slightly not matching pair of embroided shoulder titles of the Parachute Regiment. It has the the well known glue backing and has a dark blue on light blue lettering, Produced during the 1942/1944 period. A nice set of shoulder titles in a un-issued condition with some glue and paper remands on the back.
A nice standard wartime issued British other ranks collarless shirt This is a good example of a nicely issued British other ranks collarless shirt with short sleeves. Standard they were issued with long sleeves but the orginal owner have shortened the sleeves. All three zink based buttons are present and inside the collar are different stamps and writing i.e measurings and a name. This example is in a perfect issued condition with some minor staining from years of handeling i.e storage.
A nice un-issued and uncut early standard British parachute qualification wing This a fine example of a never seen before un-issued and uncut standard British made early war period parachute qualification wing. The parachute qualification wing was introduced in early 1941 for everyone who had passed the Parachute Training school located at Ringway near Manchester Airport. These wings came in all different shapes and sizes. The parachute qualification wing was issued after the soldier had qualified for them after 8 jumps. 2 from a balloon and 6 from a aircraft. This wing is in a nicely and un-issued condition.
A nice un-issued British made Canadian Calgary Highlanders, 2nd Division shoulder title This is a perfect example of a nicely British made Calgary Highlanders shoulder title. On 6 July 1944, one month after the Normandy landings, the regiment landed in France. In Operation Spring, the Calgary Highlanders were part of the Battle of Verrières Ridge, along with the Black Watch, in which the regiment took heavy casualties. The unit saw extensive action in Normandy, marched through Dieppe with the 2nd Division in September 1944 as liberators, then moved on to the fighting for the Channel Ports. By the end of September the regiment was in Belgium and forced a crossing of the Albert Canal, northeast of Antwerp. The regiment saw extensive fighting in the Netherlands in October 1944, opening the way to South Beveland, and then west to the Walcheren Island Causeway where the brigade fought an extended battle beginning on Hallowe'en night. From November to February 1945 the regiment wintered in the Nijmegen Salient, then was back in action in the Rhineland fighting, clearing the last approaches to the River Rhine itself. Fighting resumed on the far bank in March, and city fighting in Doetinchem and Groningen followed. The regiment ended the war on VE Day on German soil. The shoulder title is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A nice un-issued Canadian made South Saskatchewan Regiment, 2nd Division shoulder title This is a good example of a un-issued Canadian made South Saskatchewan Regiment, 2nd Division shoulder title. The South Saskatchewan Regiment landed on Normandy’s Juno beach on D-day, June 6, 1944. After putting up fierce resistance for two months in Normandy, German forces fell back to defensive positions on their own frontier and in the Low Countries. The Canadians were assigned the job of clearing ports on the English Channel. In doing so, they encountered tenacious German counter-attacks, particularly around the Belgian port of Antwerp. Liberating Antwerp shortened the Allies supply lines; they were almost immediately able to throw themselves against the imposing Sigfried Line and to reach the German industrial heartland along the Rhine. Once the Rhine was reached, the Canadians turned to liberate Holland. At war’s end, the toll of the Saskatchewan dead read 3,880. This single shoulder title is in perfect and un-issued condition.
A nice un-issued early wartime standard British parachute qualification wing This a fine example of a un-issued standard British made early war period parachute qualification wing. The parachute qualification wing was introduced in early 1941 for everyone who had passed the Parachute Training school located at Ringway near Manchester Airport. These wings came in all different shapes and sizes. The parachute qualification wing was issued after the soldier had qualified for them after 8 jumps. 2 from a balloon and 6 from a aircraft. This wing is in a nicely and un-issued condition.
A nice un-issued red on black Commando shoulder title This is a nice example of a red on black Commando shoulder title introduced early 1943 and worn in the early stage of formation of the Commando units before the use of the numbered shoulder titles. This title is in perfect and un-issued condition.
A nice un-issued red on black Commando shoulder title This is a nice example of a red on black Commando shoulder title introduced early 1943 and worn in the early stage of formation of the Commando units before the use of the numbered shoulder titles. This title is in perfect and un-issued condition.
A nice un-issued red on black Commando shoulder title This is a nice example of a red on black Commando shoulder title introduced early 1943 and worn in the early stage of formation of the Commando units before the use of the numbered shoulder titles. This title is in perfect and un-issued condition.
A nice un-issued set of full-worded block type lettering RAMC (Royal Army Medical Corps) shoulder titles This is a great set of full-worded block type lettering RAMC (Royal Army Medical Corps) shoulder titles. These early wartime full-worded titles were also issued to the Airborne Medical units like the 133 Parachute Field Ambulance and the 181 Airlanding Field Ambulance. This set has a white block type lettering on a maroon back ground with a black gauze backing. These full-worded titels are harder to find these days.
A nice used Airborne Forces \'Pegasus\' Divisional shoulder patch This is a fine example of a wartime printed Pegasus shoulder patch. This type whas introduced half way through the war and came in sets of two (a left and right). The badge is in a nice used condition. Difficult to find.
A nice wartime British Airborne \'Light Bulp\' qualification badge This is a neat example of a used \'Light Bulp\' qualification badge who was given to members of the Airlanding Regiments and supporting units who were flown in by glider and had not done the regular Parachute course which were earning them the Parachute wing. Instead of the 7 jump require for the Parachute wing they did 5 jumps to earn them the \'Light Bulp\'. The were wearing the light bulp on there lower right sleeve. This one has a sort of cheese cloth backing and is in a nicely used and removed from uniform condition.
A nice wartime British made Belgium Free forces ramping lion beret badge This is a good example of a wartime British made Belgium Free forces ramping lion beret badge. In 1940, Belgian pre-war émigrés and former soldiers who had escaped occupied Belgium were formed into units within the British military which later fought in the European and Mediterranean Theatres. These included an infantry formation, which later became the Brigade Piron, as well as Commando and paratroop units. Belgians also served in the Royal Air Force and Royal Navy, serving in Belgian-only units as well as in majority-British units. Significant numbers of soldiers from the Belgian Congo fought on the Allied side against the Italians in East Africa. After the liberation of Belgium in September 1944, the Free Belgian forces formed the foundations of the new Belgian army. This badge is in a nice issued condition and comes with it's original cutter pin.
A nice wartime British made The Blackwatch of Canada shoulder title This is a good example of a nice wartime British made shoulder title to The Blackwatch ( Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada. This unit was part of the 2nd Infantry Division and is well known for their actions in Normandy and Holland. This title is in a nice and overal good condition.
A nice white metal Canadian made The Governor General's Horse Guards cap badge This is a good example of a nice almost un-issued Canadian The Governor General's Horse Guards cap badge. The Governor General's Body Guard for Ontario mobilized for active service on 10 April 1885 and served in the Alberta Column of the North West Field Force. The unit was removed from active service on 24 July 1885. Details from the regiment were called out on service on 26 August 1939 and on active service on 1 September 1939 as The Governor General's Horse Guards, CASF (Details), for local protection duties. Those details called out on active service disbanded on 31 December 1940. Subsequently, the regiment mobilized as the 2nd Canadian Motorcycle Regiment, CASF (GGHG) for active service on 24 May 1940. It converted to armour and was redesignated as The Governor General's Horse Guards, CASF on 9 February 1941; as the 3rd Armoured Regiment (The Governor General's Horse Guards), CASF on 11 February 1941; as the 3rd Armoured Reconnaissance Regiment (The Governor General's Horse Guards), CAC, CASF on 1 January 1943; and as the 3rd Armoured Reconnaissance Regiment (The Governor General's Horse Guards), RCAC, CASF on 2 August 1945. It embarked for Britain on 9 October 1941 and landed in Italy on 19 December 1943 as part of the 5th Armoured Brigade, 5th Canadian Armoured Division. On 20 February 1945 the regiment moved with the 1st Canadian Corps to North-West Europe as part of OPERATION GOLDFLAKE, where it continued to fight until the end of the war. The overseas regiment disbanded on 31 January 1946. The cap badge is in a never been cleaned and good condition with it's original cutter pin.
A nice white metal NCO's small Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry beret badge This is a neat example of a nice white metal NCO's small Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry beret badge. The Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry was a light infantry regiment of the British Army that existed from 1881 until 1958, serving in the Second Boer War, World War I and World War II. The 2nd Battalion, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry returned to England in July 1940, after having served in British India and Burma for the last eighteen years. The battalion, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel L.W. Giles, became part of the 31st Independent Brigade Group, serving alongside 1st Battalion, Border Regiment, 2nd Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment and 1st Battalion, Royal Ulster Rifles, all Regular Army battalions, the latter two having also served in British India before the war. In October 1941 the battalion, together with the rest of the 31st Brigade, was re-roled as an airborne, specifically as glider infantry, and the 31st Brigade was redesignated the 1st Airlanding Brigade and became part of the 1st Airborne Division. In mid-1943 it was transferred, along with the 1st Royal Ulster Rifles, to become part of the 6th Airlanding Brigade in 6th Airborne Division. The 2nd Ox and Bucks were due to take part in the invasion of Sicily (Operation Husky); however in April 1943 the battalion was advised that the 1st Airborne and not the 6th Airborne were to be deployed in the landings. As part of Operation Deadstick just before the landings on D-Day on 6 June 1944, D Company commanded by Major John Howard as well as 30 Royal Engineers and men of the Glider Pilot Regiment (a total of 181 men), were to land in six Horsa gliders to capture the vital structure which became known as Pegasus Bridge over the Caen Canal and the bridge over the Orne River which became known as Horsa Bridge and was east of Pegasus. Their capture was intended to secure the eastern flank to prevent German armour from reaching the British 3rd Infantry Division that was due to commence landing on Sword Beach at 07:25hrs. This example is in a perfect and un-issued condition. Difficult to find these days.
A nicely British made matching pair of red on black BELGIUM shoulder title's This is a neat example of a British made set of BELGIUM shoulder title's worn by members No.4 Troop of No.10 Commando and by members of the Belgian war-time Navy. The title's have the block type lettering with the well known 'glue or patse backing'. This set is in a nice and un-issued condition.
A nicely British made red on black BELGIUM shoulder title This is a neat example of a British made, regrettably single, BELGIUM shoulder title worn by members No.4 Troop of No.10 Commando. The title has a serif type lettering with a black gauze backing and is in a nice and un-issued condition.
A nicely embroided and difficult to find 'serif type' Parachute shoulder title in a nicely used condition This is a nice example of a hard to find variation of a early Parachute Regiment shoulder title which is uncommen to find. The embroidery is don with thick threat which is commen by the early embroided shoulder titles. By this example a number, probably number 1, 2, 3, 4 or XXI had been cut off which was commen after the order was given to remove the numbers. The title is in a nicely used condition. A shoulder title to one of the more sougth after units.
A nicely issued and difficult to find emty 1943 dated detonator tin for the British No.36 Mills Grenade This is a perfect example of a difficult to find and always missing from the wooden No.36 Mills grenade crate, emty 1943 dated detonator tin. The tin can that once held 12 detonators for the standard No.36 Mills grenade used by the British army in World War II. It is roughly 5 inches wide, 3.5 inches deep and 3 inches tall. The top label has some scratch marks due to 71 years of use and storage but is clearly 1943 dated. The top is stenciled with yellow 'T' and 'P' (the story goes that TP stands for Target Practice) and the front has a stenceled yellow "5". The bottom of the tin is stamped with the tekst 'V No124 GSW CAN'. I had a few of those tins in the past and all had the same markings as this one. Unfortunately as you can see on the last photo the seam of the tin has come loose. A nice and difficult tin to find and will do great in any British war time collection.
A nicely issued printed 79th Armoured Division formation badge This is a good example of a nicley issued printed formation sign to the 79th Armoured Division. The division was formed as a standard armoured formation, but in March 1943, it was about to be disbanded for lack of resources. Alan Brooke (Chief of the Imperial General Staff), however, foresaw the need for specialised armoured vehicles and offered its command to Major General Sir Percy Hobart. Hobart accepted on the understanding that the 79th would be an operational division, not just a training and development one. After formation in October 1942, the 79th, based at the time mostly in Yorkshire, trained as a regular armoured division for about six months before the change of role. The formation did not operate as a single division: its vehicles were distributed as small units across the Divisions taking part in the landings and subsequent operations. At first, difficulties were encountered in persuading infantry commanders to use the specialised armour to best effect but these were resolved with the appointment of representatives of the GOC to each formation where elements were assigned. The 79th Armoured Division was disbanded on 20 August 1945. The badge is in a nicely issued removed from uniform condition.
A nicely issued so called 'serif type' lettering France national shoulder title This is a perfect example of a British made France national shoulder title as worn by members of the free France forces. This title, with a white so called 'serif type' lettering on a khaki coloured backing is in a overal nice issued condition. Difficult to find.
A nicely one piece medal bar or so called 'ribbon' as intended for the Canadian Volunteer Service Medal I was lucky enough to find recently eight single medal bars or so called 'medal ribbons' for the Canadian Volunteer Service Medal. The Canadian Volunteer Service Medal is granted to persons of any rank in the Naval, Military or Air Forces of Canada who voluntarily served on Active Service and honourably completed eighteen months (540 days) total voluntary service from September 3, 1939 to March 1, 1947. The ribbon is 3.2 cm wide with a royal blue centre flanked by two equal stripes of scarlet and dark green, the dark green being on the edges and having a silver coloured maple leaf at its centre The medal ribbon was issued during the war and the medal after the war. The price is naturally per medal ribbon. This is a nice little medal ribbon you won't see often.
A nicely standard issued printed Airborne arms-of-service strip This is a perfect example of a printed Airborne arms-of-service strip aka a 'Airborne balkje'. These strips were introduced at the end of 1942 and were in use by a mix of Parachute and Glider trained soldiers of the 1st, 6th and the Canadian Airborne Troops till the end of 1944. There is a variation of types and makers of these Airborne strips. These Airborne strips are getting harder to find. This one is in a used condition as you can see with a small 'bite' from its lower part. This example is coming from a old collection from the Dutch province of Zeeland. There could be a connection with the Battle of Arnhem and a Horsa Glider of the 7th Battalion, The King's Own Scottish Borderers who crashed landed at the Island of Schouwen Duiveland but I'am not sure.
A nicely un-issued and difficult to find printed Reconnaissance shoulder title This is a neat example of a issued and difficult to find printed Reconnaissance shoulder title. The Reconnaissance Corps or simply Recce Corps was a short-lived elite corps of the British Army whose units provided the mobile spearhead of infantry divisions from the Far East to Europe during the Second World War. It was formed from Infantry Brigade Reconnaissance Groups on 14 January 1941. All the Brigade reconnaissance groups of each infantry Corps were formed into reconnaissance battalions, each usually bearing the number of its relevant Division. Initially, coming from infantry units, reconnaissance units used the infantry designations of battalions, companies and platoons. However from June 1942 the Corps changed to the cavalry descriptions of regiments, squadrons and troops. It became part of the Royal Armoured Corps in 1944, still maintaining its own cap badge with two lightning strikes supporting an upright spear. With the end of the war, this number of reconnaissance units was not needed and the Corps was disbanded in August 1946. Reconnaissance duties reverted to Regular armoured units of the Royal Armoured Corps. The title is in a good un-issued condition with a minor pin hole above the middle A.
A nicely un-issued and unkown type of a embroided Airborne strip This is e perfect example of a unknown type to me of a embroided Airborne arms-of-service strip aka a 'Airborne balkje'. These strips were introduced at the end of 1942 and were in use by a mix of Parachute and Glider trained soldiers of the 1st, 6th and the Canadian Airborne Troops till the end of 1944. There is a variation of types and makers of these Airborne strips. This one has a thick lettering and a sort of black 'cheese cloth' backing. These Airborne strips are getting harder to find. This one measuring 9.5x4.0 cm in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A nicely un-issued Canadian wartime dressing/hair comb I was lucky enough to find recently eigth un-issued Canadian wartime made dressing/hair combs in their original box. These Canadian dressing/hair combs were part of a soldiers personal kit and were hold in the soldiers holdall with the rest of personal toiletries. The price is naturally for one hair comb
A nicely un-issued printed 79th Armoured Division formation badge This is a good example of a nicley un-issued printed formation sign to the 79th Armoured Division. The division was formed as a standard armoured formation, but in March 1943, it was about to be disbanded for lack of resources. Alan Brooke (Chief of the Imperial General Staff), however, foresaw the need for specialised armoured vehicles and offered its command to Major General Sir Percy Hobart. Hobart accepted on the understanding that the 79th would be an operational division, not just a training and development one. After formation in October 1942, the 79th, based at the time mostly in Yorkshire, trained as a regular armoured division for about six months before the change of role. The formation did not operate as a single division: its vehicles were distributed as small units across the Divisions taking part in the landings and subsequent operations. At first, difficulties were encountered in persuading infantry commanders to use the specialised armour to best effect but these were resolved with the appointment of representatives of the GOC to each formation where elements were assigned. The 79th Armoured Division was disbanded on 20 August 1945. The badge is in a nicely un-issued condition.
A nicely un-issued set of embroided Airborne strips This is e perfect example of a never seen before set of embroided Airborne arms-of-service strips aka a 'Airborne balkje'. These strips were introduced at the end of 1942 and were in use by a mix of Parachute and Glider trained soldiers of the 1st, 6th and the Canadian Airborne Troops till the end of 1944. There is a variation of types and makers of these Airborne strips. This set has a fine lettering and has the well known 'glue or paste' backing.. These Airborne strips are getting harder to find. This one is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A nicely un-issued so called 'block type' lettering France national shoulder title This is a perfect example of a British made France national shoulder title as worn by members of the Free France forces. This title, with a yellow on black so called 'block type' lettering is in a overal nice issued condition. Difficult to find.
A nicely used and issued and not so often seen early post war 1st Belgian Special Air Service Parachute Regiment shoulder patch for NCO's (non-commissioned officer). This is a perfect example of not so often seen and sought after very early post war 1st Belgian Special Air Service Parachute Regiment shoulder patch for NCO's (non-commissioned officer). This Belgian made shoulder patch, measures approximately 5.0 by 3.0 cm and depict a white SAS winged dagger on a khaki backing, whas introduced by the Belgian Army at the begining of 1946. The commanding officer, Major E.Blondeel, a Belgian war time vetran, dis liked the shoulder badge and whas withdrawn from the uniform at the end of that year. A nice little Special Forces badge that whas in service just over 11 months and will do great in any Special Air Service collection.
A nicely used and issued and not so often seen early post war 1st Belgian Special Air Service Parachute Regiment shoulder patch for Officers in gold bullion This is a nicely made example of not so often seen and sought after very early post war 1st Belgian Special Air Service Parachute Regiment shoulder patch for Officers made in gold bullion aka 'goud draad geborduurd'. This Belgian made shoulder patch, measures approximately 4.8 by 3.0 cm and depict a white SAS winged dagger in gold bullion on a green molton wool backing, whas introduced by the Belgian Army at the begining of 1946. The commanding officer, Major E.Blondeel, a Belgian war time vetran, dis liked the shoulder badge and whas withdrawn from the uniform at the end of that year. A nice little Special Forces badge that whas in service just over 11 months and will do great in any Special Air Service collection.
A nicely used British/Canadian standard issue CIGARETTES pocket tin This is a nice example of a standard issued British/Canadian Cigarettes pocket tin. These standard issued Cigarettes tins came in different sizes and layouts. This tin is in a nice and used condition and still has got some remnants of tape/paint. The tin is MB marked which stands for MetalBox and the number stands for the factory. A nice and diffucult tin to find these days.
A nicely used British/Canadian standard issue CIGARETTES pocket tin This is a nice example of a standard issued British/Canadian Cigarettes pocket tin. These standard issued Cigarettes tins came in different sizes and layouts. The tin is MB marked which stands for MetalBox and the number stands for the factory. Beside some small paint drops on the lid this tin is a perfect issued condition. A nice and diffucult tin to find these days.
A nicely used British/Canadian standard issue Tea Ration pocket tin This is a nice example of a standard issued British/Canadian Tea Ration pocket tin. These standard issued Tea Ration tins came in different sizes and layouts. The tin is MB marked which stands for MetalBox and the number stands for the factory. Beside some small paint drops on the lid this tin is a perfect issued condition. A nice and diffucult tin to find these days.
A nicely used British/Canadian standard issued 'THE GREYS silk cut' for 38 cigarettes 1943 dated pocket tin This is a good example of a scarce and difficult to find nicely used British/Canadian standard issued 'THE GREYS silk cut' for 38 cigarettes 1943 dated pocket tin. These standard issued cigarettes tins came in different sizes and layouts. This tin is in a nice and used condition and still has got some remnants of tape/paint. The tin is maker marked G.P. Ltd. and dated 2/43. A nice and diffucult tin to find these days.
A nicely used mid war period embroided shoulder titles to the Parachute Regiment This is a neat example of a single embroided shoulder title of the Parachute Regiment. It has the the well known glue backing and has a dark blue on light blue lettering, Produced during the 1942/1944 period. A nice single shoulder title in a issued and removed from uniform condition.
A not so often seen printed white of red Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry shoulder title This is a nicely and issued printed shoulder title to the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. The 2nd Battalion is famous for their actions during the coup-de-main at Pegasus Bridge in Normandy In June 1944. The title is in a good issued and removed from uniform condition.
A not so often seen set of white of red Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry shoulder titles This is a good example of a very nice and slightly mismatching pair of shoulder titles to Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. Introduced half way through the war with its typical british 'glue or paste backing'. A nice white on red embroided set of shoulder titles in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A orginal so called 'green diablo' shoulderflash 31st Armoured Bgde 79th Armoured Division This is a good example of a orginal so called 'green diablo' shoulderflash to the 31st Armoured Brigade, 79th Armoured Division. During the NW Europe Campaign: 16 June 1944 to 31 August 1945 the brigade was equipped with special vehicles and assigned to the 79th Armoured Division. This badge is in neat removed from uniform condition. Difficult to find these days.
A original American 'press-release' so called 'sound photograph' depicting British Commando Troops during Operation Archery This a a good example of a American released and issued 'press-release' so called 'sound photograph' depicting British Commando Troops during Operation Archery. Operation Archery, also known as the Måløy Raid, was a British Combined Operations raid during World War II against German positions on the island of Vågsøy, Norway, on 27 December 1941. The raid was conducted by British Commandos of No. 3 Commando, two troops of No.2 Commando, a medical detachment of No.4 Commando, a demolition party from 101 Troop (canoe) of No. 6 Commando and a dozen Norwegians from Norwegian Independent Company 1. The action was supported by Royal Navy gunfire, led by the light cruiser HMS Kenya, with the destroyers HMS Onslow, Oribi, Offa and Chiddingfold. The submarine HMS Tuna was in support as the force navigational check. For troop transport the Prince Charles and Prince Leopold were used. Also in support were Royal Air Force bombers and fighter-bombers. This large-sized picture - it measures 19.5 x 13.5 cms - is neatly printed in a black and white on a semy glossy paper and has no typed press information on the back, instead it has some information in Spanish I presume written on the back.
A pair of RARE and difficult to find SOE (Special Operations Executive) jumping goggles Addional pictures
A pair of RARE and difficult to find SOE (Special Operations Executive) jumping goggles I was very lucky enought to find at a Belgium militaria fair last weekend two sets of the RARE and difficult to find SOE (Special Operations Executive) jumping goggles. These goggles were part of the standard issued jumping suit aka the 'striptease suit' for the SOE secret agents who had to jump in to occupied Europe to assist the local resistance groups. These goggles are always missing when you find a jumping suit or helmet. These goggles ar still brittle today. These two pairs are in a perfect condition considering there age with some minor dust i.e damage of years of storage. A hard and difficult to find SOE item today. Hard to upgrade.
A perfect an un-issued set of printed Royal Corps of Signals shoulder titles This a perfect example of a un-issued set of printed Royal Corps of Signals shoulder titles. The Royal Corps of Signals (often simply known as the Royal Signals - abbreviated to R SIGNALS) is one of the combat support arms of the British Army. Signals units are among the first into action, providing the battlefield communications and information systems essential to all operations. Royal Signals units provide the full telecommunications infrastructure for the Army wherever they operate in the world. The set is in a perfect condtion and hard to upgrade
A perfect and difficult to find printed 'Land Forces Adriatic' sleeve badge This is a neat example of a nice and difficult to find printed probably so called 'local made' 'Land Forces Adriatic' sleeve badge. The force was formed in the summer of 1944 at Bari in Italy and comprised elements of the Long Range Desert Group, SBS, No. 40 Commando, No. 43 Commando (2nd Special Service brigade), No. 1 (Parachute) Company of the RAF Iraqi Levies, No. 2809 Squadron RAF Regiment, the Greek Sacred Squadron and others. It was primarily concerned with assisting Marshal Tito's resistance forces in the area, operating from Greece to Yugoslavia. It was disbanded in June of 1945. The unit badge featured a swimming Pegasus, and was worn in pairs on both upper arms with a blue and black backing with the snout facing forwards. A nice and scarce badge to find.
A perfect and issued example of a SOE (Special Operations Executive) developed Battery Charger No.2 i.e hand generator This is a neat example of difficult to find and rarely seen SOE (Special Operations Executive) developed Battery Charger No.2.aka a hand generator. These battery chargers were dropped together with the B2 suit case radio and were used to charge the batterys of other spy radio's as well. This example is in a nicely used condition but unfortunately it is missing a small metal plate on the side but that would be easy to replicate. At some time the previous owner had replaced the original wooden handle with a piece of rubber tube, probably after it has broken down. There is also a small crack in the bakelite piece on top of the charger. This example has a 4673 serial number and whas made by the Hoover Company and has also its clamp down bars, which are missing most of the time. A perfect item to add to your SOE collection. Due to the heavy weight its possible for customers in Europe to had it collect on a major militaria fair.
A perfect and rare set of printed British War Correspondent shoulder titles i.e slip-ons This a perfect example of rare and sought after set of printed British War Correspondent shoulder titles i.e shoulder slip-on. A war correspondent is a journalist who covers stories firsthand from a war zone. They were also called special correspondents in the 19th century. Their jobs require war correspondents to deliberately go to the most conflict-ridden parts of the world. Once there they attempt to get close enough to the action to provide written accounts, photos, or film footage. Thus, being a war correspondent is often considered the most dangerous form of journalism. On the other hand, war coverage is also one of the most successful branches of journalism. This set is in a nice slightly issued condition. Difficult to find these days.
A perfect and scrace example of a carrying case with five white rayon based identification panels as used by the British Airborne Pathfinder units I was lucky enough to find a nice example of a carrying case with five white identification panels as used by the British wartime Airborne Pathfinder units. These identification panels were used by the British Pathfinder units, like the XXIst Independent Parachute Company during the Battle of Arnhem, who were dropped in just before de big Airborne armade had to land, to mark the various LZ's (Landing Zone's) and DZ's(Dropping Zone's) see the last photograph. These five white 'silk like' rayon based (rayon is a artificial silk like material, a precursor of nylon) identification panels are still bound together with a small piece of rope and comes in a khaki coloured sort of webbing material based carrying case. Each of these five identification panels are measuring approximately 4.60m by 0.90m and are all five including the carrying case 1945 dated and were fabricated by H&S (Hampton and Sons) Ltd. Each of these five identification panels has eight metal based pens ie. tent pegs (still bound together in a piece of wax paper) attached by a piece of, what looks like parachute rigger lines, to be secured to the ground of the various LZ's and DZ's. The whole set (carrying case, with its original storage label attached and panels) are in a perfect and un-issued condition exept from some minimal staining and 'dirt' simply caused by years of storage and/or moderate wear. This set is a great addition to any Special Forces collection and would be a great 'eye catcher' at any British Airborne static display at a re-enactment event. A excellent book about the 21st Independent Parachute Company during their 1942-1946 history had been published since 2008 by Peter Gijbels and David Truesdale called "Leading the way to Arnhem" published by R.N.Sigmond Publishing
A perfect and slightly used example of a RARE and sought after Kangol Wear Limited 1947 dated Red Beret This is a perfect and slightly used example of one of the worlds most distinctive Airborne headdress, a RARE and sought after Kangol Wear Limited 1947 dated Red Beret. Worn by all men who had completed a parachute or a glider course and were a member of the British Airborne Forces or the Special Air Service. This distinctive head dress was officially introduced on the 29th July 1942 by the ACI (Army Council Instruction1596), at the direction of General Frederick Browning, commander of the British 1st Airborne Division. The colour of the beret was reportedly chosen by his wife, the novelist Daphne du Maurier. It was first worn by the men of the Parachute Regiment in action in North Africa during November 1942 nicknamed them Die Röte Teufeln. Although maroon, the beret of the British Parachute Regiment is often known as the "red beret." This example had a letter E stamped inside above the WD (War Department) stamp saying its a date letter for 1947. With a size of 7 its a good and sought after size beret. The beret has a small moth hole which is not uncommon after 63 years. The beret is in a very nice and used condition. Very hard to find these days. A perfect book has been published at the end of last year by Military Mode's about British Airborne Headdress by Daniel Fischer and Oliver Lock
A perfect and un-issued example of a plastic cap badge to The Parachute Regiment This is a perfect example of a un-issued plastic (aka bakelite) cap badge to The Parachute Regiment. Plastic cap badges were first introduced into the British Army during 1941 as a result of metal shortages caused by the prioritised demands of industrialised war production. The wearing of plastic badges proved very unpopular with British Army personnel. These plastic Parachute Regiment cap badge's are difficult to find these days. This one is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A perfect and un-issued example of a plastic cap badge to The Parachute Regiment This is a perfect example of a un-issued plastic (aka bakelite) cap badge to The Parachute Regiment. Plastic cap badges were first introduced into the British Army during 1941 as a result of metal shortages caused by the prioritised demands of industrialised war production. The wearing of plastic badges proved very unpopular with British Army personel. These plastic Parachute Regiment cap badge's are difficult to find these days. This one is in a perfect and un-issued condition and has never been cleaned.
A perfect British made Canadian Fort Garry Horse embroided shoulder title This is a neat example of a so called textbook British made Canadian embroided shoulder title to the Fort Garry Horse. The regiment mobilized The Fort Garry Horse, CASF, on 1 September 1939. It was redesignated as the 10th Armoured Regiment (The Fort Garry Horse), CASF, on 11 February 1941, the 10th Armoured Regiment (The Fort Garry Horse), CAC, CASF, on 15 October 1943 and the 10th Armoured Regiment (The Fort Garry Horse), RCAC, CASF, on 2 August 1945. The regiment embarked for Britain in November 1941. The regiment landed in Normandy on 6 June 1944, as a part of the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade, in support of the 8th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Infantry Division, and fought in North-West Europe until the end of the war. The overseas regiment was disbanded on 31 January 1946. This example is in e perfect and un-issued condition. Difficult to find these days.
A perfect example of a ULTRA RARE and sought after Intelligence School number 9 formation sign I was realy lucky to find two examples ( I kept one for my own collection) of this ULTRA RARE and sought after Intelligence School number 9 formation sign. Intelligence School number 9 was established in early 1942 as the executive branch of MI-9. Its job was to assist British and Commonwealth Service Personnel to evade capture when behind enemy lines and to assist Prisoners of War to escape. Intelligence School number 9 was attached to SHAEF and was a combined British-American Unit. 80 men strong in all ranks. It has been told that the Airborne Museum in Oosterbeek has one in their collection on display. A nice little addition to any escape and special forces collection.
A perfect example of a British made NCO's (non-commissioned officer) i.e. Officers Czechoslovakian Free Forces cap badge This is a neat example of a British made NCO's (non-commissioned officer) i.e. Officers Czechoslovakian Free Forces cap badge. Czechoslovak exile units saw action on most of the major fronts of WW2 and generally performed very well. They earned the respect and admiration of other Allied nations and units and their sacrifices were crowned when they could return home to a free Czechoslovakia in 1945, though now as part of the Soviet bloc in Europe. This badge is in a, beside of missing one pin, in a perfect condition.
A perfect example of a difficult to find full matching set of issued printed Royal Ulster Rifles shoulder titles This is a neat example of a difficult to find full matching set of issued and removed from uniform printed Royal Ulster Rifles shoulder titles. The Royal Ulster Rifles (formerly Royal Irish Rifles) was a British Army infantry regiment. It saw service in the Second Boer War, Great War, the Second World War and the Korean War, before being amalgamated into the Royal Irish Rangers in 1968. When war was declared the 1st Battalion was serving in India, with 31 Infantry Brigade Group, which was trained in mountain warfare. When the brigade returned to the United Kingdom, it was decided that, with its light scale of equipment, the brigade could be converted into a glider-borne unit. Renamed 1st Airlanding Brigade, part of 1st Airborne Division but later transferred to 6th Airborne Division as part of 6th Airlanding Brigade). Carried in Horsa gliders, the battalion took part in Operation Mallard during the D-Day landings in 1944 and Operation Varsity, the airborne element of Operation PLUNDER, the crossing of the Rhine in March 1945. The 2nd Battalion was part of the 9th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division with the British Expeditionary Force and took part in the Dunkirk campaign. The battalion returned to Europe for the D-Day landings in 1944 and fought right through to VE-Day. The Royal Ulster Rifles had the unique distinction of being the only British infantry regiment to have both of its regular battalions involved in the Normandy landings. Riflemen of the Royal Ulster Rifles, 6 Airlanding Brigade, aboard a jeep and trailer, driving off Landing Zone N past a crashed Airspeed Horsa glider on the evening of 6 June. In 1947 the Rifles were grouped with the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers and Royal Irish Fusiliers into the North Irish Brigade. This set of difficult to find shoulder titles are in a perfect and issued condition. Hard to find these days.
A perfect example of a issued British Army Flying qualification wing aka a 'Glider Pilot wing' This is a neat example of a issued flat type British Army Flying qualification wing also known as 'Glider Pilot wing'. The wing was introduced in late 1942 for Staff Sergeant, first class pilots and Officer pilots. The wing has a large light blue wing on either side of a royal crest on black background. There are some variations known on a khaki background and in bullion. This example is a big flat type and measured 12.5 cm across and is further in a perfect and issued condition. A wing that is difficult and harder to get these days. A nice little British airborne badge.
A perfect example of a late '40 early '50 issued and padded Special Air Service wing This is a neat example of a late '40 early '50 issued Special Air Service wing. This type of wing has been probably worn during the conflicts in Oman and Borneo during the '50 and '60 were the Special Air Service was involved. This padded wing is in a perfect and issued condition except from some paper remainings from a old scrap book. A type of wing that is not easy to find these days.
A perfect example of a mint and un-issued Glider Pilot Regiment shoulder title I was lucky enough to find recently four un-issued Glider Pilot Regiment embroided shoulder titles. Introduced half way through the war with its typical British 'glue or paste' backing. A nice dark blue on light blue lettering and in a perfect and un-issued condition. The price is naturaly for one Glider Pilot Regiment shoulder title.
A perfect example of a nice un-issued Indian Parachute qualification wing This is a neat example of a Iocal/Indian made Parachute qualification wing. The first Indian airborne formation was the 50 Independent Parachute Brigade raised on 29 October 1941 with 151 British, 152 Indian, and 153 Gurkha Parachute Battalions and other support units. Later, in March 1944, less the British battalion (which was transferred to Britain and renamed the 156th Para Bn and formed part of the 4th Parachute Brigade of the 1st Airborne Division), the brigade, less 154 Gurkha Para Bn, saw extensive action at Sangshak and later in the Imphal Plains on the Burmese border against two reinforced Japanese divisions. 154 Gurkha Para Bn, had not completed its air training, stayed back to attain the airborne status. Despite the performance, the Indian Parachute Regiment was disbanded in late 1945 as part of the reduction and restructuring of the postwar British Indian Army. This wing itself is in a nicely un-issued condition and is hard to find these days.
A perfect example of a nicely issued and removed from uniform Indian Parachute qualification wing This is a neat example of a Iocal/Indian made Parachute qualification wing. The first Indian airborne formation was the 50 Independent Parachute Brigade raised on 29 October 1941 with 151 British, 152 Indian, and 153 Gurkha Parachute Battalions and other support units. Lt (later Col Retd) AG Rangaraj, MVC of the Indian Medical Service and RMO of the 152 Indian Para Bn, became the first Indian along with Hav Maj Mathura Singh to make a parachute descent. In 1942-43, the formation saw limited action at Nara against the Pathan tribals in NWFP and some intelligence-gathering missions in Burma, utilizing their somewhat-limited airborne capabilities. Later, in March 1944, less the British battalion (which was transferred to Britain and renamed the 156th Para Bn and formed part of the 4th Parachute Brigade of the 1st Airborne Division), the brigade, less 154 Gurkha Para Bn, saw extensive action at Sangshak and later in the Imphal Plains on the Burmese border against two reinforced Japanese divisions. 154 Gurkha Para Bn, had not completed its air training, stayed back to attain the airborne status. The Indian Parachute Regiment was established on March 1, 1945, as the regiment to which its Indian and Gurkha parachute battalions would belong. 152nd Indian Parachute Bn was split to form the 1st Parachute Bn consisting of Hindu troops and the Muslims troops forming the 4th Para Bn, while 153rd and 154th Gurkha Para Bns being renamed the 2nd and 3rd Bns respectively. Four independent parachute companies were also raised to complete the regiment, one each as a defence company for the divisional HQ and the brigade HQs and named thus. The regiment's first airborne action was towards the end of the Second World War, when a reinforced Gurkha Parachute Bn was parachuted into Burma at Elephant Point on May 1, 1945, as part of Operation Dracula. The Bn performed well earning the respect of all, including the critics of airborne warfare. Despite the performance, the Indian Parachute Regiment was disbanded in late 1945 as part of the reduction and restructuring of the postwar British Indian Army. This wing itself is in a nicwly used condition od is hard to find these days.
A perfect example of a nicely worn and issued AMICO marked United States Navy/Marines Aviator wing This is a neat example of a nicely worn and issued AMICO marked United States Navy/Marines Aviator wing. These heavy cast wings were intend to wear on the uniform instead on the shirt because of the weight. This wing is measure 7.0 by 4.3 cm and is nicely AMICO sterling and 1/20 10k marked. AMICO is one of the many makers of these wings.
A perfect example of a nicely worn and issued sterling marked United States Army Air Force Pilot wing This is a neat example of a so called 'light weight' United States Army Air Force Pilot wing. These 'light weight' Pilot wings were intend to wear on the shirt instead of the uniform. These wings came in different sizes and variations. This one is voided of any maker marks but is only marked sterling. Sterling silver is an alloy of silver containing 92.5% by mass of silver and 7.5% by mass of other metals, usually copper. The sterling silver standard has a minimum millesimal fineness of 925.
A perfect example of a probably local made, OR (other ranks) Czechoslovakian Free Forces cap badge This is a neat example of a probably local made, thin sheet metal based, Czechoslovakian Free Forces cap badge. Czechoslovak exile units saw action on most of the major fronts of WW2 and generally performed very well. They earned the respect and admiration of other Allied nations and units and their sacrifices were crowned when they could return home to a free Czechoslovakia in 1945, though now as part of the Soviet bloc in Europe. This badge is in a, with all four pins present, in a perfect condition.
A perfect example of a single Great War period 9L (9th Queen's Royal Lancers) slip-on shoulder title This is a neat example of a single Great War period 9L (9th Queen's Royal Lancers) slip-on shoulder title. This slip-on has a white embroided 9L (9th Queen's Royal Lancers) on a khaki coloured felt based slip-on with a hessian based backing. Although engaged in combat for the whole of the war the Lancers only operated as a cavalry unit during 1914. This was due to the widespread use of machine guns and shelling and also the advent of the tank. For the remainder of the war they operated as infantry in the trenches. This slip-on is a perfect un-issued condition with only some minor moth nips to the left upper corner.
A perfect example of a ULTRA RARE and sought after Intelligence School number 9 formation sign I was realy lucky to find a nice example of this ULTRA RARE and sought after Intelligence School number 9 formation sign. Intelligence School number 9 was established in early 1942 as the executive branch of MI-9. Its job was to assist British and Commonwealth Service Personnel to evade capture when behind enemy lines and to assist Prisoners of War to escape. Intelligence School number 9 was attached to SHAEF and was a combined British-American Unit. 80 men strong in all ranks. It has been told that the Airborne Museum in Oosterbeek has one in their collection on display. A nice little addition to any escape and special forces collection. This example for sale is to be found in Evasion & Escape Devices by MI9, MIS-X, SOE in World War Two by Phil Froom published in 2015.
A perfect example of a un-issued British Army Flying qualification wing aka the 'Glider Pilot wing' This is a perfect example of a un-issued flat type British Army Flying qualification wing also known as the 'Glider Pilot wing'. The wing was introduced in late 1942 for Staff Sergeant, first class pilots and Officer pilots. The wing is was a large light blue wing on either side of a royal crest on black background. There are some variations known on a khaki background and in bullion. This example is a big flat type and measured 12.5 cm across and is further in a perfect and un-issued cindition. A wing that is difficult and harder to get these days. A nice little British airborne badge.
A perfect example of a un-issued British Army Flying qualification wing aka the 'Glider Pilot wing' This is a perfect example of a un-issued flat type British Army Flying qualification wing also known as the 'Glider Pilot wing'. The wing was introduced in late 1942 for Staff Sergeant, first class pilots and Officer pilots. The wing is was a large light blue wing on either side of a royal crest on black background. There are some variations known on a khaki background and in bullion. This example is a big flat type and measured 12.5 cm across and is further in a perfect and un-issued cindition. A wing that is difficult and harder to get these days. A nice little British airborne badge.
A perfect example of a un-issued British Army Flying qualification wing aka the 'Glider Pilot wing' This is a perfect example of a un-issued flat type British Army Flying qualification wing also known as the 'Glider Pilot wing'. The wing was introduced in late 1942 for Staff Sergeant, first class pilots and Officer pilots. The wing is was a large light blue wing on either side of a royal crest on black background. There are some variations known on a khaki background and in bullion. This example is a big flat type and measured 12.5 cm across and is further in a perfect and un-issued cindition. A wing that is difficult and harder to get these days. A nice little British airborne badge.
A perfect example of a un-issued Canadian shoulder title to the Les Fusiliers Mont-Royal Regiment This is a nice example of a shoulder title to the Canadian Les Fusiliers Mont-Royal Regiment who was part of the 6th Infantry Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division. The Les Fusiliers Mont-Royal Regiment is one of the oldest surviving units of the Canadian army. The Regiment is best known for having been one of the participants of the ill-planned Dieppe Raid, Les Fusiliers Mont-Royal was put back in shape and later obtained battle honours in seven major engagements in World War II including those in the Northern of Holland. The Latin motto of the regiment is Nunquam retrorsum, which can be roughly translated as \"Never retreat\". The shoulder title is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A perfect issued British made First Allied Airborne Army shoulder patch This is a neat example of a British made First Allied Airborne Army shoulder patch. The First Allied Airborne Army was an Allied formation formed on 2 August 1944 by the order of General Dwight D. Eisenhower, the Supreme Allied Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force. The formation was part of the Allied Expeditionary Force and controlled all Allied airborne forces in Western Europe during 1944 and 1945. These included IX Troop Carrier Command, the XVIII Corps (Airborne), which controlled the 82nd Airborne Division, the 101st Airborne Division, the 17th Airborne Division and a number of independent airborne units, and all British airborne forces including the 1st Airborne Division and the 6th Airborne Division. From the time of its creation until the end of World War II, the formation commanded the Allied airborne forces that participated in the Allied advance through North-West Europe, including Operation Market-Garden in September 1944, repelling the German counter-offensive launched during the Battle of the Bulge between December 1944 and January 1945, and Operation Varsity in March 1945. The formation was then officially deactivated on 20 May 1945, with the British units under its command returning to the United Kingdom and the American units being renamed as First Airborne Army and taking over command of the American Zone of Occupation in Berlin. This patch is in a nicely issued condition except from some minor moth nips.
A perfect issued example of a printed Royal Corps of Signals shoulder title This a perfect example of a issued printed Royal Corps of Signals shoulder title. The Royal Corps of Signals (often simply known as the Royal Signals - abbreviated to R SIGNALS) is one of the combat support arms of the British Army. Signals units are among the first into action, providing the battlefield communications and information systems essential to all operations. Royal Signals units provide the full telecommunications infrastructure for the Army wherever they operate in the world. The single shoulder title is in a perfect and issued condtion.
A perfect local made silver sandcast cap badge to the Sudan Defence Force This is a lovely example of a cap badge to the Sudan Defence Force. The Sudan Defense Force fought during the war on the "Northern Front" during the East African Campaign under the overall command of Lieutenant-General William Platt. In October 1940, three motor machine-gun companies from the Sudan Defence Force were part of Gazelle Force, a mobile reconnaissance and fighting force. In January 1941, during the British and Commonwealth offensive into the AOI, the Sudan Defence Force took part in the successful invasion of Eritrea. During this invasion, the Sudan Defence Force contributed machine gun companies, howitzer batteries, and other forces. The Sudan Defence Force also played an active role during the Western Desert Campaign along the Sudanese border with ASI in North Africa. The SDF was used to supply the Free French and then the Long Range Desert Group garrisons of the former Italian Fort Taj at the Kufra oasis in southeastern Libya. In March 1941, French and Long Range Desert Group forces had wrested control of the fort from the Italians during the Battle of Kufra. The badge is in a perfect and nicely used condition.
A perfect local/sand cast made cap badge to the Royal Air Force Levies This is a perfect example of a not so often seen Royal Air Force Levies cap badge. In 1943 the Force strength stood at; 166 British officers, 22 Assyrian companies, 5 Assyrian/Yizidi companies, 10 Kurdish companies, 4 Gulf Arab companies and 3 Baluchi companies. In addition, 11 Assyrian companies were serving in Palestine and 4 in Cyprus. The Parachute Company was embodied in the Royal Marine Commando and later were used in operations in Albania and Greece. 400 Assyrian joined from Syria, they were used in the specialist’s communication companies. Ex-officer Malik Yacou Ismail also joined as a RAB 200. The name of the force was changed to Royal Air Force Levies. In 1945 it was decided by Air ministry that post war strength should consist of 60 British officers and 1,900 other ranks. It was also decided that the RAF Regiment should take over command of the Levies and Army personnel would gradually be replaced by RAF personnel. Disbandment of companies started to meet the new establishment. This cap badge is in a perfect and slightly issued condition.
A perfect set of Dutch made so called 'Brabant weefsel' 11th Armoured Divisional patches This is a neat set of Dutch made so called 'Brabant weefsel' 11th Armoured Divisional patches. The 11th Armoured Division, known as The Black Bull, was an armoured formation of the British Army which was raised in 1941 during World War II. The 11th Armoured Division was formed in response to the unanticipated success of German panzer divisions. It was responsible for several major victories in Normandy after D-Day, and it participated in the rapid advance across France, Belgium, and the Netherlands and the Rhine crossing. It was disbanded in January 1946 and reformed towards the end of 1950. In 1956, it was converted into the 4th Infantry Division. This set is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A perfect set of printed shoulder titles to the Dorset Regiment This is a need example of a set of printed shoulder titles to the Dorset Regiment. In the Second World War, eight hostilities-only battalions were raised. The 1st Battalion was part of 231st Infantry Brigade for the duration of the war, fighting in Malta, Sicily, and Italy. It landed on Gold Beach on D-Day and fought with the Brigade in the Battle of Normandy and North-West Europe. The 2nd Battalion was part of 5th Infantry Brigade throughout the war, participating in the Battle of France and the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940. In 1944, it took part in the Burma Campaign of 1944-1945 and the Battle of Kohima. The 4th and 5th Battalions fought in the liberation of Northwest Europe in 1944-1945. The 30th Battalion was with 43rd Infantry Brigade in North Africa and the invasion of Sicily, after which it spent the rest of the war in Gibraltar. In 1958 the regiment amalgamated with The Devonshire Regiment to form the Devonshire and Dorset Regiment. This set excist of a single un-issued title and one in a perfect issued en removed from uniform condition.
A perfect singel white on red standard un-issued shoulder title to the Dorset Regiment This is a need example of a single standard issued shoulder title to the Dorset Regiment. In the Second World War, eight hostilities-only battalions were raised. The 1st Battalion was part of 231st Infantry Brigade for the duration of the war, fighting in Malta, Sicily, and Italy. It landed on Gold Beach on D-Day and fought with the Brigade in the Battle of Normandy and North-West Europe. The 2nd Battalion was part of 5th Infantry Brigade throughout the war, participating in the Battle of France and the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940. In 1944, it took part in the Burma Campaign of 1944-1945 and the Battle of Kohima. The 4th and 5th Battalions fought in the liberation of Northwest Europe in 1944-1945. The 30th Battalion was with 43rd Infantry Brigade in North Africa and the invasion of Sicily, after which it spent the rest of the war in Gibraltar. In 1958 the regiment amalgamated with The Devonshire Regiment to form the Devonshire and Dorset Regiment. This example is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
A perfect standard wartime capbadge to the Parachute Regiment This is a neat example of standard wartime Parachute Regiment beret badge. Heavy quality white metal and in a almost un-issued condition. Has never been cleaned.
A perfect standard wartime capbadge to the Parachute Regiment This is a neat example of standard wartime Parachute Regiment beret badge. Heavy quality white metal. In a almost un-issued condition. A nice example
A perfect standard wartime well polished capbadge to the Parachute Regiment This is a neat example of a well polished cap badge to the Parachute Regiment. This all brass capbadge have lost all its nickel plating off its front. To the back it\'s got two replaced loops which looks to me of typical local made. The cap badge is in a further good and used condition.
A perfect un-issued set of British First World War 3H (3rd The King's Own Hussars) slip-on shoulder titles This is a perfect example of a full matching set of Great War period 3H (3rd The King's Own Hussars) slip-on shoulder titles. This set has a white embroided 3H (3rd The King's Own Hussars) on a khaki heavy wool backing. On the outbreak of the First World War, the regiment was stationed at Shorncliffe as part of 4th Cavalry Brigade. On mobilisation, the brigade was assigned to the Cavalry Division of the British Expeditionary Force, and was sent to France. The 4th Brigade was assigned to the 2nd Cavalry Division in October, and the regiment spent the remainder of the war with this unit on the Western Front. They were later deployed to Turkey as part of the British intervention there from November 1921 until 24 August 1923, and then moved to Egypt. This set of 3rd The King's Own Hussars slip-ons is a perfect un-issued condition except form some minor moth nips to the edges.
A perfect un-issued set of British made shoulder titles to the Canadian Hastings & Prince Edward Regiment This is a neat example of a British made set of shoulder titles to the Canadian Hastings & Prince Edward Regiment. The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment, mobilized for active service on 1 September 1939 and was redesignated the 1st Battalion, The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment, on 7 November 1940. The unit embarked for Great Britain on 22 December 1939, and on 13 June 1940 it went to France as part of the Second British Expeditionary Force, reaching a point beyond Laval before being ordered back to the United Kingdom. It landed in Sicily on 10 July 1943, and in Italy on 3 September 1943, as part of the 1st Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Infantry Division. On 10 March 1945, the battalion moved with the 1st Canadian Corps to North West Europe, where it fought until the end of the war. The overseas battalion was disbanded on 15 October 1945. This set with its golden 'serif' type lettering on a dark bleu backing is in a perfect and un-issued condition. Hard to upgrate.
A perfect un-issued set of printed (never seen before) British First World War Suffolk slip-on shoulder titles I was lucky to find a small collection of First World War (aka the Great War) period slip-on shoulder titles. This is a perfect example of a full matching set of Great War period Suffolk ( Suffolk Regiment) slip-on shoulder titles. This set has a white printed( never seen befor) Suffolk (Suffolk Regiment) on a khaki coloured based cloth backing. The Battle of Le Cateau. The value of the 2nd Battalion's 20 years of peacetime training was exemplified at the Battle of Le Cateau on 26 August 1914. In this action the 2nd Battalion undertook a fierce rear-guard defence out-manned and out-gunned by superior numbers of enemy. The 2nd Battalion held their defensive position despite losing their commanding officer, Lt. Col. C.A.H Brett D.S.O., at the commencement of the action and their second in command, Maj. E.C. Doughty, who was severely wounded after six hours of battle as he went forward to take ammunition to the hard-pressed battalion machine gunners. Almost totally decimated as a fighting unit after over eight hours of incessant fighting, the 2nd Battalion was gradually outflanked but would still not surrender. This was despite the fact that the Germans, knowing the 2nd Battalion had no hope of survival, entreated them to surrender, even ordering the German buglers to sound the British Cease Fire and gesticulating for the men of the 2nd to lay down their arms. At length an overwhelming force rushed the 2nd Battalion from the rear, bringing down all resistance and the 2nd's defence of Le Cateau was at an end. Those remaining alive were taken captive by the Germans, spending the next four years as prisoners of war and not returning home until Christmas Day 1918. This set of Suffolk Regiment slip-ons is a perfect un-issued condition
A perfect used British padded Parachute Regiment qualification wing This a good example of a late/just post war padded Parachute Regiment qualification wing. The wing is smaller (6.5 cm by 3.5 cm) then the mid war type parachute wings. It has also a black paper backing. The wing is in a nicely used and removed from uniform condition.
A perfecte example of a Dutch world war two period Philips made green coloured hand generator dynamo light This is a neat example of a Dutch world war two period Philips made green coloured hand generator dynamo light, a so called 'knijpkat' which I found last weekend on a local car boot sale. The so called knijpkat has been designed by Ir. L.J. Kalff with a patent date of January 1942. The hand held dynamo lamp where made by the Phillips Comando in concentration camp Vught the Netherlands. The Phillips comando where higher educated jewish prisoners who used to work for Phillips. The voltage is 2,5 Volt bij 100 mA/0,1A. Enough to let a lamp of 2,5 Volt glow, The lens will let you shine on a small spot. This example is complete and in a perfect slightly issued condition. Difficult to find in this condition.
A rare and difficult to find very early Special IV Service (4 Commando) shoulder title This is a neat example of a rare and difficult to find very early Special IV Service (4 Commando) shoulder title in white thread, separated by the Roman numerals IV in salmon pink thread on a black arc. 4 Commando was formed in 1940 from Southern Command, along with 3 Commando. Its first shoulder title was the SPECIAL IV SERVICE version. This changed in 1941 to 4 Commando. In both cases the numeral was in pink or red. In 1942 there was a final change, this time to No.4 Commando in red on black. In August 1942 three Troops of French Marines were added to the unit, bringing with them insignia unique to them. This led to a number of variations of badge combinations within the unit. No. 4 Commando was a battalion-sized British Army commando unit, formed in 1940 early in the Second World War. Although it was raised to conduct small-scale raids and harass garrisons along the coast of German occupied France, it was mainly employed as a highly trained infantry assault unit. The unit's first operation was the successful raid on the Lofoten Islands in March 1941. The next two planned operations were both cancelled and it was not until 1942 that No. 4 Commando took part in another raid, Operation Abercrombie, a raid on the French coastal town of Hardelot. Later the same year No. 4 was one of three commando units selected for the Dieppe raid. Under the command of Lord Lovat, No. 4 Commando landed on the right flank of the main landings and successfully silenced a German gun battery. This was the only complete success of the operation, which was eventually aborted following heavy losses. As part of the 1st Special Service Brigade, No. 4 Commando took part in the Normandy Landings in June 1944. Finally withdrawn to Britain in September 1944, they were reassigned to the 4th Special Service Brigade for the assault on Walcheren island. At the end of the war No. 4 Commando became part of the occupation force in Germany, but together with all other army commando units were disbanded in 1946.
A RARE and sought after early printed curved Airborne shoulder title I was lucky enought to find at a local fair this neat example of a early and RARE to find uncommon printed curved Airborne shoulder title. These curved Airborne shoulder title were introduced at the beginning of the formation of Airborne Forces and were mainly worn by the units until they were issued with there own shoulder titles. Through out the war these curved (embroided examples) Airborne titles were mainly worn by officers who were not attached to a specific unit. This title is in a overal nice good and un-issued condition with some minor traces of glue to the back from a scrap book. A early British Airborne shoulder title which is hard to find and upgrade. A must have for every British Airborne collector. For more information see the latest book about British Airborne badge called British Airborne Insignia by Oliver Lock.
A RARE and sought after example of a Dutch East Indies School Opleiding Parachutisten metal parachute qualification wing This is a perfect example of a rare and sought after Dutch East Indies metal parachute qualification wing. The parachute wings worn in the Dutch East Indies were conceived in March 1946 by Sergeant Kampschuur after he had won a contest with it. In March 1948 the first parachute wings were actually awarded. The parachute wing was meant to be theworn first on the left breast. Because the Parachute Training School in 1947 was transferred to a cloth parachute wing on the chest as worn by British Indian paratroopers it was decided that the bronze paratroopers wing was to be wearing on the beret instead of the Dutch lion. The eyelets at the bottom of the wing was meant to hold a small bar, star or dagger after a action jump but this was never implemented. The parachute wings were worn from 1948 to 1954. This bronze wing on offering whas on of the first batch of wings that was handed out and is in a perfect, uncleaned and un-issued condtion with a nice patina. A wing that is difficult to hold of these days. More information to find on : http://www.hetdepot.com/ http://youtu.be/H4JuazXxkAY
A rare and sought after Number 10 Commando shoulder title in a red on black block type lettering This is a perfect example of a rare and sought after No.10 Commando shoulder title in a red on black block type lettering with the well known 'glue' backing. No. 10 (Inter-Allied) Commando was a commando unit of the British Army during the Second World War. The first No. 10 Commando was proposed in August 1940, using volunteers from Northern Command, however there was such a poor response that No. 10 Commando was disbanded and the men that had volunteered were posted to other commando units. In early 1942 the commando was raised again, this time as No. 10 (Inter-Allied) Commando. By the end of the war the commando had become the largest commando in the British Army and included volunteers from France, Belgium, Holland, Norway, Denmark, Poland and Yugoslavia. There was another group of volunteers in X Troop which contained enemy aliens, Germans and Austrians who had escaped from Nazi Germany. Men from the No. 10 Commando served in the Mediterranean, Scandinavia, Burma and Western Europe during the Second World War, mostly in small numbers attached to other formations, never as a complete unit. The No. 2 Dutch Troop consisted of 62 men under command of Captain Mulders. The troop formed in June 1942 was always below establishment and never deployed as a complete independent unit. But the men acted as liaison officers, guides and interpreters during operations Market Garden, Infatuate I and II. This rare title is in a perfect and un-issued condition and is coming from my own collection.
A scarce and difficult to find small Horlicks Ration tin This is a perfect example of a difficult to find small Horlicks Ration tin, probably issued in the '20 or '30. The tins is showing some wear but is in a overal good condition. A nice little ration item.
A set of Hereford Light Infantry shoulder titles This is a nice and slightly used matching set of a yellow on black to the Hereford Light Infantry.
A small and sought after BBC (British Broadcast Corporation) staff cap badge also worn by some of the British War Corrspondents during the 2nd World War This is a good example of a small and sought after BBC (British Broadcast Corporation) staff cap badge that was also worn by some of the British War Corrspondents during the 2nd World War. This example is maker marked and was made by the Birmingham based company of N.W.Miller Ltd who had a shop at Branston Street. This example with its original cutter pin present is in a overal nice and slightly used condition. A rare badge to find these days and that you can find back on page 96 of Ink & Images, a book that covering the War Correspondents and War Photographers.
A small and sought after BBC (British Broadcast Corporation) staff cap badge also worn by some of the British War Corrspondents during the 2nd World War This is a good example of a small and sought after BBC (British Broadcast Corporation) staff cap badge that was also worn by some of the British War Corrspondents during the 2nd World War. This example is maker marked and was made by the Birmingham based company of N.W.Miller Ltd who had a shop at Branston Street. This example is in a overal nice and slightly used condition. A rare badge to find these days and that you can find back on page 96 of Ink & Images, a book that covering the War Correspondents and War Photographers.
A standard wartime capbadge to the Parachute Regiment This is a neat example of standard wartime Parachute Regiment beret badge. Heavy quality white metal. One of the lugs has been bend on the back but further in a good and nice condition.
A standard wartime capbadge to the Parachute Regiment This is a neat example of standard wartime Parachute Regiment beret badge. Heavy quality white metal. in a good and nice condition.
A unuassual and early, 17th of August 1941 dated, American press released photograph entiteld 'Britain trains her Parachute Troops' This is a good example of a not so often seen official American press released early war time dated, 17th August 1941, press photgraph dispicting a parachutist floating to earth after he had left a air balloon during a training jump. This fairly large sized offical photograph, 22.5cm x 18cm, is printed in a semy gloss black/white colour. The photograph still retains its original (machine-typed) press information glued to the back. These propaganda-type ‘high-quality’ photos were for example used to illustrate the various magazines and/or newspapers. A simply and nice unsual item!
A unussual early wartime period American press released photograph entitled ' Britain's Paratroops go into action' dated 27th October 1941 This is another example of a photograph of a small lot of orginal American war time press released photographs dispicting British Airborne troops. This example dispicts two paratroopers as they wait to board their transport plane to be part of a mass dropp on the English countryside. This fairly large sized offical photograph, 18cm x 23cm, is printed in a semy gloss black/white colour. The photograph still retains its original (machine-typed) press information glued to back. These propaganda-type ‘high-quality’ photos were for example used to illustrate the various magazines and/or newspapers. A simply and nice unsual item!
A unusual and difficult to find original 'press-release' photograph depicting British Commando Troops of No.6 Commando returning from a raid during 'Operation Bristle' on the France coast on the night of 3/4 June 1942 This is a unusual and difficult to find original war time 'press-release' photograph depicting British Commando Troops of No.6 Commando returning from a raid on the France coast in the night of 3/4 June 1942. Operation Bristle was a British Commando over the night of the 3/4 June 1942 raid during the Second World War. The target of the raid was a German radar site, at Plage-Ste-Cecile between Boulogne and Le Touquet. The raiding force which was provided by No. 6 Commando was defeated by the strong German defences. During the return voyage at around dawn the naval force was attacked by German fighter aircraft which damaged two Motor Launches and one Motor Gun Boat, killing one Commando and two naval personnel and wounding another 19, only the arrival of Royal Air Force preventing further damage and losses. The photograph still retains its original (machine-typed) press information page glued to back. This large-sized picture - it measures 25,5 x 20,5 cms - is neatly printed in a black and white on a semy glossy paper. These propaganda-type ‘high-quality’ photos were for example used to illustrate the various magazines and/or newspapers. This example is glued to a piece of white card board. A simply and nice unsual item!
A unusual and difficult to find original 'press-release' photograph depicting two Free French Commando members welcomed by three local residents of Amfreville This is a unusual and difficult to find original war time 'press-release' photograph depicting two Free French Commando members, most certainly members of No.4 Commando who are being welcomed back by three local residents of Amfreville just north of Ranville. The French commando private is wearing a '37 Pattern Battle Dress blouse and trousers with embroided France (large type) shoulder titles and embroided (probably No.4) Commando and Combined Operations insignia. He is also wearing his Thompson submachine gun 1928 A1 and his issued 2nd type of Fairbairn & Sykes, The photograph still retains its original (machine-typed) press information page glued to back. This large-sized picture - it measures 25,5 x 20,5 cms - is neatly printed in a black and white on a semy glossy paper. These propaganda-type ‘high-quality’ photos were for example used to illustrate the various magazines and/or newspapers. A simply and nice unsual item!
A unusual and difficult to find original American 'press-release' so called 'sound photograph' depicting British Commando Troops during training at the Southern Command Training School This is a good example of a unusual and difficult to find original American issued 'press-release' so called 'sound photograph' depicting British Commando Troops during training at the Southern Command Training School. This, 22-05-1942 early dated could be used by one of the newspapers based in Chicago. The photograph still retains its original (machine-typed) press information page glued to back. This large-sized picture - it measures 21.5 x 17 cms - is neatly printed in a black and white on a semy glossy paper.
A unusual and difficult to find original Arnhem 'press-release' photograph depicting members of one of the Parachute Battalions preparing for the Arnhem jump. This is a neat example of a unusual and difficult to find original Battle of Arnhem 'press-release' photograph depicting members of one of the Parachute Battalions preparing for the Arnhem jump. This, 18 September 1944 dated example could be used by one of the newspapers based in England or America. The photograph still retains its original (machine-typed) press information page glued to back. This large-sized picture - it measures 20.0 x 14.0 cms - is neatly printed in a black and white on a semy glossy paper.
A unusual and difficult to find original early Airborne Forces 'press-release' photograph dispicting young trainees, probably from X-Troop just after landing after a training jump This is a neat example of a unusual and difficult to find original early Airborne Forces 'press-release' photograph dispicting young trainees just after a training jump. These men a probably from the famous X-Troop. Members of X-Troop took part in the first ever Airborne operation named Operation Colossus. The target chosen for the operation was a fresh-water aqueduct near Calitri in southern Italy, which supplied water to a large portion of the Italian population as well as several ports used by the Italian military; it was also hoped that its destruction would hamper Italian military efforts in North Africa and Albania. This small-sized picture - it measures 17.5 x 15.5 cms - is neatly printed in a black and white on a semy glossy paper. This example has a earlt releas date of 30 October 1941. A difficult to find press photographs these days.
A unusual and difficult to find original early Airborne Forces 'press-release' photograph dispicting young trainees, probably from X-Troop waiting for a training jump This is a neat example of a unusual and difficult to find original early Airborne Forces 'press-release' photograph dispicting young trainees waiting for a training jump. These men a probably from the famous X-Troop. Members of X-Troop took part in the first ever Airborne operation named Operation Colossus. The target chosen for the operation was a fresh-water aqueduct near Calitri in southern Italy, which supplied water to a large portion of the Italian population as well as several ports used by the Italian military; it was also hoped that its destruction would hamper Italian military efforts in North Africa and Albania. This small-sized picture - it measures 17.5 x 15.5 cms - is neatly printed in a black and white on a semy glossy paper. This example has a earlt releas date of 30 October 1941. A difficult to find press photographs these days.
A unusual and difficult to find original Operation Varsity 'press-release' photograph This is a neat example of a unusual and difficult to find original Operation Varsity 'press-release' photograph. Operation Varsity (24 March 1945) was a successful airborne forces operation launched by American, British and Canadian troops that took place toward the end of World War II. Involving more than 16,000 paratroopers and several thousand aircraft, it was the largest airborne operation in history to be conducted on a single day and in one location. Part of Operation Plunder, the effort by the British 21st Army Group under Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery to cross the Rhine River and from there enter Northern Germany, Varsity was meant to help the 21st Army Group to secure a foothold across the Rhine River in western Germany by landing two airborne divisions on the eastern bank of the Rhine near the village of Hamminkeln and the town of Wesel. The photograph still retains its original (machine-typed) press information to the back. This large-sized picture - it measures 25.5 x 20x5 cms - is neatly printed in a black and white on a semy glossy paper.
A unusual and difficult to find original partisan related 'press-release' photograph This is a unusual and difficult to find original British war time 'press-release' photograph depicting two Partisan fighters some were in Eastern Europe believe to be Yugoslavia. These two men ar holding their British dropped Thomson M1A1 type machine guns. Unfortunately this example is missing it's original (machine-typed) press information page on the back. Except from the four pin holes in the corners this example is in a nice condition.
A unusual and difficult to find original World War 1 nicely embroided Scots Guards shoulder/epaulette patch This is a fine example of a unusual and difficult to find original World War 1 nicely embroided Scots Guards shoulder/epaulette patch. The shoulder/epaulette patch is embroided on a piece of flannel wool. Scots Guards titles of this type were never issued with reverse fitting straps. They were intended to be stitched directly onto the tunic shoulder/epaulette. During the First World War the Regiment saw heaving fighting all over the battle field including during the First and Third Battle of Ypres. This Scots Guards shoulder/epaulette patch is in a perfect and un-issued condition for it's age. A nice piece of history.
A unusual and difficult to find original Yugoslav partisan related 'press-release' photograph This is a unusual and difficult to find original British war time 'press-release' photograph depicting a RAF (Royal Air Force) supply drop to the Yugoslav partisans commanded by Marshal Tito. The Yugoslav Partisans or the National Liberation Army, officially the National Liberation Army and Partisan Detachments of Yugoslavia, was Europe's most effective anti-Nazi resistance movement, often compared to the Polish resistance movement. The Yugoslav Resistance was led by the Communist Party of Yugoslavia during World War II. Its commander was Marshal Josip Broz Tito. The photograph still retains its original (machine-typed) press information page glued to back. This large-sized picture - it measures 25,5 x 20,5 cms - is neatly printed in a black and white on a semy glossy paper. These propaganda-type ‘high-quality’ photos were for example used to illustrate the various magazines and/or newspapers. A simply and nice unsual item!
A unusual example of a British/USA made No.2 Commando shoulder title This is a unusual example of a never seen before British/USA made No.2 Commando shoulder title. No. 2 Commando was a battalion-sized British Commando unit of the British Army during the Second World War. The No. 2 Commando unit was reformed three times during the Second World War. The original No. 2 Commando, unlike the other commando units, was formed from volunteers from across the United Kingdom and was always intended to be a parachute unit. On 22 June 1940, No. 2 Commando was turned over to parachute duties, and, on 21 November, was re-designated as the 11th Special Air Service (SAS) Battalion and eventually re-designated 1st Parachute Battalion. After their re-designation as the 11th SAS Battalion, a second No. 2 Commando was formed. This No. 2 Commando was the leading commando unit in the St Nazaire Raid and suffered heavy casualties. Those who made it back from St Nazaire rejoined the few who had not gone on the raid, and the Commando was reinforced by the first intake of volunteers from the new Commando Basic Training Centre at Achnacarry. No. 2 Commando then went on to serve in the Mediterranean, Sicily, Yugoslavia, and Albania, before being disbanded in 1946. This example is in a nicely un-issued condition.
A unusual to find original British 'press-release' photograph depicting early British parachute troops in training This is a nice and original 'press-release' photograph depicting early British parachute troops in training . This, undated example could be used by one of the newspapers based in England or America. The photograph still retains its original (machine-typed) press information page glued to back. This large-sized picture - it measures 19.0 x 24.0 cms - is neatly printed in a black and white on a semy glossy paper.
A very early Sten gun magazine bandolier Pattern A and a RARE piece of early British Airborne equipment Additional images...
A very early Sten gun magazine bandolier Pattern A and a RARE piece of early British Airborne equipment Additional images
A very early Sten gun magazine bandolier Pattern A and a RARE piece of early British Airborne equipment This is a neat example of a very RARE and sought after very early Sten gun magazine bandolier Pattern A for seven magazines. This type of bandolier was developed in the early days of British Airborne Forces as part of there equipment. This type of bandolier was also used during Operation Biting, known as the Bruneval Raid. Operation Biting was the code name given to a British Combined Operations raid on a German radar installation at Bruneval in northern France, which took place on the night of 27–28 February 1942 during World War II. On the night of 27 February, after a period of intense training and several delays due to poor weather, a company of airborne troops under the command of Major John Frost parachuted into France a few miles from the installation. The main force then assaulted the villa in which the radar equipment was kept, killing several members of the German garrison and capturing the installation after a brief firefight. An RAF technician with the force dismantled the Würzburg radar array and removed several key pieces, after which the force withdrew to the evacuation beach. The detachment assigned to clear the beach had initially failed to do so, but the German force guarding it was soon eliminated with the help of the main force. The raiding troops were picked up by landing craft, then transferred to several Motor Gun Boats which returned them to Britain. This piece of early British Airborne equipment is in a almost mint and un-issued condition with some minor staining from years of handeling i.e storage. There is also some loose stitching (see photographs) on two of the magazine holders but is not disturbing. A piece of equipment that is hard to upgrade. More photographs on request.
A very nice and issued set of embroided taylor made 'Cherry' type Pegasus arm formation signs This is a very nice and issued set of "Cherry' type Pegasus formation signs. These 'Cherry' type Pegasus signs and Airborne strips, introduced in the early days of Airborne Forces, were mostly taylor made en favorite by the Officers. This set is in a perfect and issued condtion. Hard to find these days.
A very nice and not so often seen example of a Air Despatch arms-of-service strip This is a very nice example of a not so often seen Air Despatch arms-of-service strip. There is very little known about these RASC Air Despatch arms-of-service strips. They were worn below the yellow on blue Dakota patch on each arm. Except from a moth nip above the I this arms-of-service strip is in a nice condition.
A very nice example of a RARE and difficult to find Reconnaissance Corps shoulder title This is a very nice example of a RARE and difficult to find Reconnaissance Corps shoulder title. This title whas introduced in early 1941 during the time of the formation and there is further little known about this rare title. The Reconnaissance Corps, or simply Recce Corps, was a Second World War corps of the British Army whose units provided the mobile spearhead of infantry divisions. It was formed from Infantry Brigade Reconnaissance Groups on 14 January 1941. All the Brigade reconnaissance groups of each infantry Corps were formed into reconnaissance battalions, each usually bearing the number of its relevant Division. For example, the 43rd Battalion, Reconnaissance Corps (based on the 5th Battalion, the Gloucestershire Regiment) was the divisional reconnaissance battalion of the 43rd (Wessex) Infantry Division. Initially, coming from infantry units, reconnaissance units used the infantry designations of battalions, companies and platoons. However, from 6 June 1942, the Corps changed to the cavalry descriptions of regiments, squadrons and troops. It became part of the Royal Armoured Corps in 1944, still maintaining its own cap badge with two lightning strikes supporting an upright spear. With the end of the war, this number of reconnaissance units was not needed and the Corps was disbanded in August 1946. This example is in a fine and un-issued condition and is just the second title I have ever encounterd.
A very nice example of a RARE and difficult to find Reconnaissance Corps shoulder title This is a very nice example of a RARE and difficult to find Reconnaissance Corps shoulder title. This title whas introduced in early 1941 during the time of the formation and there is further little known about this rare title. The Reconnaissance Corps, or simply Recce Corps, was a Second World War corps of the British Army whose units provided the mobile spearhead of infantry divisions. It was formed from Infantry Brigade Reconnaissance Groups on 14 January 1941. All the Brigade reconnaissance groups of each infantry Corps were formed into reconnaissance battalions, each usually bearing the number of its relevant Division. For example, the 43rd Battalion, Reconnaissance Corps (based on the 5th Battalion, the Gloucestershire Regiment) was the divisional reconnaissance battalion of the 43rd (Wessex) Infantry Division. Initially, coming from infantry units, reconnaissance units used the infantry designations of battalions, companies and platoons. However, from 6 June 1942, the Corps changed to the cavalry descriptions of regiments, squadrons and troops. It became part of the Royal Armoured Corps in 1944, still maintaining its own cap badge with two lightning strikes supporting an upright spear. With the end of the war, this number of reconnaissance units was not needed and the Corps was disbanded in August 1946. This example is in a fine and un-issued condition and is just the second title I have ever encounterd.
A very nice un-issued and unfortunately single example of a embroided i.e. taylor made so called 'Cherry' type Pegasus arm formation sign This is a very nice un-issued unfortunately single example of a so called "Cherry' type Pegasus formation signs. These 'Cherry' type Pegasus signs and Airborne strips were introduced in the early days of Airborne Forces and were mostly taylor made and favorite by the Officers. This example is in a perfect and un-issued condtion. Hard to find these days.
A very nice un-issued matching set of a embroided i.e. taylor made so called 'Cherry type' Pegasus arm formation signs This is a very nice example of a difficult to find so called 'Cherry type' Pegasus formation signs. These 'Cherry type' Pegasus signs and Airborne strips were introduced in the early days of Airborne Forces and were mostly taylor made and favorite by the Officers. This matching set is in a perfect and un-issued condtion. Hard to find these days.
A very nice, actually rarely encountered and difficult to find so called 'container boekje' as issued by the SOE (Special Operations Executive) to the Resistance movements in Europe This is a neat example of a RARE and difficult to find of a so called 'container boekje'. These container manuals were issued by the SOE (Special Operations Executive) for the resistance movements in Europe and were packed in some of the dropping containers, not all of them. That's why they are so hard and difficult to find. These manuals were made as a manual for the various sabotage equipment supplied by SOE (Special Operations Executive) for the European resistance movements. The manual consist of six identical chapters in English, Dutch, French, German, Danish and Norwegian and is filled with a large part of illustrations in the back of the manual. This example is in a perfect almost un-issued condition exeot from a very tiny tear to the front page. A manual what will do good in any SOE or Special Forces collection. Accordenly to it's rarity this manual will posted with signed mail.
A wartime issue of the ATC (Air Training Corps) Gazette July 1943 This is a good example of a wartime issue of the ATC (Air Training Corps) Gazette July 1943. This example is in a nice issued condition with 33 pages and measures 18.5 x 25.0 cm.
A wartime Officers knitted tie This is a good example of a wartime issued Officers knitted tie.
British made Belgian Free Forces national cap badge This is a good example of a British made Belgian Free Forces national cap badge worn by members by all Belgian units in the U.K.such as the Brigade Piron and No.4 (Belgian) Troop, No.10 (I.A.) Commando. A nice and unusual item to find. Never been cleaned and in a good condition.
British set of Bedford and Hertford shoulder titles This is a nice set of shouldertitles to the Bedfordshire & Hertfordshire Regiment. Don\'t know exactly which period but I think just postwar. This is a sweet pair in a removed form uniform condition.
British wartime made Infantry/Airborne camo scarf i.e face veil I was lucky to find at a recently militaria fair in Belgium four British made wartime period infantry/airborne camo scarfs i.e face veils. Often used as a scarf, the face veil was intended to be used as a tool to aid personal camouflage. When draped over the head, the man could see out whilst concealing his face, or when tied over his personal equipment it would break up his outline. Issued from 1942 on a limited basis, these were a standard item of equipment for all Airborne troops. Frequently face veils were cut to a more practical width, making them less bulky, and worn fashionably as scarves. This practice was useful in that it also helped to stop the neck from chafing when wearing the abrasive KF shirt, and in warmer temperatures could be moistened with water to keep the neck cool. These four face veils I found are all four in a good and unissued condition. The price is naturaly for one face veil. A piece of personal kid that is difficult to find these days.
British wartime SCARE Plastic (bakelite) South Staffordshire Regiment cap badge This is a perfect example of a mind plastic cap badge to the South Staffordshire Regiment. A hard and diffucult to find cap badge. The badge is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
British/local made Arab Legion head-dress badge This is a neat example of a nicely British/local made head-dress badge to the Arab Legion. During World War II, the Arab Legion took part in the British war effort against pro-Axis forces in the Middle East Theatre. By then the force had grown to 1,600 men. The Legion, part of Iraqforce, contributed significantly in the Anglo-Iraqi War and in the Syria-Lebanon campaign, the two decisive early victories for the Allies. By 1956 the Arab Legion had been transformed into the Jordanian Army but the Army retained much of its British heritage. The traditions of the Arab Legion are maintained to this day by a ceremonial Arab Legion mounted troop.
British/local made \'white metal \'sand cast\' Arab Legion head-dress badge This is a perfect example of a wartime/early post war local made white metal \'sand cast\' Arab Legion head dress badge. During World War II, the Arab Legion took part in the British war effort against pro-Axis forces in the Middle East Theatre. By then the force had grown to 1,600 men. The Legion, part of Iraqforce, contributed significantly in the Anglo-Iraqi War and in the Syria-Lebanon campaign, the two decisive early victories for the Allies. By 1956 the Arab Legion had been transformed into the Jordanian Army but the Army retained much of its British heritage. The traditions of the Arab Legion are maintained to this day by a ceremonial Arab Legion mounted troop. The badge is in a perfect slightly used condtion comes with its full-length, typically shaped pin and functional catch.
Buy, sell, exchange I only deal with original items. Please visit my website regularly or send me an email with your likings or needs. I\'m always looking to exchange or buy British Special Forces, Commando, Airborne uniforms, insignia, equipment and headwear from the WW2 period.
Difficult to find plastic cap badge to the Reconnaissance Corps This is a perfect example of a un-issued plastic cap badge to the Recce Corps. The Reconnaissance Corps or simply Recce Corps was a short-lived elite corps of the British Army whose units provided the mobile spearhead of infantry divisions from the Far East to Europe during the Second World War. It was formed from Infantry Brigade Reconnaissance Groups on 14 January 1941. It became part of the Royal Armoured Corps in 1944, still maintaining its own cap badge with two lightning strikes supporting an upright spear. With the end of the war, this number of reconnaissance units was not needed and the Corps was disbanded in August 1946. This plastic cap badge, made by the well known maker, A.Stanley&Sons Walsall. is in a prefect and un-issued condition. Difficult to find these days.
Difficult to find wartime 'local made' British Parachute qualification wing This is a SCARCE and difficult to find example of a 'local made' British Parachute qualification wing on a dark blue/black background. These 'local made' qualifications wings on a dark blue/black background are usually referred to have been worn by members of the Special Operations Executive in Eastern Europe like the Balkan and to the members of the 151/156 Parachute Battalion who were raised in India in 1941. The wing it self is in a nicley used and removed from uniform condition.
Early wartime British Airborne \'Light Bulp\' qualification badge This is a perfect example of a early and un-issued \'Light Bulp\' qualification badge who was given to members of the Airlanding Regiments and supporting units who were flown in by glider and had not done the regular Parachute course which were earning them the Parachute wing. Instead of the 7 jump require for the Parachute wing they did 5 jumps to earn them the \'Light Bulp\'. The were wearing the light bulp on there lower right sleeve. This one is made on serge in stead of the later one\'s made on felt. This one has a sort of cheese cloth backing. It has some damage on the right side of the parachute from a old rusty staple. But otherwise it is in a nice condition.
Good and SCARCE 'Zones of France' silk escape map, SOE and Airborne related This is a neat example of a scare silk escape map covering France. The scale is 1:2,000,00 and is a second edition and was produced in March 1944. These maps were worn by most of the men landing on D-Day including the British and American Airborne Forces and were also issued to members of the SOE who were dropped in occupied France. The map is in a nice and slightly used condition. A nice and scare map to find these days
Good example of a British Royal Corps of Signals printed shoulder title This is a perfect example of a printed shoulder titel to the Royal Corps of Signals. The title is in a nice and un-issued condition. These title are getting harder to find these days.
Good example of a set of difficult to find shoulder titles to the Rough Riders. This is e neat example of a total matching set of shoulder titles to the Rough Riders. The Rough Riders started out as 283 Light Anti-Aircraft Battery (City of London Yeomanry) TA and became 1st Air-landing Anti-Aircraft battery in 42 what info i have is that 283rd Light Anti-Aircraft Battery RA joined 1st Airborne Division on 03.12.1942 and became 1st Airlanding Light Anti-Aircraft Battery RA till 21.02.1944 when it was dispanded. they did wear the light blue on purple title all through there 2 year time with the Division. 1st A-L LAA Battery did go with 1st Airborne Division to North Africa, but were not deployed in action as such. The Battery was commanded by Major The Earl of Hardwicke, a pre-war TA Rough Rider. HQ 1st Abne Corps decided in early 44 that only one Air-Landing LAA Battery would be retained, and chose the 2nd, which was then part of 6th Abne. The Battery was not actually disbanded, but returned to its original Regiment. From Jan 44 onwards the 2nd A/L LAA Battery became a unit directly under command of HQ 1st British Airborne Corps and could be allocated to either 1st or 6th Airborne Division as required for ops, in much the same was as the Glider Pilot Regiment. It would have deployed to Nijmegen with the Airborne Forward Delivery Airfield Group during Operation "Market-Garden" but in the event AFDAG was never deployed. In March 1945 the Battery was broken up, half going to each Airborne Division to form an additional A/T Battery for each. At least one "Rough Rider" did serve during the Battle of Arnhem. Captain Graham Chatfield-Roberts, TD, Urquhart's ADC, was a Rough Rider and came originally from the 1st A/L LAA Battery. He remained in the TA post-war, was promoted to Lt-Colonel, and commanded The City of London Yeomanry (Rough Riders) (TA) during the 1950s. This set of shoulder titles are in a perfect and removed from uniform condition.
Good original South Staffordshire Regiment cap badge with it's original 'HollandPatch' backing This is a very nice and difficult to find example of a cap badge to the South Staffordshire Regiment with it's original 'HollandPatch' cloth backing. The history of the 'HollandPatch' goes back to 1794 when the Battalion sailed for Holland where they were involved in fighting the French which was their first major campaign. Until 1942, the cloth was an oval, which exceeded the cap badge, but was cut down in half and could only be seen through the knot on the badge. The badge and backing are in a perfect and nicely used condition.
Good wartime printed Combined Operations formation badge This is a good example of a printed Combined Operations formation badge facing left. The phrase \"combined operations\" was first introduced by the British War Office in World War II to denote multi-service activities, those that involved air, land or naval forces acting together, and coordinated by the Combined Operations Headquarters. The printed badge is in a good and removed from uniform condition.
Good wartime printed \'thombstone\' shape Combined Operations formation badge This is a good example of a printed Combined Operations formation facing right badge. The phrase \"combined operations\" was first introduced by the British War Office in World War II to denote multi-service activities, those that involved air, land or naval forces acting together, and coordinated by the Combined Operations Headquarters. The printed badge is in a good and in a un-issued condtion..
Matching pair of printed Royal Artillery shoulder titles A nice and lovely used set of Royal Artillery shoulder titles. The set is in a good ena removed from uniform condition.
Mid 50\'s American made 101st Airborne Division shoulder patch This is a excellent example of a un-issued 101st Airborne Division shoulder patch. This flat edge type whas introduced in the mid 50\'s just after the war in Korea and whas in use till the early 70\'s just after the Vietnam war. This one has the blue edge instead of the khaki one you will see on the one\'s during the Second World War. A perfect and hounest item.
Mid-war period matching set No.9 Commando embroided shoulder titles This is a neat example of a mid-war period matching set of embroided shoulder titles the No.9 Commando. No. 9 Commando undertook its first raid on the nights of 22/23 November 1941 against Houlgate in France Operation Sunstar on the French coast at Houlgate. The raid was a success and they landed and evacuated without any loss. The next operation men from No. 9 were involved in was the St. Nazaire Raid in March 1942, the main landing force was provided by No. 2 Commando. They were then used to reinforce the Gibraltar garrison during Operation Torch the landings in French North Africa. They remained in Gibraltar until November 1943 when they carried out raids on the islands of Tremiti and Pianosa During the Allied invasion of Italy as party of the 2nd Special Service Brigade they were involved in Operation Partridge in December 1943 in the are of the Garigliano River. This was followed by Operation Shingle the Anzio landings and fighting at Monte Ornito before being withdrawn to Naples in March 1943. In 1944 No. 9 Commando were involved in Operation Darlington 11 in May and Operation Gradient in August. They then operated in Greece before returning to Italy and took part Operation Roast the crossing of Commachio Lagoon and the battle of the Argenta Gap in April 1945. The Second World War in Europe ended in May 1945 and in 1946 all the Army Commandos were disbanded.
Mid-war period single No.9 Commando embroided shoulder title with the well known 'glue backing' This is a perfect example of a No.9 Commando 'glue backing' shoulder title introduced during the mid-war period. No. 9 Commando undertook its first raid on the nights of 22/23 November 1941 against Houlgate in France Operation Sunstar on the French coast at Houlgate. The raid was a success and they landed and evacuated without any loss. The next operation men from No. 9 were involved in was the St. Nazaire Raid in March 1942, the main landing force was provided by No. 2 Commando. They were then used to reinforce the Gibraltar garrison during Operation Torch the landings in French North Africa. They remained in Gibraltar until November 1943 when they carried out raids on the islands of Tremiti and Pianosa. During the Allied invasion of Italy as party of the 2nd Special Service Brigade they were involved in Operation Partridge in December 1943 in the are of the Garigliano River. This was followed by Operation Shingle the Anzio landings and fighting at Monte Ornito before being withdrawn to Naples in March 1943. In 1944 No. 9 Commando were involved in Operation Darlington 11 in May and Operation Gradient in August. They then operated in Greece before returning to Italy and took part Operation Roast the crossing of Commachio Lagoon and the battle of the Argenta Gap in April 1945. The Second World War in Europe ended in May 1945 and in 1946 all the Army Commandos were disbanded. The title is in perfect and un-issued condition.
Neat example of a difficult curved Airborne shoulder title This is a good example of a uncommon curved Airborne shoulder title. These curved Airborne shoulder title were introduced at the beginning of the formation of Airborne Forces and were mainly worn by the units until thye were issued with there own shoulder titles. Trough out the war these curved Airborne titles were mainly worn by officers who were not attached to a specific unit. This title is in a overal nice good and issued condition.
Neat example of a scarce Norwegian Free Forces British made Haakon 7 silver hallmarked capbadge This is a neat example of a scarce and difficult silver cap badge worn aswell by the member of the Norwegian Linge Company. H7 was the monogram of the Norwegian head of state, King Haakon VII (7th), who reigned from 1905 to 1957. When Germany invaded Norway in 1940 as a part of World War II, the royal family fled the country, and Haakon VII later spearheaded the Norwegian resistance in exile in the United Kingdom. H7 became one of several symbols used by the Norwegian populace to mark solidarity and loyalty to the King. The cap badge is in a prefect and never been cleaned condition. A scarce and difficult badge to find.
Neat example of a scarce Norwegian Free Forces British made Haakon 7 silver hallmarked for 1942 or 1943 capbadge This is a neat example of a scarce and difficult silver cap badge worn aswell by the member of the Norwegian Linge Company. H7 was the monogram of the Norwegian head of state, King Haakon VII (7th), who reigned from 1905 to 1957. When Germany invaded Norway in 1940 as a part of World War II, the royal family fled the country, and Haakon VII later spearheaded the Norwegian resistance in exile in the United Kingdom. H7 became one of several symbols used by the Norwegian populace to mark solidarity and loyalty to the King. The cap badge is in a prefect and never been cleaned condition. A scarce and difficult badge to find
Nice American made 82nd (All American) Airborne Division shoulder patch This is a perfect example of an American made shoulder patch to the 82nd Airborne Division. The 82nd Division was re designated 13 February 1942 as Division Headquarters, 82nd Division. After the outbreak of World War II, it was recalled to active service on 25 March 1942, and reorganized at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana, under the command of Major General Omar N. Bradley. During this time spent in training, the division brought together three officers who would ultimately steer the US Army during the next two decades: Matthew B. Ridgway, James M. Gavin, and Maxwell D. Taylor. On 15 August 1942, the 82nd Infantry Division became the first airborne division in the U.S. Army and was redesignated the 82nd Airborne Division. And the rest is history ......... The badge is in a nice removed from uniform condition with its tab still attached.
Nice and difficult to find plastic Army Air Corps cap badge This is a good example of a plastic/bakelite Army Air Corps badge mainly worn by members of the Glider Pilot Regiment. The AAC badge was also worn by the early members of the Parachute Regiment in North Africa. This one is in a perfect condition and has two brass coloured lugs to the back. And is made by the well known maker Stanley&Sons.
Nice and difficult to find printed shoulder title to the Intelligence Corps This is a perfect example of a nice and difficult to find these days printed shoulder title to the Intelligence Corps. The title is in a nicely used and removed from uniform condition.
Nice and early white on black Commando shoulder title This is good example of a early white on black Commando shoulder title introduced in early 1942 and were mainly worn by members on the early Commando raids in Norway. This one is in a overal nice and un-issued condition and has the early hessian backing.
Nice and original womans Auxiliary Territorial Service PROVOST shoulder title This is a perfect example of a wartime PROVOST shoulder title only worn by both Officers and Auxiliaries who served with the military police wing of the Auxiliary Territorial Service. The title it self is in a good condition except from some paper remains form a scrapbook. A nice a good title which you won't find easy these days.
Nice and scarce pair of British made Belgium Special Air Service shoulder titles This is a nicely and scarce set of British made Belgium Special Air Service shoulder titles. A Belgian Independent Parachute Company was officially installed at Malvern Wells (Worcestershire) on the 8th of May 1942 by Mr Henri Rolin, Belgian under-Secretary of Defence. The newly formed Company continued to train as an Independent Parachute Company making extensive use of the many schools and training facilities offered by the British (the first Parachutists wings worn by Belgians were earned at Ringway parachute school in early 1942). The unit was attached for 3 months to the 8th Parachute Battalion of the 6th Airborne Division in 1943, then spent a month intensive training in December 1943 at the 'Allied Training Centre' Inverlochy Castle (Fort William), and finally moved, in February 1944, to Loudon Castle Camp, near Galston (Ayrshire) to join the Special Air Service Brigade. The role of the Belgian SAS parachutists during the Second World War was primarily sabotage, intelligence gathering and reconnaissance. The men saw their first action towards the end of July 1944 in France. During the Ardennes offensive in 1944 the unit was regrouped and equipped with armoured jeeps. As a reconnaissance squadron, they executed security and reconnaissance missions in order to support the 6th British Airborne Division. In 1945 they were used for counter-intelligence work which involved the location and arrest of top ranking Nazis and war criminals. In the beginning of April 1945 the Belgian SAS Squadron consisted of three reconnaissance squads which were deployed in the north of Holland and in Germany. After the capitulation of the Germans on the 8th of May 1945 the Belgian SAS participated in 'Counter Intelligence' missions in both Germany and Denmark. At the end of the war the Belgian SAS Regiment had much to be proud of. They had been the first allied unit to set foot in Belgium & Germany and the only Belgian unit permanently on active deployment between July 1944 and May 1945. These shoulder titles are of a different type than the normal wartime Special Air Service shoulder titles. These are white on maroon instead of blue on maroon and are a different shape as well. The shoulder titles are in a perfect and un-issued condition apart from a little moth nip on the left corner on one of the titles. Hard to find these days.
Nice condition Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry white on red shoulder title This is a nicely and un-issued shoulder title to the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. The 2nd Battalion is famous for their actions during the coup-de-main at Pegasus Bridge in Normandy In June 1944. The title is in a good un-issued condition and has the well known glue-backing.
Nice condition Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry white on red shoulder title This is a nicely and un-issued embroided shoulder title to the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. The 2nd Battalion is famous for their actions during the coup-de-main at Pegasus Bridge in Normandy In June 1944. The title is in a good un-issued condition and has the well known glue i.e paste backing.
Nice condition pre war/war time Officers bronze cap badge to the South Staffordshire Regiment This is a good example of a pre war/war time bronze Officers cap badge to the South Staffordshire Regiment. It has two lugs on the back with its original split pin and has no makers mark. The badge is in a perfect and almost un-used condition. A nice badge of heavy quality. And difficult to find these days.
Nice condition pre war/war time Officers bronze cap badge to the South Staffordshire Regiment This is a good example of a pre war/war time bronze Officers cap badge to the South Staffordshire Regiment. It has three lugs on the back with one of it's original cotter pins present and has no makers mark. The badge is in a perfect un-issued condition. A nice badge of good quality. Difficult to find these days.
Nice condition uncommen Airborne shoulder title This is a good example of a uncommon Airborne shoulder title. These curved Airborne shoulder title were introduced at the begining of the formation of Airborne Forces and were mainly worn by the units until the were issued with there own shoulder titles. Trought out the war these curved Airborne titles were mainly worn by officers who were not attached to a specific unit. This title is in a overal nice good condition with some minor moth nips to the bottom edge.
Nice condition uncommen curved Airborne shoulder title This is a good example of a uncommon curved Airborne shoulder title. These curved Airborne shoulder title were introduced at the beginning of the formation of Airborne Forces and were mainly worn by the units until the were issued with there own shoulder titles. Trough out the war these curved Airborne titles were mainly worn by officers who were not attached to a specific unit. This title is in a overal nice good and issued condition.
Nice local made Chindit shoulder title This is a good example of a local made Chindit shoulder title. During the 1939/45 War a Special force was trained in Commando methods to infiltrate behind the Japanese lines in Burma. They were known as the CHINDITS, a name given to them by their leader, Major-General Orde C. Wingate, D.S.O. After the initial expedition in 1943 the full force was marched or landed in the jungle on makeshift air-strips by glider or Dakota aircraft 200 miles behind enemy lines in March 1944. The mission was successful and called Operation Thursday, this eventually started the rot, which led to the Japanese surrender. The force suffered many casualties killed, wounded or taken prisoner. Many of the survivors still suffer today from the hardship, rigours and strain of the two long arduous campaigns, when the only contact with base was by radio, all supplies came by air-drop. The Chindits were very much an International Force, which include British, Burma Rifles, Hong Kong Volunteers, Gurkhas and West African Serviceman. The R.A.F. and First Air Commando , U.S.A.A.F. provided air support. The title is in a nice and almost un-issued condition.
Nice printed Royal Army Medical Corps shoulder title This is a perfect example of a un-issued printed shoulder title to the Royal Army Medical Corps. The titel is in a perfect an un-issued condition.
Nice RARE un-issued un-official 1st Battalion, The Border Regiment Airborne shoulder title This is a neat example of a RARE and un-issued un-offical shoulder title to the 1st Battalion The Border Regiment. The Battalion is famous for their action\'s during the Battle of Arnhem in September 1944. \"The coloured Border cloth shoulder title was taken into wear by the 1st Battalion in 1942. The colours of yellow and green were the facing colours of the 34th and 55th Foot Regiments. All the other battalions continued to wear the white on red title.\" Except from a little moth nip on the right side of the purple backing from storage and some glue remnants the title is in almost mint condition.
Nice RARE un-official 1st Battalion, The Border Regiment Airborne shoulder title This is a neat example of a RARE and un-offical shoulder title to the 1st Battalion The Border Regiment. The Battalion is famous for their action's during the Battle of Arnhem in September 1944. "The coloured Border cloth shoulder title was taken into wear by the 1st Battalion in 1942. The colours of yellow and green were the facing colours of the 34th and 55th Foot Regiments. All the other battalions continued to wear the white on red title."
Nice set of British Norwegian Free army badges This is a good example of a neat set of badges worn by members, officers and NCO's', of the Norwegian army in England during the second world war. This set consists of a corcarde of enamal (which was worn on the front of the side cap), a cloth Norwegian flag worn on the battle dress and a small pinflag. A nice and not so found often set of Norwegian badges.
Nice set of original postwar Border Regiment shoulder titles. This is a neat example of a set of Border Regiment shoulder titles. This type of shoulder titel was produced in the early \'50s. \"The Border Regiment shoulder designation \"BORDER\" in Yellow on green and purple (yellow stitching), Catalogue number CB 2479, Pattern number 15196, sealed on 14th Aug 1952 introduction authority was List of Changes, C 5516 Sep 1953, declared obsolete 18th Oct 1956. \" A nice little set of shoulder titles.
Nice un-issued British wartime medical tourniquet This is a good example of a un-issued British medical tourniquet mainly used by members of the Royal Army Medical Corps and found in almost every medical kit. The tourniquet is in a perfect condition and is marked with a WD mark and made by Bailey, London. A nice and not often seen medical item.
Nice un-issued mid war/late war Airborne Forces \'Pegasus\' Division shoulder patch This is a fine example of a wartime printed Pegasus shoulder patch. This type whas introduced half way through the war. This type came in sets of two (a left and right). The badge is in a un-issued and perfect condition. Hard to come by these Pegasus patches
Nice uncommon cut-out (voided) crown capbadge to the Parachute Regiment This is a neat example of a early war capbadge to the Parachute Regiment. These uncommon voided crown examples do excists in various type\'s and makers. Mostly these cap badges were privatly purchase by the members of the Regiment. This one is in a perfect and slightly used condition.
Nice uncommon cut-out (voided) crown capbadge to the Parachute Regiment This is a good example of a early war capbadge to the Parachute Regiment. These uncommon voided crown examples do excists in various type\'s and makers. Mostly these cap badges were privatly purchase by the members of the Regiment. This one is in a perfect and slightly used condition.
Nice uncommon cut-out (voided) crown capbadge to the Parachute Regiment This is a neat example of a early war time capbadge to the Parachute Regiment. These uncommon voided crown examples do excists in various type's and makers. Mostly these cap badges were privatly purchase by the members of the Regiment. This one is in a perfect and slightly used condition.
Nice used British Gliderborne 'Gliderpatch' qualification badge This is a perfect example of a nicely used 'Gliderpatch'. The badges were issued to soldiers who had completed their glider course as a infantry soldier. A scare badge to find these days. The badge is in a perfect and removed from uniform condition.
Nicely British made matching pair of BELGIUM shoulder title's This is a neat example of a British made set of BELGIUM shoulder title's worn by members No.4 Troop of No.10 Commando. The title's have the serif type lettering with a black gauze backing and are in a nice and removed from uniform condition.
Nicely British made matching pair of BELGIUM shoulder title\'s This is a neat example of a British made set of BELGIUM shoulder title\'s worn by some members of the Belgium Free Army in England. The title\'s have the red on black block type lettering and are in a nice and un-issued condition.
Nicely British made matching pair of red/black BELGIUM shoulder title\'s This is a neat example of a British made set of BELGIUM shoulder title\'s worn by members No.4 Troop of No.10 Commando and by members of the Belgian war-time Navy. The title\'s have the block type lettering with the well known \'gleu backing\'. This set is in a nice and un-issued condition.
Nicely British made Norwegian Free Forces side cap cocarde This is a good example of nicely used British made, by Norwegian Free Forces side cap corcarde showing the Norwegian national colors in enemal and the Norwegian lion in brass. A item that is difficult to encounter but is in a nicely used condition. With some little damage to the red enemal on the National coulours as the lion.
Nicely British made Norwegian Free Forces side cap cocarde This is a good example of nicely used British made, by Norwegian Free Forces side cap corcarde showing the Norwegian national colours in enemal and the Norwegian lion in brass. A item that is difficult to encounter but is in a nicely used condition. With some little damage to the red enemal on the National colours as the lion.
Nicely British made single red on black/dark blue BELGIUM shoulder title's This is a neat example of a single British made red on black/dark blue BELGIUM shoulder title worn by some members of the Belgium Free Army in England. This type of title was also worn by members of No.10 Commando beneath the No.10 Commando shoulder title. The title's has the red on black/dark blue block type lettering and is in a nice and un-issued condition. (the title is 7x2 cm)
Nicely embroided Reconnaissance shoulder title in mint condition This is a nice example of a variation of a Reconnaissance shoulder title which is uncommen to find. The embroidery is don with thick threat is commen by the early embroided shoulder titles. The title is in a almost stone-mint condition exept form some paper and glue remnants on the back. A shoulder title to one of the more sougth after units.
Nicely embroided so called 'serrif type' lettering Reconnaissance shoulder title in mint condition This is a nice example of a variation of a Reconnaissance shoulder title which is uncommen to find. The embroidery is don with thick threat and is commen by the early embroided shoulder titles. The title is in a almost stone-mint condition. A shoulder title to one of the more sougth after units.
Nicely good condition mid war period No.5 Commando embroided shoulder title This is a neat example of a mid war period shoulder title to No.5 Commando. No. 5 Commando was a battalion-sized commando unit of the British Army during the Second World War. Formed in July 1940, the unit took part in a couple of small-scale raids in France in 1941 and contributed some personnel to Operation Chariot before taking part in the landings on Madagascar in 1942. In late 1943 it was sent to India with the rest of the 3rd Special Service Brigade and subsequently took part in operations in Burma throughout 1944 and 1945. Following the end of the war the unit undertook occupation duties in Hong Kong where they were amalgamated with No.1 Commando before being disbanded on 23 March 1946. This shoulder title is in a good and un-issued condition and has the well known glue backing.
Nicely good condition mid war period No.5 Commando embroided shoulder title This is a neat example of a mid war period shoulder title to No.5 Commando. No. 5 Commando was a battalion-sized commando unit of the British Army during the Second World War. Formed in July 1940, the unit took part in a couple of small-scale raids in France in 1941 and contributed some personnel to Operation Chariot before taking part in the landings on Madagascar in 1942. In late 1943 it was sent to India with the rest of the 3rd Special Service Brigade and subsequently took part in operations in Burma throughout 1944 and 1945. Following the end of the war the unit undertook occupation duties in Hong Kong where they were amalgamated with No.1 Commando before being disbanded on 23 March 1946. This shoulder title is in a good and un-issued condition and has the well known glue backing.
Nicely good condition mid war period No.5 Commando embroided shoulder title This is a neat example of a mid war period shoulder title to No.5 Commando. No. 5 Commando was a battalion-sized commando unit of the British Army during the Second World War. Formed in July 1940, the unit took part in a couple of small-scale raids in France in 1941 and contributed some personnel to Operation Chariot before taking part in the landings on Madagascar in 1942. In late 1943 it was sent to India with the rest of the 3rd Special Service Brigade and subsequently took part in operations in Burma throughout 1944 and 1945. Following the end of the war the unit undertook occupation duties in Hong Kong where they were amalgamated with No.1 Commando before being disbanded on 23 March 1946. This shoulder title is in a good and un-issued condition and has the well known 'glue backing'.
Nicely issued wartime embroided Parachute Regiment shoulder title This is a good example of a mid wartime embroided shoulder title to the Parachute Regiment. It has the the well known glue backing and has a dark blue on light blue lettering, Produced during the 1942/1944 period. A nice shoulder title in a issued condition. Herder to find these days.
Nicely matching set of late war printed Airborne \'Pegasus\' Divisional formation signs This is a neat example of a late war printed full matching set of printed Pegasus badges. First introduced in 1942 and designed by Major E.Seago based on the Greek saga of the winged horse Pegasus and his rider Bellerophon. This perfect matching set is in a good and un-issued condition.
Nicely printed schoulder title to the Duke of Wellington\'s This is a good example of a nicely used and removed from uniform condition printed schoulder title to the Duke of Wellington\'s Regiment. During the 2nd World War battalions of the Regiment took part in the campaigns of Dunkirk, North West Europe, North Africa, Italy and Burma.
Nicely printed schoulder title to the Duke of Wellington\'s Regiment This is a good example of a nicely used and removed from uniform condition printed schoulder title to the Duke of Wellington\'s Regiment. During the 2nd World War battalions of the Regiment took part in the campaigns of Dunkirk, North West Europe, North Africa, Italy and Burma.
Nicely scarce to find serif-type lettering Royal Army Medical Corps shoulder title This is e perfect example of a nicely used serif-type lettering Royal Army Medical Corps shoulder title. These serif-type lettering shoulder titles were mostly tailor-made and difficult to find these days. The title is in a nicely used removed from uniform condition.
Nicely scarce to find serif-type lettering Royal Army Medical Corps shoulder title This is e perfect example of a nicely un-issued serif-type lettering Royal Army Medical Corps shoulder title. These serif-type lettering shoulder titles were mostly tailor-made and difficult to find these days. The title is in a nicely un-issued condition with some minor paper on the reverse from a old scrapbook.
Nicely scrace early wartime Glider Pilot Regiment shoulder title This is a perfect example of a early wartime shoulder title to the Glider Pilot Regiment. This same type of title was made with the number 2 beneath it for the 2nd Battalion, The Glider Pilot Regiment. Early 1943 they got rid of the numbers, 1 for 1st Battalion and 2 for 2nd Battalion. This title is in a perfect condition with only some glue remands on its black gauze backing. A scarce Glider Pilot Regiment shoulder title.
Nicely set of printed badges to the 52nd (Lowland) Infantry Division This is a nice printed set of a Mountain scroll and shield to the 52nd (Lowland) Infantry Division. On 9 October 1944, soon after the division arrived on the Continent the 52nd Lowland Division was assign to the First Canadian Army to help open the vital port of Antwerp. Therefore the first major operations of the 52nd were not in mountainous terrain or through the air, but deployed below sea level on the flooded polders around the Scheldt Estuary of Belgium and the Netherlands. Operation Vitality and Operation Infatuate were aimed at capturing South Beveland and the island of Walcheren to open the mouth of the Scheldt estuary. This would enable the Allies to use the port of Antwerp as a supply route for the troops in North-West Europe. It was in this vital operation that the 52nd Division was to fight its first great battle with brilliant success. In January 1945 the 52nd Division participated in Operation Blackcock, the clearing of the Roer Triangle between the rivers Meuse and Roer. The set in in a nice and removed from uniform condition. Hard to find these days.
Nicely set of printed badges to the 52nd (Lowland) Infantry Division This is a nice printed set of a Mountain scroll and shield to the 52nd (Lowland) Infantry Division. On 9 October 1944, soon after the division arrived on the Continent the 52nd Lowland Division was assign to the First Canadian Army to help open the vital port of Antwerp. Therefore the first major operations of the 52nd were not in mountainous terrain or through the air, but deployed below sea level on the flooded polders around the Scheldt Estuary of Belgium and the Netherlands. Operation Vitality and Operation Infatuate were aimed at capturing South Beveland and the island of Walcheren to open the mouth of the Scheldt estuary. This would enable the Allies to use the port of Antwerp as a supply route for the troops in North-West Europe. It was in this vital operation that the 52nd Division was to fight its first great battle with brilliant success. In January 1945 the 52nd Division participated in Operation Blackcock, the clearing of the Roer Triangle between the rivers Meuse and Roer. The set is in a nice and un-issued condition. Hard to find these days.
Nicely un-issued British Gliderborne 'Gliderpatch' qualification badge This is a perfect example of a nicely un-issued 'Gliderpatch'. The badges were issued to soldiers who had completed their glider course as a infantry soldier. A scare badge to find these days. The badge is in a perfect condition and are harder to find these days.
Nicely un-issued embroided Airborne strip This is a perfect example of a embroided Airborne arms-of-service strip aka a 'Airborne balkje'. These strips were introduced at the end of 1942 and were in use by a mix of Parachute and Glider trained soldiers of the 1st, 6th and the Canadian Airborne Troops till the end of 1944. There is a variation of types and makers of these Airborne strips. This one has the well known 'glue backing'. These Airborne strips are getting harder to find. This one is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
Nicely un-issued embroided Airborne strip This is e perfect example of a embroided Airborne arms-of-service strip aka a 'Airborne balkje'. These strips were introduced at the end of 1942 and were in use by a mix of Parachute and Glider trained soldiers of the 1st, 6th and the Canadian Airborne Troops till the end of 1944. There is a variation of types and makers of these Airborne strips. This one has a thick lettering and a sort of 'cheese cloth' backing. These Airborne strips are getting harder to find. This one is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
Nicely un-issued embroided Airborne strip This is a perfect example of a embroided Airborne arms-of-service strip aka a 'Airborne balkje'. These strips were introduced at the end of 1942 and were in use by a mix of Parachute and Glider trained soldiers of the 1st, 6th and the Canadian Airborne Troops till the end of 1944. There is a variation of types and makers of these Airborne strips. This one has the well known 'glue backing'. These Airborne strips are getting harder to find. This one is in a perfect and un-issued condition.
Nicely un-issued wartime embroided Parachute Regiment shoulder title This is a good example of a mid wartime embroided shoulder title to the Parachute Regiment. It has the the well known glue backing and has a dark blue on light blue lettering, Produced during the 1942/1944 period. A nice shoulder title in a un-issued condition.
Nicely un-issued wartime embroided Parachute Regiment shoulder title This is a good example of a mid wartime embroided shoulder title to the Parachute Regiment. It has the the well known glue backing and has a dark blue on light blue lettering, Produced during the 1942/1944 period. A nice shoulder title in a un-issued condition.
Nicely un-issued wartime embroided Parachute Regiment shoulder title This is a good example of a mid wartime embroided shoulder title to the Parachute Regiment. It has the the well known glue backing and has a dark blue on light blue lettering, Produced during the 1942/1944 period. A nice shoulder title in a un-issued condition
Nicely used printed Border Regiment shoulder title This is a nice example of a nicley used printed shoulder title to the Border Regiment. Difficult to find these days. The title is in a nice and good removed from uniform condition.
Nicely used printed Border Regiment shoulder title This is a nice example of a nicley used printed shoulder title to the Border Regiment. Difficult to find these days. The title is in a nice and good removed from uniform condition.
Nicely used printed formation sign to the 79th Armoured Division This is a good example of a nicley used printed formation sign to the 79th Armoured Division. The division was formed as a standard armoured formation, but in March 1943, it was about to be disbanded for lack of resources. Alan Brooke (Chief of the Imperial General Staff), however, foresaw the need for specialised armoured vehicles and offered its command to Major General Sir Percy Hobart. Hobart accepted on the understanding that the 79th would be an operational division, not just a training and development one. After formation in October 1942, the 79th, based at the time mostly in Yorkshire, trained as a regular armoured division for about six months before the change of role. The formation did not operate as a single division: its vehicles were distributed as small units across the Divisions taking part in the landings and subsequent operations. At first, difficulties were encountered in persuading infantry commanders to use the specialised armour to best effect but these were resolved with the appointment of representatives of the GOC to each formation where elements were assigned. The 79th Armoured Division was disbanded on 20 August 1945. The badge is in a nicely used removed from uniform condition.
Nicely used SCARCE British Gliderborne \'Gliderpatch\' qualification badge This is a perfect example of a nicely used \'Gliderpatch\'. The badges were issued to soldiers who had completed their glider course as a infantry soldier. A scare badge to find these days. The badge is in a perfect and removed from uniform condition
Out of print book : Desert Rise - Arnhem Descent, the 10th Parachute Battalion in the Second World War by Martin Peters and Niall Cherry with John Howes & Graham Francis SIGNED COPY This is a nice, almost mint example of a 2016 1st print hardback Desert Rise - Arnhem Descent, the 10th Parachute Battalion in the Second World War by Martin Peters and Niall Cherry with John Howes & Graham Francis. Desert Rise - Arnhem Descent covers the story of the 10th Parachute Battalion during its short life in the Second World War, from the formation of the unit in the Western Desert in 1942, their actions in Italy and extensive coverage of their ill-fated Battle at Arnhem in September 1944. The book has 296 Pages with approx 120 colour and black and white photographs, various documents, coloured maps and aerial photographs. Limited edition of 400 copies and each copy has been numbered.
Out of print book : The 43rd Wessex Division at War 1944-1945 compiled by Major-General H.Essame This is a nice example of a book on one of the well known units from the British army. The 43rd Wessex Division who earned their battle honours trough out the entire war from Normandy, Arnhem and Germany. The book has a lot of maps and photographs and still has its original dust cover. In a nice and good condition.
Out of print book : \'Lease of Live\' by Andrew Milbourne SIGNED COPY This is a neat example of a book written by Andrew Milbourne of R Company, 1st Parachute Battalion, 1st Parachute Brigade. This book is a vivid and deeply moving record of the author\'s courage and determination in the face of tremendous odds-of courage which led him to perform the almost incredible feat of working with artificial limbs in a coalmine. The book in in a good condition and was published in 1952 by Museum Press Limited.
Pre war/war time Officers bronze cap badge to the Border Regiment This is a good example of a pre war/war time bronze Officers cap badge to the Border Regiment. It has three lugs on the back and was made by Jennens&Co. The badge is in a perfect and almost un-used condition. A nice badge of heavy quality and one of the nices I have had for a long time.
Rare and difficult to find all ranks Reconnaissance Squadron shoulder lanyard This is a neat example of a rare and difficult to find all ranks Reconnaissance Squadron shoulder lanyard. This is only the second example I have seen for sale in all those years of collecting. This example is of the thicker type. These lanyards were worn on the right side of the battle dress. This example is in a nicely worn condition and has a total length of 75 cm. A nice little item to complete your Special Forces collection.
RARE Kangol Wear Limited 1943 Red Beret This is a perfect example of a RARE 1943 Kangol Wear Limited red beret worn by all men who had completed a parachute or a glider course and were a member of the British Airborne Forces or the Special Air Service. This distinctive head dress was officially introduced in 1942, at the direction of General Frederick Browning, commander of the British 1st Airborne Division. The colour of the beret was reportedly chosen by his wife, the novelist Daphne du Maurier. It was first worn by the men of the Parachute Regiment in action in North Africa during November 1942. Although maroon, the beret of the British Parachute Regiment is often known as the "red beret." The beret has its original Parachute Regiment cap badge attached and it is showing a 'ghost' image after removing. With a size of 6 7/8 its a good size beret. The beret has also some small and medium moth holes which is not uncommon after 68 years. The beret is in a very nice and used condition. Very hard to find these days.
Rare Out of Print book: Foreign Legions of the Third Reich Volume 2 ( Belgium, Great Britain, Holland, Italy and Spain) This a neat copy of a much sought-after book called Foreign Legions of the Third Reich by David Littlejohn. Volume 2 deals with the the badges and insignia worn by the Waffen SS volunteers of Belgium, Great Britain, Holland, Italy and Spain. This copy is in a good condition with some small damage to the two lower corners. And someone wrote down the ISBN number and the date of publishing on the third page.
Rare Out of Print book: \"Whoa Mahomet !\" by Major Eric Mackay, 1st Parachute Squadron, Royal Engineers This is a fine example of a rare out of print book called \"Whoa Mahomet\" written by Eric Mackay. Mackay was a Major with the 1st Parachute Squadron, Royal Engineers and whas commanding B.Troop at the Arnhem Bridge during the Battle of Arnhem. The book, published in 1947, tells his story, in Dutch, about his time during the Arnhem Battle. The book is in a excellent condition except form a very small tear in the lower right corner of the dustjacket.
Scarce and hard to find copy (second edition) of 'Your Men in Battle' about the Story of the South Staffordshire Regiment during the Second World War This is a neat example of a truly scarce and hard to find copy of the second edition of 'Your Men in Battle' and gives you the story about the South Staffordshire Regiment during the Second World War. The 2nd Battalion is well known for their actions in capture the Ponte Grande bridge during operation Ladbroke and the 2 Victoria Crosses which members of the Battalion won during the actions in Oosterbeek during operation Market Garden. This booklet is still in a nice and good condition for its age and counts 47 pages.
Scarce matching set of embroidered South Stafford shoulder titles This is a good example of a very nice and matching pair of shoulder titles to the South Staffordshire Regiment. Introduced half way through the war with its typical British 'glue backing'. A nice white on red embroided and in a perfect and un-issued condition.
Scarce matching set of printed Parachute Regiment shoulder titles This is a nice example of a used set of printed Parachute Regiment shoulder titles. When the Parachute Regiment was officially formed in August 1942 they changed there shoulder title from the early cherry-type Parachute to the dark blue on light blue printed and embroided Parachute Regiment shoulder title. This scarce set is in a perfect and removed from uniform condition.
Scarce Out of Print book : The Pegasus Patrol by J.TurnBull and J.Hamblett (signed copy) This is a nice, almost mint, copy of The Pegasus Patrol. This book tells the unrecorded history of the 1st Airborne Division Provost Company. This book covers there formation in 1942, its move to North Africa, the invasion of Sicily and from there into Italy. There is also a big part about there actions during the Battle of Arnhem in September 1944. Finally, the story follows the unit during there re-grouping and reinforcing after Arnhem and the operations in Norway and Denmark. The book is in a good and almost perfect condition and is signed by both authors.
Scarce Plastic (bakelite) The Border Regiment cap badge This is a perfect example of a mind plastic cap badge to The Border Regiment. The badge is in a perfect and un-issued condition and is made by the well know firm of Stanly&Sons in Walsall. It has the number 1-A on the back. The badge is one of the few who are diffucult to find these days.
Scarce Plastic (bakelite) The Border Regiment cap badge This is a perfect example of a plastic cap badge to The Border Regiment. The badge is in a perfect and un-issued condition and is made by the well know firm of Stanly&Sons in Walsall. It has the number 1-A on the back. The badge is a never been cleaned condition and has the two copper blades still present on the back. Hard to find these days.
Scarce Plastic (bakelite) The Border Regiment cap badge This is a perfect example of a mind plastic cap badge to The Border Regiment. The badge is in a perfect and un-issued condition and is made by the well know firm of Stanly&Sons in Walsall. It has the number 1-A on the back. The badge is one of the few who are diffucult to find these days.
Scarce set of embroidered Glider Pilot Regiment shoulder titles This is a good example of a scarce, nice and sligtly not matching pair of shoulder titles to the Glider Pilot Regiment. Introduced half way through the war with its typical British 'glue backing'. A nice dark blue on light blue and in a perfect and un-issued condition.
Scarce wartime British made complete divider set This is a nice example of a nice properly marked divider set including 3 dividers, 2 rulers and parts. This is the early wartime brass variety, Well marked with makers name, BWC and broad arrow. The pics even does not do them justice. A sweet set in good condition. And hard to find.
Scarce WW2 British UNCUT 1st Type Parachute qualification wing This is a neat example of a rare wing. This qualification wing is of the early wartime split feather type and was introduced in the early days of the Airborne Forces. These wings were issued on a square of cloth and were cut to shape. This wing is in a perfect and unissued condition. A nice little cloth item.
Scare \'Zones of France\' silk escape map This is a neat example of a scare silk escape map covering France. The scale is 1:2,000,00 and is a second edition and was produced in March 1944. These maps were worn by most of the men landing on D-Day including the British and American Airborne Forces. The map itself is in a good condition except from some little stains in the left lower corner. A nice and scare map to find these days.
This is a good example of a difficult to find shoulder title to the Royal Army Chaplains Department This is a neat example of a difficult to find shoulder title to the Royal Army Chaplains Department. The Army Chaplains' Department (AChD) was formed by Royal Warrant of 23 September 1796.[2] Previously chaplains had been part of individual regiments, but not on the central establishment. Only Anglican chaplains were recruited until 1827, when Presbyterians were recognised. Roman Catholic chaplains were recruited from 1836, Methodist chaplains from 1881, and Jewish chaplains from 1892. The Department received the "Royal" prefix in February 1919 for its services during World War I. Some 4,400 Army Chaplains were recruited between 1914 and 1918; 179 lost their lives on active service and three were awarded the Victoria Cross. The RAChD is the only branch of the Army to perpetuate the tradition of dividing supporting troops into "departments". When Airborne Forces first was formed in 1940, members of the RAChD were amongst the first members to join. Chaplains undertook the same training at Hardwick Hall and Ringway as the soldiers. The first Chaplain to jump operationally was Padre RE Price who dropped with the 1st Battalion at Souk el Arba on 16 November 1942. Since the ens of the Second World War, Army Chaplains have continued to serve an important role within Airborne Forces. The shoulder title is in a perfect and un-issued condtion with its black gauze backing. Difficult to find these days.
This is a good example of shoulder title to the 8th Reconnaissance Regiment (14th Canadian Hussars) This is a perfect example of a un-issued British made shoulder title to the Canadian 8th Reconnaissance Regiment (14th Canadian Hussars). The 8th Reconnaissance Regiment (14th Canadian Hussars), commonly abbreviated to 8 Recce, VIII Recce or (within the British Army) 8 Canadian Recce, was the reconnaissance arm of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division during World War II. 8 Recce spent the first three years of its existence involved in training and coastal defence duties in southern England. It was not involved in the ill-fated Dieppe Raid on August 19, 1942, and thus avoided the heavy losses suffered that day by many other units of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division. The regiment landed with its division in Normandy on July 6, 1944, one month after D-Day, and first entered combat as infantry in the on-going Battle of Normandy. 8 Recce saw heavy action through to the end of the war including the costly Battle of the Scheldt, the liberation of the Netherlands and the invasion of Germany. 8 Recce's last two major engagements were the Battle of Groningen over April 13–16 and the Battle of Oldenburg, in Germany, over April 27 to May 4. This set, which is is a perfect and un-issued condition will do great in any Canadian collection. Hard to up grade.
This is a neat and scarce example of a British made US Pathfinder badge This is a perfect and scarce example of a British made uncut and issued US Pathfinder badge. A division Pathfinder School, under Captain Frank Lillyman, was established in Nottingham, England before D-Day. The Pathfinder wing, which were worn on the lower left sleeve above any hash marks or overseas bars, were originally made in England. Any paratrooper who completed the training was eligible to wear this patch, regardless of whether he ever made a combat jump as a Pathfinder. This British made Pathfinder wing is in a perfect and issued condition.
This is a neat example of a nicely issued Canadian made Canadian Armoured Corps shoulder title This is a perfect example of a nicely issued Canadian made Canadian Armoured Corps shoulder title.
This is a neat example of a nicely un-issued and difficult to find printed Parachute Regiment shoulder title This is a perfect example of a nicely used and issued printed shoulder title to the Parachute Regiment. These printed shoulder titles were introduced half way trough 1943. The title has a dark blue lettering on pale blue backing and is in a nicely condition with a minor little stain due to years of storage to the left upper corner. Difficult to find these days. Simply a nice example of this shought after shouler title!
This is a neat example of a nicely un-issued and difficult to find printed Parachute Regiment shoulder title This is a perfect example of a nicely used and issued printed shoulder title to the Parachute Regiment. These printed shoulder titles were introduced half way trough 1943. The title has a dark blue lettering on pale blue backing and is in a nicely condition with a minor little stain due to years of storage to the left upper corner. Difficult to find these days. Simply a nice example of this shought after shouler title!
This is a neat set of shoulder titles to the 8th Reconnaissance Regiment (14th Canadian Hussars) This is a perfect example of a un-issued set of British made shoulder titles to the Canadian 8th Reconnaissance Regiment (14th Canadian Hussars). The 8th Reconnaissance Regiment (14th Canadian Hussars), commonly abbreviated to 8 Recce, VIII Recce or (within the British Army) 8 Canadian Recce, was the reconnaissance arm of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division during World War II. 8 Recce spent the first three years of its existence involved in training and coastal defence duties in southern England. It was not involved in the ill-fated Dieppe Raid on August 19, 1942, and thus avoided the heavy losses suffered that day by many other units of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division. The regiment landed with its division in Normandy on July 6, 1944, one month after D-Day, and first entered combat as infantry in the on-going Battle of Normandy. 8 Recce saw heavy action through to the end of the war including the costly Battle of the Scheldt, the liberation of the Netherlands and the invasion of Germany. 8 Recce's last two major engagements were the Battle of Groningen over April 13–16 and the Battle of Oldenburg, in Germany, over April 27 to May 4. This set, which is is a perfect and un-issued condition will do great in any Canadian collection. Hard to up grade.
This is a perfect example of a American made enlisted man 2nd pattern Airborne/Glider garrison cap patch This is a neat example of a American made enlisted man Airborne/Glider garrison cap patch. In the spring of 1943, an Airborne cap patch combining the parachute and the glider was adopted. This was the first part of a process to remove the distinction between those who glided into combat and those who jumped into combat, designating both glidermen and jumpers as "Airborne." This one is in nicely used condition.
This is a perfect example of a British Middle East Commando shoulder title This is a perfect example of a British Middle East Commando shoulder title. Middle East Commando was a battalion sized British Commando unit of the British Army during the Second World War. The Commando was formed in the Middle East in October 1941 from L Detachment, Special Air Service, the remnants of Layforce (No.3 Troop) and No. 51 Middle East Commando and the Special Boat Section partly to placate Winston Churchill who championed the commando idea. In December 1940 a Middle East Commando depot was formed with the responsibility of training and supplying reinforcements for the Commando units in the Middle East. The Middle East Commando was disbanded in 1942. The title is in perfect and un-issue condition.
Two British made Canadian Military Headquarters shoulder patches This is a nice example of a set of two different British made shoulder patches for the Canadian Military Headquarters. This set consiting of a printed and a embroided one. Both patches are in a perfect and un-issued condition.
Very nice and difficily to find British made RP (Regimental Police/Provost) brassard in a slightly issued condition I was lucky enough to find recently three slightly issued RP (Regimental Police/Provost) brassards. The Regimental Police or Regimental Provost (RP) are soldiers responsible for regimental discipline enforcement and unit custody in the British Army, some other Commonwealth armies and some armed forces structured in the British tradition. They belong to the regiment or corps in which they enforce discipline rather than the Military Police or its equivalent. All three brassards are fitted with male and female snap fasteners made by the well known Newey Company. One of the brassards has a small puncture in the middle, I presume that a Regimental badge has been fitted at one time. They other two are in a good un-issued condition with some minor dust from years of storage i.e slightly handeling. A brassard that is difficult to find these days. The price is naturally for one brassard.
Very nice mid war period Corps of Military Police shoulder title This is a neat example of a mid war period shoulder title to the Corps of Military Police. In 1926 the Corps of Military Police, or CMP, was formed by the amalgamation of the Military Mounted Police and the Military Foot Police. At the outbreak of war in 1939 the Corps strength stood at little more than 3,500 officers and men, by the end of the war this had risen to over 50,000 officers and men. By war end the Corps was effectively made up of a number of different wings, the Provost wing, Vulnerable Points (generally older gentlemen up to the age of 55), Traffic Control, Special Investigation Branch and a wing of Auxiliary Territorial Service. The Corps were to serve with great distinction in all theatres where the British Army fought including Dunkirk along with troops at Arnhem as part of the Airborne Forces. Except from some paper remnants this title is in a perfect an un-issued condition.
Wartime British made Canadian Officers 2nd Division shoulder patch This is a perfect example of a British made Canadian 2nd Division patch for officers. Tha patch has the typical British midwar gluebacking and is in un-issued condition.
Wartime Commenwealth made 14 Royal Canadian Armoured Regiment shoulder patch This is a perfect example of een Commenwealth made shoulder patch to the 14RCAR. The Calgarry Regiment was formed into the 14RCAR when they were posted to Northern Europe and they are well known for there cations at Dieppe and the rest of Europe. Tha patch is in a nice condition with some traces of sticky tape on the back.
Wartime \'Palestine\' Jewish Brigade shoulder title A good example of a scarce British made Palestine shoulder title to the Jewish Brigade. \"The brigade and its predecessor, the Palestine Regiment, and the three infantry companies that had formed it, were open to Jewish and non-Jewish soldiers, but was composed primarily of Jews. Many were refugees displaced from countries that had been occupied or controlled by the Axis powers in Europe and Ethiopia. Volunteers from the United Kingdom its empire, the Commonwealth, and other \"western democracies\" also provided contingents\". The shoulder title is in a perfect condition.
WW2 1 LAA RCA cloth shoulder title This is a fine example of a un-issued British made gluebacking Royal Canadian Artillery shoulder title. This unit, the 1ste Light Anti Aircraft, was attached to HQ RCA, 1st Canadian Corps and was existing of three units, the 35th, the 89th and the 109th LAA.
WW2 4 Med RCA cloth shoulder title This is a neat example of a RCA shoulder title beloning to the 4th Medium Regiment. This one has been shorten.
WW2 Airborne Canada shoulder title This is a fine example of the first shoulder title worn by the members of the Canadian Airborne forces. The title has a white lettering on a dark green background and has a black gauze backing. The title is in a un-issued condition. The title was removed from a scrapbook at some stage and left some paper tracings at the back. This title was authorized to wear at the beginning of April 1943 and was issued to all personel of the Canadian Airborne Force\'s during the rest of April.
WW2 American made First Allied Airborne Army shoulder patch This is a perfect example of a American made First Allied Airborne Army shoulder patch. The First Allied Airborne Army was an Allied formation formed on 2 August 1944 by the order of General Dwight D. Eisenhower, the Supreme Allied Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force. The formation was part of the Allied Expeditionary Force and controlled all Allied airborne forces in Western Europe during 1944 and 1945. These included IX Troop Carrier Command, the XVIII Corps (Airborne), which controlled the 82nd Airborne Division, the 101st Airborne Division, the 17th Airborne Division and a number of independent airborne units, and all British airborne forces including the 1st Airborne Division and the 6th Airborne Division. From the time of its creation until the end of World War II, the formation commanded the Allied airborne forces that participated in the Allied advance through North-West Europe, including Operation Market-Garden in September 1944, repelling the German counter-offensive launched during the Battle of the Bulge between December 1944 and January 1945, and Operation Varsity in March 1945. The formation was then officially deactivated on 20 May 1945, with the British units under its command returning to the United Kingdom and the American units being renamed as First Airborne Army and taking over command of the American Zone of Occupation in Berlin. The patch itself is in a un-issued condition.
WW2 Army Air Corps cap badge This is a good example of a AAC badge badge manly worn by members of the Glider Pilot Regiment. The AAC was also worn by the early members of the Parachute Regiment in North Africa. This one is in a nice condition and has two silvered coloured lugs to the back.
WW2 Army Air Corps cap badge This is a good example of a plastic/bakelite Army Air Corps badge mainly worn by members of the Glider Pilot Regiment. The AAC was also worn by the early members of the Parachute Regiment in North Africa. This one is in a perfect condition and has two brass coloured lugs to the back. And was made by the well known maker Stanley&Sons.
WW2 British 3rd Infantry Division shoulder patch This is a neat example of a cloth shoulder badge to the 3rd Infantry Division. The Division is well known for their action on D-Day in Normandy in 1944. The badge is in a perfect and removed from uniform condition.
WW2 British 79th Armoured Division formation sign This is a good example of a printed British made formation sign of the 79th Armoured Division. The Division is well known for their action in Normandy and Holland. The badge is in a good un-issued condition.
WW2 British Airborne 'Light Bulp' qualification badge This is a un-issued 'Light Bulp' qualification badge who was given to members of the Airlanding Regiments and supporting units who were flown in by glider and had not done the regular Parachute course which were earning them the Parachute wing. Instead of the 7 jump require for the Parachute wing they did 5 jumps to earn them the 'Light Bulp'. The were wearing the light bulp on there lower right sleeve. This one has a sort of cheese cloth backing.
WW2 British Airborne \'Light Bulp\' qualification badge This is a un-issued \'Light Bulp\' qualification badge who was given to members of the Airlanding Regiments and supporting units who were flown in by glider and had not done the regular Parachute course which were earning them the Parachute wing. Instead of the 7 jump require for the Parachute wing they did 5 jumps to earn them the \'Light Bulp\'. The were wearing the light bulp on there lower right sleeve. This one has a sort of cheese cloth backing
WW2 British embroided Pegasus shoulder badge This is a neat example of a Airborne Forecs division formation sign. This one is in un-issued condition exept from the little discoulor on the horse. It has the well know gluebacking.
WW2 British embroided Pegasus shoulder badge This is a fine example of a wartime embroided Pegasus shoulder patch. This type whas introduced half way through the war. This type came in sets of two (a left and right) still attached together and you had to cut them before putting them on your BD or SD. The badge is in a un-issued and good condition.
WW2 British made 1st Canadian Army Artillery shoulder badge This is a nicely example of a printed (British made) shoulder badge to the 1st Canadian Army Artillery, 1st and 2nd Royal Canadian Artillery groups. The badge is in a good and used condition.
WW2 British made 8th Canadian Reconnaissance Regiment, 14th Canadian Hussars shoulder title This is a perfect example of a un-issued British made VIII Canadian Recce Regt 14CH shoulder title. They were part of the Canadian 2nd Infantry Division and are well known for their action In the Northern part of Holland. The title is in a un-issued and perfect condition.
WW2 British made Auxiliary Territorial Service cap badge backing This is a scare ATS badge backing. With the typical ATS colours orange, green and black. The badge has a hessian type backing and is in a un-issued mint condition. Hard to find these days. A fair and honest badge.
WW2 British made Canadian 1st Independent Canadian Armoured Brigade shoulder badge This is a nice example of British made Canadian Armoured Brigade shoulder badge. The badge itself in in a perfect un-issued condition and has a brown paper backing.
WW2 British made Canadian Toronto Scottish shoulder title This is a perfect example of a British made, glue backing, Canadian shoulder title to the Toronto Scottish. This unit was part of the 2nd Infantry Division and are well known for their actions in Normandy and Holland. This is a good and honest shoulder title.
WW2 British made SCARCE Reconnaissance Plastic cap badge This is a good example a nicely used plastic cap badge to the Reconnaissance Corps. The cap badge is slightly bent to form it to the beret and made by the well know maker Stanley&Sons in Walsall. A nice and SCARCE plastic badge.
WW2 British made SCARE set of a cherry type Pegasus and matching Airborne strip. This is a neat example of a slightly non-matching set of a cherry type Pegasus shoulder patch and a cherry type Airborne strip. Just like no 50131 these badge\'s are difficult to find on their own. So to find a set is hard to find. The Pegasus is in a removed from uniform condition and the Airborne strip is in a un-issued condition.
WW2 British made set of a printed Pegasus and matching Airborne strip. This is a neat example of a perfect matching set of a printed Pegasus shoulder patch and a matching Airborne strip. These badge's are difficult to find on their own. So to find a set that has been always together is hard to find. The set in is a perfect issued and removed from uniform condition. This a rare and honest set of badge's.
WW2 British Officers/NCO ATP wrist watch This is a nice example of a British wartime Officers/NCO ATP (Army Time Piece) wrist watch. The watch it self is in a nicely used and working condition with a replaced leather band. Bravingtons is one of the well know makers. There is a number as well, 273381
WW2 British Parachute qualification wing This is a perfect example of a British qualification wing is of the mid wartime type. The wing is in a excellent and in a fine removed from uniform condition.
WW2 British printed Anti-Aircraft Command divisional sign This is a good example of the 1st type Anti-Aircraft Command divisional sign and is in a un-issued condition. A nice wartime badge.
WW2 British Royal Air Force Parachute qualification wing This is a neat example of a wartime British RAF parachute qualification wing. The wing is in a overal good condition.
WW2 British Royal Army Service Corps Air Despatch arm badge This is a neat example of a used RASC Air Despatch arm badge. These were worn by the man who were dropping containers and baskets with supplies in Europe and Asia. They are well known for there action at Arnhem 1944. Throughout the battle, Air Despatchers of 63, 223, 253, 398, 799 and 800 Companies RASC (AD) flew 611 re-supply sorties, dropping just over 2000 tons from Stirling and Dakota aircraft during the period 18 -26 Sept 1944. This badge has the door and a intact tail. You will find them with a cliped tail aswell. The badge is in a overal nice used condition.
WW2 British Royal Corps of Signals printed shoulder title This is a perfect example of a printed shoulder titel to the Royal Corps of Signals. The title is in a nice and removed from uniform condition. These title are getting harder to find these days.
WW2 British Royal Navy Combined Operations shoulder formation sign This is a perfect example of a Naval Combined Operations shoulder badge. Its just like the Army Combined Operations badge except this has a yellow/gold threat instead of red. The badge is in a perfect un-issued condition with the typical gleu backing.
WW2 British SCARCE small Horlicks Ration tin This is a fine example of a SCARCE Horlicks Ration tin. The big one\'s you can still find if you have a good look but the small one\'s are difficult to find. The tin is in a good condition for its age.
WW2 British SCARE Horlicks 'Public Emergency 25 Hour Ration' tin This is a nice example of a SCARE Horlicks 24 hour ration tin. This type, the Public Emergency, is more diffulcult to find than his brother. The tin is in a overall good and slightly used condition. It has still its orange rubber seal present. A nice and saught after ration tin.
WW2 British set of Corps of Military Police shoulder titles This is a neat set of CMP shoulder titles. Akwardly cut set with a with a textbook gluebacking. One title appeares to have some minor gluemarks.
WW2 British tin of War Time Pack Boot polish This is a fine example of a tin of British boot polish. Made by Lane\'s Bros. Ltd and issued in a economy war time pack. I found a couple of those on my last trip to England and are coming straight from its original box of issue. A nice and little item to complete your holdall.
WW2 British XXX Corps formation signs This is a good example of a used set of the famous XXX Corps. Nice matching pair and is made on felt and removed from uniform.
WW2 Canadian made 1st Infantry Division Royal Canadian Corps of Signals divisional patch This is a perfect example of a Canadian made Royal Canadian Corps of Signals divisional patch to the 1st Infantry Division. This badge has a black gauze backing and is in a perfect condition.
WW2 Canadian made The Blackwatch of Canada shoulder title This is a good example of a used Canadian made shoulder title to The Blackwatch ( Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada. This unit was part of the 2nd Infantry Division and is well known for their actions in Normandy and Holland. This title is in a nice and overal good condition.
WW2 Canadian made Toronto Scottish shoulder title This is a nice example of a Canadian made shoulder title to the Toronto Scottish. This unit was part of the 2nd Infantry Division and are well known for their actions in Normandy and Holland.
WW2 Lord Strathcona's Horse Royal Canadians shoulder title This is a neat example of a British made Canadian shoulder title of the LSH. The Lord Strathcona's Horse Royal Canadians were part of the Canadian 5th Armoured Division.
WW2 Norwegian King Haakon 7 cap badge This is a nice example of a not often seen cap badge to the Norwegian Free Forces. H7 was the monogram of the Norwegian head of state, King Haakon VII (7th). When Germany invaded Norway in 1940 as a part of World War II, the royal family fled the country, and Haakon VII later spearheaded the Norwegian resistance in exile in the United Kingdom. H7 became one of several symbols used by the Norwegian populace to mark solidarity and loyalty to the King, and adherence to the Norwegian resistance movement. The badge is in a nice and good condition.
WW2 Plastic (bakelite) Army Air Corps cap badge This a nice example of a Army Air Corps plastic badge. Now days difficult to find. Overal good and nice cindition.
WW2 Plastic (bakelite) Devon Cap badge This is a nice example of a plastic cap badge to the Devonshire Regiment. And is made by the well known manufactory Stanley&Sons in Walsall. The badge has the number 1H on the back aswell. The 12th Battalion of the Devonshire Regiment is well know for their actions during D-Day in June 1944 as part of the 6th Airlanding Brigade.
WW2 Plastic (bakelite) Military Police cap badge This is a good example of a un-used plastic cap badge. This one is made by Stanly&Sons in Walsall. Overal nice condition.
WW2 Plastic (bakelite) Parachute Regiment cap badge This is a nice example of a plastic Parachute Regiment cap badge. Difficult to upgrade. Overal good condition.
WW2 SCARCE Plastic (bakelite) Royal Marines cap badge This is a perfect example of a SCARCE Royal Marines cap badge. These are more hard to find then the Royal Marines plastic collar badges. The badge is in a perfect condition and was made by the well known maker Stanly&Sons in Walsall. It has the numbers 103-104 on the back as well.
WW2 SCARE Plastic (bakelite) Border Regiment cap badge This is a perfect example of a mind plastic cap badge to the Border Regiment. And hard to find. The badge is in a perfect and un-issued condition and is made by Stanly&Sons in Walsall. It has the number 1-A on the back.
WW2 set of British Royal Army Medical Corps shoulder titles This is a perfect matching pair of shoulder titles to the Royal Army Medical Corps. The set is in a nice clean un-issued condition with a textbook gluebacking. A nice little set.
WW2 TL-122-B US Flashlight This is a TL-122-B US flashlight. Used by most of the US Military units during the second world war. This flashlight was also populair by the British Paratroopers during the war. This flashlight is in a fine and almost new condition, except from some little \'rust\' on the clip.